matt holliday 2016 stats

his one blemish — Matt Holliday's game-tying homer in the fourth — by After two singles the rest of the night, Ortiz's stats in this. Matt Holliday: 2014 Stats (When healthy).272/.370/.441, 20 HR, 90 RBI, 4 SB, 74 BB, 100 SO. 2016 Stats.246/.322/.461, 20 HR, 62 RBI. Get the latest news, stats, videos, highlights and more about left fielder Matt Holliday on ESPN.

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Thoughts following the Matt Holliday signing

(Presswire)

Last night the Yankees addressed one of their major offseason needs and landed a new DH. The team agreed to sign veteran Matt Holliday to a one-year contract worth $13M. Once he takes his physical and all that — I guess that’s something less than a formality considering a broken thumb effectively ended his season in August — the deal will be official. Until then, here are some thoughts.

1. My quick personal take: I like the signing. I don’t love it and I don’t hate it. It’s a solid, reasonable move. I would have preferred Carlos Beltran on a one-year contract myself, but Carlos had other ideas, so the Yankees moved on to the next best thing. I didn’t want Chris Carter’s or Mike Napoli’s strikeouts, or Brandon Moss’ or Pedro Alvarez’s pulled grounders into the shift. Holliday is, as announcers like to say, a professional hitter who is going to grind out at-bats. That’s pretty cool. The Yankees have lacked that in recent years. Plus Holliday is said to be a great clubhouse guy, and that’s important, especially with the team focusing on getting younger. The kids need someone to show them the way.

2. I’m really glad the Yankees did the sensible thing and stuck to a one-year contract. Edwin Encarnacion is awesome — that dude is absolutely terrifying at the plate — but committing huge dollars to a DH is not something the Yankees should be doing right now. They just got rid of how many expensive DHs this year, three? Maybe four? Whatever the number is, it was too many. The Yankees are trending young and that’s pretty damn exciting. Spending big on an inflexible DH would have complicated things, especially since the team is trying to get under the luxury tax threshold. Encarnacion would make sense if the Yankees were on the postseason bubble and trying to get over the hump, not trying to groom their next young core. A one-year deal was always the way to go.

3. One reason to expect Holliday’s numbers to bounce back next season: his .253 BABIP was by far a career low and well below his career .333 BABIP. That happened even though his hard contact rate (38.5%) was comfortably above the MLB average (31.4%) and his career average (35.6%). In fact, among the 375 players to put at least 100 balls in play this past season, Holliday had the third highest average exit velocity (94.7 mph). Only Nelson Cruz (95.9 mph) and Giancarlo Stanton (95.1 mph) were better. Miguel Cabrera (94.5 mph) was fourth. That is some good company. Also, according to Mike Petriello, Holliday put 42.5% of his balls in play at 100 mph or better, the fourth best rate in baseball. Exit velocity isn’t everything — it’s possible to hit a 100 mph pop-up, you know — but it’s not nothing either. Holliday can still strike the ball with authority. That suggests that .253 BABIP, which was so far out of line with the rest of his career, might not last.

4. One more reason to expect Holliday’s numbers to bounce back next season: the guy hits to all fields. A right-handed hitter who can go to right field will be rewarded in Yankee Stadium. Handsomely too. Here is Holliday’s spray chart from this past season, via Baseball Savant:

matt-holliday

That is a beautiful thing. Holliday, even at age 36, still hit for power to all fields this summer. Homers and doubles, from foul pole to foul pole. (I won’t hold my breath waiting for triples.) There’s nothing wrong with pulling the ball. Not at all. But being to hit for power to all three fields is what separates great hitters from good hitters, and over the course of his career, Holliday has truly been a great hitter. That .303/.382/.515 (137 wRC+) batting line in nearly 7,500 plate appearances ain’t no accident. This dude is a total pro at the plate.

5. The key to the Holliday signing is keeping him out of the outfield. He’s a very poor defensive left fielder and has been for years. Both the eye test and the defensive stats agree on that. The Yankees should consider him an emergency option out there only. The team has enough outfield depth that I’m hopeful Holliday won’t have to play left field at all. Even if the Yankees trade Brett Gardner, there’s still Aaron Hicks, Tyler Austin, Rob Refsnyder, and Mason Williams, and those are only the 40-man roster guys. Holliday has ten games of experience at first base, all in 2016, so if he does need to play the field, hopefully it’s there. The entire point is getting off his feet though. Holliday’s an older player, and the entire idea behind the signing is that limiting him to DH will help keep him healthy and prevent him from wearing down later in the season. If he ends up playing the field regularly, either at first base or left field, it’s a problem.

6. There is still an awful lot of offseason left to go, so it’s silly to think the Yankees are done making moves. But, as it stands right now, the lineup probably looks something like this, realistically:

  1. LF Brett Gardner
  2. CF Jacoby Ellsbury
  3. C Gary Sanchez
  4. DH Matt Holliday
  5. SS Didi Gregorius
  6. 2B Starlin Castro
  7. 1B Greg Bird
  8. RF Aaron Judge
  9. 3B Chase Headley

Eh? That leaves Austin Romine, Ronald Torreyes, Hicks, and either Austin or Refsnyder on the bench. Gardner and/or Headley could still be traded, which would obviously change things, but that’s the lineup right now, on December 5th. I have no idea whether that lineup can score runs at an above-average rate. At least it’s mostly young with some upside. That’ll be fun.

7. Ridiculously premature 2017-18 offseason thought: I hope the Yankees are in on Carlos Santana, who will be a free agent. He’s always been a personal favorite — switch-hitters with power and patience are my jam — and he’d step right into Holliday’s roster spot and annual salary slot nicely. Santana, who turns 31 in April, will command multiple years though, which could throw a wrench into the long-term payroll plans. Otherwise he’d be a really great fit as a most of the time DH/part-time first baseman/emergency catcher. I’ll spend the next eleven months pretending Holliday is a placeholder for Santana. That sounds good.

Filed Under: Musings

Источник: http://riveraveblues.com/2016/12/thoughts-following-the-matt-holliday-signing-147816/

(Updated Dec. 25, 2018)

In his short stint with the Cardinals, reliever Greg Holland did as poorly for them as he did when he opposed them.

Holland, a free agent who signed a one-year contract for $14 million with the Cardinals on March 31, 2018, was 0-2 with a 7.92 ERA in 32 appearances for them.

During his career, Holland also experienced some of his roughest outings when he pitched against the Cardinals.

Big hit

With the Royals in 2011, Holland was 5-1 with a 1.80 ERA. The lone loss came against the Cardinals.

On June 18, 2011, at St. Louis, the Royals led, 4-3, when Colby Rasmus led off the bottom half of the eighth inning for the Cardinals with a single against Tim Collins. Royals manager Ned Yost brought in Holland to face the Cardinals’ power hitters, Albert Pujols and Matt Holliday. Pujols grounded out, moving Rasmus to second. After getting a strike on Holliday, Holland tried to jam him with a 96 mph fastball.

“I knew it was a bad pitch before he hit it,” Holland said to the Kansas City Star. “Then, when he hit it, I knew it was a really bad pitch.”

Holliday hit the ball 422 feet over the center field wall for a two-run home run, giving the Cardinals a 5-4 lead. Video

“Everybody in their bullpen throws 95 or 96 (mph), so you better be ready for the fastball,” Holliday said.

Said Holland: “I tried to get the ball in and it leaked back over the plate. It was up. Boom! Bad combination.”

The Cardinals won, breaking a seven-game losing streak. Cardinals manager Tony La Russa called Holliday’s home run “as big a hit as we’ve had all year.”

Yost said of Holland, “He’s been lights out and he was lights out tonight with the exception of one pitch. He didn’t execute a pitch to Holliday. I mean, he threw it right down the middle.” Boxscore

Command issues

A year later, on June 16, 2012, Holliday again got to Holland.

With the Royals ahead, 7-6, in the seventh inning at St. Louis, Holland yielded a RBI-single to Holliday and a two-run single to Yadier Molina. The Cardinals won, 10-7. Boxscore

“Holly struggled with his command and it just wasn’t good for us,” Yost said.

A week later, on June 23, 2012, at Kansas City, Holland permitted a double by Holliday and a two-run home run by Allen Craig during an 8-4 Cardinals victory. Boxscore 

Yost said of Holliday, “We try to get him on breaking balls and he hits the curveball. We try to stay hard on him with fastballs and he hits the fastball. We’ve got to make a pitch in a good location and hope he hits it hard at somebody.”

On May 28, 2017, at Denver, Paul DeJong, in his first major-league at-bat, hit a home run for the Cardinals against Holland, who was in his lone season with the Rockies. Video

It was the first home run Holland allowed that season. Said DeJong of the ball he hit, “I kept watching where it would go, and it kept going.” Boxscore

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From Stats Perform: Rockies Take on Rangers in Arlington Monday-Wednesday

The Rangers have really struggled against the NL since the start of last season, both at the plate and on the mound.

Rangers Since 2020, Stats in Interleague Games w/MLB Ranks

Record          9-26 (.257)       last

Runs/Gm         3.54 (124/35)     last

Opp Runs/Gm     5.51          2nd-highest (LAA, 5.76)

AVG             .203           2nd-lowest (Sea, .2026)

OPS             .631           2nd-lowest (Sea, .628)

The Rockies swept the Rangers at Coors Field in June, allowing a .167 batting average in the three-game series.

 

The Rockies took two of three at the Dodgers over the weekend for just their second road series win of the year. This inched them ahead of the Diamondbacks, who have the worst road series record this season; both clubs are on track to rank in the bottom three for any season since 1990.

MLB, Lowest Series Win Pct on Road in a Season - Since 1990

(Minimum 2 games in series)

2020 Texas Rangers                 1-9-0  .100

2021 Arizona Diamondbacks         2-18-2  .136

2021 Colorado Rockies             2-17-2  .143

2020 Pittsburgh Pirates            1-8-1  .150

2018 Baltimore Orioles            3-21-2  .154

2014 Colorado Rockies             3-21-2  .154

2012 Houston Astros               4-22-0  .154

C.J. Cron hit a three-run blast in the first inning last night, his 10th HR of the month. He is one of only five Rockies with 10+ HR, 10+ walks and 30+ RBI in a single month.

 

Rockies, 10+ HR, 10+ BB & 30+ RBI In Calendar Month – All-Time

                                HR     BB    RBI

Larry Walker, June 1999         10     10     30

Preston Wilson, Jul 2003        11     10     34

Matt Holliday, Sept 2006        10     16     34

Matt Holliday, Sept 2007        12     11     30

Nolan Arenado, Aug 2016         10     18     36

C.J. Cron, Aug 2021             10     12     33

 

Cron is slugging .814 this month, highest in MLB (minimum 50 PA).  

 

Adolis Garcia leads the Rangers in RBI and runs scored. Only four AL Rookies have done that since 1980 and each was named Rookie of the Year.

 

AL Rookies Leading Team in RBI & Runs – Since 1980

                                 RBI   Runs

2021 Adolis Garcia, Tex          77     65

2017 Aaron Judge, NYY           114    128 ß Won ROY

1997 Nomar Garciaparra, Bos      98    122 ß Won ROY

1987 Mark McGwire, Oak          118     97 ß Won ROY

1986 Jose Canseco, Oak          117     85 ß Won ROY

Other notable AL rookies to lead their team in RBI and runs are Fred Lynn for Boston in 1975 (who won Rookie of the Year and MVP that season) and Ted Williams for Boston in 1939.

 

After several trade deadline moves, the Rangers are now the youngest team in MLB.

Youngest Average Age of Active Rosters, as of August 30

                            Yrs  Days

Texas Rangers                26   348

Cleveland Indians            27   102

Pittsburgh Pirates           27   229

Baltimore Orioles            27   330

Miami Marlins                28    39

The Rangers have the youngest average age for position players (26 years, 34 days) and the third-youngest pitching staff (27 years, 252 days).

Colorado’s bullpen has been much better over the past 2+ weeks after a rough patch immediately following the All-Star Break.

Rockies Bullpen Since All-Star Break – First 21 vs. Last 18

                    First 21        Last 18

ERA                     6.11           3.61 (25/62.1)

Opp. AVG                .260           .231

Opp. SLG                .462           .368

Opp. OPS                .801           .686

HR Allowed/9            1.71           0.87

 

German Marquez is hoping to reverse this odd trend of pitching very well at Coors Field and poorly on the road.

German Marquez, Home vs. Road Stats w/ MLB Difference Rank

(Ranks among ERA qualifiers; home better than road)

                    Home      Road      Diff      MLB Rank

Win Pct             .800      .300      .500       largest

ERA                 3.13      5.31      2.18    3rd-largest

Opp. AVG            .200      .267      .067       largest

Opp. SLG            .313      .428      .115    6th-largest

Opp. OPS            .591      .752      .161    6th-largest

Marquez has a 1.93 ERA in three career starts vs. Texas, his second-lowest ERA against any opponent with multiple starts (1.76 vs. Pittsburgh).

 

A.J. Alexy is expected to make his MLB debut for the Rangers tonight as Texas has three of its starting pitchers on the COVID-IL. Alexy will be the third different Ranger to start in his MLB debut over the past week, something that has only happened three times after the first month of a season since WWII.

 

3 Starters to Make MLB Debut in 1-Week Span – Since 1940

(Excluding first month of season)

Rangers        Aug 25-29, 2021  (J.Latz, G.Otto, A.Alexy*)

Rockies        June 6-11, 2014  (E.Butler, C.Bergman, T.Matzek)

Padres        Sept 17-21, 1986  (E.Vosberg, R.Hayward, J.Jones)

Cardinals  Sept 27-Oct 1, 1969  (J.Reuss, S.Guzman, R.Cleveland)

*Assuming A.J. Alexy starts on Monday

Источник: https://www.insidetheseams.com/all-things-rockies/2021/8/30/from-stats-perform

Imagine heading into the next fiscal year at your place of employment, your last year on the job, knowing you could perform as poorly as anyone ever has in the history of said job, and that your tenure there would still be held in high regard?  (Robert De Niro might be pulling this off as we speak.)  Those sort of no pressure, no fuss expectations would probably speak to exceptional past performance, and that's the enviable position where Matt Holliday finds himself today.

It's widely known that Holliday has been a huge bargain for the Cardinals.  Since signing a seven-year/$120 million contract in 2010 (with a team option for 2017), the richest contract in team history, he's been one of the most valuable players in the National League (more on that in a moment).  And, as Ben Godar highlighted yesterday, the Cardinals had the luxury of inking Holliday to this deal before opt-outs became more common with high-end free agents.

Holliday's contract would look even better if he played good defense in left field but he doesn't.  2011 was the last time he posted a positive UZR.  As a result, since early last season when it was apparent first base was a problem for the Cardinals - a problem which is projected to persist into 2016 - there's been half-serious chatter that Holliday should give the position a try.  I've dabbled in this trade myself.  It's good to dream but Holliday to first base won't happen.  A more ideal scenario would be for the Cardinals to pick up his option in 2017 in a designated hitter role but we learned this week that's also unlikely.

And that's fine, Holliday's defense is not a big concern of mine because the value of his contract comes from his bat.  Since signing the contract he's hit .294/.384/.490, including 123 home runs in 3,425 plate appearances.  Two years after he signed the deal, a literal and figurative offensive void was left on the roster when Albert Pujols headed west. With that context in hindsight, Holliday's offensive production seem ever more valuable if not imperative.  And as recently noted by Joe Schwarz, even as Holliday's power has diminished with age he's still shown to be quite adept as an offensive player.  Holliday's .394 on-base percentage in 2015 came in limited action due to quad injuries (277 total plate appearances), but it was still his highest OBP since joining the Cardinals.

To understand his value, know that Holliday has been worth 23.7 fWAR while under this contract, which is sixth in the National League, behind Andrew McCutchen, Joey Votto, Buster Posey, Jason Heyward, and Giancarlo Stanton, and ahead of the likes of Ryan Braun, Yadier Molina, and Justin Upton - who have all seen a comparative amount of plate appearances.  In those six years, Holliday has made just under $101 million, meaning he's cost about $4.26 million per win.  Coincidentally, in 2015, $4.26 million was approximately the average major league salary (and coincidentally, because of the injuries, Holliday was worth only about one win per fWAR in 2015).

For perspective, and I'm not sure if there's a perfect science to this calculation, but it seems understood that the cost per win on the free agent market in 2016 is around $7.5 to $8 million.  Even adjusting for inflation (opening day payroll in MLB in 2010 was $2,717,766,875 and ballooned to around $3.6 billion in 2015), Holliday has easily been worth every penny.  In 2016, Steamer projects Holliday to be worth 1.9 wins while ZiPS gives him a zWAR of 1.6.  That's not unfair, he'll be in his age-36 season.  And if he performs to the slightly more conservative ZiPS projection, he'll still finish out the contract (excluding the team option in 2017) costing just under $5 million per win.  On the whole, it would still be regarded as a great contract from the Cardinals' perspective.

The takeaway, and my opening point, is that Holliday's been so good that he'd have to be really bad in 2016 for history to judge his time with the Cardinals a bit differently.  Really bad - as in he'd have to be maybe one of the worst everyday players of all time.  Per FanGraphs, here are the ten least valuable outfielders since 1901 by fWAR who have qualified for a batting title:

  1. Jose Guillen (1997) - Pirates: -3.1
  2. Ruben Sierra (1993) - A's: -2.6
  3. Luis Polonia (1993) - Angels: -2.6
  4. Lou Piniella (1973) - Royals: -2.4
  5. Bernie Williams (2005) - Yankees: -2.3
  6. Dante Bichette (1999) - Rockies: -2.1
  7. Von Joshua (1977) - Brewers: -2.1
  8. Chris James (1989) - Phillies/Padres: -2.0
  9. Joe Carter (1990) - Padres: -2.0
  10. Johnny Rucker (1944) - Giants: -2.0

A couple of things before returning to the topic at hand: First, there's a reason why Jose Guillen played on ten different teams in 14 years.  And second, Dante Bichette is noted here as having the sixth worst season by WAR in 1999 for an outfielder since 1901, yet he had an .895 OPS that season.  Sure, OPS is an imperfect stat but .895 would have ranked sixth in the National League in 2015 yet was 24th in 1999.  Baseball in 1999 was weird.

Anyway, let's say Holliday somehow "outperforms" Jose Guillen and is worth -3.2 WAR in 2016.  Over the course of his entire contract he'd still equal out to costing about $5.79 million per win.  And then say even in light of this very bad season, the Cardinals inexplicably exercise their option for 2017 and Holliday returns for another abysmal -3.2 WAR-type season.  The contract would then equal out to around $7.78 million per win.  It no longer looks like the huge bargain but it's still not an albatross.  And for context, Mike Leake is due to make an average of $16 million over the next five years and he was worth 1.7 fWAR in 2015.

Baseball fans can be a fickle "What have you done for me lately?" lot, and if Matt Holliday is sinking to the bottom of the WAR barrel in 2016 while making $17 million the average fan probably won't care how good he was between 2010 and 2014.  That's fair.  But in no universe is Holliday going to have such a dreadful season.  Every single player in the list above had at least 516 plate appearances to maximize their ineffectiveness.  If Holliday sees that much action in 2016 it's hard to imagine that it won't be to the team's advantage.  And even if it's not, the Cardinals will still have zero regrets about this contract, which is the most a team can ask for when the subject is the biggest contract in franchise history.

Источник: https://www.vivaelbirdos.com/2016/1/28/10839874/matt-holliday-contract-2016

Using Batted-Ball Stats to Predict MLB's Second-Half All-Stars

Now that the pesky "real" All-Star game is over, we can finally focus on things that truly matter: fake awards that nobody will ever actually receive.

No, we're not being delusional by discussing "second-half All-Stars." We know those don't really exist, but so what? The first-half studs got their due, and now it's time to check out some dudes who could put in work in the second half.

To do this, we'll be looking at batted-ball stats from the season's first few months to spot players who are striking the ball well but were not selected to the mid-summer classic. We'll pick one player for each league from each onesie position and then three outfielders who could be primed for a big-time output post-All-Star break based on how well they hit the ball in the first half. We'll try to exclude strict platoon players whose numbers may be skewed by only facing pitchers of the opposite handedness.

Which players are primed to bust out in the second half? Let's take a look.

Catcher

American League: Brian McCann

National League: Nick Hundley

Catcher is far from the deepest position in the American League, but Brian McCann is very much worthy of recognition. McCann's 36.4% hard-hit rate is his highest since 2010, when he was still bumping with the Atlanta Braves. What jacks up his fun factor is that he has been even better of late, posting a 43.4% hard-hit rate and 50.0% fly-ball rate since the start of June. His strikeout rate over that span is just 16.4%, and putting him in a park that slathers love on lefties won't hurt.

Nick Hundley missed a good amount of time in the first half, but when he was healthy, he was sneaky good. His hard-hit rate is 38.9%, up from 27.8% in 2015 and his career high of 33.0% in 2010. His 13.2% walk rate and 15.1% strikeout rate have allowed him to get on base at a .358 clip, and that's despite a .282 batting average on balls in play (BABIP) that is well below his career mark of .302. His numbers in the first half were good, but they could be even better going forward.

First Base

American League: Chris Davis

National League: Joey Votto

Is it cheating to include a dude who hit 22 tanks in the first half? Probably. But I'll take any opportunity I can get to peep Chris Davis dinger videos.

Massive taters.

Davis' .237/.348/.497 slash won't blow you away outside of the isolated power, but his hard-hit rate is still a hefty 40.6% with a 49.0% fly-ball rate. Putting those numbers in Camden Yards will lead to some gross totals, especially with the temperatures and humidity going up.

For a guy who said he was contemplating retirement earlier, Joey Votto sure did some silly things in the first half. He's fourth in the league in hard-hit rate at 43.1%, and his 10.9% soft-hit rate is third lowest. Votto is striking out more and walking less, but his batted-ball stats are the best of his career. Like Davis, he plays in a long-ball-friendly park, so don't be shocked if his June hot streak stretches into the latter months.

Second Base

American League: Logan Forsythe

National League: Neil Walker

General perception of Logan Forsythe is that he's limited to mashing just lefties. It seems he takes umbrage with that assertion.

Forsythe's soft-hit rate against righties is down to 10.5% this year, putting him at 9.4% overall with a 36.1% hard-hit rate. His earlier injury doesn't appear to have had a negative effect as his hard-hit rate since coming off the disabled list is 35.4%, so there are plenty of reasons to buy into Forsythe as a potential second-half stud.

While the New York Mets are busy lamenting the successes of the departed Daniel Murphy, Neil Walker is having a truly solid season. For the year, he has a 15.9% strikeout rate, 38.5% hard-hit rate, and 53.8% fly-ball rate -- against left-handed pitching, that is. It's still a small, 69-plate-appearance sample, but he's becoming a more balanced hitter who may be less of a liability when a southpaw is on the bump. With a career-high 36.0% hard-hit rate for the season, he's not going to erase the pains of losing Murphy, but he can at least help close the gap.

Third Base

American League: Kyle Seager

National League: Jake Lamb

Kyle Seager has already been to the All-Star game once, but here's a dirty little secret: he's getting even better.

He currently has career-best marks in both hard-hit rate and soft-hit rate while striking out just 15.1% of the time. If he were playing in a more hitter-friendly park, it's hard to grasp how good his traditional stats might be. His brother, Corey Seager, is justifiably getting all the hype right now, but the elder is straight raking. We can't overlook what he has done thus far.

There is no way on this beautiful Earth that Jake Lamb should be eligible for this list. He's the only player in the National League with a slugging percentage above .600, and it's close to being a sustainable mark with his 41.9% hard-hit rate. Lamb has launched 20 home runs already, and he's walking 10.6% of the time. There's legitimately nothing about his game right now that we shouldn't love. Don't expect his first-half slaughtering to end any time soon.

Shortstop

American League: Carlos Correa

National League: Trevor Story

We probably don't need to shed any tears that Carlos Correa wasn't in this year's All-Star game. He'll be there plenty in the future, especially if he keeps hitting the way he has recently. His hard-hit rate for the year is an impressive 37.7%, but it jumps up to 40.2% with a 15.7% strikeout rate over his past 115 plate appearances. His .260/.354/.459 slash isn't as good as his marks from last year, but it'll get there quickly if he can keep this up.

It seems to be a fad to hate on Trevor Story by showing his stats when you omit his disgusting first week. Let's do that! Instead of focusing on silly stats such as batting average, though, here are his batted-ball stats without his first week tear compared to those of the National League All-Stars.

Since April 12th Hard-Hit Rate Soft-Hit Rate Fly-Ball Rate
Trevor Story 42.4% 15.2% 44.1%
Corey Seager 41.8% 9.6% 30.6%
Addison Russell 29.7% 18.5% 31.8%
Aledmys Diaz 32.7% 20.4% 39.8%


The first takeaway -- again -- is that Corey Seager is ign'ant. The second, though, is that if you're going to bash Story, you're going to have to try harder than leaving out his first week. He has been crushing the ball since then, too, and his numbers look even better when you consider the position he plays. Even with the high strikeout rate, he can be a great player when he mashes like this.

Outfield

American League: Shin-Soo Choo, Miguel Sano, and Max Kepler

National League: Michael Conforto, Yasmany Tomas, and Matt Holliday

Each of the American League outfielders missed a bit of time in the first half for one reason or another, but they all tattooed the ball when they played in the bigs.

Shin-Soo Choo is second in hard-hit rate among all outfielders with at least 100 plate appearances, and his 43.2% mark there comes with an 8.0% soft-hit rate. He has brought his strikeout rate down to 20.9% with a 12.9% walk rate, making his .388 on-base percentage appear largely sustainable. He's batting at the top of a quality batting order in a good hitter's park, so as long as he's healthy, he could post some tasty second-half marks.

There weren't a whole lot of reasons for optimism for the Minnesota Twins in the first half, but Miguel Sano and Max Kepler can serve as the exceptions. They're third and ninth, respectively, in hard-hit rate in the American League among outfielders with at least 100 plate appearances. Both of their fly-ball rates are above 39.0%, as well, so there could be some dingers flying out of Target Field in July. They seem to have already kicked off that quest.

Oh my, indeed.

Including Michael Conforto here would seem a bit strange considering that it's hard to be a Major-League All-Star when you're not -- ya know -- in the Major Leagues. If his .340/.411/.580 slash in Triple-A is any indication, though, he'll be back soon, meaning we can focus again on his delicious 41.7% hard-hit rate. Even when we take out his red-hot April, Conforto's hard-hit rate stays up at 35.4%. If he can cut the strikeouts, he'll return to the middle of the Mets' order quickly.

Yasmany Tomas was another guy flirting with a minor-league assignment earlier in the year, but his batted-ball stats give that sentiment a bit of resistance. He has jacked his hard-hit rate up to 40.5% this year from 31.0% in his rookie season, but it hasn't resulted in big-time improvements in his slash yet. If he keeps stroking the way he has, those things will catch up, and he could catch fire.

This list includes a good number of spring chickens just coming into their own. The 36-year-old Matt Holliday doesn't qualify for that distinction, but you could argue this has been one of his more impressive seasons in a long time. His 40.2% hard-hit rate is the best of his career, but you wouldn't know it because his .248 BABIP is holding his traditional numbers down. Things have been trending up, too, with his hard-hit rate at 43.2% since the start of June. Keep an eye on Holliday down the stretch as his success could be key to a second-half run from the St. Louis Cardinals.

Источник: https://www.numberfire.com/mlb/news/9628/using-batted-ball-stats-to-predict-mlb-s-second-half-all-stars

: Matt holliday 2016 stats

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Matt holliday 2016 stats
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Thoughts following the Matt Holliday signing

(Presswire)

Last night the Yankees addressed one of their major offseason needs and landed a new DH. The team agreed to sign veteran Matt Holliday to a one-year contract worth $13M. Once he takes his physical and all that — I guess that’s something less than a formality considering a broken thumb effectively ended his season in August — the deal will be official. Until then, here are some thoughts.

1. My quick personal take: I like the signing. I don’t love it and I don’t hate it. It’s a solid, reasonable move. I would have preferred Carlos Beltran on a one-year contract myself, but Carlos had other ideas, so the Yankees moved on to the next best thing. I didn’t want Chris Carter’s or Mike Napoli’s strikeouts, or Brandon Moss’ or Pedro Alvarez’s pulled grounders into the shift. Holliday is, as announcers like to say, a professional hitter who is going to grind out at-bats. That’s pretty cool. The Yankees have lacked that in recent years. Plus Holliday is said to be a great clubhouse guy, and that’s important, especially with the team focusing on getting younger. The kids need someone to show them the way.

2. I’m really glad the Yankees did the sensible thing and stuck to a one-year contract. Edwin Encarnacion is awesome — that dude is absolutely terrifying at the plate — but committing huge dollars to a DH is not something the Yankees should be doing right now. They just got rid of how many expensive DHs this year, three? Maybe four? Whatever the number is, it was too many. The Yankees are trending young and that’s pretty damn exciting. Spending big on an inflexible DH would have complicated things, especially since the team is trying to get under the luxury tax threshold. Encarnacion would make sense if the Yankees were on the postseason bubble and trying to get over the hump, not trying to groom their next young core. A one-year deal was always the way to go.

3. One reason to expect Holliday’s numbers to bounce back next season: his .253 BABIP was by far a career low and well below his career .333 BABIP. That happened even though his hard contact rate (38.5%) was comfortably above the MLB average (31.4%) and his career average (35.6%). In fact, among the 375 players to put at least 100 balls in play this past season, Holliday had the third highest average exit velocity (94.7 mph). Only Nelson Cruz (95.9 mph) and Giancarlo Stanton (95.1 mph) were better. Miguel Cabrera (94.5 mph) was fourth. That is some good company. Also, according to Mike Petriello, Holliday put 42.5% of his balls in play at 100 mph or better, the fourth best rate in baseball. Exit velocity isn’t everything — it’s possible to hit a 100 mph pop-up, you know — but it’s not nothing either. Holliday can still strike the ball with authority. That suggests that .253 BABIP, which was so far out of line with the rest of his career, might not last.

4. One more reason to expect Holliday’s numbers to bounce back next season: the guy hits to all fields. A right-handed hitter who can go to right field will be rewarded in Yankee Stadium. Handsomely too. Here is Holliday’s spray chart from this past season, via Baseball Savant:

matt-holliday

That is a beautiful thing. Holliday, even at age 36, still hit for power to all fields this summer. Homers and doubles, from foul pole to foul pole. (I won’t hold my breath waiting for triples.) There’s nothing wrong with pulling the ball. Not at all. But being to hit for power to all three fields is what separates great hitters from good hitters, and over the course of his career, Holliday has truly been a great hitter. That .303/.382/.515 (137 wRC+) batting line in nearly 7,500 plate appearances ain’t no accident. This dude is a total pro at the plate.

5. The key to the Holliday signing is keeping him out of the outfield. He’s a very poor defensive left fielder and has been for years. Both the eye test and the defensive stats agree on that. The Yankees should consider him an emergency option out there only. The team has enough outfield depth that I’m hopeful Holliday won’t have to play left southern states bank sylacauga at all. Even if the Yankees trade Brett Gardner, there’s still Aaron Hicks, Tyler Austin, Rob Refsnyder, and Mason Williams, and those are only the 40-man roster guys. Holliday has ten games of experience at first base, all in 2016, so if he does need to play the field, hopefully it’s there. The entire point is getting off his feet though. Holliday’s an older player, and the entire idea behind the signing is that limiting him to DH will help keep him healthy and prevent him from wearing down later in the season. If he ends up playing the field regularly, either at first base or left field, it’s a problem.

6. There is still an awful lot of offseason left to go, so it’s silly to think the Yankees are done making moves. But, as it stands right now, the lineup probably looks something like this, realistically:

  1. LF Matt holliday 2016 stats Gardner
  2. CF Jacoby Ellsbury
  3. C Gary Sanchez
  4. DH Matt Holliday
  5. SS Didi Gregorius
  6. 2B Starlin Castro
  7. 1B Greg Bird
  8. RF Aaron Judge
  9. 3B Chase Headley

Eh? That leaves Austin Romine, Ronald Torreyes, Hicks, and either Austin or Refsnyder on the bench. Gardner and/or Headley could still be traded, which would obviously change things, but that’s the lineup right now, on December 5th. I have no idea whether that lineup can score runs at an above-average rate. At least it’s mostly young with some upside. That’ll be fun.

7. Ridiculously premature 2017-18 offseason thought: I hope the Yankees are in on Carlos Santana, who will be a free agent. He’s always been a personal favorite — switch-hitters with power and patience are my jam — and he’d step right into Holliday’s roster spot and annual salary slot nicely. Santana, who turns 31 in April, will command multiple years though, which could throw a wrench into the long-term payroll plans. Otherwise he’d be a really great fit as a most of the time DH/part-time first baseman/emergency catcher. I’ll spend the next eleven months pretending Holliday is a placeholder for Santana. That sounds good.

Filed Under: Musings

Источник: http://riveraveblues.com/2016/12/thoughts-following-the-matt-holliday-signing-147816/

Using Batted-Ball Stats to Predict MLB's Second-Half All-Stars

Now that the pesky "real" All-Star game is over, we can finally focus on things that truly matter: fake awards that nobody will ever actually receive.

No, we're not being delusional by discussing "second-half All-Stars." We know those don't really exist, but so what? The first-half studs got their due, and now it's time to check out some dudes who could put in work in the second half.

To do this, we'll be looking at batted-ball stats from the season's first few months to spot players who are striking the ball well but were not selected to the mid-summer classic. We'll pick one player for each league from each onesie position and then three outfielders who could be primed for a big-time output post-All-Star break based on how well they hit the ball in the first half. We'll try to exclude strict platoon players whose numbers may be skewed by only facing pitchers of the opposite handedness.

Which players are primed to bust out in the second half? Let's take a look.

Catcher

American League: Brian McCann

National League: Nick Hundley

Catcher is far from the deepest position in the American League, but Brian McCann is very much worthy of recognition. McCann's 36.4% hard-hit rate is his highest since 2010, when he was still bumping with the Atlanta Braves. What jacks up his fun factor is that he has been even better of late, posting a 43.4% hard-hit rate and 50.0% fly-ball rate since the start of June. His strikeout rate over that span is just 16.4%, and putting him in a park that slathers love on lefties won't hurt.

Nick Hundley missed a good amount of time in the first half, but when he was healthy, he was sneaky good. His hard-hit rate is 38.9%, up from 27.8% in 2015 and his career high of 33.0% in 2010. His 13.2% walk rate and 15.1% strikeout rate have allowed him to get on base at a .358 clip, and that's despite a .282 batting average on balls in play (BABIP) that is well below his career mark of .302. His numbers in the first half were good, but they could be even better going forward.

First Base

American League: Chris Davis

National League: Joey Votto

Is it cheating to include a dude who hit 22 tanks in the first half? Probably. But I'll take any opportunity I can get to peep Chris Davis dinger videos.

Massive taters.

Davis' .237/.348/.497 slash won't blow you away outside of the isolated power, but his hard-hit rate is still a hefty 40.6% with a 49.0% fly-ball rate. Putting those numbers in Camden Yards will lead to some gross totals, especially with the temperatures and humidity going up.

For a guy who said he was contemplating retirement earlier, Joey Votto sure did some silly things in the first half. He's fourth in the league in hard-hit rate at 43.1%, and his 10.9% soft-hit rate is third lowest. Votto is striking out more and walking less, matt holliday 2016 stats his batted-ball stats are the best of his career. Like Davis, he plays in a long-ball-friendly park, so don't be shocked if his June hot streak stretches into the latter months.

Second Base

American League: Logan Forsythe

National League: Neil Walker

General perception of Logan Forsythe is that he's limited to mashing just lefties. It seems he takes umbrage with that assertion.

Forsythe's soft-hit rate against righties is down to 10.5% this year, putting him at 9.4% overall with a 36.1% hard-hit rate. His earlier injury doesn't appear to have had a negative effect as his hard-hit rate since coming off the disabled list is 35.4%, so there are plenty of reasons to buy into Forsythe as a potential second-half stud.

While the New York Mets are busy lamenting the successes of the departed Daniel Murphy, Neil Walker is having a truly solid season. For the year, he has a 15.9% strikeout rate, 38.5% hard-hit rate, and 53.8% fly-ball rate -- against left-handed pitching, that is. It's still a small, 69-plate-appearance sample, but he's becoming a more balanced hitter who may be less of a liability when a southpaw is on the bump. With a career-high 36.0% hard-hit rate for the season, he's not going to erase the pains of losing Murphy, but he can at least help close the gap.

Third Base

American League: Kyle Seager

National League: Jake Lamb

Kyle Seager has already been to the All-Star game once, but here's a dirty little secret: he's getting even better.

He currently has career-best marks in both hard-hit rate and soft-hit rate while striking out just 15.1% of the time. If he were playing in a more hitter-friendly park, it's hard to grasp how good his traditional stats might be. His brother, Corey Seager, is justifiably getting all the hype right now, but the elder is straight raking. We can't overlook what he has done thus far.

There is no way on this beautiful Earth that Jake Lamb should be eligible for this list. He's the only capital one pay car loan in the National League with a slugging percentage above .600, and it's close to being a sustainable mark with his 41.9% hard-hit rate. Lamb has launched 20 home runs already, and he's walking 10.6% of the time. There's legitimately nothing about his game right now that we shouldn't love. Don't expect his first-half slaughtering to end any time soon.

Shortstop

American League: Carlos Correa

National League: Trevor Story

We probably don't need to shed any tears that Carlos Correa wasn't in this year's All-Star game. He'll be there plenty in the future, especially if he keeps hitting the way he has recently. His hard-hit rate for the year is an impressive 37.7%, but it jumps up to 40.2% with a 15.7% strikeout rate over his past 115 plate appearances. His .260/.354/.459 slash isn't as good as his marks from last year, but it'll get there quickly if he can keep this up.

It seems to be a fad to hate on Trevor Story by showing his stats when you omit his disgusting first week. Let's do that! Instead of focusing on silly stats such as batting average, though, here are his batted-ball stats without his first week tear compared to those of the National League All-Stars.

Since April 12th Hard-Hit Rate Soft-Hit Rate Fly-Ball Rate
Trevor Story 42.4% 15.2% 44.1%
Corey Seager 41.8% 9.6% 30.6%
Addison Russell 29.7% 18.5% 31.8%
Aledmys Diaz 32.7% 20.4% 39.8%


The first takeaway -- again -- is that Corey Seager is ign'ant. The second, though, is that if you're going to bash Story, you're going to have to try harder than leaving out his first week. He has been crushing the ball since then, too, and his numbers look even better when you consider the position he plays. Even with the high strikeout rate, he can be a great player when he mashes like this.

Outfield

American League: Shin-Soo Choo, Miguel Sano, and Max Kepler

National League: Michael Conforto, Yasmany Tomas, and Matt Holliday

Each of the American League outfielders missed a bit of time in the first half for one reason or another, but they all tattooed the ball when they played in the bigs.

Shin-Soo Choo is second in hard-hit rate among all outfielders with at least 100 plate appearances, and his 43.2% mark there comes with an 8.0% soft-hit rate. He has brought his strikeout rate down to 20.9% with a 12.9% walk rate, making his .388 on-base percentage appear largely sustainable. He's batting at the top of a quality batting order in a good hitter's park, so as long as he's healthy, he could post some tasty second-half marks.

There weren't a whole lot of reasons for optimism for the Minnesota Twins in the first half, but Miguel Sano and Max Kepler can serve as the exceptions. They're third and ninth, respectively, in hard-hit rate in the American League among outfielders with at least 100 plate appearances. Both of their fly-ball rates are above 39.0%, as well, so there could be some dingers flying out of Target Field in July. They seem to have already kicked off that quest.

Oh my, indeed.

Including Michael Conforto here would seem a bit strange considering that it's hard to be a Major-League All-Star when you're not -- ya know -- in the Major Leagues. If his .340/.411/.580 slash in Triple-A is any indication, though, he'll be back soon, meaning we can focus again on his delicious 41.7% hard-hit rate. Even when we take out his red-hot Matt holliday 2016 stats, Conforto's hard-hit rate stays up at 35.4%. If he can cut the strikeouts, he'll return to the middle of the Mets' order quickly.

Yasmany Tomas was another guy flirting with a minor-league assignment earlier in the year, but his batted-ball stats give that sentiment a bit of resistance. He has jacked his hard-hit rate up to 40.5% this year from 31.0% in his rookie season, but it hasn't resulted in big-time improvements in his slash yet. If he keeps stroking the way he has, those things will catch up, and he could catch fire.

This list includes a good number of spring chickens just coming into their own. The 36-year-old Matt Holliday doesn't qualify for that distinction, but you could argue this has been one of his more impressive seasons in a long time. His 40.2% hard-hit rate is the best of his career, but you wouldn't know it because his .248 BABIP is holding his traditional numbers down. Things have been trending up, too, with his hard-hit rate at 43.2% since the start of June. Keep an eye on Holliday down the stretch as his success could be key to a second-half run from the St. Louis Cardinals.

Источник: https://www.numberfire.com/mlb/news/9628/using-batted-ball-stats-to-predict-mlb-s-second-half-all-stars

St. Louis Cardinals 2016 Preview and Prediction

As pitchers and catchers report this week in Florida and Arizona, Athlon Sports will preview every team in Major League Baseball. Outlooks for every team and so much more information, including rosters, advanced stats and anonymous scouting reports, are featured in the Athlon Sports 2016 MLB Preview, available on newsstands everywhere and in our online store.

The Cardinals spent a year recruiting an outfielder they believed could be a part of the next core, the one who would in the coming years inherit the history and annual championship aspirations now driving Yadier Molina and Adam Wainwright. They gave him a summer to scott pulcini trader comfortable in the clubhouse and, when he reached free agency, an offer potentially richer than any they had made before. Two weeks before Christmas, Jason Heyward made his decision. He left the Cardinals for the Chicago Cubs, offering a public referendum on a changing division.

The Cardinals enter 2016 facing their sternest challenge yet to their dynastic hold on the division and franchise record run of postseason appearances. And it’s not just the Cubs that should concern Cardinals fans — it’s also time. The three pillars from a decade of contending — Molina, Wainwright and 2009 addition Matt Holliday — are in their mid-30s, and each spent significant time on the disabled list in 2015. All three return for 2016, but it’s identifying who will join Matt Carpenter in the next core that will determine if they can not only fend off the Cubs now but also meet their own expectations for seasons to come.

Rotation

The backbone of the best record in baseball in 2015 and one of the best run-prevention teams of the era was pitching, or, as manager Mike Matheny called it, “historically good pitching.” The Cardinals’ starters had a 2.99 ERA — a half run better than all but two other teams in the majors. The Cardinals did that without ace Wainwright, who missed five months recovering from a ruptured Achilles’ tendon. As Wainwright returns, Lance Lynn departs.

The workhorse will miss the entire season recovering from elbow surgery. To pick up those innings, the Cardinals signed free agent Mike Leake — a prototypical, contact-seeking, athletic Cardinals pitcher who can be a quality start monster in the middle of the rotation. The Cardinals don’t expect the rotation to match last year’s history, but they believe young arms Michael Wacha and Carlos Martinez can improve, if only by adding more innings and more consistency deeper into the season. Lefty Jaime Garcia’s health was an unexpected bonus in 2015 and a necessity for 2016.

Bullpen

It wasn’t until the 67th of his jobs amazon near me games last summer that Trevor Rosenthal blew his third save and first against a team other than Pittsburgh. Rosenthal asserted his place as a shutdown closer with a club-record 48 saves and would have challenged 50 if not for a last-weekend shutdown. Workload was, after all, the prevailing concern. Two of the relievers who led the majors in appearances were setup men Kevin Siegrist (81) and Seth Maness (76). They were a sturdy, well-trod bridge to Rosenthal, and the Cardinals must remain wary of creaks. With Jordan Walden an unknown due to a shoulder injury, burly Jonathan Broxton returns to fortify the route to Rosenthal. Korea’s all-time saves leader with 277, Seung Hwan Oh brings late-inning savvy to a setup role. Tyler Lyons is an intriguing addition as a lefty who won’t be limited to a specialist role.

Middle Infield

Injuries and slumps to other All-Stars left shortstop Jhonny Peralta to carry a greater offensive load, and it came at a cost. A year after leading the team in homers, Peralta faded to a .243/.306/.325 slash line in the second half with only three extra-base hits in his final 146 plate appearances. His legs left him, and his swing followed. To keep Peralta fresher in his third year with the team and help third-year second baseman Kolten Wong blossom, the Cardinals traded for Jedd Gyorko. The right-handed-hitting infielder will be an alternative to Peralta at short and a platoon complement for Wong matt holliday 2016 stats second, or a challenger. Gyorko has averaged 16 homers in three seasons — the kind of pop the Cardinals want from Peralta and expect Wong to grow into.

Corners

The corners were a study in contrasts. Carpenter, who frequently batted first — not a spot often reserved for power — led the team in homers (28) and RBIs (84). From first base, a position defined by power, the Cardinals got fizzle. The combined .392 slugging percentage from the position was the lowest in the NL, and the committee provided almost 10 strikeouts for every one homer. Incumbent Matt Adams and veteran Brandon Moss will get first crack, with Stephen Piscotty a right-handed-hitting option. At first, it’s simple: Who produces most, plays most.

Outfield

The departures of Heyward and Jon Jay, who went to San Diego in the Gyorko trade, clear the way for the next generation. The Cardinals want to unleash Randal Grichuk and Piscotty in 2016, and the lone question is where will they find at-bats. Barring a late-winter acquisition, the answer is every day. Grichuk had as many homers (17) as Peralta — and in 256 fewer at-bats. If Grichuk can stay healthy returning from elbow soreness and hernia surgery, he has rare power for a center fielder, power the Cardinals crave. Heady hitter Piscotty is set to replace Heyward in right, and he ultimately may be the superior offensive player. While the twentysomethings will get a chance to reveal who they are, most of all the Cardinals need Holliday to be who he always has been. The All-Star twice tore a quadriceps muscle and had career lows across the board.

Catching

For the second time in as many springs, Molina will be returning from hand surgery. Molina shredded a ligament in his left hand late in 2015 and required two offseason surgeries to repair damage. It took him time a year ago to regain strength in the right hand and force in his swing. To sub while Molina heals and alleviate some innings, the Cardinals added Brayan Pena, a seasoned backup.

Bench

What happens at other positions will define the bench bats (Adams or Moss? Gyorko or Wong?). For years, the Cardinals have struggled to find that right fit for pinch-hitting — cycling unsuccessfully through veterans — so they’ll attempt a blend this season. There should be more versatility and more damage to choose from, but also more part-time players to stay sharp with starts and not idly wait for that one swing at contributing.

Management

A gifted, players-first motivator capable of infusing his guys with confidence, Matheny embraced a “next man up” mantra and refused to let the clubhouse surrender to the absence of multiple stars, convincing youngsters and backups they could win 100. He admits to learning the clockwork of his job — particularly bullpen management — in the crucible of contending, and he’s eagerly sought suggestions, including tips he’s employed from the analytics department. John Mozeliak, entering his ninth year as general manager, works to shape a roster for his manager’s tendencies. What he did for the bullpen during 2015, he wants to do for the bench — add name players Matheny will trust and thus play. A series of playoff exits shy of a title has increased the pressure on leadership and gotten Mozeliak rethinking the trade deadline through a postseason lens. This July he’ll look for an addition that lifts them in October.

Final Analysis

The Cardinals entered the winter eager to pursue two of the most prominent free agents available, and they finished second each time. Pitcher David Price signed with the cash-splashier Red Sox, and Heyward picked the flashier Cubs. This didn’t sit well with the Cardinals, who have long used their history and atmosphere to woo players. While their place as a destination franchise may have changed, the Cardinals and their aging core have this year to show that their status hasn’t changed where it counts — the standings.

Prediction: 2nd NL Central

Lineup

3B Matt Carpenter (L)

RF Stephen Piscotty (R)

LF Matt Holliday (R)

CF Randal Grichuk (R)

1B Brandon Moss (L)

SS Jhonny Peralta (R)

C Yadier Molina (R)

2B Kolten Wong (L)

Bench

1B Matt Adams (L)

INF Jedd Gyorko (R)

C Brayan Pena (S)

OF Tommy Pham (R)

INF Greg Garcia (L)

Rotation

RHP Adam Wainwright

RHP Michael Wacha

RHP Mike Leake

LHP Jaime Garcia

RHP Carlos Martinez

Bullpen

RHP Trevor Rosenthal (Closer)

RHP Jordan Walden

RHP Seth Maness

RHP Jonathan Broxton

LHP Kevin Siegrist

LHP Seung Hwan Oh

LHP Tyler Lyons

Источник: https://athlonsports.com

Matt Holliday net worth and salary: Matt Holliday is an American baseball player who has a net worth of $60 million dollars.


Click to see full answer

Then, who is Matt Holliday playing for in 2019?

Matt Holliday says that he intends to play Major League Baseball in the 2019 season. Holliday will turn 39 in January, but certainly showed that he can still be a productive bat in 2018 as a September call-up with the Colorado Rockies.

One may also ask, why did Matt Holliday leave the Cardinals? The Cardinals aren't keeping Matt Holliday, but he has no intention of retiring. On Friday, the Cardinals activated outfielder Matt Holliday off the disabled list so he could play a farewell series at Busch Stadium in St. The hometown crowd gave him a huge ovation and Holliday got emotional as he crossed the plate.

Similarly, you may ask, who is Matt Holliday playing for now?

Matt Holliday
Home runs316
Runs batted in1,220
Teams
Colorado Rockies (2004–2008) Oakland Athletics (2009) St. Louis Cardinals (2009–2016) New York Yankees (2017) Colorado Rockies (2018)

How old is Matt Holliday?

40 years (January 15, 1980)

Источник: https://findanyanswer.com/how-much-is-matt-holliday-worth

Matt Holliday's Extra Base Hits Per Season Line Chart

This line chart shows Matt Holliday's yearly Extra Base Hits for each season of his Major League Baseball career. Also included, for comparison, are yearly player averages for MLB, Hall of Fame players, LF, and players from their country of birth. For these groups, averages are calculated for each group's performance for the defined year.

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Matt Holliday's Cumulative Extra Base Hits by Season

This line chart attempts to show shows Matt Holliday's progression over their entire career. Each year on the chart represents Matt Holliday's career total Extra Base Hits at the end of that season.

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Matt Holliday's Extra Base Hits Per Season Box Chart

This chart attempts to draw comparisons between Matt Holliday and related player groups by summarizing Extra Base Hits for each season played by Matt Holliday. The box represents the middle 50% of the matt holliday 2016 stats for each player with the line in the box being the median value. The whiskers represent the ranges for the top and bottom 25% of the data. Review the spread and medians to draw your conclusions!

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Matt Holliday's Yearly Extra Base Hits Stats Table

This table shows Matt Holliday's Extra Base Hits stats by year for his full MLB career with the aggregations’ sum, average, minimum, maximum, and median. Also included, for comparison, are yearly player averages for MLB, Hall of Fame players, LF, and players from their country of birth. The comparisons are calculated for each group for each year of Matt Holliday's career.

Note: "—" indicate there were no players for comparison for a specific year. Most commonly this happens for the hall of fame group where there may not have been a hall of famer playing that year.

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Источник: https://www.jmanesaz.com/player-charts/playerID/hollima01/statType/XBH/dataSet/Hitting

From Stats Perform: Rockies Take on Rangers in Arlington Monday-Wednesday

The Rangers have really struggled against the NL since the start of last season, both at the plate and on the mound.

Rangers Since 2020, Stats in Interleague Games w/MLB Ranks

Record          9-26 (.257)       last

Runs/Gm         3.54 (124/35)     last

Opp Runs/Gm     5.51          2nd-highest (LAA, 5.76)

AVG             .203           2nd-lowest (Sea. 2026)

OPS             .631           2nd-lowest (Sea. 628)

The Rockies swept the Rangers at Coors Field in June, allowing a .167 batting average in the three-game series.

 

The Rockies took two of three at the Dodgers over the weekend for just their second road series win of the year. This inched them ahead of the Diamondbacks, who have the worst road series record this season; both clubs are on track to rank in the bottom three for any season since 1990.

MLB, Lowest Series Win Pct on Road in a Season - Since 1990

(Minimum 2 games in series)

2020 Texas Rangers                 1-9-0  .100

2021 Arizona Diamondbacks         2-18-2  .136

2021 Colorado Rockies             2-17-2  .143

2020 Pittsburgh Pirates            1-8-1  .150

2018 Baltimore Orioles            3-21-2  .154

2014 Colorado Rockies             3-21-2  .154

2012 Houston Astros               4-22-0  .154

C.J. Cron hit a three-run blast in the first inning last night, his 10th HR of the month. He is one of only five Rockies with 10+ HR, 10+ walks and 30+ RBI in a single month.

 

Rockies, 10+ HR, 10+ BB & 30+ RBI In Calendar Month – All-Time

                                HR     BB    RBI

Larry Walker, June 1999         10     10     30

Preston Wilson, Jul 2003        11     10     34

Matt Holliday, Sept 2006        10     16     34

Matt Holliday, Sept 2007        12     11     30

Nolan Arenado, Aug 2016         10     18     36

C.J. Cron, Aug 2021             10     12     33

 

Cron is slugging .814 this month, highest in MLB (minimum 50 PA).  

 

Adolis Garcia leads the Rangers in RBI and runs scored. Only four AL Rookies have done that since 1980 and each was named Rookie of the Year.

 

AL Rookies Leading Team in RBI & Runs – Since 1980

                                 RBI   Runs

2021 Adolis Garcia, Tex          77     65

2017 Aaron Judge, NYY           114    128 ß Won ROY

1997 Nomar Garciaparra, Bos      98    122 ß Won ROY

1987 Mark McGwire, Oak          118     97 ß Won ROY

1986 Jose Canseco, Oak          117     85 ß Won ROY

Other notable AL rookies to lead their team in RBI and runs are Fred Lynn for Boston in 1975 (who won Rookie of the Year and MVP that season) and Ted Williams for Boston in 1939.

 

After several trade deadline moves, the Rangers are now the youngest team in MLB.

Youngest Average Age of Active Matt holliday 2016 stats, as of August 30

                            Matt holliday 2016 stats Days

Texas Rangers                26   348

Cleveland Indians            27   102

Pittsburgh Pirates           27   229

Baltimore Orioles            27   330

Miami Matt holliday 2016 stats 28    39

The Rangers have the youngest average age for position players (26 years, 34 days) and the third-youngest pitching staff (27 years, 252 days).

Colorado’s bullpen has been much better over the past 2+ weeks after a rough patch immediately following the All-Star Break.

Rockies Bullpen Since All-Star Break – First 21 vs. Last 18

                    First 21        Last 18

ERA                     6.11           3.61 (25/62.1)

Opp. AVG                .260           .231

Opp. SLG                .462           .368

Opp. OPS                .801           .686

HR Allowed/9            1.71           0.87

 

German Marquez is hoping to reverse this odd trend of pitching very well at Coors Field and poorly on the road.

German Marquez, Home vs. Road Stats w/ MLB Difference Rank

(Ranks among ERA qualifiers; home better than road)

                    Home      Road      Diff      MLB Rank

Win Pct             .800      .300      .500       largest

ERA                 3.13      5.31      2.18    3rd-largest

Opp. AVG            .200      .267      .067       largest

Opp. SLG            .313      .428      .115    6th-largest

Opp. OPS            .591      .752      .161    6th-largest

Marquez has a 1.93 ERA in three career starts vs. Texas, his second-lowest ERA against any opponent with multiple starts (1.76 vs. Pittsburgh).

 

A.J. Alexy is expected to make his MLB debut for the Rangers tonight as Texas has three of its starting pitchers on the COVID-IL. Alexy will be the third different Ranger to start in his MLB debut over the past week, something that has only happened three times after the first month of a season since WWII.

 

3 Starters to Make MLB Debut in 1-Week Span – Since 1940

(Excluding first month of season)

Rangers        Aug 25-29, 2021  (J.Latz, G.Otto, A.Alexy*)

Rockies        June 6-11, 2014  (E.Butler, C.Bergman, T.Matzek)

Padres        Sept 17-21, 1986  (E.Vosberg, R.Hayward, J.Jones)

Cardinals  Sept 27-Oct 1, 1969  (J.Reuss, S.Guzman, R.Cleveland)

*Assuming A.J. Alexy starts on Monday

Источник: https://www.insidetheseams.com/all-things-rockies/2021/8/30/from-stats-perform

(Updated Dec. 25, 2018)

In his short stint with the Cardinals, reliever Greg Holland did as poorly for them as he did when he opposed them.

Holland, a free agent who signed a one-year contract for $14 million with the Cardinals on March 31, 2018, was 0-2 with a 7.92 ERA in 32 appearances for them.

During his career, Holland also experienced some of his roughest outings when he pitched against the Cardinals.

Big hit

With the Royals in 2011, Holland was 5-1 with a 1.80 ERA. The lone loss came against the Cardinals.

On June 18, 2011, at St. Louis, the Royals led, 4-3, when Colby Rasmus led off the bottom half of the eighth inning for the Cardinals with a single against Tim Collins. Royals manager Ned Yost brought in Holland to face the Cardinals’ power hitters, Albert Pujols and Matt Holliday. Pujols grounded out, moving Rasmus to second. After getting a strike on Holliday, Holland tried to jam him with a 96 mph fastball.

“I knew it was a bad pitch before he hit it,” Holland said to the Kansas City Star. “Then, when he hit it, I knew it was a really bad pitch.”

Holliday hit the ball 422 feet over the center field wall for a two-run home run, giving the Cardinals a 5-4 lead. Video

“Everybody in their bullpen throws 95 or 96 (mph), so you better be ready for the fastball,” Holliday said.

Said Holland: “I tried to get the ball in and it leaked back over the plate. It was up. Boom! Bad combination.”

The Cardinals won, breaking a seven-game losing streak. Cardinals manager Tony La Russa called Holliday’s home run “as big a hit as we’ve had all year.”

Yost said of Holland, “He’s been lights out and he was lights out tonight with the exception of one pitch. He didn’t execute a pitch to Holliday. I mean, he threw it right down the middle.” Boxscore

Command issues

A year later, on June 16, 2012, Holliday again got to Holland.

With the Royals ahead, 7-6, in the seventh inning at St. Louis, Holland yielded a RBI-single to Holliday and a two-run single to Yadier Molina. The Cardinals won, 10-7. Boxscore

“Holly struggled with his command and it just wasn’t good for us,” Yost said.

A week later, on June 23, 2012, at Kansas City, Holland permitted a double by Holliday and a two-run home run by Allen Craig during an 8-4 Cardinals victory. Boxscore 

Yost said of Holliday, “We try to get him on breaking balls and he hits the curveball. We try to stay hard on him with fastballs and he hits the fastball. We’ve got to make a pitch in a good location and hope he hits it hard at somebody.”

On May 28, 2017, at Denver, Paul DeJong, in his first major-league at-bat, hit a home run for the Cardinals against Holland, who was in his lone season with the Rockies. Video

It was the first home run Holland allowed that season. Said DeJong of the ball he hit, “I kept watching where it would go, and it kept going.” Boxscore

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