mickey mouse piggy bank

Mickey small piggy bank Financial This product is part of the collection of Superbe brand with the famous Disney character Mickey Mouse will crack all. (There's so much money around. Madsen pulls out kids' T-shirts featuring Mickey and Minnie Mouse and "It's like a piggy bank next to your phone. You can put your money on Donald being angry as he drives Mickey and his friends around town in this taxi bank. The Fab 5 squeeze into the Duck Cab Co. mickey mouse piggy bank

Mickey mouse piggy bank -

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Mickey Mouse Collectibles is an authorized representative for Mickey Mouse product sellers. All trademarks belong to their respective owners. Mickey Mouse is a trademark of The Walt Disney Company and Disney Enterprises, Inc. This site is neither endorsed, nor sponsored, nor affiliated with The Walt Disney Company or Disney Enterprises, Inc.:

Walt Disney
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Burbank, California 91521

 

Источник: https://mickey.mickeymousecollectibles.com/mickeymouse-bank.html

Mickey Mouse Bank Toys


Mickey Mouse Coin Bank

Mickey Mouse Pride Lines Bank

Mickey Mouse Pride Lines Bank

One of the most popular Mickey Mouse coin banks to collect is this one from Pride Lines and made in the 1980s.

This is a cast iron, mechanical bank. As shown it originally comes in a wooden box. The key to open the bank is in the shape of Minnie Mouse.

We have seen this one sell for $125.




Applause Mickey Mouse Bank

This Wonderful bank by Applause show Mickey Mouse cross-legged while sitting. The bank is approximately nine inches tall. The bank depicts Mickey with his hand holding his chin. His eyes are looking skyward waiting for the next coin to drop.

Value and Pricing: We have seen this Applause made Mickey Mouse bank with a few scrapes but otherwise in good condition sell for $26.

More Applause Mickey toys can be found on our Mickey Mouse Applause page.




Mickey Mouse Bank Robber

Is Mickey Mouse helping Pete break open a bank vault to steal all the money?

We think it is more likely Mickey is sneaking over the top to capture Pete in the act.

We saw this colorful vintage bank and it is really interesting and fun.

Value and Pricing: The bank we saw was in excellent condition and sold for $40.




Ceramic Mickey Mouse Bank

Mickey Mouse Ceramic Bank

This Mickey Mouse bank is made from ceramic. It is about eight and one-half inches tall and six inches wide. It features Mickey in a sitting position with his legs crossed.




Vintage Mickey Mouse Bank

Vintage Mickey Mouse Bank

Here is a vintage Mickey Mouse bank that is about eleven inches tall.




Cast Iron Mickey Mouse Bank

Metal Cast Iron Mickey Mouse Bank

This metal bank is made of cast iron and dates from the 1930s - 1940s.




Glass Mickey Mouse Bank

(see a larger picture here)

This glass piggy bank is in the shape of Mickey Mouse. So maybe we should call it a Mickey Bank!

(see a larger picture here)

Made in the late 1950s to early 1960s these banks are stamped Mickey Mouse Club on the back.

(see a larger picture here)

On the bottom is stamped Walt Disney Productions.

The color of the glass most commonly seen is often referred to as brown or amber. The size is about seven inches high.

(see a larger picture here)

There is also a cobalt blue version of the glass bank. This one is rarer than the brown or amber glass bank.

Value and Pricing: These Mickey Mouse glass banks often sell for less than ten dollars - although sometimes the blue version is a little more. However, as they are glass extra care in shipping is often required. Between the product price and shipping a combined investment of less than twenty dollars is a good deal.

If you are wondering - how do you get your money out of a glass piggy bank? You don't, at least not without breaking it. For that reason it is a bit surprising that these Disney bank collectibles can still be found for such an inexpensive price.




Mickey Mouse Tokyo Disneyland Bank

(see a larger picture here)

This happy Mickey Mouse bank was sold at Tokyo Disneyland.

Mickey has a large nose that almost seems to hide his eyes when looked at from straight on. The bank is of Mickey's head / bust, and he is wearing a yellow bowtie.

(see a larger picture here)

On the bottom of the ceramic bank it refers to Tokyo Disneyland.

Not large, this porcelain piece is about four and three-quarter inches (twelve centimeters) tall.







Related search term: banks





 
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Vintage Disney Piggy Banks and Their Prices

The Walt Disney Studios have produced some of the most highly sort after memorabilia and collectibles of all time. There is one product that stands out most as having the largest impact and influence on the lives of so many. Over the years the humble piggy bank has not only taught many children around the world the skills needed for saving money. They also gave many of us a sense of pride every time we managed to save up enough money to buy that new toy or see how much money we were putting into our bank accounts.

Disney was able to capitalize not only on the parents who were wanting to help their children learn vital skills for the future. But also the child’s fascination and obsessions that comes with their favorite characters.



From Mickey Mouse and his friends, to Disney Princesses and beloved characters from all of their movies and shows. We are able to find piggy banks still being highly sort after, even today. This is not just limited to the older characters, styles and designs. As both adults and children alike, happily take ownership of the news release based off of their favorite characters and movies.

Here are a few examples of Mickey Mouse and friends themed piggy banks that enthusiast and collectors are seeking out these days.

1930’s – 1940’s Classic Disney Characters

While Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck are some of the more well known classic Disney characters. There are many, more lesser known characters such as Elmer the timid elephant. These smaller lesser known characters have their own cult following today, as they usually displayed a character trait that many children could relate to, such as being the target of bullies. Mickey and Donald still remain the easier charters to find due to their popularity and production volumes.

1) Drum Playing Elmer With Movable Trunk

1930s-elmer-money-bank



Estimated Sales Price: $60.00 USD

2) Vintage Ceramic Donald Duck Holding a Coin

1930s-Vintage-Ceramic-Donald-Duck-Holding-Coin-Bank

Estimated Sales Price: $75.00 USD

3) Mickey Mouse Tin Lithograph Beehive

1930-mickey-mouse-beehive-money-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $175.00 USD

4) Mickey and Minnie Treasure Chest

1930s-mickey-and-minnie-mouse-digging-treasure-chest

Estimated Sales Price: $230.00 USD

5) Bobble Head Donald Duck

1930s-donald-duck-booble-head-money-banks

Estimated Sales Price: $140.00 USD

1950’s – 1960’s An Expanding Universe

With the introduction of new characters, franchises and the opening of Disneyland. More and more families were introduced to the wonders of Disney. A time to be considered the golden years of Disney by many, we saw the creation of the Mickey Mouse Club, Disney’s first TV program Disneyland, and live-action film Treasure Island. With these Disney franchises expanding, we got to view many of Disney’s classics for the first time.

1) 2nd National Duck Bank

1950s-2nd national duck bank

Estimated Sales Price: $230.00 USD

2) Vintage Uncle Scrooge Holding a Bag of Money

1960s-scrooge-money-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $45.00 USD

3) Promotional  Nabisco Wheat Puffs Puppets

1960s-nabisco-puppets-mickey-wheat-puff-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $30.00 USD

1966-Nabisco-Puppets-Wheat-Puffs-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $25.00 USD

4) Enesco Donald Duck Head

1960s-Donald-Duck-Head-Ceramic-Bank-Enesco

Estimated Sales Price: $ 60.00 USD

1970’s – 1980’s The Arrival of Home Entertainment

A period where people were no longer limited to just watching Disney films at the cinemas. As Disney produced more and more TV series, they were able to tell more stories through direct to TV shorts and episodes, bringing in more and more fans.

1) Donald Duck With a Blue Hat and a Red Tie

1971-donald-duck-blue-shirt-red-tie

Estimated Sales Price: $30.00 USD

2) Waving Donald Duck

1970-waving-vintage-plastic-donald-duck-money-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $40.00 USD

3) Silver Plated Donald Duck

1970-donald-duck-silver-plated-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $95.00 USD

4) Brown Glass Mickey Mouse Club Piggy Bank

1970s-Vintage-Walt-Disney-Productions-Mickey-Mouse-Club-Glass

Estimated Sales Price: $15.00 USD

Filed Under: Antique Toy, DisneyTagged With: Antique Price Guide, Antique Toy Price, coin banks, Collectibles, disney banks, disneyana, Memorabilia, Piggy banks, Price Guide, toy bank, Vintage

Источник: https://www.antiques-prices.com/vintage-disney-piggy-banks-and-their-prices-1856

UPC 688955033276

upc 688955033276 image

Barcode for Disney Mickey Mouse Piggy Bank for Boys & Girls Kids Ceramic Coin Bank with Rubber Stopper

Tags:HomeFAB StarpointRed Black White

Department: Toys & Games > Novelty & Gag Toys > Money Banks

Marketplaces and prices shown matched UPC number 688955033276 during our search.

  • Image of sellers logo$24.99

    Updated: 04/21/2021 09:13:06 GMT - Details

  • scannable barcode image

Sellers

MarketplacePriceUpdated
$24.9904/21/2021 09:13:06 GMT - Details

Description

  • MICKEY MOUSE BANK The perfect size for keeping kids' savings safe, this Mickey Mouse piggy bank holds both coins and folded bills. Best of all, it's in the shape of the most beloved Disney character wearing his iconic red, white and yellow outfit.
  • CUTE KIDS' PIGGY BANK - Kids can put Mickey on their nightstands, dressers, or desks as a daily reminder to save their tooth fairy money and allowance. They can even use it to collect spending money for Disney vacation trips!
  • CERAMIC WITH RUBBER STOPPER Kids can easily take money out by removing the stopper at the bottom of the bank. It is made of durable, sturdy ceramic with a glossy finish and with non-slip protectors on the bottom. It is breakable, and is not a toy.
  • MAKES A GREAT MICKEY MOUSE GIFT Doubling as room d cor, this ceramic bank is as functional as it is cute! Give it to kids who love Mickey at birthday parties and on holidays, and expect huge smiles when they open it!

Attributes

AttributeValue
BrandFAB Starpoint
ColorRed, Black, White
EAN0688955033276
ManufacturerFAB Starpoint
UPC688955033276

Reviews

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Price Disclaimer

Product prices are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on amazon.com, amazonsupply.com, or myhabit.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

Источник: https://barcodeindex.com/upc/688955033276
Privacy

This Mickey Mickey mouse piggy bank Piggy Bank Reminds This Entrepreneur to Hustle Hard, Every Day

When I was nine years old, I overheard my parents arguing about the is kroger green tea good for you. They didn’t have the money to pay it. I had a Mickey Mouse piggy bank with $30 saved up, which was a lot of money to me, so I thought I had the solution and offered it mickey mouse piggy bank them. “Thank you; that’s sweet, but it won’t cut it,” they said, “and it’s not for you to worry about anyway.” I remember thinking, If that’s not enough, I can get more.

I grew up in Los Angeles’ Brentwood neighborhood in the early ’80s. Friends and I spent summers skateboarding all over. We also had a casual business operation: We’d wash neighborhood cars for $5 each, then immediately spend that money at McDonald’s. When I heard my parents arguing about rent, I set out to grow the operation.

Related: This 9-Year-Old Boy Became KIND's CFO for the Day and Learned an Amazing Lesson

I told my friends that if they helped me wash more cars, I’d buy an aboveground pool for the neighborhood. Whatever was left I’d save for rent. We went door to door offering our services, and every night I’d stuff my Mickey Mouse piggy bank with $5 bills. After a while, I had to buy another Mickey Mouse bank to accommodate the cash -- and then a third. Before long, I bought a $1,500 pool (which made me a complete rock star) and still had $1,500 left over.

I gave the remaining money to my parents, who thought Mickey mouse piggy bank stole it. When I told them about my business, they cried -- and did ultimately put it toward rent. From that moment on, I never stopped hustling. You can do a lot of good with money.

When I think back to that piggy bank -- or see any image of Mickey Mouse -- it reminds me of that hustle, and how important it is to incentivize a team. Our car-washing days were a success because my friends knew they would benefit directly from our work. Even today, that memory impacts how I work at Luxury Brand Partners. We develop and operate beauty brands, and our management team has equity in all our companies. When we recently sold our brand Oribe, that team benefited from the sale. It felt so good -- the same as when my friends and I bought that pool.

Related:

Copyright 2018 Entrepreneur.com Inc., All rights reserved

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This comenity bank century 21 credit card originally appeared on entrepreneur.com
Источник: https://www.ctpost.com/news/article/This-Mickey-Mouse-Piggy-Bank-Reminds-This-13466175.php

Vintage Disney Piggy Banks and Their Prices

The Walt Disney Studios have produced some of the most highly sort after memorabilia and collectibles of all time. There is one product that stands out most as having the largest impact and influence on the lives of so many. Over the years the humble piggy bank has not only taught many children around the world the skills needed for saving money. They also gave many of us a sense of pride every time we managed to save up enough money to buy that new toy or see how much money we were putting into our bank accounts.

Disney was able to capitalize not only on the parents who were wanting to help their children learn vital skills for the future. But also the child’s fascination and obsessions that comes with their favorite characters.



From Mickey Mouse and his friends, to Disney Princesses and beloved characters from all of their movies and shows. We are able to find piggy banks still being highly sort after, even today. This is not just limited to the older characters, styles and designs. As both adults and children alike, happily take ownership of the news release based off of their favorite characters and movies.

Here are a few examples of Mickey Mouse and friends themed piggy banks that enthusiast and collectors are seeking out these days.

1930’s – 1940’s Classic Disney Characters

While Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck are some of the more well known classic Disney characters. There are many, more lesser known characters such as Elmer the timid elephant. These smaller lesser known characters mickey mouse piggy bank their own cult following today, as they usually displayed a character trait that many children could relate to, such as being the target of bullies. Mickey and Donald still remain the easier charters to find due to their popularity and production volumes.

1) Drum Playing Elmer With Movable Trunk

1930s-elmer-money-bank



Estimated Sales Price: $60.00 USD

2) Vintage Ceramic Donald Duck Holding a Coin

1930s-Vintage-Ceramic-Donald-Duck-Holding-Coin-Bank

Estimated Sales Price: $75.00 USD

3) Mickey Mouse Tin Lithograph Beehive

1930-mickey-mouse-beehive-money-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $175.00 USD

4) Mickey and Minnie Treasure Chest

1930s-mickey-and-minnie-mouse-digging-treasure-chest

Estimated Sales Price: $230.00 USD

5) Bobble Head Donald Duck

1930s-donald-duck-booble-head-money-banks

Estimated Sales Price: $140.00 USD

1950’s – 1960’s An Expanding Universe

With the introduction of new characters, franchises and the opening of Disneyland. More and more families were introduced to the wonders of Disney. A time to be considered the golden years of Disney by many, we saw the creation of the Mickey Mouse Club, Disney’s first TV program Disneyland, and live-action film Treasure Island. With these Disney franchises expanding, we got to view many of Disney’s classics for the first time.

1) 2nd National Duck Bank

1950s-2nd national duck bank

Estimated Sales Price: $230.00 USD

2) Vintage Uncle Scrooge Holding a Bag of Money

1960s-scrooge-money-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $45.00 USD

3) Promotional  Nabisco Wheat Puffs Puppets

1960s-nabisco-puppets-mickey-wheat-puff-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $30.00 USD

1966-Nabisco-Puppets-Wheat-Puffs-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $25.00 USD

4) Enesco Donald Duck Head

1960s-Donald-Duck-Head-Ceramic-Bank-Enesco

Estimated Sales Price: $ 60.00 USD

1970’s – 1980’s The Arrival of Home Entertainment

A period where people were no longer limited to just watching Disney films at the cinemas. As Disney produced more and more TV series, they were able to tell more stories through direct to TV shorts and episodes, bringing in more and more fans.

1) Donald Duck With a Blue Hat and a Red Tie

1971-donald-duck-blue-shirt-red-tie

Estimated Sales Price: $30.00 USD

2) Waving Donald Duck

1970-waving-vintage-plastic-donald-duck-money-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $40.00 USD

3) Silver Plated Donald Duck

1970-donald-duck-silver-plated-bank

Estimated Sales Price: $95.00 USD

4) Brown Glass Mickey Mouse Club Piggy Bank

1970s-Vintage-Walt-Disney-Productions-Mickey-Mouse-Club-Glass

Estimated Sales Price: $15.00 USD

Filed Under: Antique Toy, DisneyTagged With: Antique Price Guide, Antique Toy Price, coin banks, Collectibles, disney banks, disneyana, Memorabilia, Piggy banks, Price Guide, toy bank, Vintage

Источник: https://www.antiques-prices.com/vintage-disney-piggy-banks-and-their-prices-1856

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  • Rudy Giuliani under the microscope 4.29.21( )

  • Foot in the mouth 4.28.21( )

  • The man behind the mask 4.27.21( )

  • Equity isn’t always equal(ity) 4.26.21( )

  • License to abuse  4.25.21( )

  • Weather happens  4.24.21( )

  • State of emergencies  4.18.21( )

  • Merit, schmerit 4.23.21( )

  • Silenced by color 4.22.21( )

  • Pouring gasoline on the fire 4.21.21( )

  • One last roadblock 4.20.21( )

  • Two-headed monster 4.19.21( )

  • Harris a puppeteer for Biden China policy 4.16.21( )

  • From Bernie to BLM 4.14.21( )

  • Biden’s infrastructure plan like putting lipstick on a pig 4.13.21( )

  • Ready to ignite 4.12.21( )

  • Weighty decision  4.11.21( )

  • Senseless acts 4.9.21( )

  • It’s starting to show 4.7.21( )

  • Democratic denial 4.6.21( )

  • MLB buys into ‚woke‘ propaganda 4.5.21( )

  • Easter in Minnesota  4.4.21( )

  • Mad about taxes 4.2.21( )

  • Pumping up his rep mickey mouse piggy bank in the details 3.31.21( )

  • Election reform stake 3.30.21( )

  • Mixed messages 3.29.21( )

  • Unlimited supply  3.28.21( )

  • Any Democrat who’s handy  3.27.21( )

  • Running on empty 3.25.21( )

  • Second Amendment under fire 3.24.21( )

  • Off with their heads! 3.23.21( )

  • Rolling out the red carpet. 3.22.21( )

  • No police allowed 3.21.21( )

  • Ultimate slap in the face 3.19.21( )

  • Biden’s Border Crisis 3.18.2021( )

  • The blame game 3.16.21( )

  • Obedience training 3.16.21( )

  • Inside Biden’s mind 3.15.21( )

  • Dangerous waters 3.14.21( )

  • Just read the prompter 3.13.21( )

  • Cagey president? 3.12.21( )

  • Have you seen my dogs? 3.11.21( )

  • Royal robbery 3.10.21( )

  • Playing Biden like a violin 3.9.21( )

  • Return to open borders 3.8.21( )

  • AlphaNewsMN.com Cartoon, March 7, 2021( )

  • The Gipper speaks 3.6.21( )

  • A Cancel lineup 3.5.21( )

  • Rush Limbaugh at the Pearly gates( )

  • Biden’s migrant blood on hands( )

  •  The real Andrew Cuomo? 3/3/2021( )

  • Mr Potato Head goes gender-neutral 3.2.21( )

  • Fauci moves the goalposts yet again 3.1.21( )

  • First things first  2.28.21( )

  • Shot in the dark?  2.27.21( )

  • Going to the piggy bank 2.26.21( )

  • Free speech under fire  2.25.21( )

  • Mixed media message 2.24.21( )

  • The man behind the curtain 2.23.21( )

  • Who’s running the White House 2.22.21( )

  • Licenses for all 2.21.21( )

  • Biden checks the boxes 2.20.21( )

  • Trump gone, but not forgotten 2.19.21( )

  • Passing the torch of truth and liberty 2.18.21( )

  • Another swing and a miss! 2.16.21( )

  • Mickey Mouse fights freedom of speech 2.15.21 ( )

  • Dem governor’s priorities 2.14.21( )

  • Cuomo wins again 2.13.21( )

  • Where is the media’s attention? 2.11.21( )

  • Dems going „where no one has gone before“ 2.10.21 ( )

  • Left’s unhealthy addiction to Trump Feb 09, 2021( )

  • Nowhere to hide  6.13.21( )

  • Источник: https://www.freethewords.com/2021/11/27/political-cartoon-of-the-day-equity-justice/

    Mickey Mouse Bank Toys


    Mickey Mouse Coin Bank

    Mickey Mouse Pride Lines Bank

    Mickey Mouse Pride Lines Bank

    One of the most popular Mickey Mouse coin banks to collect is this one from Pride Lines and made in the 1980s.

    This is a cast iron, mechanical bank. As shown it originally comes in a wooden box. The key to open the bank is in the shape of Minnie Mouse.

    We have seen this one sell for $125.




    Applause Mickey Mouse Bank

    This Wonderful bank by Applause mickey mouse piggy bank Mickey Mouse cross-legged while sitting. The bank is approximately nine inches tall. The bank depicts Mickey with his hand holding his chin. His eyes are looking skyward waiting for the next coin to drop.

    Value and Pricing: We have seen this Applause made Mickey Mouse bank with a few scrapes but otherwise in good condition sell for $26.

    More Applause Mickey toys can be found on t mobile free phones online Mickey Mouse Applause page.




    Mickey Mouse Bank Robber

    Is Mickey Mouse helping Pete break open a bank vault to steal all the money?

    We think it is more likely Mickey is sneaking over the top to capture Pete in the act.

    We saw bmo harris auto loan sign in colorful vintage bank and it is really interesting and fun.

    Value and Pricing: The bank we saw was in excellent condition and sold for $40.




    Ceramic Mickey Mouse Bank

    Mickey Mouse Ceramic Bank

    This Mickey Mouse bank is made from ceramic. It is about eight and one-half inches tall and six inches wide. It features Mickey in a sitting position with his legs crossed.




    Vintage Mickey Mouse Bank

    Vintage Mickey Mouse Bank

    Here is a vintage Mickey Mouse bank that is about eleven inches tall.




    Cast Iron Mickey Mouse Mickey mouse piggy bank src="https://mickeymousecollectibles.com/graphics/bank-metal.jpg" alt="Metal Cast Iron Mickey Mouse Bank">

    This metal bank is made of cast iron and dates from the 1930s - 1940s.




    Glass Mickey Mouse Bank

    (see a larger picture here)

    This mickey mouse piggy bank piggy bank is in the shape of Mickey Mouse. So maybe we should call it a Mickey Bank!

    (see a larger picture here)

    Made in the late 1950s to early 1960s these banks are stamped Mickey Mouse Club on the back.

    (see a larger picture here)

    On the bottom is stamped Walt Disney Productions.

    The color of the glass most commonly seen is often referred to as brown or amber. The size is about seven inches high.

    (see a larger picture here)

    There is also a cobalt blue version of the glass bank. This one is rarer than the brown or amber glass bank.

    Value and Pricing: These Mickey Mouse glass banks often sell for less than ten dollars - although sometimes the blue version is a little more. However, as they are glass extra care in shipping is often required. Between the product price and shipping a combined investment of less than twenty dollars is a good deal.

    If you are wondering - how do you get your money out of a glass piggy bank? You don't, at least not without breaking it. For that reason it is a bit surprising that these Disney bank collectibles can still be found for such an inexpensive price.




    Mickey Mouse Tokyo Disneyland Bank

    (see a larger picture here)

    This happy Mickey Mouse bank was sold at Tokyo Disneyland.

    Mickey has a large nose that almost seems to hide his eyes when looked at from straight on. The bank is of Mickey's head / bust, and he is wearing a yellow bowtie.

    (see a larger picture here)

    On the bottom of the ceramic bank it refers to Tokyo Disneyland.

    Not large, this porcelain piece is about four and three-quarter inches (twelve centimeters) tall.







    Related search term: banks





     
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    © Copyright 2010-2021 MickeyMouseCollectibles.com All Rights Reserved.

    Contact

    This story appears in the December 2018 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » You're reading Entrepreneur United States, an international franchise of Entrepreneur Media.

    When I was nine years old, I overheard my parents arguing about the rent. They didn’t have the money to pay it. I had a Mickey Mouse piggy bank with $30 saved up, which was a lot of money to me, so I thought I had the solution and offered it to them. “Thank you; that’s sweet, but it won’t cut it,” they said, “and it’s not for you to worry about anyway.” I remember thinking, If that’s not enough, I can get more.

    David Rinella

    I grew up in Los Angeles’ Brentwood neighborhood in the early ’80s. Friends and I spent summers skateboarding all over. We also had a casual business operation: We’d wash neighborhood cars for $5 each, then immediately spend that money at McDonald’s. When I heard my parents arguing about rent, I set out to grow the operation. 

    Источник: https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/322967

    : Mickey mouse piggy bank

    Mickey mouse piggy bank
    HOW MUCH MONEY SHOULD I SAVE TO MOVE TO CALIFORNIA
    2 bedroom apartments downtown san jose
    Mickey mouse piggy bank
    TKTX NUMBING CREAM FOR WAXING

    Mickey mouse piggy bank -

    UPC 688955033276

    upc 688955033276 image

    Barcode for Disney Mickey Mouse Piggy Bank for Boys & Girls Kids Ceramic Coin Bank with Rubber Stopper

    Tags:HomeFAB StarpointRed Black White

    Department: Toys & Games > Novelty & Gag Toys > Money Banks

    Marketplaces and prices shown matched UPC number 688955033276 during our search.

    • Image of sellers logo$24.99

      Updated: 04/21/2021 09:13:06 GMT - Details

    • scannable barcode image

    Sellers

    MarketplacePriceUpdated
    $24.9904/21/2021 09:13:06 GMT - Details

    Description

    • MICKEY MOUSE BANK The perfect size for keeping kids' savings safe, this Mickey Mouse piggy bank holds both coins and folded bills. Best of all, it's in the shape of the most beloved Disney character wearing his iconic red, white and yellow outfit.
    • CUTE KIDS' PIGGY BANK - Kids can put Mickey on their nightstands, dressers, or desks as a daily reminder to save their tooth fairy money and allowance. They can even use it to collect spending money for Disney vacation trips!
    • CERAMIC WITH RUBBER STOPPER Kids can easily take money out by removing the stopper at the bottom of the bank. It is made of durable, sturdy ceramic with a glossy finish and with non-slip protectors on the bottom. It is breakable, and is not a toy.
    • MAKES A GREAT MICKEY MOUSE GIFT Doubling as room d cor, this ceramic bank is as functional as it is cute! Give it to kids who love Mickey at birthday parties and on holidays, and expect huge smiles when they open it!

    Attributes

    AttributeValue
    BrandFAB Starpoint
    ColorRed, Black, White
    EAN0688955033276
    ManufacturerFAB Starpoint
    UPC688955033276

    Reviews

    • Be the first to write a review.

    Price Disclaimer

    Product prices are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on amazon.com, amazonsupply.com, or myhabit.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product.

    Источник: https://barcodeindex.com/upc/688955033276

    Mickey Mouse Bank Toys


    Mickey Mouse Coin Bank

    Mickey Mouse Pride Lines Bank

    Mickey Mouse Pride Lines Bank

    One of the most popular Mickey Mouse coin banks to collect is this one from Pride Lines and made in the 1980s.

    This is a cast iron, mechanical bank. As shown it originally comes in a wooden box. The key to open the bank is in the shape of Minnie Mouse.

    We have seen this one sell for $125.




    Applause Mickey Mouse Bank

    This Wonderful bank by Applause show Mickey Mouse cross-legged while sitting. The bank is approximately nine inches tall. The bank depicts Mickey with his hand holding his chin. His eyes are looking skyward waiting for the next coin to drop.

    Value and Pricing: We have seen this Applause made Mickey Mouse bank with a few scrapes but otherwise in good condition sell for $26.

    More Applause Mickey toys can be found on our Mickey Mouse Applause page.




    Mickey Mouse Bank Robber

    Is Mickey Mouse helping Pete break open a bank vault to steal all the money?

    We think it is more likely Mickey is sneaking over the top to capture Pete in the act.

    We saw this colorful vintage bank and it is really interesting and fun.

    Value and Pricing: The bank we saw was in excellent condition and sold for $40.




    Ceramic Mickey Mouse Bank

    Mickey Mouse Ceramic Bank

    This Mickey Mouse bank is made from ceramic. It is about eight and one-half inches tall and six inches wide. It features Mickey in a sitting position with his legs crossed.




    Vintage Mickey Mouse Bank

    Vintage Mickey Mouse Bank

    Here is a vintage Mickey Mouse bank that is about eleven inches tall.




    Cast Iron Mickey Mouse Bank

    Metal Cast Iron Mickey Mouse Bank

    This metal bank is made of cast iron and dates from the 1930s - 1940s.




    Glass Mickey Mouse Bank

    (see a larger picture here)

    This glass piggy bank is in the shape of Mickey Mouse. So maybe we should call it a Mickey Bank!

    (see a larger picture here)

    Made in the late 1950s to early 1960s these banks are stamped Mickey Mouse Club on the back.

    (see a larger picture here)

    On the bottom is stamped Walt Disney Productions.

    The color of the glass most commonly seen is often referred to as brown or amber. The size is about seven inches high.

    (see a larger picture here)

    There is also a cobalt blue version of the glass bank. This one is rarer than the brown or amber glass bank.

    Value and Pricing: These Mickey Mouse glass banks often sell for less than ten dollars - although sometimes the blue version is a little more. However, as they are glass extra care in shipping is often required. Between the product price and shipping a combined investment of less than twenty dollars is a good deal.

    If you are wondering - how do you get your money out of a glass piggy bank? You don't, at least not without breaking it. For that reason it is a bit surprising that these Disney bank collectibles can still be found for such an inexpensive price.




    Mickey Mouse Tokyo Disneyland Bank

    (see a larger picture here)

    This happy Mickey Mouse bank was sold at Tokyo Disneyland.

    Mickey has a large nose that almost seems to hide his eyes when looked at from straight on. The bank is of Mickey's head / bust, and he is wearing a yellow bowtie.

    (see a larger picture here)

    On the bottom of the ceramic bank it refers to Tokyo Disneyland.

    Not large, this porcelain piece is about four and three-quarter inches (twelve centimeters) tall.







    Related search term: banks





     
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    © Copyright 2010-2021 MickeyMouseCollectibles.com All Rights Reserved.

    Contact

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    Vintage 1960's Mickey Mouse Glass Piggy Bank at PristineAuction.com
    Vintage 1960's Mickey Mouse Glass Piggy Bank at PristineAuction.com
    Vintage 1960's Mickey Mouse Glass Piggy Bank at PristineAuction.com

    Vintage 1960's Mickey Mouse Glass piggy bank. Please see photos for more information.

    Due to the uniqueness of each item, please refer to the photos provided in this auction. We offer high resolution images of each item rather than a written description of condition.

    This item is being shipped from the Pristine Auction warehouse.

    A 17% buyer's premium will be added to the total at the checkout process.

    By placing a bid, you agree to abide by all Pristine Auction policies.

    Источник: https://www.pristineauction.com/a3145382-Vintage-1960s-Mickey-Mouse-Glass-Piggy-Bank

    This Mickey Mouse Piggy Bank Reminds This Entrepreneur to Hustle Hard, Every Day

    When I was nine years old, I overheard my parents arguing about the rent. They didn’t have the money to pay it. I had a Mickey Mouse piggy bank with $30 saved up, which was a lot of money to me, so I thought I had the solution and offered it to them. “Thank you; that’s sweet, but it won’t cut it,” they said, “and it’s not for you to worry about anyway.” I remember thinking, If that’s not enough, I can get more.

    I grew up in Los Angeles’ Brentwood neighborhood in the early ’80s. Friends and I spent summers skateboarding all over. We also had a casual business operation: We’d wash neighborhood cars for $5 each, then immediately spend that money at McDonald’s. When I heard my parents arguing about rent, I set out to grow the operation.

    Related: This 9-Year-Old Boy Became KIND's CFO for the Day and Learned an Amazing Lesson

    I told my friends that if they helped me wash more cars, I’d buy an aboveground pool for the neighborhood. Whatever was left I’d save for rent. We went door to door offering our services, and every night I’d stuff my Mickey Mouse piggy bank with $5 bills. After a while, I had to buy another Mickey Mouse bank to accommodate the cash -- and then a third. Before long, I bought a $1,500 pool (which made me a complete rock star) and still had $1,500 left over.

    I gave the remaining money to my parents, who thought I stole it. When I told them about my business, they cried -- and did ultimately put it toward rent. From that moment on, I never stopped hustling. You can do a lot of good with money.

    When I think back to that piggy bank -- or see any image of Mickey Mouse -- it reminds me of that hustle, and how important it is to incentivize a team. Our car-washing days were a success because my friends knew they would benefit directly from our work. Even today, that memory impacts how I work at Luxury Brand Partners. We develop and operate beauty brands, and our management team has equity in all our companies. When we recently sold our brand Oribe, that team benefited from the sale. It felt so good -- the same as when my friends and I bought that pool.

    Related:

    Copyright 2018 Entrepreneur.com Inc., All rights reserved

    More News



    This article originally appeared on entrepreneur.com
    Источник: https://www.ctpost.com/news/article/This-Mickey-Mouse-Piggy-Bank-Reminds-This-13466175.php

    Daffy Duck

    Warner Bros. theatrical cartoon character

    "Daffy" redirects here. For other uses, see Daffy (disambiguation).

    Daffy Duck
    Daffy Duck.svg
    First appearancePorky's Duck Hunt (1937)
    Created by
    Voiced by
    • Mel Blanc (1937–1989)
    • Jeff Bergman (1989–1993, 1997, 2002, 2004, 2007, 2011–2018)
    • Joe Alaskey (1990–2011, 2014)
    • Greg Burson (1990, 1992–1998)
    • Maurice LaMarche (1991)
    • Frank Gorshin (1996)
    • Dee Bradley Baker (1996, 2008, 2016–2020)
    • Billy West (1999)
    • Sam Vincent (2001–2006)
    • Jeff Bennett (2003–2004, 2006)
    • Eric Bauza (2018–present)
    • (see below)
    Developed by
    AliasDuck Dodgers
    SpeciesAmerican black duck
    GenderMale
    FamilyNone specified
    Significant other
    NationalityAmerican

    Daffy Duck is an animated cartooncharacter created by Warner Bros. Styled as an anthropomorphicblack duck, he has appeared in cartoon series such as Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies, in which he is usually depicted as a foil for Bugs Bunny.[1] He was one of the first of the new "screwball" characters that emerged in the late 1930s to replace traditional everyman characters who were more popular earlier during the decade, such as Mickey Mouse and Popeye.

    Daffy starred in 130 shorts in the golden age, making him the third-most frequent character in the Looney Tunes/Merrie Melodies cartoons, behind Bugs Bunny's 167 appearances and Porky Pig's 153 appearances. Virtually every Warner Bros. cartoon director put his own spin on the Daffy Duck character. Directors such as Bob Clampett, Robert McKimson, and Chuck Jones are notable examples of the character.

    He was ranked number 14 on TV Guide's list of top 50 greatest cartoon characters.[2][3]

    History

    Origin

    Daffy first appeared in Porky's Duck Hunt, released on April 17, 1937.[4] The cartoon was directed by Tex Avery and animated by Bob Clampett. Porky's Duck Hunt is a standard hunter/prey pairing, but Daffy (barely more than an unnamed bit player in this short) was something new to moviegoers: an assertive, completely unrestrained, combative protagonist. Clampett later recalled:

    "At that time, audiences weren't accustomed to seeing a cartoon character do these things. And so, when it hit the theaters it was an explosion. People would leave the theaters talking about this daffy duck."[5]

    This early Daffy is less anthropomorphic and resembles a normal black duck. In fact, the only aspects of the character that have remained consistent through the years are his voice characterization by Mel Blanc; and his black feathers with a white neck ring. Blanc's characterization of Daffy once held the world record for the longest characterization of one animated character by their original actor: 52 years.

    The origin of Daffy's voice, with its lateral lisp, is a matter of some debate. One often-repeated "official" story is that it was modeled after producer Leon Schlesinger's tendency to lisp. However, in Mel Blanc's autobiography, That's Not All Folks!, he contradicts that conventional belief, writing, "It seemed to me that such an extended mandible would hinder his speech, particularly on words containing an s sound. Thus 'despicable' became 'desth-picable.'"

    Daffy's slobbery, exaggerated lisp was developed over time, and it is barely noticeable in the early cartoons. In Daffy Duck & Egghead, Daffy does not lisp at all except in the separately drawn set-piece of Daffy singing "The Merry-Go-Round Broke Down" in which just a slight lisp can be heard.

    In The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950), Daffy has a middle name, Dumas as the writer of a swashbuckling script, a nod to Alexandre Dumas. Also, in the Baby Looney Tunes episode "The Tattletale", Granny addresses Daffy as "Daffy Horatio Tiberius Duck". In The Looney Tunes Show (2011), the joke middle names "Armando" and "Sheldon" are used.

    Golden Age Years

    Daffy's early years, 1937–1940

    Tex Avery and Bob Clampett created the original version of Daffy in 1937. Daffy established his status by jumping into the water, hopping around, and yelling, "Woo-hoo!" Animator Bob Clampett immediately seized upon the Daffy Duck character and cast him in a series of cartoons in the 1930s and 1940s. The early Daffy is a wild and zany screwball, perpetually bouncing around the screen with cries of "Hoo-hoo! Hoo-hoo!" (In his autobiography, Mel Blanc stated that the zany demeanor was inspired by Hugh Herbert's catchphrase, which was taken to a wild extreme for Daffy.)

    World War II Daffy, 1941–45

    600 Bomb Squadron emblem Daffy Duck.

    Daffy would also feature in several war-themed shorts during World War II, remaining true to his unbridled nature. He battles a Nazi goat intent on eating Daffy's scrap metal in Scrap Happy Daffy (1943), hits Adolf Hitler's head with a giant mallet in Daffy the Commando (1943) and outwits Hitler, Goebbels and Goering in Plane Daffy (1944). Oddly enough, it was only after these wartime escapades that Daffy is actually subject to conscription into military service, in the form of "the little man from the draft board", whom he tries to dodge in Draftee Daffy (1945). In the real world, Daffy was indeed "drafted" as a mascot for the 600th Bombardment Squadron.[citation needed]

    Evolving "Earlier" Daffy 1946–1952

    For Daffy Doodles (his first Looney Tunes cartoon as a director), Robert McKimson tamed Daffy a bit, redesigning him yet again to be rounder and less elastic. The studio also instilled some of Bugs Bunny's savvy into the duck, making him as brilliant with his mouth as he was with his battiness. Daffy was teamed up with Porky Pig; the duck's one-time rival became his straight man. Arthur Davis, who directed Warner Bros. cartoon shorts for a few years in the late 1940s until upper management decreed there should be only three units (McKimson, Friz Freleng, and Jones), presented a Daffy similar to McKimson's. McKimson is noted as the last of the three units to make his Daffy uniform with Jones', with even late shorts, such as Don't Axe Me (1958), featuring traits of the "screwball" Daffy. Starting in You Were Never Duckier, Daffy's personality evolved to be from being less loony and more greedy.

    Experimenting with Daffy 1953–1964

    While Daffy's looney days were over, McKimson continued to make him as bad or good as his various roles required him to be. McKimson would use this Daffy from 1946 to 1961. Although, even McKimson would follow in Jones' footsteps in many aspects with cartoons like People Are Bunny (1959) and Ducking the Devil (1957). Friz Freleng's version took a hint from Chuck Jones to make the duck more sympathetic, as in the 1957 Show Biz Bugs. Here, Daffy is overemotional and jealous of Bugs, yet he has real talent that is ignored by the theater manager and the crowd. This cartoon finishes with a sequence in which Daffy attempts to wow the Bugs-besotted audience with an act in which he drinks gasoline and swallows nitroglycerine, gunpowder, and uranium-238 (in a greenish solution), jumps up and down to "shake well" and finally swallows a lit match that detonates the whole improbable mixture. When Bugs tells Daffy that the audience loves the act and wants more, Daffy, now a ghost floating upward (presumably to Heaven), says that he can only do the act once. Some TV stations, and in the 1990s the cable network TNT, edited out the dangerous act, afraid of imitation by young children.

    Pairing of Daffy and Porky in parodies of popular movies, 1951–1965

    While Bugs Bunny became Warner Bros.' most popular character, the directors still found ample use for Daffy. Several cartoons place him in parodies of popular movies and radio serials; Porky Pig was usually a comic relief sidekick. For example, Daffy in The Great Piggy Bank Robbery (1946) as "Duck Twacy" (Dick Tracy) by Bob Clampett; in The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950), Daffy was the hero and Porky Pig was the villain. In Drip-Along Daffy (1951), named after the Hopalong Cassidy character, throws Daffy into a Western with him labeled "Western-Type Hero" and Porky Pig labeled "Comedy Relief". In Duck Dodgers in the 24½th Century (1953), a parody of Buck Rogers, Daffy trades barbs (and bullets) with Marvin the Martian, with Porky Pig retaining the role of Daffy's sidekick. In Rocket Squad (1956), a parody of Dragnet and Racket Squad, Daffy and Porky Pig pair up once again. Daffy also played Stupor Duck, a parody of the Adventures of Superman television series. Robin Hood Daffy (1958) casts the duck in the role of the legendary outlaw Robin Hood with Porky Pig as Friar Tuck. Besides being playing parodies, Daffy also played a salesman-who continually annoys a potential customer into buying something: in Fool Coverage, Daffy actually succeeds into selling Porky Pig a $1,000,000 accident policy which only works under impossible conditions-unfortunately for Daffy, all the conditions occur!

    Pairing of Bugs and Daffy, 1951–1964

    Bugs' ascension to stardom also prompted the Warner Bros. animators to recast Daffy as the rabbit's rival, intensely jealous, insecure and determined to steal back the spotlight, while Bugs either remained cool headed but mildly amused and/or indifferent to the duck's jealousy and/or used it to his advantage. Daffy's desire to achieve stardom at almost any cost was explored as early as 1940 in Freleng's You Ought to Be in Pictures, but the idea was most successfully used by Chuck Jones, who redesigned the duck once again, making him scrawnier and scruffier. In Jones' "Hunting Trilogy" (or "Duck Season/Rabbit Season Trilogy") of Rabbit Fire, Rabbit Seasoning and Duck! Rabbit, Duck! (each respectively launched in 1951, 1952, and 1953), Daffy's attention-grabbing ways and excitability provide Bugs Bunny the perfect opportunity to fool the hapless Elmer Fudd into repeatedly shooting the duck's bill off. Also, these cartoons reveal Daffy's catchphrase, "Youuu're deththpicable!" Jones' Daffy sees himself as self-preservationist, not selfish. However, this Daffy can do nothing that does not backfire on him, more likely to singe his tail feathers as well as his ego and pride than anything.[6] It is thought that Chuck Jones based Daffy Duck's new personality on his fellow animator Bob Clampett, who, like Daffy, was known as a loud self-promoter. In Beanstalk Bunny Daffy, Bugs and Elmer are once again teamed up in a parody of Jack and the Beanstalk (with Elmer as the giant); in A Star Is Bored Daffy tries to upstage Bugs Bunny; while in the spoofs of the TV shows The Millionaire and This Is Your Life, The Million Hare Daffy tries to defeat his arch-rival Bugs Bunny for a $1,000,000.00 prize given out by his favorite TV show and This Is a Life? Daffy tries to upstage Bugs Bunny in order to be the guest of honor on the show; in all four of these cartoons Daffy ends up a loser because of his own overemotional personality (which impairs Daffy's common sense and reasoning ability) and his craving for attention.

    Solo Daffy

    Film critic Steve Schneider calls Jones' version of Daffy "a kind of unleashed id."[7] Jones said that his version of the character "expresses all of the things we're afraid to express."[7] This is evident in Jones' Duck Amuck (1953), "one of the few unarguable masterpieces of American animation" according to Schneider.[8] In the episode, Daffy is plagued by a godlike animator whose malicious paintbrush alters the setting, soundtrack, and even Daffy. When Daffy demands to know who is responsible for the changes, the camera pulls back to reveal none other than Bugs Bunny. Duck Amuck is widely heralded as a classic of filmmaking for its illustration that a character's personality can be recognized independently of appearance, setting, voice, and plot.[8] In 1999, the short was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry.

    Daffy's pairing with Speedy in 1965–68

    When the Warner Bros. animation studio briefly outsourced cartoon production to DePatie-Freleng Enterprises (DFE) in the 1960s, Daffy Duck became an antagonist in several cartoons opposite Speedy Gonzales, who refers to Daffy as "the loco duck." In Well Worn Daffy (1965), Daffy is determined to keep the mice away from a desperately needed well seemingly for no other motive than pure maliciousness. Furthermore, when he draws all the water he wants, Daffy then attempts to destroy the well in spite of the vicious pointlessness of the act, forcing Speedy to stop him. The Warner Bros. studio was entering its twilight years, and even Daffy had to stretch for humor in the period. In many of the later DFE cartoons, such as Feather Finger and Daffy's Diner, Daffy is portrayed as a more sympathetic character (often forced to turn against Speedy at the behest of a common enemy) rather than the full-blown villain he is in cartoons like Well Worn Daffy and Assault and Peppered. The last cartoon featuring Daffy and Speedy is See Ya Later Gladiator, in what animation fans call the worst cartoon made by Warner Bros.[9]

    The Daffy Duck Show

    In light of the longstanding popularity of The Bugs Bunny Show and its various incarnations on CBS and ABC, NBC commissioned their own half-hour series, The Daffy Duck Show, which began airing in the fall of 1978. While some well-known titles were included in the program, most of the cartoons featured on the series were from the late '60s Depatie-Freleng run.[10] The program ran on NBC for two years, then in 1981 was rechristened The Daffy/Speedy Show and ran for another two years.[11] Eventually, NBC cancelled the series, and many of the cartoons were reintegrated into the lineups for the respective CBS and ABC Bugs Bunny shows.

    More recent years

    Daffy appeared in later cartoons. He was one of many Looney Tunes characters licensed by Warner Bros. to appear in the 1988Disney/Amblin film Who Framed Roger Rabbit. In the film, Daffy (utilizing his original, wacky characterization) shares a scene with his Disney counterpart Donald Duck whilst performing in a piano duel. In 1987, to celebrate Daffy's 50th anniversary, Warner Bros. released "The Duxorcist" as its first theatrical Looney Tunes short in two decades. Daffy Duck also appeared in several feature-film compilations, including two films centering on Daffy. The first was released in 1983, Daffy Duck's Fantastic Island; the second came in 1988, Daffy Duck's Quackbusters, which is considered one of the Looney Tunes' best compilation films and featured another new theatrical short, "The Night of the Living Duck". Daffy has also had major roles in films such as Space Jam in 1996 and Looney Tunes: Back in Action in 2003. The latter film does much to flesh out his character, even going so far as to cast a sympathetic light on Daffy's glory-seeking ways in one scene, where he complains that he works tirelessly without achieving what Bugs does without even trying. That same year, Warner Bros. cast him in a brand-new Duck Dodgers series. (It should be stressed that in this show, Duck Dodgers actually is Daffy Duck due to him being frozen in suspended animation in some unknown incident.) He had a cameo appearance in The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries episode "When Granny Ruled the Earth", first airing on March 27, 1999. Daffy has also been featured in several webtoons, which can be viewed online.

    Daffy has also made appearances on numerous television series. In Tiny Toon Adventures, Daffy is a teacher at Acme Looniversity, where he is the hero and mentor of student Plucky Duck. He is shown as a baby in Baby Looney Tunes and appears to have a similar personality to some of his earlier years with him being a rival of Bugs and saying Woo-hoo! a lot. show and made occasional cameo appearances on Animaniacs and Histeria!. In Loonatics Unleashed, his descendant is Danger Duck (voiced by Jason Marsden), who is also lame and unpopular to his teammates. A majority of these appearances try to emulate Chuck Jones of the characters.

    Daffy has also been given larger roles in more recent Looney Tunes films and series. Following Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Warner Bros. has slowly moved the spotlight away from Bugs and more towards Daffy, as shown in the 2006 direct-to-video movie Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas, where Daffy plays the lead, while Bugs appears in a minor supporting role.

    However, more recent merchandise of the duck, as well as that featured on the official website, have been shown to incorporate elements of the zanier, more light-hearted Daffy of the 1930s and 1940s. Producer Larry Doyle noted that recent theatrical cartoons were planned that would portray a more diverse Daffy closer to that of Robert McKimson's design; however, due to the box office bomb of Looney Tunes: Back in Action, these new films ceased production.[12]

    Daffy returned to Cartoon Network in The Looney Tunes Show, voiced by Jeff Bergman.[citation needed] His characterization here seems to incorporate some elements of Clampett's and Jones' designs while giving him an overall cheery if dimwitted personality. In the show, he has moved out of the forest and shares Bugs' house with him. Unlike Bugs and their neighbors, Daffy has no way of earning money and relies on Bugs for food and shelter. He tried on numerous occasions to get rich quick, but ended up failing repeatedly. Daffy's one possession he is proud of is his paper-mache parade float, constructed on top of a flatbed truck, which is his main means of transportation. While Daffy's greed and jealousy of Bugs remains, he appears to be less antagonistic in this show, as Bugs even tells Daffy in spite of his faults, he is Bugs' best friend and vice versa. Daffy serves as a sort of mentor to Gossamer. Daffy has difficulty telling fiction from reality; he often confuses television shows for his own life, believes Bugs is Superman, and at one point hallucinates he is a wizard.

    Daffy starred in the 3-D short Daffy's Rhapsody with Elmer Fudd that was originally set to premiere before Happy Feet Two but instead debuted prior to Journey 2: The Mysterious Island. The short features Daffy and Elmer in the first CG or 3-D depiction of these specific Looney Tunes characters. According to Matthew O’Callaghan, who directed the short, the audio comes from a 1950s recording for a children's album.[13] Daffy is performing in a hunting musical, when Elmer, who is in the audience, pursues him. Daffy is initially unaware of the danger, but quickly realizes the threat Elmer poses and outwits him by using the props against him.

    Daffy appeared in the 2015 DTV movie Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run.

    Daffy appears in the Cartoon Network series New Looney Tunes where he is voiced by Dee Bradley Baker. Daffy is often paired with Porky where Daffy will annoy and bedevil the pig, though occasionally Porky one ups Daffy.

    Daffy appears in Looney Tunes Cartoons, where he is voiced by Eric Bauza.

    Daffy will appear in the preschool series Bugs Bunny Builders which will air on Cartoon Network's Cartoonito block and HBO Max.[14]

    Comics

    Dell Comics published several Daffy Duck comic books, beginning in Four Color Comics #457, #536, and #615 and then continuing as Daffy #4-17 (1956–59), then as Daffy Duck #18-30 (1959–62). The comic book series was subsequently continued in Gold Key ComicsDaffy Duck #31-127 (1962–79). This run was in turn continued under the Whitman Comics imprint until the company completely ceased comic book publication in 1984. In 1994, corporate cousin DC Comics became the publisher for comics featuring all the classic Warner Bros. cartoon characters, and while not getting his own title, Daffy has appeared in many issues of Looney Tunes.

    Voice actors

    • Mel Blanc (1937–1989, Daffy's Rhapsody; archive audio)
    • Bob Clampett (vocal effects in A Corny Concerto)
    • Dave Barry (gurgling in The Stupid Cupid, saying, "Aha! An impostor!" in What Makes Daffy Duck)
    • Richard Bickenbach (imitating Bing Crosby in Hollywood Daffy)
    • Gilbert Mack (Golden Records records, Bugs Bunny Songfest)[15][16]
    • Richard Andrews (Bugs Bunny Exercise and Adventure Album)[17]
    • Dave Spafford ("woo-hoos" in Who Framed Roger Rabbit)[18][19][20]
    • Bob Bergen (ABC Family Fun Fair)[21][22][23]
    • Mel Tormé (singing voice in Daffy Duck's Quackbusters)
    • Jeff Bergman (1989 Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade,[24]Cartoon All-Stars to the Rescue, Happy Birthday, Bugs!: 50 Looney Years, Gremlins 2: The New Batch, Tiny Toon Adventures, Tyson Foods commercial,[25][26]Box Office Bunny, Bugs Bunny's Overtures to Disaster, (Blooper) Bunny, Invasion of the Bunny Snatchers, The Plucky Duck Show, Special Delivery Symphony,[27][28]Cartoon Network bumpers,[29]Boomerang bumpers,[30][31]Ad Council commercial,[32]The Looney Tunes Show, Mad, Scooby Doo and Looney Tunes: Cartoon Universe, Looney Tunes Dash, Looney Tunes: Rabbits Run, Wun Wabbit Wun, Daffy Duck Dance Off,[33]Ani-Mayhem, Meet Bugs (and Daffy))[34]
    • Joe Alaskey (Tiny Toon Adventures, Bugs Bunny's Lunar Tunes, Looney Tunes River Ride, Yosemite Sam and the Gold River Adventure!, The Toonite Show Starring Bugs Bunny,[35]Have Yourself a Looney Tunes Christmas,[36]The Bugs Bunny Wacky World Games,[37]67th Academy Awards, Carrotblanca, Bugs & Daffy Sing the Beatles,[38]Bugs 'n' Daffy intro, Marvin the Martian in the Third Dimension, Bugs & Friends Sing Elvis,[39]Bugs Bunny's Silly Seals,[40]The Drew Carey Show, Quest for Camelot Sing-Along, Looney Tunes Sing-Along,[41]Looney Tunes: What's Up Rock?!,[42]The Looney Tunes Rockin' Road Show,[43]Tweety's High-Flying Adventure, The Looney Tunes Kwazy Christmas, Duck Dodgers, Looney Tunes: Back in Action, Daffy Duck for President, Bah, Humduck! A Looney Tunes Christmas, Looney Tunes Dance Off,[44]TomTomLooney TunesGPS,[45]Looney Tunes ClickN READ Phonics, Lego Batman 3: Beyond Gotham, various video games, webtoons, and commercials)[34]
    • Greg Burson (Bugs Bunny's Birthday Ball, Tiny Toon Adventures, Daffy Duck: The Marvin Missions,[46][47]Animaniacs, Bugs Bunny: Rabbit Rampage,[48][47]Acme Animation Factory,[49][47]Looney Tunes B-Ball,[50][47]Warner Bros. Kids Club,[51]Quest for Camelot promotion[52])[34]
    • Keith Scott (Looney Tunes Musical Revue,[53][54]Spectacular Light and Sound Show Illuminanza,[55][56]Looney Tunes: We Got the Beat!,[42][57]Looney Tunes on Ice, Looney Tunes LIVE! Classroom Capers,[58]The Looney Tunes Radio Show,[59][60]Looney Rock, Looney Tunes Christmas Carols,[61][62][63] various commercials)[34][64][65][66]
    • Maurice LaMarche (Taz-Mania)
    • Frank Gorshin (Superior Duck)[34]
    • Dee Bradley Baker (Space Jam, Boomerang bumpers,[67][31]New Looney Tunes, Converse commercials[68])[34]
    • Billy West (Histeria!)[34]
    • Samuel Vincent (Baby Looney Tunes, Baby Looney Tunes' Eggs-traordinary Adventure)[34]
    • Noel Blanc (Chevrolet Monte Carlo 400 with the Looney Tunes)[69]
    • Jeff Bennett (Sprint commercial, Wendy's commercial, Attack of the Drones, A Looney Tunes Sing-A-Long Christmas[70])[34]
    • Tom Jones (speaking and singing in Jones' voice in an episode of Duck Dodgers)[71]
    • Bill Farmer (Robot Chicken)[72]
    • Kevin Shinick (Mad)[73]
    • Gary Martin (Looney Tunes Take-Over Weekend promotion)[31]
    • Eric Bauza (Looney Tunes: World of Mayhem, Looney Tunes Cartoons, Animaniacs, Bugs Bunny in The Golden Carrot, Space Jam: A New Legacy, Bugs & Daffy's Thanksgiving Road Trip[74][75])[76][77][78][79][80][81]

    Other media

    • In 1991, Daffy Duck had a number 58 hit in the UK charts with a house/dance record called "Party Zone",[82] a record which featured songwriters/producers Giorgio[83] and Martin Koppehele[84][85] under one of their aliases called The Groove Gang (other aliases have included G. + M. Cope and Cymurai). The record was issued by Warner's eastwest label and spent three weeks in the UK charts.[86]
    • In 1999, the U.S. Postal Service issued a 33 cent stamp, designed and illustrated by Ed Wleczyk of Warner Bros., featuring Daffy leaning against a rural mailbox with a "that's despicable" look directed at two letters in the mailbox that bear Bugs Bunny stamps.[87]
    • Daffy makes a vocal cameo appearance in the 2020 Animaniacs revival segment "Suffragette City", with Eric Bauza reprising his role.

    See also

    References

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    Sources

    Wikimedia Commons has media related to Daffy Duck.
    Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daffy_Duck

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