what is the capital of western australia

loophole to create the principality in an isolated part of Western Australia, 500 kilometers (310 miles) north of state capital Perth. Capital of Western Australia crossword clue. Posted on June 09, 2020 at 12:00 AM. Thank you for visiting our website! Below you will be able to find the. Land areas of States and Territories; Australian Capital Territory and Jervis Bay Territory Western Australia, 32.9, 2 523 924, 3089, 2 527 013.

What is the capital of western australia -

14 Top-Rated Tourist Attractions in Western Australia

Written by Karen Hastings

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Western Australia is a land of superlatives and extremes. Occupying a third of the continent's total area, it's the largest of the Australian states with less than 10 percent of the country's total population. The state's capital, Perth, exudes a vibrant, sophisticated feel, with glitzy shops, galleries, and gourmet restaurants, but the beating hot heart of the vast desert and a wild and rugged coastline beckon just beyond. Endless stretches of white-sand beach, rugged red gorges, sweeping fields of wildflowers, and bizarre rock formations are just some of the stunning natural attractions, and the state is also famous for its distinctive flora and fauna.

Wilderness adventures are a top draw. You can four-wheel-drive along the Kimberley's Gibb River Road, surf big-wave breaks at the Margaret River, bask on the beach with a kangaroo, hand-feed wild dolphins, and swim with whale sharks at the planet's largest fringing coral reef. Plan your trip with our list of the top tourist attractions in Western Australia.

Note: Some businesses may be temporarily closed due to recent global health and safety issues.

1. Perth

Perth

Perth

Perhaps no Australian capital has changed as much in recent decades as Perth. Thanks to a mining boom, it's now the fourth largest city in Australia, flaunting its wealth with shiny skyscrapers, hip boutiques, gourmet restaurants, and buzzing entertainment venues. Bounded on the west by the Indian Ocean and set on the banks of the winding Swan River, Perth is a hot spot for water sports. Surfing, swimming, and sailing are part of everyday life, and enjoying the city's beautiful beaches is among the top fun things to do in Perth.

Other Perth attractions include Kings Park and Botanic Garden, where you can admire more than 1,200 species of native plants and a spectacular display of wildflowers in the spring. The poignant Kings' Park War Memorial here is worth a stop as well. Among the city's most popular museums are the Art Gallery of Western Australia and Scitech, and gamers can play their favorite 80s video games at The Nostalgia Box museum, one of the more unusual things to do in Perth. The city also makes a great base for rewarding day trip adventures, including picturesque Rottnest Island and the port city of Fremantle.

Accommodation: Where to Stay in Perth

2. The Margaret River

Margaret River

Margaret River

Home to galleries and gourmet restaurants, Margaret River is a much-loved holiday resort and a popular spot for surfers. This pretty town lies in the state's south west, about a 3.5-hour drive south of Perth, making it a favorite weekend escape from the city. Surfers flock here for the consistent big-wave breaks, as well as more than 40 surf spots sprinkled along the coast.

Tourists love the region's beautiful scenery, with tall timber forests and sparkling white-sand beaches. The area is also noted for its impressive limestone caves, such as Lake Cave, Jewel Cave, and Mammoth Cave, with glittering stalactites and prehistoric fossils. Other popular things to do include rock climbing, mountain biking, fishing, kayaking, and whale watching tours.

Accommodation: Where to Stay in Margaret River

3. Broome

Broome and the Kimberley

Broome and the Kimberley

The thriving tourist town of Broome is one of the most popular Western Australian destinations and a gateway to the magnificent Kimberley region. One of the town's main attractions is Cable Beach. Backed by striking red cliffs, this impressive shoreline stretches for 22 kilometers, with sweeping white sands and turquoise waters. Sunset camel rides are a popular way to soak up the scenery.

Broome is also Australia's pearling capital, and you can learn about this fascinating history at The Broome Historical Museum. Other things to see and do include the Malcolm Douglas Wilderness Wildlife Park; watching a movie at Sun Pictures, a quirky outdoor movie theater; and touring local pearl farms. Broome is also famous for a natural phenomenon called the Staircase to the Moon. When the full moon rises over the bay, locals and tourists gather to admire the rays of light gleaming on the water, creating an optical illusion of steps leading to the moon.

Broome is also a popular base for Kimberley adventures, such as the Horizontal Waterfall, Cape Leveque, the Gibb River Road, Purnululu (Bungle Bungle) National Park, and Mitchell Falls.

Accommodation: Where to Stay in Broome

4. Ningaloo Reef Marine Park

Ningaloo Reef Marine Park

Whale shark at Ningaloo Reef Marine Park

A UNESCO World Heritage site, Ningaloo Reef is the world's largest fringing reef. The Ningaloo Reef Marine Park extends for about 260 kilometers and harbors an astounding diversity of marine life, but unlike the Great Barrier Reef, it's easily accessible from shore. Marine life includes manta rays, dugongs, whale sharks, humpback whales, turtles, and more than 500 species of fish and 300 species of coral.

One of the top beaches for snorkeling is beautiful Turquoise Bay, a sublime stretch of blinding white sand and crystal-clear water laced with coral. It's also one of the few places in the world where you can swim with whale sharks, an experience which graces the bucket lists of countless animal lovers.

The town of Exmouth is the main gateway to Ningaloo Reef and a popular launching point for reef trips. It's also one of the top fishing destinations in Australia. Coral Bay is also a great base, with long, white-sand beaches and ideal conditions for swimming, snorkeling, fishing, and boating. Off the coast are ample opportunities for scuba divers, with numerous wrecks round Point Cloates. Ningaloo Reef Marine Park also includes the coastal area of spectacular Cape Range National Park, where you can explore rugged limestone cliffs, dunes, and canyons.

5. Cruise on a Jet Boat through the Horizontal Falls

Aerial view of the Horizontal Falls

Aerial view of the Horizontal Falls

Viewing the Horizontal Falls from a jet boat is one of the most popular things to do up north in the rugged Kimberley region. Powerful tides of up to 11 meters squeeze through two narrow gorges to form this curious natural phenomenon, which is also one of the top outdoor adventures in Australia. The only way to experience this remote attraction is on an organized tour by seaplane and/or jet boat. Tours usually depart from Broome or Derby and include a scenic flight over the jaw-droppingly beautiful Buccaneer peninsula, a wild stretch of red, cliff-fringed coast washed by turquoise water and dotted with hundreds of tiny uninhabited islands. Tours usually involve a water landing on Talbot Bay; a lunch of fresh-caught seafood; an exhilarating jet boat ride through the falls; and, for the more adventurous, an optional shark swim. Others also include a stop in nearby Cape Leveque, an achingly gorgeous area of wild beaches, blue sea, and vermilion-hued cliffs.

6. Relax on Rottnest Island

Rottnest Island

Rottnest Island

A ferry ride from Perth or Fremantle, Rottnest Island is a car-free nature reserve and a popular spot for a city escape. The Dutch navigator Willem de Vlamingh landed on the island in 1696 and pronounced it an earthly paradise. Mistaking the small marsupials, called quokkas, for rats, he named the island Rottnest ('rats' nest'). Today, the adorable quokkas still inhabit the island and are only found in Western Australia. Sparkling bays, white-sand beaches, and coral reefs fringe the island's shores, providing excellent opportunities for snorkeling and swimming.

Top attractions on the island include the Rottnest Museum, housed in an 1857-era barn and threshing mill, with collections of historical material and relics of shipwrecks; the Parker Point Marine Trail; and Vlamingh Lookout. Most of the little limestone houses around the harbor were built by convict labor and are among the oldest buildings in Western Australia. Other things to do include hiking the trails, tennis, golf, cycling, and boating.

7. Explore Esperance Bay and Cape Le Grand National Park

Esperance Bay and Cape Le Grand National Park

Esperance Bay and Cape Le Grand National Park

Ravishing beaches, turquoise lagoons, wildflowers, wildlife, and easy accessibility to spectacular national parks make Esperance Bay a haven for nature lovers. One of the region's top attractions is Lucky Bay in spectacular Cape le Grand National Park. Set against the islands of the Recherche Archipelago, this dazzling stretch of sand is one of Australia's best beaches, and lounging along its sublime shores with wild kangaroos is one of the top free things to do in Western Australia. Other popular activities along this unspoiled coast include snorkeling, surfing, fishing, and beach safaris.

Hikers and bikers love the Great Ocean Drive, which runs from Esperance to beautiful Twilight Beach. Strangely, the region even offers its own mini replica of Stonehenge. Also in the area, Cape Arid, Fitzgerald River, and Stokes National Parks are popular excursions, famed for their stunning coastal scenery, diverse flora and fauna, and fantastic hiking trails.

8. Purnululu (Bungle Bungle) National Park, The Kimberley

Purnululu (Bungle Bungle) National Park

Purnululu (Bungle Bungle) National Park

One of Western Australia's hidden gems, the remote and spectacular rock formations of Purnululu (Bungle Bungle) National Park in the Kimberley remained unknown to the outside world until 1983. Today, the park graces both the National and UNESCO World Heritage lists. Despite its relatively recent discovery, the Bungle Bungle hills and surrounding area were home to Aboriginal tribes for thousands of years and hold remains of their culture, including ceremonial sites, rock paintings, and a burial ground. Violent summer monsoon rains carved the park's deep gorges and chasms, and the bee-hived shaped rock domes of the Bungle Bungle are made of soft sandstone.

You can explore the main sites on walking trails of varying difficulty. Cathedral Gorge, Piccaninny Gorge, and Echidna Chasm are some of the most popular sites. But perhaps the best way to appreciate the massive scope of these magnificent structures in on a sightseeing flight. Departing from Halls Creek and Kununurra, the flights usually include a visit to the Argyle diamond mine. Longer tours in all-terrain vehicles are also available.

Official site: https://parks.dpaw.wa.gov.au/park/purnululu

9. Karijini National Park

Karijini National Park

Karijini National Park

Karijini National Park is one of the largest and most rewarding national parks in Western Australia. Over many millions of years, erosion created steep gorges, up to 100 meters deep, with waterfalls and rock pools bordered by lush foliage. A track running through the Yampire Gorge leads to most of the scenic highlights of the park. The Fortescue Falls, fed by a groundwater river, do not dry up even in the heat of summer. You can explore the Kalamina Gorge and its deep waterholes on foot, while it's possible to drive through the Wittenoom Gorge for about 30 kilometers, with shady picnic spots beside natural swimming pools.

The park is home to the second highest peak in Western Australia, Mount Bruce, but the best views are from Oxer Lookout, perched over four red-walled gorges. Four-wheel-drive vehicles are recommended.

10. Feed the Dolphins at Monkey Mia

Shark Bay and Monkey Mia

Shark Bay and Monkey Mia

Shark Bay, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, shelters some of the world's largest and richest sea grass beds. But the most famous tourist attractions in Shark Bay are the dolphins of Monkey Mia, about 25 kilometers from Denham. Every morning, rangers select a few visitors to hand-feed these friendly dolphins in their natural habitat. The dolphins became accustomed to human beings in the 1960s, when fishermen began throwing the remains of their catch into the sea.

Apart from dolphin watching, you can also enjoy swimming in the beautiful bays, fishing, kayaking, four-wheel-drive adventures, Aboriginal cultural tours, and camel rides here. Shark Bay is also known for its population of dugongs and stromatolites, mats of algae, which are among the oldest life forms on earth.

Official site: http://www.sharkbay.org.au/

11. The Pinnacles, Nambung National Park

The Pinnacles

The Pinnacles

In Nambung National Park, about a two-hour drive from Perth, the Pinnacles are thousands of limestone pillars rising from a lunar-like landscape of yellow sand. These bizarre rock formations range in height from between a few centimeters to four meters. Controversy persists over their origin, but it seems that a process of chemical change caused by wind and water erosion led to the softer sandstones being washed away, leaving the harder limestone exposed. You can explore these strange-looking rock spires via a scenic drive or walking trail. The Pinnacles Desert Discovery Centre displays exhibits on the park.

Location: Pinnacles Drive, via Nambung National Park, Cervantes

12. Drive the Gibb River Road in The Kimberley

Gibb River Road, The Kimberley

Gibb River Road, The Kimberley

Slicing through the heart of the Kimberley, Gibb River Road is legendary among outback adventures. "The Gibb," as it's called, is an old cattle-droving route running northeast for 600 kilometers from Derby to just short of Wyndham. Recommended for 4WD vehicles, the road threads past rugged red-rock gorges, outback cattle stations, aboriginal communities, croc-filled rivers, savannah, and magnificent mountain ranges. Travelers along this route can camp or stay at one of the remote stations in the region. El Questro is one of the most famous. During the rainy season, from November through March, the road is usually closed due to flooding.

13. Wave Rock

Wave Rock

Wave Rock

The famous Wave Rock is an extraordinary rock formation of banded granite, 15 meters high, in the form of a wave about to break. Rainwater reacting with different chemical substances in the rock has created a series of vertical stripes in shades of gray, red, and ochre. In the spring, look for wildflowers growing around its base. From Wave Rock, you can also walk the one-kilometer loop to see Hippo's Yawn, another distinctive rock feature shaped just like a gaping hippo's mouth. Other curious granite outcrops lie in the surrounding area, including the Humps, the King Rocks, and the Gnamma Hole, and you can explore them on an 80-kilometer driving circuit from Hyden. Bates Cave, to the north of Hyden, has Aboriginal rock paintings and handprints.

14. Cape to Cape Track

Track through Boranup karri forest

Track through Boranup karri forest

Stretching for 135 kilometers from Cape Naturaliste south to Cape Leeuwin through the Margaret River, the Cape to Cape Track is one of the top hikes in Australia. Stunning beaches, secluded bays, steep sea cliffs, deep caves, rugged headlands, and fields of wildflowers are some of the highlights, and you'll see plenty of wildlife along the way. In areas, the track loops inland, weaving through woodland and dense forests.

Walking through these diverse ecosystems is a rewarding way to explore some of the top natural attractions in southwest Western Australia. Highlights include the beautiful Boranup karri forest, Quininup Falls, and the Wilyabrup sea cliffs. You can also break up the hike into smaller sections depending on your interests, skill level, and time constraints. Tackling the entire walk typically takes between five and seven days. Guided tours are also available, with camping along the way or, if you don't want to rough it, you can stay in nearby hotels and lodges and rest your weary limbs in a plush bed.

Источник: https://www.planetware.com/tourist-attractions-/western-australia-aus-wa-wa.htm

Name the city that is the capital of Western Australia.

The correct answer is Perth.

Key Points

  • Western Australia is a state occupying the western land of the Australian continent.
  • Western Australia is bounded by:
    • The Timor Sea on the north.
    • The Indian Ocean on the northwest and west.
    • Southern Ocean (or Antarctic Ocean) on the south.
  • York was the first inland settlement in Western Australia.
  • Western Australia joined the Federation of Australia in 1901.
  • Western Australia was the last of the Australian colonies to agree to join the Federation of Australia.

Important Points

  • Perth is the capital of Western Australia.
    • Perth is the fourth-most populous city in Australia.
    • Perth was founded in 1829 as the administrative center of the Swan River Colony by Captain James Stirling.

Additional Information

  • Darwin is the capital city of the Northern Territory, Australia.
  • Brisbane is the capital of the Australian state of Queensland.
  • Hobart is the capital of Australia's island state of Tasmania.
Источник: https://testbook.com/question-answer/name-the-city-that-is-the-capital-of-western-austr--6125e9801ebc59f6d14dab86

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Capital of western australia

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Источник: https://7littlewordsanswers.com/capital-of-western-australia-7-little-words-bonus-2

Australia's oldest micronation, Hutt River is no more thanks to Covid-19

(CNN) — The 50-year reign of an Australia-based micronation formed by a "prince" has come to an end.

Hutt River, a self-declared principality, issued its own passports and once even declared war on Australia. In recent years, however, it's been known as a quirky tourist attraction.

But the economic impact of the Covid-19 pandemic, coupled with a giant tax bill, have forced the principality to announce it will finally surrender to Australia.

Hutt River's origins as a micronation date back to 1970, when the late Prince Leonard Casley claimed he'd exploited a legal loophole to create the principality in an isolated part of Western Australia, 500 kilometers (310 miles) north of state capital Perth.

Set on 75 square kilometers of farming land, it was more than twice the size of Macau but populated by less than 30 people.

The principality -- though not officially recognized by the Australian government -- acted like an independent nation. Its government granted visas and driver's licenses, issued passports and currency, produced its own stamps, flew its own flag and reportedly operated 13 foreign offices in 10 different countries, including the US and France.

Now its rollicking journey is over.

Prince Leonard Casley, pictured in 1998 with his French-born wife, Princess Shirley.

Prince Leonard Casley, pictured in 1998 with his French-born wife, Princess Shirley.

Olivier Chouchana/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images

When Prince Leonard died in February last year he left behind a US$2.15 million tax bill, which forced his son and successor, Prince Graeme Casley, to announce last week the principality would sell its land to pay the debt.

Casley told CNN Travel he was devastated to dissolve the micronation.

"It's very sad watching your father build up something for 50 years and then you have to close it down," said Casley. "They're very harsh times economically and health wise around the world due to Covid and we're feeling that too."

Australia's most famous micronation

Micronations are entities that claim to be sovereign states but aren't legally considered independent, as opposed to microstates like Vatican City, which have internationally recognized sovereignty.

Australia has spawned far more micronations than most countries.

Over recent decades, dozens of its citizens have declared independence from Australia, and set up their own nation within a nation.

Leonard Casley founded the Principality of Hutt River in 1970.

Leonard Casley founded the Principality of Hutt River in 1970.

Olivier Chouchana/Gamma-Rapho/Getty Images

None, however, are as renowned as the Principality of Hutt River -- also known as Hutt River Province -- which has created headlines across the world for the past 50 years.

While Prince Leonard originally decided to secede from Australia over his disagreement with farming regulations, he turned the principality into a unique tourist attraction, with visitors arriving to buy passports, currency and stamps.

But, like tourism destinations around the world, the principality had been left vulnerable due to the economic impact of the pandemic.

Tourism was one of Hutt River's key sources of income, particularly over the past 15 years, as the Internet helped spread its odd tale across the world.

It's been closed to travelers since January but, previously, Hutt River's self-proclaimed "Royal Family" went to great effort to make their micronation intriguing to tourists. Visitors who arrived at the property were greeted by a member of the family, who first helped them secure their entry visa, which cost US$2.50.

For many visitors, just getting a Hutt River Principality stamp in their passport made the trip worthwhile.

Once this process was completed they were escorted through the principality's main buildings by a staff member who explained the local history. Travelers could visit the principality's Post Office to send a letter or buy Hutt River stamps, then peruse the Memorabilia Department and Historical Society, before enjoying a light meal in its tea rooms.

There was currency, too. Visitors could buy and spend the Hutt River dollar, which was traded one-to-one for the Australian dollar.

Other attractions included a non-denominational chapel and Princess Shirley's Sacred Educational Shrine. Named after Prince Leonard's wife, it displayed findings relating to religion and physics and was established with the help of academics of the principality's "Royal College of Advanced Research".

The souvenir shop at the Principality of Hutt River in Western Australia.

The souvenir shop at the Principality of Hutt River in Western Australia.

Stuart Forster/Shutterstock

And then there was the Royal Art Collection, made up of 300 pieces scattered through these buildings, as well a giant bust of Prince Leonard, carved from rock by a Canadian artist.

The walls of these buildings were also adorned by documents, news clippings and photos related to the principality and its history -- including the time in 1977 when Prince Leonard declared war against Australia.

When he learned the Australian government was pursuing the principality over unpaid taxes, he reportedly consulted his own government and, rather than pay, decided to declare war. How he intended to wage battles was not clear, given the Royal Hutt River Defence Force was not established until 11 years later.

This force included an army, a navy and a military college, which developed artillery manuals and training programs so impressive they were adopted by affiliates of the US Army, claims Hutt River's official website.

This giant bust of Prince Leonard was carved from rock by a Canadian artist.

This giant bust of Prince Leonard was carved from rock by a Canadian artist.

Stuart Forster/Shutterstock

Prince Leonard's war against Australia lasted only a few days, and this brazen show of force did nothing to deter the Australian Taxation Office.

The ATO continued to pursue the Principality over unpaid bills, which belatedly prompted its surrender last week.

Though disappointed, successor Graeme Casley says he's "very proud" of what his father achieved and hoped its story would be remembered for generations to come.

"I have so many wonderful memories of living here (in the principality)," he said. "Once mum passed away (in 2013) I spent five years full time working alongside my father and it was more than just a father-son relationship we had a very deep working relationship.

"What he created here over the last 50 years is amazing, it's really a unique story that people around the world have read about, and it won't just be forgotten about now."

Источник: https://www.cnn.com/travel/article/australia-micronation-hutt-river-principality/index.html

Capital Punishment

Hangman's noose, Fremantle Prison Gallows, 1991.
Courtesy of West Australian Newspaper.


Perth Gaol opened in 1856, and until 1888 it was the major focus for legal executions by hanging in the State.During the early days of settlement in Western Australia between 1829 and 1855, legal executions of convicted criminals appear to have taken place in various localities including York, Perth, Fremantle, and Canning River. In some cases, prisoners condemned to hang were executed at the spot where they had committed the crime.

In 1867 the Imperial Convict Establishment at Fremantle was renamed Fremantle Prison, and in 1886 it was handed over to the colonial government as a major high security prison. One of the first things the government did was to build a gallows there in 1888. This became the only place of legal execution in Western Australia between 1888 and 1984. During that time 43 men and 1 woman were hanged there.

The last person to be hanged at the gallows in Fremantle Prison was Eric Edgar Cooke, in 1964. Cooke was a serial killer, and although charged with, and tried for, only one murder, evidence plus his own voluntary confessions, indicate that he killed a number of others during his three or four year reign of terror in the suburbs of Perth.

Most hangings at Fremantle Prison were carried out on a Monday morning at 8.00am.

Prior to this time, the hangman was responsible for seeing that a number of things were in order. These included: testing the trapdoor mechanism functioned properly; eliminating any potential for the rope to stretch; and determining the length of rope needed to properly execute a condemned person, using calculations accounting for their height, and their weight.

On the day of the execution, the condemned person was woken around 5.30 am. He showered, and was given breakfast. He was then transferred from death row, located in the New Division cell block, to a cell in the Solitary Confinement block, where he was kept under constant surveillance. He was allowed the services of a priest or an equivalent, and offered the option of a glass of whiskey.

At the allotted time the prisoner was escorted to the gallows with his hands and feet secured in leather shackles and his head covered by a cloth hood.

The formalities of the ritual were strictly observed. Once everything was in place the event happened very quickly. The time from leaving the condemned cell in Solitary Confinement to the actual hanging was around 60 seconds.

Executions listed by date

Name

CrimeDate
Long, JimmyMurder02/03/1889
Pres, ArleMurder08/11/1889
Ah ChiMurder16/04/1891
Chew FangMurder29/04/1892
Lyee NyeeMurder29/04/1892
Sin Cho ChiMurder29/04/1892
Young QuongMurder29/04/1892
Mahomet GoulamMurder02/05/1896
Jumna KhanMurder31/03/1897
De La Cruz, PedroMurder19/07/1900
Perez, PeterMurder19/07/1900
Peters, SamuelMurder9/07/1902
Psichitsas, SteliosMurder15/04/1903
Mailliat, FredrickMurder21/04/1903
Rocca (Rokka), SebaroMurder7/07/1903
Ah HookMurder11/01/1904
Mianoor, MohometMurder4/05/1904
Espada, SimeonMurder14/12/1905
Hagan, CharlesMurder14/12/1905
Marquez, PabloMurder14/12/1905
Sala, AntonioMurder19/11/1906
De Kitchilan, AugustinMurder23/10/1907
Smith, Harry G.Murder23/03/1908
Oki, IwakichiMurder22/10/1908
Rendell, MarthaMurder6/10/1909
Robustelli, PeterMurder9/02/1910
Smart, AlexanderMurder7/03/1911
Smithson, David H.Murder25/07/1911
Spargo, CharlesMurder1/07/1913
Odgers, Charles H.Murder14/01/1914
Sacheri, AndreaMurder12/04/1915
Rosland, FrankMurder12/03/1923
Rennie, RoystonMurder2/08/1926
Coulter, WilliamMurder25/10/1926
Trefene, Phillip J.Murder25/10/1926
Milner, John SumpterMurder21/05/1928
Hulme, CliffordMurder3/09/1928
Fanto, AntonioMurder18/05/1931
Smith, John T.Murder13/06/1932
Tapci, KarolMurder23/06/1952
Thomas, Robert J.Murder18/07/1960
Fallows, MervynMurder6/06/1961
Robinson, BrianMurder20/01/1964
Cooke, Eric EdgarMurder26/10/1964

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS
Capital Punishment - For and against

Western Australia’s State Parliament passed legislation abolishing capital punishment in 1984. The short title of that Act is Acts Amendment (Abolition of Capital Punishment) Act 1984.

If you are studying this subject and need information about the arguments for and against, we suggest that you visit either your school library or your local library. Here are some suggestions about searching for texts on the subject-

For information on the topic generally look in your library collection under the Dewey Decimal subject classification number 364.66. Also you may look up the following subjects in the library catalogue to see what books and other materials on the topic are held in the collection:

  • Capital punishment
  • Death penalty

Look up the subjects in your library’s encyclopedias, usually kept in the Reference section & not for loan.

Ask at your school or local library if they have any of the books listed below. Your local public library will probably have the listed encyclopedias in its reference collection. If not, try other encyclopedias on their reference shelves.

Most of the books listed below are available through your local public library. You may have to ask the librarian to obtain a title for you on inter-library loan. In some cases it could take a number of weeks before the book becomes available for you to use, so do not leave your assignment until the day before it is due for handing in. Plan ahead so you have resources in plenty of time for you to make use of them.

Suggested reading

The Australian Encyclopedia (1988) (check in the Reference section)

Capital Punishment: the Death Penalty Debate (1997) by Ted Gottfried

The Death Penalty: Opposing Viewpoints (1986) edited by Bonnie Szumski (and others)

End of the line: capital punishment in Australia (1994) by Michael Victory (this has an excellent chapter on the arguments for & against)

For and against: an anthology of public issues in Australia (1989) edited by R. Giles

The New Encyclopaedia Britannica Micropaedia Vol. 2 p831 (check in the Reference section)

On Capital Punishment (1985) by William H. Baker

Punishment and the Death Penalty: the Current Debate edited by Robert M. Baird & Stuart E. Resenbaum

When the State Kills: the Death Penalty v. Human Rights (1989) Amnesty International

The World Book Encyclopedia Vol. 3 p114 (check in the Reference section)

Источник: https://fremantleprison.com.au/history-heritage/history/the-modern-era/capital-punishment/

Western Australia Population 2021

Western Australia, or WA, is the largest state in Australia. It occupies the whole western third of the country. The Indian Ocean borders Western Australia to the west and north, the Great Australian Bight and the Southern Ocean to the south, South Australia to the southeast and the Northern Territory to the northeast. Western Australia is also the second-largest country subdivision in the world.

Despite its grand size, only 11% of Australia’s population live in the state – around 2.5 million inhabitants. 92% of Western Australia’s residents live in the southwest region near the capital of the state – Perth. Western Australia has the fastest growing population of all the Australian states – growing by 110,000 in just 2013. In 2014, Western Australia had an estimated population of 2.52 million, which makes it the 4th most populous state in Australia.

Due to Western Australia having such an immense area – around 2.6 million square kilometers -- and a relatively low population, the population density is just less than one person per square km or 2.5 people per square mile. The majority of Western Australia is made up of a desert area with a tiny proportion of the population living closer inland than nearer to the coastal regions which have a more Mediterranean feel to the climate.

Cities in Western Australia

Most of the population make their home in Perth and its surrounding metropolitan area – residents there make up 75% of the state’s population. Perth has an estimated population of 1.97 million, which makes it the 4th most populous city in all of Australia. The area around Perth is coastal and more pleasant in terms of climate. It has a higher population density of 310 persons per km squared which only goes to emphasize the sparsely inhabited rest of Western Australia. Perth became known as the "City of Light" when residents lit their homes and streetlights as American astronaut John Glenn passed overhead in 1962 and again in 1998.

The city of Mandurah is the second-largest city in Western Australia and sits about 45 miles south of Perth with a population of 84,000 and a population density of 636 people per square mile, or 1,647 per square mile. The city is a popular tourist destination and a retirement community.

Bunbury is the third-largest city of Western Australia with a population of 70,000, which makes it the 27th largest city in Australia. Bunbury has a population density of 492 people per square mile or 1,270 per square mile.

Western Australia Demographics

77.5% of the people in Western Australia report being of European descent. 32.7% of the state’s population report being of English origin. Only 22.8% of the residents of Western Australian would cite Australian as their ethnic background. In Western Australia around 15% of the population do not speak English at home – the languages spoken range from a variety of the surrounding areas such as Mandarin, Cantonese, Vietnamese, Indonesian and others. The biggest group of religious people in Western Australia report to be Roman Catholic; other Christian religions make up the most significant majority of the state.

After this Buddhism is a popular choice – probably due to the number of those of South Asian and Indonesian origin, Western Australia has a relatively low median age of around 36 years. It has been increasing to this number due to a decrease in fertility and an increase in longevity. An interesting fact about the population in Australia and mainly Western Australia is the huge unbalance of males to females. The numbers, for Western Australia, in 1901 were around 155.7 males to every 100 women, these days numbers are more even with approximately 100.2 males for every female – reported in 2001. For Australia as a whole, numbers are now overcompensated with only 98.3 males to every female.

Western Australia Growth

Despite its vast uninhabitable area, Western Australia contributes 58% of Australia’s mineral and energy exports. It also provides a potential 4.6% of Australia’s GDP. Western Australia also has the highest earning per person than any other state. An increasingly important industry for the state is tourism with 28% of visitors coming from the UK and Ireland to manly visit the coastal areas of the state. Another bonus of the coastal regions is the booming fishing industry which enables a significant boost to Western Australia.

Источник: https://worldpopulationreview.com/territories/western-australia-population

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7 Facts about Australia's largest state: Western Australia

: What is the capital of western australia

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Cyclone Seroja cuts power to thousands in Western Australia

Tens of thousands of people in Western Australia were without power on Monday after a rare tropical cyclone tore roofs from homes and destroyed flimsily built houses as it crossed the coast on Sunday night.

Officials said approximately 70 percent of the structures in the coastal town of Kalbarri, about 500km (310 miles) north of state capital Perth, were damaged when the category three storm made landfall with winds at speeds of as much as 170km/h.

About 30 percent of the damage was “significant”, WA Emergency Services Commissioner Darren Klemm told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. The area had not seen such a cyclone in at least 40 years, local media reported.

“The situation in Western Australia remains very serious,” Prime Minister Scott Morrison posted on his official Facebook page, adding the federal government’s disaster response plan had been activated.

The cyclone, named Seroja, was downgraded to a category two system after making landfall and finally moved back out to sea in the early afternoon, according to the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) in Perth. Showers and gusty winds were expected to continue but not to be severe, it added.

Photos on social media and local broadcasts showed fallen power cables, debris and houses stripped of roofs and walls. Western Australia state authorities opened three evacuation centres for displaced residents.

Ella Curic, who lives what is the capital of western australia Kalbarri, told the ABC that the town, a popular tourist spot, had been “flattened” what is the capital of western australia the cyclone. They had been sitting at the dining room table eating dinner when the neighbour’s roof “came through the window.

“The glass shattered, it all happened very quickly so we grabbed the children and got to the laundry,” Curic told the broadcaster. “It was insane. Timber was being impaled through the house. It was really unnerving.”

The region was on high alert for the what is the capital of western australia, given that houses and other buildings were not embed fonts in powerpoint to withstand tropical cyclones, which usually enemy at the gates not occur so far south.

“This is a rare weather event for people in southern and eastern parts of WA,” the BOM said.

Source: Al Jazeera and news agencies


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Источник: https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/4/12/cyclone-seroja-cuts-power-to-thousands-in-western-australia

Capital Punishment

Hangman's noose, Fremantle Prison Gallows, 1991.
Courtesy of West Australian Newspaper.


Perth Gaol opened in 1856, and until 1888 it was the major focus for legal executions by hanging in the State.During the early days of settlement in Western Australia between 1829 and 1855, legal executions of convicted criminals appear to have taken place in various localities including York, Perth, Fremantle, and Canning River. In some cases, prisoners condemned to hang were executed at the spot where they had committed the crime.

In 1867 the Imperial Convict Establishment at Fremantle was renamed Fremantle Prison, and in 1886 it was handed over to the colonial government as a major high security prison. One of amazon com black friday code first things the government did was to build a gallows there in 1888. This became the only place of legal execution in Western Australia between 1888 and 1984. During that time 43 men and 1 woman were hanged there.

The last person to be hanged at the gallows in Fremantle Prison was Eric Edgar Cooke, in 1964. Cooke was a serial killer, and although charged with, and tried for, only one murder, evidence plus his own voluntary confessions, indicate that he killed a number of others during his three or four year reign of terror in the suburbs of Perth.

Most hangings at Fremantle Prison were carried out on a Monday morning at 8.00am.

Prior to this time, the hangman was responsible for seeing that a number of things were in order. These included: testing the trapdoor mechanism functioned properly; eliminating any potential for the rope to stretch; and determining the length of rope needed to properly execute a condemned person, using calculations accounting for their height, and their weight.

On the day of the execution, the condemned person was woken around 5.30 am. He showered, and was given breakfast. He was then transferred from death row, located in the New Division cell block, to a cell in the Solitary Confinement block, where he was kept under constant surveillance. He was allowed the services of a priest or an equivalent, and offered the option of a glass of whiskey.

At the allotted time the prisoner was escorted to the gallows with his hands and feet secured in leather shackles and his head covered by a cloth hood.

The formalities of the ritual were strictly observed. Once everything was in place the event happened very quickly. The time from leaving the condemned cell in Solitary Confinement to the actual hanging was around 60 seconds.

Executions listed by date

Name

CrimeDate
Long, JimmyMurder02/03/1889
Pres, ArleMurder08/11/1889
Ah ChiMurder16/04/1891
Chew FangMurder29/04/1892
Lyee NyeeMurder29/04/1892
Sin Cho ChiMurder29/04/1892
Young QuongMurder29/04/1892
Mahomet GoulamMurder02/05/1896
Jumna KhanMurder31/03/1897
De La Cruz, PedroMurder19/07/1900
Perez, PeterMurder19/07/1900
Peters, SamuelMurder9/07/1902
Psichitsas, SteliosMurder15/04/1903
Mailliat, FredrickMurder21/04/1903
Rocca (Rokka), SebaroMurder7/07/1903
Ah HookMurder11/01/1904
Mianoor, MohometMurder4/05/1904
Espada, SimeonMurder14/12/1905
Hagan, CharlesMurder14/12/1905
Marquez, PabloMurder14/12/1905
Sala, AntonioMurder19/11/1906
De Kitchilan, AugustinMurder23/10/1907
Smith, Harry G.Murder23/03/1908
Oki, IwakichiMurder22/10/1908
Rendell, MarthaMurder6/10/1909
Robustelli, PeterMurder9/02/1910
Smart, AlexanderMurder7/03/1911
Smithson, David H.Murder25/07/1911
Spargo, CharlesMurder1/07/1913
Odgers, Charles H.Murder14/01/1914
Sacheri, AndreaMurder12/04/1915
Rosland, FrankMurder12/03/1923
Rennie, RoystonMurder2/08/1926
Coulter, WilliamMurder25/10/1926
Trefene, Phillip J.Murder25/10/1926
Milner, John SumpterMurder21/05/1928
Hulme, CliffordMurder3/09/1928
Fanto, AntonioMurder18/05/1931
Smith, John T.Murder13/06/1932
Tapci, KarolMurder23/06/1952
Thomas, Robert J.Murder18/07/1960
Fallows, MervynMurder6/06/1961
Robinson, BrianMurder20/01/1964
Cooke, Eric EdgarMurder26/10/1964

INFORMATION FOR STUDENTS
Capital Punishment - For and against

Western Australia’s State Parliament passed legislation abolishing capital punishment in 1984. The short title of that Act is Acts Amendment (Abolition of Capital Punishment) Act 1984.

If you are studying this subject and need information about the arguments for and against, united american insurance provider phone number suggest that you visit either your school library or your local library. Here are some suggestions about searching for texts on the subject-

For information on the topic generally look in your library collection under the Dewey Decimal subject classification number 364.66. Also you may look up the following subjects in the library catalogue to see what books and other materials on the topic are held in the collection:

  • Capital punishment
  • Death penalty

Look up the subjects in your library’s encyclopedias, usually kept in the Reference section & not for loan.

Ask at your school or local library if they have any of the books listed below. Your local public library will probably have the listed encyclopedias in its reference collection. If not, try other encyclopedias on their reference shelves.

Most of the books listed below are available through your local public library. You may have to ask the librarian to obtain a title for you on inter-library loan. In some cases it could take a number of weeks before the book becomes available for you to use, so do not leave your assignment until the day before it is due for handing in. Plan ahead so you have resources in plenty of time for you to make use of them.

Suggested reading

The Australian Encyclopedia (1988) (check in the Reference section)

Capital Punishment: the Death Penalty Debate (1997) by Ted Gottfried

The Death Penalty: Opposing Viewpoints (1986) edited by Bonnie Szumski (and others)

End of the line: capital punishment in Australia (1994) by Michael Victory (this has an excellent chapter what is the capital of western australia the arguments for & against)

For and against: an anthology of public issues in Australia (1989) edited by R. Giles

The New Encyclopaedia Britannica Micropaedia Vol. 2 p831 (check in the Reference section)

On Capital Punishment (1985) by William H. Baker

Punishment and the Death Penalty: the Current Debate edited by Robert M. Baird & Stuart E. Resenbaum

When the State Kills: the Death Penalty v. Human Rights (1989) Amnesty International

The World Book Encyclopedia Vol. 3 p114 (check in the Reference section)

Источник: https://fremantleprison.com.au/history-heritage/history/the-modern-era/capital-punishment/

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Capital of western australia

Below you will find the solution for: Capital of western australia 7 Little Words which contains 5 Letters.

Capital of western australia 7 Little Words


Since you already solved the clue Capital of western australia which had the answer PERTH, you can simply go back at the main post to check the other daily crossword clues. You can do so by clicking the link here 7 Little Words Bonus 2 October 22 2021

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Western Australia Population 2021

Western Australia, or WA, is the largest state in Australia. Jefferson financial credit union baton rouge occupies the whole western third of the country. The Indian Ocean borders Western Australia to the west and north, the Great Australian Bight and the Southern Ocean to the south, South Australia to the southeast and the Northern Territory to the northeast. Western Australia is also the second-largest country subdivision in the world.

Despite its grand size, only 11% of Australia’s population live in the state – around 2.5 million inhabitants. 92% of Western Australia’s residents live in the southwest region near the capital of the state – Perth. Western Australia has the fastest growing population of all the Australian states – growing by 110,000 in just 2013. In 2014, Western Australia had an estimated population of 2.52 million, which makes it the 4th most populous state in Australia.

Due to Western Australia having such an immense area – around 2.6 million square kilometers -- and a relatively low population, the population density is just less than one person per square km or 2.5 people per square mile. The majority of Western Australia is made up of a desert area what is the capital of western australia a tiny proportion of the population living closer inland than nearer to the coastal regions which have a more Mediterranean feel to the climate.

Cities in Western Australia

Most of the population make their home in Perth and its surrounding metropolitan area – residents there make up 75% of the state’s population. Perth has an estimated population of 1.97 million, which makes it the 4th most populous city in all of Australia. The area around Perth is coastal and more pleasant in terms of climate. It has a higher population density of 310 persons per km squared which only goes to emphasize the sparsely inhabited rest of Western Australia. Perth became known as the "City of Light" when residents lit their homes and streetlights as American astronaut John Glenn passed overhead in what is the capital of western australia and again in 1998.

The city of What is the capital of western australia is the second-largest city in Western Australia and sits about 45 miles south of Perth with a population of 84,000 and a population density of 636 people per square mile, or 1,647 per square mile. The city is a popular tourist destination and a retirement community.

Bunbury is the third-largest city of Western Australia with a population of 70,000, which makes it the 27th largest city in Australia. Bunbury has a population density of 492 people per square mile or 1,270 per square mile.

Western Australia Demographics

77.5% of the people is cranberry juice good for you during pregnancy Western Australia report being of European descent. 32.7% of the state’s population report being of English origin. Only 22.8% of the residents of Western Australian would cite Australian as their ethnic background. In Western Australia around 15% of the population do not speak English at home – the languages spoken range from a variety of the surrounding areas such as Mandarin, Cantonese, Vietnamese, Indonesian and others. The biggest group of religious people in Western Australia report to be Roman Catholic; other Christian religions make up the most significant majority of the state.

After this Buddhism is a popular choice – probably due to the number of those of South Asian and Indonesian origin, Western Australia has a relatively low median age of around 36 years. It has been increasing to this number due to a decrease in fertility and an increase in longevity. An interesting fact about the population in Australia and mainly Western Australia is the huge unbalance of males to females. The numbers, for Western Australia, in 1901 were around 155.7 males to every 100 women, these days numbers are more even with approximately 100.2 males for every female – reported in 2001. For Australia as a whole, numbers are now overcompensated with only 98.3 males to every female.

Western Australia Growth

Despite its vast uninhabitable area, Western Australia contributes 58% of Australia’s mineral and energy what is the capital of western australia. It also provides a potential 4.6% of Australia’s GDP. Western Australia also has the highest earning per person than any other state. An increasingly important industry for the state is tourism with 28% of visitors coming from the UK and Ireland to manly visit the coastal areas of the state. Another bonus of the coastal regions is the booming fishing industry which enables a significant boost to Western Australia.

Источник: https://worldpopulationreview.com/territories/western-australia-population

The capital of Western Australia (5)

'the capital of western australia' is the definition.
(I've seen this before)

This is all the clue.

what is the capital of western australia (Other definitions for perth that I've seen before include what is hsa contribution "City of Scotland" "Home of fair maid" "Scottish/Australian city" "Capital of Western Australia" "Town at the head of the Tay estuary" .)

I've seen this clue in The Independent.
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Источник: https://crosswordgenius.com/clue/the-capital-of-western-australia

4 Replies to “What is the capital of western australia”

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