adapt bb nike shoes

The Hyperadapt BB is way more advanced, half as expensive, and hitting NBA hardwood soon. “The shoes sounded like a cat that had its tail run. Sneakers. Nike Adapt Bb 2.0 alternate Nike Mag Black Wolf Grey Bq5397-002 Men's Size 11. Visit. Save. Product sold by. ebay.com. Select Footwear and Boots for the Whole Family Connect your DICK'S ScoreCard and Nike Membership accounts for exclusive member-only products.

Adapt bb nike shoes -

Read the article

9.0

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

The traction is nuts on clean courts, but the translucent rubber picks up some dust on dirty courts.

Watch the video

On a clean court, the traction is great. On dusty courts, it picks up a lot of dust and causes a little bit of slipping.

Watch the video

8.0

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

On clean courts, you will have no issues, but the translucent rubber didn't work very well on dusty courts which means you need to wipe consistently.

Watch the video

Cushion of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

Expert Cushion Rating: 8.5(ranks #106 of 191)

User Cushion Rating: NA

9.0

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

The Zoom Turbo setup is low profile, springy and ultra-responsive.

Watch the Video

Nike Adapt BB 2.0

At $400 the Nike Adapt BB 2.0 is the most expensive basketball shoe currently on the market. Is it also the best? The herringbone pattern and translucent rubber work very well on clean courts, but if there's only a little bit of dust present you will need to wipe consistently. The Cushlon foam and Zoom Turbo in the forefoot give you a bouncy and responsive ride similar to the Kyrie 6. The materials get the job done but they feel cheap, plasticky, and are super heavy. The electric self-lacing system is super convenient to use but it can be hard to find the perfect setting as you are not able to adjust the lacing systems to fit the shape of your feet. Overall, the Adapt BB 2.0 is only recommended for sneakerheads who can spare $400 easily - there are much-better performers out there for a fraction of the price.

See all 4 reviews

Expert Reviews of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

Expert Rating: 8.1(ranks #149 of 191)

8.2

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

Overall, I found that the Nike Adapt BB 2.0 was better than the original Adapt BB, but I still don’t feel that these are necessarily for me.

Watch the Video Read the article

8.0

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

The Zoom Turbo has a nice bounce and good impact protection. Court feel isn't great as you feel pretty high off the ground.

Watch the video

The cushion is the main highlight of the shoe. It reminds me a lot of the Kyrie 6 with the use of Zoom Turbo.

Watch the video

8.0

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

The full-length Cushlon foam with a Zoom Turbo unit in the forefoot works well but is not as bouncy or responsive as the Zoom Turbo in the Kyrie 6.

Watch the video

Materials of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

Expert Materials Rating: 7.5(ranks #175 of 191)

User Materials Rating: NA

9.0

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

The textiles and TPU materials get the job done, but this shoe is heavy as hell because of the electric components.

Watch the Video Read the article

8.0

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

The Fit Adapt system hasn't improved compared to last year, but the system still works well and is super convenient. It can be hard to find the right tightness settings that work best on-court.

Watch the video

The shoe fits nicely with the automated lace system.

Watch the video

7.0

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

I experienced some pinching pain and cramping because I wasn't able to adjust the lacing to my feet.

Watch the video

Outdoor of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

Expert Outdoor Rating: 0.0(ranks #158 of 191)

User Outdoor Rating: NA

no

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

The rubber is super soft and frays easily - definitely don't play outdoors in these.

Watch the video

The traction has frayed for me and for the price, I wouldn't take these outdoors.

Watch the video

Width of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

slightly narrow

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

slightly narrow

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

Pretty narrow fit.

Watch the video

regularly wide

For a better fit, wide footers might want to go up half a size.

Watch the video

regularly wide

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

Not nearly as narrow as the Adapt Pro BB 1.0.

Watch the video

Size of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

true to size

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

true to size

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

I went true to size which is pretty snug.

Watch the video

true to size

True to size for regular footers and go up half a size for wide footers.

Watch the video

true to size

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

Runs true to size.

Watch the video

Источник: https://www.thehoopsgeek.com/shoe-reviews/nike-adapt-bb-20/

Nike’s new $350 “smart” shoe is its most unusual sneaker yet

All around you could hear the motors going, a slight mechanical wheeze announcing the tightening or loosening of sneakers. It was constantly in the background at Nike’s unveiling of its newest innovation, the Nike Adapt BB, at its offices in New York today (Jan. 15).

“No shoe yet has been iconic audibly,” said Ross Klein, a senior design director in Nike’s innovation department. ”As we were working out the torque and the amount of force that the system has, we really enjoyed the sound.”

That a basketball sneaker even has a recognizable sound is one of several things that makes the Adapt BB unusual. The shoes, which cost a hefty $350 and release in mid-February, contain smartphone-grade electronics, including the CPU and memory, according to Nike. They need to be charged, which users do with a specially adapted Qi wireless charger. The process takes a few hours, and the battery life lasts about two weeks.

Put your foot in the Adapt BB and it will automatically sense its volume and close around it. You control the fit further with buttons on the side of each shoe, or you can do it via sliders on an app. If you choose to go that route—you don’t have to—you scan a chip in the shoes to pair them with the app, allowing you, and only you, to tighten or loosen them from your phone. One button on the app lets you release the tension, or restore it to its last setting, with a single tap.

Marc Bain/Quartz

That sounds like an excess of technology just to make your shoes snug, but the real purpose of the app is that it’s the interface for an ongoing relationship among you, Nike, and your shoes. If you opt in, Nike can receive data from your shoes, and occasionally update the firmware in them wirelessly, to make the shoes work better for your personal preferences. (The company emphasizes that it does not, and has no plans, to sell user data.)

It’s a strange concept, updating your shoes. The first update will come in a few weeks, and will allow users to save fit preferences. If there’s one fit you like for playing basketball, you can program that in and then switch to it easily. If there’s another you prefer for casual use, you can save that one too. Does the average person need numerous fits on file? Probably not, but the option will be there. Nike said it has several updates in the pipeline, but declined to say what sorts of features they would include.

This abundance of technology in a pair of sneakers all comes down to one thing: fit. Nike’s aim is to lock down your foot inside the shoe in a way that laces can’t. (“Shoelaces: you had a good run. But we think we may have finally bettered you,” the company said in a press release.) Key to this quest is a small, encased motor that took years of development and testing, not just to get the function right but also to make sure it was durable enough to endure hard, sweaty use. To close the shoes, it winds in a braided cord that cinches around your instep and behind your ankle, while pulling a tough mesh snug around the foot. The mesh, which Nike designed itself, molds to your foot based on where it’s exerting force to make for a close fit.

Marc Bain/Quartz

The concept arguably isn’t too different from the way existing knit uppers and lacing systems, such as Nike’s Flyknit and Flywire, function, hugging your foot all around and pulling the whole upper tight around your foot when you pull the laces. But Nike claims the fit system in Adapt BB does it better than anything it has developed before. “Everything is coming much closer, and contouring closer to the foot,” Klein says. It shapes to your arch and the bottom of your foot, too, something he says previous fit systems and materials haven’t done.

On foot, the shoes did feel very secure, like they were applying pressure that was distributed around the whole foot. It gave me a sense of being buckled in. I was able to tighten them enough that I thought they might cut off circulation in the top of my foot and had to ease back on the in-app sliders.

During the morning-long presentation for press and other guests, a few Nike staff noted that an independent study by the University of Denver found the Adapt BB reduced the foot’s movement inside the shoe by up to 40%. Jordan Rice, the senior director of Nike smart systems engineering, compared the Adapt BB to Nike’s Zoom Vaporfly 4%, a running shoe that testing by the University of Colorado found reduced the amount of energy runners used by 4%, allowing them to run faster for longer. “This is the equivalent of that for basketball,” Rice noted.

Marc Bain/Quartz

In basketball, players run, jump, and cut quickly, putting tremendous pressure on certain parts of the foot and the shoe as they change direction. A shoe that really does hold the foot more securely in place could potentially offer an advantage. The late John Wooden, who coached the basketball team at University of California-Los Angeles to 10 championships in 12 years in the 1960s and 1970s, would even start with new players by teaching them how to properly put on their socks and tie their shoelaces. It would help them to avoid blisters and other injuries, and he believed those small details were the foundation of great play.

At this stage, it’s not clear whether any performance benefits will be worth the price premium for people other than professional athletes. But Nike does plan to expand the technology in the near future to other sports, such as running, and even lifestyle shoes, where performance isn’t a top priority. It clearly sees a lot of opportunity in the technology, and expects it to help the company with the strong roll it’s currently on, especially in the US, where it’s rebounding after a couple years of ceding ground to Adidas. Rice said Nike is “sensitive” to the high price of the shoes and working to make them more widely available.

Nike

In the meantime, the sneaker is getting its NBA debut tomorrow, when Jayson Tatum of the Boston Celtics will wear them in a game against the Toronto Raptors, marking a milestone in a concept that started literally decades ago. The origins of Nike’s idea date back to the auto-lacing shoe Nike design legend Tinker Hatfield first imagined for the movie Back to the Future II. Nike set out to make that fantasy real, and along the way, got the idea that a shoe that tightens via technology rather than manual tying could offer a performance benefit in sports.

The notion led Nike to develop the HyperAdapt 1.0, a $720 self-tightening shoe for athletes that was to be the first step toward sneakers that fit unlike anything before. The ultimate goal was a shoe that would adapt on its own, responding to the way an athlete’s foot can swell during a game. The Adapt BB isn’t quite there, but it’s another step in that evolution, and viable enough to be the first-ever self-tightening shoe that will see use in the NBA.

This story has been updated with the name of the university that Nike says carried out the study on the Adapt BB.

Источник: https://qz.com/quartzy/1524594/nikes-new-adapt-bb-sneakers-to-be-worn-by-nba-player-jayson-tatum/

By Mark Wilson8 minute Read

For the past three years, a team inside Nike has been working on a shoe that could change the trajectory of the company. It’s the most-tested piece of footwear Nike has ever released. Athletes, ranging from high schoolers to pros, wore it for more than 27,000 miles on the court. Laces were snapped. Circuits were crushed underfoot. In the end, Nike developed a final product it calls Nike Adapt BB (the “BB” stands for “basketball”).

At a glance, it’s a high-tech, low-top basketball shoe with self-tightening Power Laces. It’s the first time the legendary shoe designer Tinker Hatfield’s 30-year-old vision from Back to the Future II has come to life–at least in the form of a shoe that Nike is willing to deem a performance-level product (the company released a pair of self-lacing shoes back in 2016).

But more importantly, it’s the first digitally connected shoe that doesn’t just measure your activity the way Nike+ technologies have for years. Instead, the Adapt BB can actively alter its shape, adapting in ways that fixed foams and Flyknits never could, whether that’s locking on tight to your foot during a drive to the hoop, or just loosening your kicks into slipper mode after a long day at the office.

“We’re moving from a fixed state of performance to something more fluid and dynamic,” says Eric Avar, creative director of innovation at Nike, who was the 15th designer Nike hired 27 years ago. “As long as I’ve been here at Nike, this has been a conversation, and I think we’re just starting to see it come to fruition.”

The Nike Adapt BB debuts technology that Nike executives readily put on the same pedestal as Nike Air. But for Nike, the Adapt BB is just the first step on a long journey toward making shoes that can literally feel your pain and react to it–the sort of shapeshifting apparel teased by researchers for years. It’s just the sort of radical product that proves that Nike, despite being the number-one shoe manufacturer in the world, sitting on a few years of solid growth and a strong appetite from China, doesn’t want to leave room for competitors to catch up.

The Adapt BB will be available on February 17 for $350, but the public can expect countless additional updates to the Nike Adapt platform–mix of sensors, processors, and digital software–which will eventually be applied to other products to tackle problems beyond just fit. In fact, Adapt technology is expected to come to other Nike shoes and clothing in the months and years to come. The company’s apparel will soon tailor itself to you, at a moment’s notice.

The Shoe

The Nike Adapt BB is an unabashed tech product, complete with two glowing LED circles in the sole that are meant to anthropomorphize the shoe with eyes, suggesting that the footwear is alive, if only a little. The shoes connect to your smartphone of choice via Bluetooth–you can even use your phone to change the color of the LED lights. To keep the shoes powered, the soles rest on an inductive charger, which tops off their batteries to run about 10 days on a charge.

To skeptics, these tropes might make a bad first impression. Charging! Lights! Smart shoes have failed to catch fire over the past few years–including Nike’s own launch of Nike+ basketball shoes in 2012.

But Nike’s meticulous attention to classic shoe design can’t be denied. The outer shell of the shoe fits like a sock, woven from Nike’s yarn-like Flyknit fabric. Inside that layer is basically a whole other shoe, woven from Nike’s firmer, newer Quadfitmaterial, complete with a more typical tongue. This double-stacked mix of materials and construction is the result of multiple fit studies performed within Nike to help make all the new tech in the shoe feel both comfortable and familiar.

Ask anyone at Nike why they launched Adapt technologies with a basketball shoe, and they’ll tell you it’s because basketball is the most challenging vertical–a combination of big jumps, hard landings, and lateral cuts that are more explosive and less predictable than any other sport. Question why they started the Adapt platform with a self-tightening “lace engine,” and they’ll explain it’s because fit is the most important quality of any shoe.

Case in point: LeBron James takes 10 minutes to lace up his shoes before a game to get that perfect level of “containment,” according to Nike. Containment is the phenomenon in which the bottom of your foot and the sole of your shoe become a single entity, so that you don’t slip or lose any energy as you move.

The Nike Adapt BB’s primary goal is to automate containment. The shoe doesn’t have laces as you know them. You slip your foot inside, and with a squeeze of buttons hidden in the upper, or a tap of a smartphone app, a series of integrated straps wrapping around your foot will tighten down to your preferred level. Inside the shoe, the lace engine–which is a small gear box that fits into the midsole–features sensors and microprocessors that spool up loose slack with 32 pounds of pressure to tighten the upper without yanking with the tips of your fingers.

Getting the perfect amount of tightness was a challenge, because fit is at least partially subjective–and because you don’t always want shoes to fit the same way.

“If you’re going to have a shoe you wear all day long, generally people don’t want an ultra-tight, form-fitting, no-room-for-breathing experience,” says Michael Donaghu, vice president of innovation at Nike. “But if you’re lining up at the starting line of the 100m final of the Olympic Games, you have your shoe so tightly fit to your body.”

Nike’s solution was twofold. First, the designers built extra foam into the tongue and the heel of the shoe, to create a bit of wiggle room when it comes to locking down without squashing your foot. The second solution was to create “modes” of tightness. When you first set up your shoe–with the aid of an iPhone or Android phone–it gradually tightens to help you find your primary mode. After that, you can set up other modes. So if you’re an athlete, you might want a Bench mode that’s loose, a Warm Up mode that’s medium tight, and a Game mode that’s super locked down. Through the game, you could adjust your fit by tapping at the shoe or your smartphone, rather than re-lacing. Perhaps smartphone-managed presets sound like a headache. But they come with a big advantage: Nike claims the Adapt BB’s Power Laces provide a 40% improvement to containment over their best basketball shoe.

The Platform

The Nike Adapt platform is a lot more than the lace engine. It’s what Nike’s designers and engineers compare to an iPhone that lives under your foot–capable of withstanding someone literally jumping on it again and again–with enough durability to actually outlast the foams and cloths of the shoe itself. The hardware will be constantly iterated upon (the company is already planning second and third versions). And it will collect an unprecedented amount of data about human movement, akin to what Nike collects in its own internal Performance Lab. “Not like GPS,” cautions Donaghu. “Literally the forces you are using.”

For that data, Nike has many plans–first and foremost of which is creating shoes that will adjust to your needs in real time, not just through presets.

“If your feet swell or socks change, we do have the ability to understand that,” says Jordan Rice, senior director and smart systems engineer. “And it’s the world’s first firmware updatable shoe, so there’s plenty of opportunity [to take advantage of it].” From my interviews with Nike, it seemed plausible that the BB will receive such an update.

The other aspect of this data collection could inform how you train or even play. Here’s where the connected smartphone app comes in, providing all sorts of feedback to the user that screen-less shoes can’t.

“If we see you’re running without perfect bilateral balance, we know that now. We can change the way you train to get stronger, maybe head off injury,” says Donaghu. “Another thing we have is this unbelievable partnership of teammates and elite athletes in every sport. It has been difficult to share how Michael Jordan moves, deeply. How do we bring what an athlete knows and does [to you]?”

I float the possibility of a “Couch to Dunk” mode, much like the famous “Couch to 5K” running plan–a set regimen anyone could follow to learn how to dunk. Donaghu confirms this is just the sort of thing they’d like to bring consumers, to create a more long-tail relationship after a shoe is purchased.

This digital-tracking relationship may worry some privacy-minded athletes. Nike claims that sharing your data with the company will always be completely opt-in on the Adapt platform. Nike Adapt BB’s fit will be customizable “forever” without “making you opt-in to anything,” according to Donaghu. And Adapt’s services will be tiered, allowing you to use some features by sharing some, but not all of your data. Furthermore, Nike promises to never share your data with third parties–though of course that promise alone can’t stop a data breach.

If you squint through all the design and technology, you can spot a deeper business plan at play. It’s easy to imagine Nike using Adapt to diversify its revenue from products into services. While Nike does not break out revenue from services in public accounting, it’s hard to imagine the brand is making much, if anything, from its now-free Nike+ subscriptions. Even companies like Apple are eyeing services because, sooner or later, it just gets hard to sell more things. While Nike representatives tell me they have no immediate plans to create revenue from the Adapt digital product, it’s easy to imagine future opportunities including subscriptions and one-off workout plans, if it scales.

But to pigeonhole Nike Adapt as some subscription-based revenue generator misses out on what the product means to veteran designers working within Nike–and what it could mean for the future of apparel.

“We believe a big portion of the future of performance will be adaptive . . . It might be electro-mechanically based right now. That adaptation may evolve to smart fibers; it may evolve to being more organic, and a natural extension of the body,” says Avar. “Although we’re super excited about this product and where it is right now, it is just one small step on a much broader journey…” he continues, before adding, with a sweeping optimism that feels very Nike, “…how we can blur the line between advances in the digital world and technological world and, fundamentally, what it means to be human.”

Источник: https://www.fastcompany.com/90291303/nikes-big-bet-on-the-future-of-connected-shoes

Nike Adapt

The Adapt App gives you exclusive access to the latest and greatest features of your Nike Adapt footwear.

CONTROL THE FIT FROM YOUR PHONE
Tighten, loosen and fine-tune the fit of each shoe using the Adapt App.

ADJUST WITH GESTURES, HANDS FREE
Change your fit when you’re on the go using the Gestures feature. It’s as easy as tapping your heel and doesn’t require a phone, so you can stay focused on your activity.

PRESET AND CUSTOM MODES
The first time you put on your shoes, the app will create two modes; one tuned for activity and the other relaxing. You can also create personalized fits with custom modes.

ADD GOOGLE ASSISTANT SHORTCUTS
Instantly adjust your shoes using only your voice with Google Assistant.

THEMED INTERFACE
Every detail within the app matches the look and feel of the shoes you’re connected to.

CUSTOMIZE THE COLORS & LIGHT EFFECTS
Light packs combine iconic Nike colors with pulsing, strobe and gradient light effects. Set how long you want your shoes to glow, or turn off the lights completely.

CHECK YOUR CHARGE
Know exactly how much power you have left, and get notified when you need to charge your shoes.

SECURELY CONNECT YOUR SHOES
The Adapt App gives you a secure connection to your Nike Adapt shoes. Once your shoes are paired, only you can control your fit.

The Adapt App allows you to remotely adjust the fit of your Nike Adapt shoes and requires data like current fit, LED color and battery level to be transmitted from the shoes to the app. For more information, go to nike.com/adapt/support.

Источник: https://play.google.com/

Adapt bb nike shoes -

Nike has revealed a futuristic new self-lacing sneaker that's half the price of its original model as it charts a course for 'footwear to firmware'

  • Nike revealed a new shoe called the Nike Adapt BB on Tuesday. 
  • The shoe features the next generation of Nike's EARL self-lacing technology, as well as a companion app that can instantly change how the shoes fit using Bluetooth.
  • It will launch on February 17 and cost $350 — far cheaper than Nike's first self-lacing shoe.
  • Nike execs are calling the Adapt BB the start of the company's evolution from "footwear to firmware," with more self-lacing shoes on the way.

NEW YORK — "Say goodbye to the shoelace," Michael Donaghu, Nike's director of global footwear innovation, told a group of assembled media and influencers from a stage in the company's New York headquarters on Tuesday.

The presentation was held to reveal the Nike Adapt BB, the company's new version of a self-lacing shoe. It's a performance-focused and heavily upgraded version of Nike's first self-lacing shoe, the Hyperadapt 1.0, which was built for general consumers. 

The BB stands for "basketball," and the shoes were created to be played in, first and foremost.

The new shoe is all about fit, Donaghu said, which is something top of mind for these players.

The Adapt allows for minute changes in tightness through a companion app, leading to 40% more "lockdown" for feet in the sneaker. Unlike the Hyperadapt, which was controlled by physical buttons on the side of the shoe, the app is the only way to control how this new shoe fits.

Nike Adapt BB
Nike

The new shoe is targeted directly at basketball athletes, but that's a market that is shrinking, according to NPD analyst Matt Powell. Fewer people are playing basketball, Powell tweeted, and sales of basketball sneakers are expected to decline this year.

The Adapt BB is smart enough, however, to adapt to a wearer's foot at the touch of a button. The app also lets users change the color of the glowing twin dots on the midsole of the shoe to 14 different colors.

Nike will begin offering the Adapt BB in February for $350 — less than half the Hyperadapt's original price of $720. It comes with a wireless charging mat, which can charge the shoes in three hours for two weeks of wear time.

A shoe that can really connect

The new shoe is also connected, unlocking its potential beyond offering exact fit.

"We'rebeginningtotalkaboutmorethanjusttheproductitself," Donaghu said.

Read more: Nike says it's going to make cooler, cheaper sneakers as sales soar

Much of that functionality won't be available at launch or in this first iteration, but it's the start of where Nike is going with its tech-enabled footwear.

The Adapt can send data about usage and analytics back to Nike, should users allow that. The data could also eventually be used to track athletes' movement and performance, which Nike says can help it offer new products or services to customers.

Nike
Business Insider/Dennis Green

"We are essentially putting in a mobile sport research lab on the feet of athletes all over the world," Donaghu said, adding that Nike will provide incentives to share this data.

Users can also update the firmware on the shoe, potentially unlocking additional functionality.

It's also the beginning of the Adapt platform, which Nike said it hopes to expand into running and lifestyle categories with different shoes. 

Nike allowed attendees hands-on experience with the shoe, along with a pre-paired smartphone for testing purposes. The first impression is that the adaptive lacing system is very comfortable, offering a very snug feeling. The interface is easy to use, and the shoes can get extremely tight.

The shoes were also surprisingly loud due to the speed at which the internal motors clamp down on the foot. For whatever reason, the experience was less disorienting than lacing up the Hyperadapt was.

Jayson Tatum of the Boston Celtics will debut the shoe in his team's game against the Toronto Raptors on Wednesday. 

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/nike-new-self-lacing-sneaker-adapt-bb-2019-1

Hey Google, Ask Nike

The first ever voice-activated shoe drop — a live broadcast turn e-commerce experience that prompted the Adapt BBs to sell out in 6 minutes.

 

To give fans early access to the power-lacing Adapt BB, Nike teamed up with Google to create a live, in-game shopping experience where fans could get what their favorite athletes were wearing during the game simply by asking Google Assistant.

 

Nike hyped the voice-powered shoe release through social and digital out-of-home takeovers — priming fans to interact with Google Assistant. We shot NBA stars Jayson Tatum and Kyle Kuzma who answered fan questions in custom videos on Google Assistant, then debuted the shoes during the game on TNT. The shoes received prominent coverage — including a courtside segment, on-screen messages to get people talking with Google Assistant, and a halftime show takeover where commentator Ernie Johnson announced to fans could buy the shoes if they asked Google Assistant how to get a pair.

 

The shoe sold out in six minutes, lighting up a new way for fans to shop what their favorite athletes are wearing — all they have to do is ask.

Источник: https://www.rga.com/work/case-studies/hey-google-ask-nike

By Mark Wilson8 minute Read

For the past three years, a team inside Nike has been working on a shoe that could change the trajectory of the company. It’s the most-tested piece of footwear Nike has ever released. Athletes, ranging from high schoolers to pros, wore it for more than 27,000 miles on the court. Laces were snapped. Circuits were crushed underfoot. In the end, Nike developed a final product it calls Nike Adapt BB (the “BB” stands for “basketball”).

At a glance, it’s a high-tech, low-top basketball shoe with self-tightening Power Laces. It’s the first time the legendary shoe designer Tinker Hatfield’s 30-year-old vision from Back to the Future II has come to life–at least in the form of a shoe that Nike is willing to deem a performance-level product (the company released a pair of self-lacing shoes back in 2016).

But more importantly, it’s the first digitally connected shoe that doesn’t just measure your activity the way Nike+ technologies have for years. Instead, the Adapt BB can actively alter its shape, adapting in ways that fixed foams and Flyknits never could, whether that’s locking on tight to your foot during a drive to the hoop, or just loosening your kicks into slipper mode after a long day at the office.

“We’re moving from a fixed state of performance to something more fluid and dynamic,” says Eric Avar, creative director of innovation at Nike, who was the 15th designer Nike hired 27 years ago. “As long as I’ve been here at Nike, this has been a conversation, and I think we’re just starting to see it come to fruition.”

The Nike Adapt BB debuts technology that Nike executives readily put on the same pedestal as Nike Air. But for Nike, the Adapt BB is just the first step on a long journey toward making shoes that can literally feel your pain and react to it–the sort of shapeshifting apparel teased by researchers for years. It’s just the sort of radical product that proves that Nike, despite being the number-one shoe manufacturer in the world, sitting on a few years of solid growth and a strong appetite from China, doesn’t want to leave room for competitors to catch up.

The Adapt BB will be available on February 17 for $350, but the public can expect countless additional updates to the Nike Adapt platform–mix of sensors, processors, and digital software–which will eventually be applied to other products to tackle problems beyond just fit. In fact, Adapt technology is expected to come to other Nike shoes and clothing in the months and years to come. The company’s apparel will soon tailor itself to you, at a moment’s notice.

The Shoe

The Nike Adapt BB is an unabashed tech product, complete with two glowing LED circles in the sole that are meant to anthropomorphize the shoe with eyes, suggesting that the footwear is alive, if only a little. The shoes connect to your smartphone of choice via Bluetooth–you can even use your phone to change the color of the LED lights. To keep the shoes powered, the soles rest on an inductive charger, which tops off their batteries to run about 10 days on a charge.

To skeptics, these tropes might make a bad first impression. Charging! Lights! Smart shoes have failed to catch fire over the past few years–including Nike’s own launch of Nike+ basketball shoes in 2012.

But Nike’s meticulous attention to classic shoe design can’t be denied. The outer shell of the shoe fits like a sock, woven from Nike’s yarn-like Flyknit fabric. Inside that layer is basically a whole other shoe, woven from Nike’s firmer, newer Quadfitmaterial, complete with a more typical tongue. This double-stacked mix of materials and construction is the result of multiple fit studies performed within Nike to help make all the new tech in the shoe feel both comfortable and familiar.

Ask anyone at Nike why they launched Adapt technologies with a basketball shoe, and they’ll tell you it’s because basketball is the most challenging vertical–a combination of big jumps, hard landings, and lateral cuts that are more explosive and less predictable than any other sport. Question why they started the Adapt platform with a self-tightening “lace engine,” and they’ll explain it’s because fit is the most important quality of any shoe.

Case in point: LeBron James takes 10 minutes to lace up his shoes before a game to get that perfect level of “containment,” according to Nike. Containment is the phenomenon in which the bottom of your foot and the sole of your shoe become a single entity, so that you don’t slip or lose any energy as you move.

The Nike Adapt BB’s primary goal is to automate containment. The shoe doesn’t have laces as you know them. You slip your foot inside, and with a squeeze of buttons hidden in the upper, or a tap of a smartphone app, a series of integrated straps wrapping around your foot will tighten down to your preferred level. Inside the shoe, the lace engine–which is a small gear box that fits into the midsole–features sensors and microprocessors that spool up loose slack with 32 pounds of pressure to tighten the upper without yanking with the tips of your fingers.

Getting the perfect amount of tightness was a challenge, because fit is at least partially subjective–and because you don’t always want shoes to fit the same way.

“If you’re going to have a shoe you wear all day long, generally people don’t want an ultra-tight, form-fitting, no-room-for-breathing experience,” says Michael Donaghu, vice president of innovation at Nike. “But if you’re lining up at the starting line of the 100m final of the Olympic Games, you have your shoe so tightly fit to your body.”

Nike’s solution was twofold. First, the designers built extra foam into the tongue and the heel of the shoe, to create a bit of wiggle room when it comes to locking down without squashing your foot. The second solution was to create “modes” of tightness. When you first set up your shoe–with the aid of an iPhone or Android phone–it gradually tightens to help you find your primary mode. After that, you can set up other modes. So if you’re an athlete, you might want a Bench mode that’s loose, a Warm Up mode that’s medium tight, and a Game mode that’s super locked down. Through the game, you could adjust your fit by tapping at the shoe or your smartphone, rather than re-lacing. Perhaps smartphone-managed presets sound like a headache. But they come with a big advantage: Nike claims the Adapt BB’s Power Laces provide a 40% improvement to containment over their best basketball shoe.

The Platform

The Nike Adapt platform is a lot more than the lace engine. It’s what Nike’s designers and engineers compare to an iPhone that lives under your foot–capable of withstanding someone literally jumping on it again and again–with enough durability to actually outlast the foams and cloths of the shoe itself. The hardware will be constantly iterated upon (the company is already planning second and third versions). And it will collect an unprecedented amount of data about human movement, akin to what Nike collects in its own internal Performance Lab. “Not like GPS,” cautions Donaghu. “Literally the forces you are using.”

For that data, Nike has many plans–first and foremost of which is creating shoes that will adjust to your needs in real time, not just through presets.

“If your feet swell or socks change, we do have the ability to understand that,” says Jordan Rice, senior director and smart systems engineer. “And it’s the world’s first firmware updatable shoe, so there’s plenty of opportunity [to take advantage of it].” From my interviews with Nike, it seemed plausible that the BB will receive such an update.

The other aspect of this data collection could inform how you train or even play. Here’s where the connected smartphone app comes in, providing all sorts of feedback to the user that screen-less shoes can’t.

“If we see you’re running without perfect bilateral balance, we know that now. We can change the way you train to get stronger, maybe head off injury,” says Donaghu. “Another thing we have is this unbelievable partnership of teammates and elite athletes in every sport. It has been difficult to share how Michael Jordan moves, deeply. How do we bring what an athlete knows and does [to you]?”

I float the possibility of a “Couch to Dunk” mode, much like the famous “Couch to 5K” running plan–a set regimen anyone could follow to learn how to dunk. Donaghu confirms this is just the sort of thing they’d like to bring consumers, to create a more long-tail relationship after a shoe is purchased.

This digital-tracking relationship may worry some privacy-minded athletes. Nike claims that sharing your data with the company will always be completely opt-in on the Adapt platform. Nike Adapt BB’s fit will be customizable “forever” without “making you opt-in to anything,” according to Donaghu. And Adapt’s services will be tiered, allowing you to use some features by sharing some, but not all of your data. Furthermore, Nike promises to never share your data with third parties–though of course that promise alone can’t stop a data breach.

If you squint through all the design and technology, you can spot a deeper business plan at play. It’s easy to imagine Nike using Adapt to diversify its revenue from products into services. While Nike does not break out revenue from services in public accounting, it’s hard to imagine the brand is making much, if anything, from its now-free Nike+ subscriptions. Even companies like Apple are eyeing services because, sooner or later, it just gets hard to sell more things. While Nike representatives tell me they have no immediate plans to create revenue from the Adapt digital product, it’s easy to imagine future opportunities including subscriptions and one-off workout plans, if it scales.

But to pigeonhole Nike Adapt as some subscription-based revenue generator misses out on what the product means to veteran designers working within Nike–and what it could mean for the future of apparel.

“We believe a big portion of the future of performance will be adaptive . . . It might be electro-mechanically based right now. That adaptation may evolve to smart fibers; it may evolve to being more organic, and a natural extension of the body,” says Avar. “Although we’re super excited about this product and where it is right now, it is just one small step on a much broader journey…” he continues, before adding, with a sweeping optimism that feels very Nike, “…how we can blur the line between advances in the digital world and technological world and, fundamentally, what it means to be human.”

Источник: https://www.fastcompany.com/90291303/nikes-big-bet-on-the-future-of-connected-shoes

Nike Adapt

The Adapt App gives you exclusive access to the latest and greatest features of your Nike Adapt footwear.

CONTROL THE FIT FROM YOUR PHONE
Tighten, loosen and fine-tune the fit of each shoe using the Adapt App.

ADJUST WITH GESTURES, HANDS FREE
Change your fit when you’re on the go using the Gestures feature. It’s as easy as tapping your heel and doesn’t require a phone, so you can stay focused on your activity.

PRESET AND CUSTOM MODES
The first time you put on your shoes, the app will create two modes; one tuned for activity and the other relaxing. You can also create personalized fits with custom modes.

ADD GOOGLE ASSISTANT SHORTCUTS
Instantly adjust your shoes using only your voice with Google Assistant.

THEMED INTERFACE
Every detail within the app matches the look and feel of the shoes you’re connected to.

CUSTOMIZE THE COLORS & LIGHT EFFECTS
Light packs combine iconic Nike colors with pulsing, strobe and gradient light effects. Set how long you want your shoes to glow, or turn off the lights completely.

CHECK YOUR CHARGE
Know exactly how much power you have left, and get notified when you need to charge your shoes.

SECURELY CONNECT YOUR SHOES
The Adapt App gives you a secure connection to your Nike Adapt shoes. Once your shoes are paired, only you can control your fit.

The Adapt App allows you to remotely adjust the fit of your Nike Adapt shoes and requires data like current fit, LED color and battery level to be transmitted from the shoes to the app. For more information, go to nike.com/adapt/support.

Источник: https://play.google.com/

Nike Adapt BB 2.0

At $400 the Nike Adapt BB 2.0 is the most expensive basketball shoe currently on the market. Is it also the best? The herringbone pattern and translucent rubber work very well on clean courts, but if there's only a little bit of dust present you will need to wipe consistently. The Cushlon foam and Zoom Turbo in the forefoot give you a bouncy and responsive ride similar to the Kyrie 6. The materials get the job done but they feel cheap, plasticky, and are super heavy. The electric self-lacing system is super convenient to use but it can be hard to find the perfect setting as you are not able to adjust the lacing systems to fit the shape of your feet. Overall, the Adapt BB 2.0 is only recommended for sneakerheads who can spare $400 easily - there are much-better performers out there for a fraction of the price.

See all 4 reviews

Expert Reviews of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

Expert Rating: 8.1(ranks #149 of 191)

8.2

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

Overall, I found that the Nike Adapt BB 2.0 was better than the original Adapt BB, but I still don’t feel that these are necessarily for me.

Watch the Video

Hands-on with Nike’s self-lacing, app-controlled sneaker of the future

I flew across the country to Portland to experience the Adapt BB, Nike’s new self-lacing, Bluetooth-enabled sneakers, but the guy showing me around campus is wearing a pair of Zoom Flys that refuse to stay tied. Within 10 minutes of tying them, they’re untied again, flailing all over. I hate when people point out my untied shoes, but his feel intentional. Of course I notice the laces. Of course I point them out. He laughs and swears he’s not doing this on purpose, that Nike hasn’t deliberately set up my visit with a scene out of an infomercial fail.

The Adapt BB — the BB stands for “basketball” — build on Nike’s decades-long dream to create an auto-lacing smart shoe that adapts to wearers’ feet. The company wants to fundamentally change footwear and, of course, sell more shoes.

Imagine: your feet swell during a basketball game because you’ve been running back and forth on the court, and your sneakers detect your blood pressure. Instead of reaching down and untying your laces, the shoes loosen automatically. Never again will you have to fuss around with your laces because, guess what, your shoes already know what you want to do.

“That is the broader vision, or the biggest dream, that the product becomes so synergistic to your body. It just knows almost kind of what you’re thinking,” says Eric Avar, VP & creative director at Nike Innovation. “It’s a natural extension of your body.”

This imaginary, all-knowing shoe doesn’t exist yet. Instead, the Adapt BB represent the next step in that dream product journey. This is the shoe that’ll make self-lacing technology available to more people and get them used to the idea of an app-controlled shoe.

The Adapt BB are a pair of sneakers, sure, but they’re connected tech, too, which means that if Nike pulls off its goal of making a popular, smart footwear line, we’re going to have to care for our shoes differently than we ever have before. We’ll charge them wirelessly, update their companion phone apps, and replace their batteries like we’re starting to do with our iPhones. That’s a lot to ask of people, and that’s not even everything Nike needs to accomplish. Beyond fundamentally changing how we think about shoes, the company has to confront new responsibilities and challenges, like e-waste and tech degradation. The Adapt BB are a big bet for Nike, but the company seems confident that customers will get on board with whatever they sell. (Well, unless they prefer Adidas.)

I’m promised the shoes will move me. Nike says wearing them will be like trying a TV remote for the first time. I’ve grown up with remotes my whole life.

“I’m old enough to remember when you had to get off the couch to change the channel, like it’s that level of wow,” says Dustin Tolliver, senior product director in basketball footwear.

Adapt BB’s predecessor, the HyperAdapt 1.0, debuted in 2016 as a limited run for $720. That first go-around was bulkier, uglier. That same year, Nike sold 89 pairs of high-top adaptive fit Mags, just like the ones in Back to the Future Part II. These sneakers were more of a novelty, and they were certainly not built for a large consumer market. The Adapt BB are something completely new. They forgo anything that resembles a lace, and they ship with Bluetooth connectivity so wearers can tighten and loosen their shoes from their phone. They can even choose the color the sneakers emit when in tightening mode. Adapt BB will debut on the NBA court on both Jayson Tatum when he plays against the Raptors and on Luka Dončić when he plays against the Spurs. Both games are on January 16th.

The shoes will be available for preorder today, and they will officially go on sale on February 17th at Nike stores, online, and through the SNKRS app for $350.

Nike has built connected footwear before — remember the Nike+iPod and the Nike+ Training? — but the company is serious about making adaptive fit a thing. A mysterious but seemingly thoroughly built-out product road map is mentioned to me multiple times throughout my visit. I get the impression that Nike wants adaptive fit technology to be a data-fueled platform with a storied product lineage. Just like we look to the original iPhone to see how far we’ve come with smartphones, we’ll look at the original adaptive shoes and marvel at the fact that we ever used laces.

These new shoes are “smart,” but not in the most obvious sense. Right now, they don’t even track steps or activity levels. They just tighten and loosen at the tap of an app, or whenever someone sticks their feet inside them.

“What we wanted to do was solve something that we knew consumers wanted first as a problem because we look at things like step counting and activity tracking as easy things to add around that, but it’s not necessarily the reason you would go out and buy the shoe,” says Jordan Rice, senior director in Smart Systems Engineering at Nike.

He’s probably right. Sure, it’d be nice if I could wear and charge one less thing, but people like their Apple Watches and Fitbits. They don’t need tracking in a shoe immediately. While the Adapt BB look notably different than the HyperAdapt 1.0, the bigger innovation has to do with what Nike calls the “lace engine.” Every component needed to make the shoe smart lives inside that engine: a microcontroller, 505mAh battery, gyroscope, accelerometer, Bluetooth module, motor, lights, pressure sensor, capacitive touch sensor, temperature sensor, and wireless charging coil. All of the tech that you find in a smartphone is packed inside this shoe; Nike could easily update the app to start counting steps or tracking fitness.

The app walks wearers through the pairing process, which involves holding each shoe close to their phone. That process failed a couple of times during my demo. The sneakers each have a battery inside that Rice says should last 10 to 14 days on a single charge, and they’ll always save enough juice to loosen, meaning your feet will never be trapped. The shoes charge wirelessly on a new mat that Rice says is “Qi-like,” but not Qi. There’s a coil in each shoe, and to charge, the shoes have to be placed on a specific zone on the mat, which has a USB-C port. Mats won’t initially be sold individually and will instead ship with the shoes. Each pair comes with a mat, USB-C cable, and wall plug.

Yes, Adapt BB wearers will be walking around, generating heat, and jumping on top of lithium-ion batteries, which might make anyone familiar with 2016’s Samsung Galaxy Note 7 situation nervous. Still, Nike says it put the shoes through “hours and hours” of testing to make sure they don’t crack under the weight of a six-foot-something, 200-pound basketball player. Rice says that testing involved two parts: a real-world, on-athletes portion, and a lab test that included thousands of impact and impulse cycles. The impulse test attempted to seep water into the lace engine, which is sealed shut. The shoes are waterproof, so they’re safe to wear outside on a rainy day, or in “any moisture environment” that someone might encounter (although I have my doubts about the New York City subways after a rainstorm). The real-world test involved a variety of athletes, including “NCAA athletes, semi-pro athletes, athletes that play professionally overseas and come home for the summer, and regular athletes” wearing and playing in the shoes for hours.

The tightening technology relies on a single cable loop that’s threaded through the motor, which acts as a spool. When the shoe tightens, the cable winds around the motor. Wearers can customize three presets in the app, ideally for warming up or gameplay. They can access those presets from the app, or hold down a button on the side of the shoe to go all the way from tight to loose. They can also make more precise adjustments from the app or by using those buttons. The shoe will remember the last tightness setting and default to that when being worn again.

I can’t overstate the importance of this lace engine; it’s a pivotal upgrade. The HyperAdapt 1.0 was a tangled, entwined mess that couldn’t have been easily mass-produced. With this modular component, however, Nike can pump out shoe husks, stick the lace engine inside, and create a fully connected shoe. That lace engine can go in any shoe that’s big enough to house it, regardless of the design of the shoe. It’s critical to making the Adapt BB widely available and easily repairable.

But right now, it’s not perfect. The shoes are supposed to tighten once your feet are fully inside, but they triggered at the wrong times whenever I wore them. Presumably, this will improve over time as Nike gets data from wearers.

As far as fit, imagine a toy claw machine, but the claw is flipped upside down and inside your shoe, closing in on you. That’s the sensation I felt when the shoe tightened — almost like a robot was hugging me. Compared to the Jordans I wore during my Nike campus visit, though, they were comfortable and tight enough. I can’t imagine ever adjusting them on a normal day, but once you get used to tight shoes, it’s a bummer to go back to your loose-fitting ones. It is kind of a bummer to have to tie them, too.

  • The Adapt BB app
  • The fit presets Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge
  • A couple lighting color options Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge

That said, the Adapt BB are hard to slip into, which The Verge’s video producer Vjeran Pavic discovered when he couldn’t fit into them at all. He has wide feet. I have smaller feet, or at least they’re average for women, and I still had a hard time getting into them. The latch on top is critical for pulling them up, but I really had to yank them. When it comes to sizes, Nike let me try on the only pair of women’s sevens they have, an original prototype in a colorway that doesn’t commercially exist. The shoes will only be released in men’s sizing, in sizes seven to 15, and half sizes will be available up to size 14, too. That means the smallest size is a women’s 8.5. The WNBA tells me that the smallest women’s size in the league is a men’s 6.5, so not even every professional basketball player can wear these. Nike suggested it’ll bring this technology to smaller sizes in the future, but I’m disappointed they haven’t at first.

Now, Nike knows how to build shoes, but creating a gadget requires new processes. The shoes might last a long time sitting on a shelf, but the battery inside them could degrade. (Rice is confident that the shoes will wear out before the tech, but my old Zune that’s been sitting in a drawer for 10 years doesn’t turn on anymore, simply because I stopped using it and the battery degraded.) The same could happen for these shoes if collectors keep them on a shelf. That’s a long-term problem, though, and Rice says the modular component is specifically designed to be swappable. If someone needs a repair, or if a motor dies, users can ship the shoes back to Nike, and the team can pull that lace engine out and insert a new one.

“We have to sort of crawl and then walk and then run,” says Tinker Hatfield, VP of creative concepts. “We’re past crawling. We’re walking, so to speak. So the next phase for us will be to proliferate this technology.”

It’s been two months since I visited the Nike campus, and I can still hear the distinctive sound of the Adapt BB. Strangely, it reminds me of a more harmonic version of what you hear when a Keurig brews a cup of coffee and then tosses the pod into its trash. Rice says the sound, which is an E flat Major, was a long discussion that included one engineer making it play the tone of the aliens in Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It’s valuable product currency, and the company is trying to make it synonymous with Nike. Two chords are generated: the first and second chord of the E flat Major scale when the battery is above 20 percent, and an E flat C, or an octave lower, when it’s below 20 percent. The lace engine’s plastic shell amplifies the sound. It’s pretty loud, and there’s no way to make it quieter. The entire experience is sensual, with the shoe tightening at the same time as this note playing.

Rice admits some people might not dig it. “I know it’s polarizing, but a lot of people really like it. They really like the sound, and I think it’s resonated — no pun intended — with a lot of people.”

It’s still unclear if that will be true, if one of the world’s largest apparel makers can make us love charging our shoes or feel bonded with them as they tighten around us. But Nike still knows how to lean into its greatest strength: the brand.

Subscribe!

Источник: https://www.theverge.com/2019/1/15/18167388/nike-self-lacing-shoes-adapt-bb-smart-bluetooth-app-features-battery-life-price-release-date
Read the article

8.0

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

The Zoom Turbo has a nice bounce and good impact protection. Court feel isn't great as you feel pretty high off the ground.

Watch the video

The cushion is the main highlight of the shoe. It reminds me a lot of the Kyrie 6 with the use of Zoom Turbo.

Watch the video

8.0

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

The full-length Cushlon foam with a Zoom Turbo unit adapt bb nike shoes the forefoot works well but is not as bouncy or responsive as the Zoom Turbo in the Kyrie 6.

Watch the video

Materials of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

Expert Materials Rating: 7.5(ranks #175 of 191)

User Materials Rating: NA

9.0

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

The textiles and TPU materials get the job done, but what is the weather in poplar bluff mo shoe is heavy as hell because of the electric components.

Watch the Video

Hands-on with Nike’s self-lacing, app-controlled sneaker of the future

I flew across the country to Portland to experience the Adapt BB, Nike’s new self-lacing, Bluetooth-enabled sneakers, but the guy showing me around campus is wearing a pair of Zoom Flys that refuse to stay tied. Within 10 minutes of tying them, they’re untied again, flailing all over. I hate when people point out my untied shoes, but his feel intentional. Of course I notice the laces. Of course I point them out. Adapt bb nike shoes laughs and swears he’s not doing this on purpose, that Nike hasn’t deliberately set up my visit with a scene out of an infomercial fail.

The Adapt BB — the BB stands for “basketball” — build on Nike’s decades-long dream to create an auto-lacing smart shoe that adapts to wearers’ feet. The company wants to fundamentally change footwear and, of course, sell more shoes.

Imagine: your feet swell during a basketball game because you’ve been running back and forth on the court, and your sneakers detect your blood pressure. Instead of reaching down and untying your laces, the shoes loosen automatically. Never again will you have to fuss around with your laces because, guess what, your shoes already know what you want to do.

“That is the broader vision, or the biggest dream, that the product becomes so synergistic to your body. It just knows almost kind of what you’re thinking,” says Eric Avar, VP & creative director at Nike Innovation. “It’s a natural extension of your body.”

This imaginary, all-knowing shoe doesn’t exist yet. Instead, the Adapt BB represent the next step in that dream product journey. This is the shoe that’ll make self-lacing technology available to more people and get them used to the idea of an app-controlled shoe.

The Adapt BB are a pair of sneakers, sure, but they’re connected tech, too, which means that if Nike pulls off its goal of making a popular, smart footwear line, we’re going to have to care for our shoes differently than we ever have before. We’ll charge them wirelessly, update their companion phone apps, and replace their batteries like we’re starting to do with our iPhones. That’s a lot to ask of people, and that’s not even everything Nike needs to accomplish. Beyond fundamentally changing how we think about shoes, the company has to confront new responsibilities and challenges, like e-waste and tech degradation. The Adapt BB are a big bet for Nike, but the company seems confident that customers will get on board with whatever they sell. (Well, unless they prefer Adidas.)

I’m promised the shoes will move me. Nike says wearing them will be like trying a TV remote for the first time. I’ve grown up with remotes my whole life.

“I’m old enough to remember when you had to get off the couch to change the channel, like it’s that level of wow,” says Dustin Tolliver, senior product director in basketball footwear.

Adapt BB’s predecessor, the HyperAdapt 1.0, debuted in 2016 as a limited run for $720. That first go-around was bulkier, uglier. That same year, Nike sold 89 pairs of high-top adaptive fit Mags, just like the ones in Back to the Future Part II. These sneakers were more of a novelty, and they were certainly not built for a large consumer market. The Adapt BB are something completely new. They forgo anything that resembles a lace, and they ship with Bluetooth connectivity so wearers can tighten and loosen their shoes from their phone. They can even choose the color the sneakers emit when in tightening mode. Adapt BB will debut on the NBA court on both Jayson Tatum when he plays against the Raptors and on Luka Dončić when he plays against the Spurs. Both games jose luis martinez candial on January 16th.

The shoes will be available for preorder today, and they will officially go on sale on February 17th at Nike stores, online, and through the SNKRS app for $350.

Nike rockland community college transcript built connected footwear before — remember the Nike+iPod and the Nike+ Training? — but the company is serious about making adaptive fit a thing. A mysterious but seemingly thoroughly built-out product road map is mentioned to me multiple times throughout my visit. I get the impression that Nike wants adaptive fit technology to be a data-fueled platform with a storied product lineage. Just like we look to the original iPhone to see how far we’ve come with smartphones, we’ll look at the original adaptive shoes and marvel at the fact that we ever used laces.

These new shoes are “smart,” but not in the most obvious sense. Right now, they don’t even track steps or activity levels. They just tighten and loosen at the tap of an app, or whenever someone sticks their feet inside them.

“What we wanted to do adapt bb nike shoes solve something that we knew consumers wanted first as a problem because we look at things like step counting and activity tracking as easy things to add around that, but it’s not necessarily the reason you would go out and buy the shoe,” says Jordan Rice, senior director in Smart Systems Engineering at Nike.

He’s probably right. Sure, it’d be nice if I could wear and charge one less thing, but people like their Apple Watches and Fitbits. They don’t need tracking in a shoe immediately. While the Adapt BB look notably different than the HyperAdapt 1.0, the bigger innovation has to do with what Nike calls the “lace engine.” Every component needed to make the shoe smart lives inside that engine: a microcontroller, 505mAh battery, gyroscope, accelerometer, Bluetooth module, motor, lights, pressure sensor, capacitive touch sensor, temperature sensor, and wireless charging coil. All of the tech that you find in a smartphone is packed inside this shoe; Nike could easily update the app to start counting steps or tracking fitness.

The app walks wearers through the pairing process, which involves holding each shoe close to their phone. That process failed a couple of times during my demo. The sneakers each have a battery inside that Rice says should last 10 to 14 days on a single charge, and they’ll always save enough juice to loosen, meaning your feet will never be trapped. The shoes charge wirelessly on a new mat that Rice says is “Qi-like,” but not Qi. There’s a coil in each shoe, and to charge, the shoes have to be placed on a specific zone on the mat, which has a USB-C port. Mats won’t initially be sold individually and will instead ship with the shoes. Each pair comes with a mat, USB-C cable, and wall plug.

Yes, Adapt BB wearers will be walking around, generating heat, and jumping on top of lithium-ion batteries, which might make anyone familiar with 2016’s Samsung Galaxy Note 7 situation nervous. Still, Nike says it put the shoes through “hours and hours” of testing to make sure they don’t crack under the weight of a six-foot-something, 200-pound basketball player. Rice says that testing involved two parts: a real-world, on-athletes portion, and a lab test that included thousands of impact and impulse cycles. The impulse test attempted to seep water into the lace engine, which is sealed shut. The shoes are waterproof, so they’re safe to wear outside on a rainy day, or in “any moisture environment” that someone might adapt bb nike shoes (although I have my doubts about the New York City subways after a rainstorm). The real-world test involved a variety of athletes, including “NCAA athletes, semi-pro athletes, athletes that play professionally overseas and come home for the summer, and regular athletes” wearing and playing in the shoes for hours.

The tightening technology relies on a single cable loop that’s threaded through the motor, which acts as a spool. When the shoe tightens, the cable winds around the motor. Wearers can customize three presets in the app, ideally for warming up or gameplay. They can access those presets from the app, or hold down a button on the side of the shoe to go all the way from tight to loose. They can also make more precise adjustments from the app or by using those buttons. The shoe will remember the last tightness setting and default to that when being worn again.

I can’t overstate the importance of this lace engine; it’s a pivotal upgrade. The HyperAdapt 1.0 was a tangled, entwined mess that couldn’t have been easily mass-produced. With this modular component, however, Nike can pump out shoe husks, stick the lace engine inside, and create a fully connected shoe. That lace engine can go in any shoe that’s big enough to house it, regardless of the design of the shoe. It’s critical to making the Adapt BB widely available and easily repairable.

But right now, it’s not perfect. The shoes are supposed to tighten once your feet are fully inside, but they triggered at the wrong times whenever I wore them. Presumably, this will improve over time as Nike gets data from wearers.

As far as fit, imagine a toy claw machine, but the claw is flipped upside down and inside your shoe, closing in on you. That’s the sensation I felt when the shoe tightened — almost like a robot was hugging me. Compared to the Jordans I wore during my Nike campus visit, though, they were comfortable and tight enough. I can’t imagine ever adjusting them on a normal day, but once you get used to tight shoes, it’s a bummer to go back to your loose-fitting ones. It is kind of a bummer to have to tie them, too.

  • The Adapt BB app
  • The fit presets Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge
  • A couple lighting color options Photo by Vjeran Pavic / The Verge

That said, the Adapt BB are hard to slip into, which The Verge’s video producer Vjeran Pavic discovered when he couldn’t fit into them at all. He has wide feet. I have smaller feet, or at least they’re average for women, and I still had a hard time getting into them. The latch on top is critical for pulling them up, but I really had to yank them. When it comes to sizes, Nike let me try on the only pair of women’s sevens they have, an original prototype in a colorway that doesn’t commercially exist. The shoes will only be released in men’s sizing, in sizes seven to 15, and half sizes will be available up to size 14, too. That means the smallest size is a women’s 8.5. The WNBA tells me that the smallest women’s size in the league is a men’s 6.5, so not even every professional basketball player can wear these. Nike suggested it’ll bring this technology to smaller sizes in the future, but I’m disappointed they haven’t at first.

Now, Nike knows how to build shoes, but creating a gadget requires new processes. The shoes might last a long time sitting on a shelf, but the battery inside them could degrade. (Rice is confident that the shoes will wear out before the tech, but my old Zune that’s been sitting in a drawer for 10 years doesn’t turn on anymore, simply because I stopped using it and the battery degraded.) The same could happen for these shoes if collectors keep them on a shelf. That’s a long-term problem, though, and Rice says the modular component is specifically designed to be swappable. If someone needs a repair, or if a motor dies, users can ship the shoes back to Nike, and the team can pull that lace engine out and insert a new one.

“We have to sort of crawl and then walk and then run,” says Tinker Hatfield, VP of creative concepts. “We’re past crawling. We’re walking, so to speak. So the next phase for us will be to proliferate this technology.”

It’s been two months since I visited the Nike campus, and I can still hear the distinctive sound of the Adapt BB. Strangely, it reminds me of a more harmonic version of what you hear when a Keurig brews a cup of coffee and then tosses the pod into its trash. Rice says the sound, which is an E flat Major, was a long discussion that included one engineer making it play the tone of adapt bb nike shoes aliens in Close Encounters of the Third Kind. It’s valuable product currency, and the company is trying to make it synonymous with Nike. Two chords are generated: the first and second chord of the E flat Major scale when the battery is above 20 percent, and an E flat C, or an octave lower, when it’s below 20 percent. The lace engine’s plastic shell amplifies the sound. It’s pretty loud, and there’s no way to make it quieter. The entire experience is sensual, with the shoe tightening at the same time as this note playing.

Rice admits some people might not dig it. “I know it’s polarizing, but a lot of people really like it. They really like the sound, and I think it’s resonated — no pun intended — with a lot of people.”

It’s still unclear if that will be true, if one of the world’s largest apparel makers can make us love charging our shoes or feel bonded with them as they tighten around us. But Nike still knows how to lean into its greatest strength: the brand.

Subscribe!

Источник: https://www.theverge.com/2019/1/15/18167388/nike-self-lacing-shoes-adapt-bb-smart-bluetooth-app-features-battery-life-price-release-date

Nike Adapt

The Adapt App gives you exclusive access to the latest and greatest features of your Nike Adapt footwear.

CONTROL THE FIT FROM YOUR PHONE
Tighten, loosen and fine-tune the fit of each shoe using the Adapt App.

ADJUST WITH GESTURES, HANDS Us bank loans for bad credit your fit when you’re on the go using the Gestures feature. It’s as easy as tapping your heel and doesn’t require a phone, so you can stay focused on your activity.

PRESET AND CUSTOM MODES
The first time you put on your shoes, the app will create two modes; one tuned for activity and the other relaxing. You can is columbus day a holiday in new hampshire create personalized fits with custom modes.

ADD GOOGLE ASSISTANT SHORTCUTS
Instantly adjust your shoes using only your voice with Google Assistant.

THEMED INTERFACE
Every detail within the app matches the look and feel of the shoes you’re connected to.

CUSTOMIZE THE Current home interest rates & LIGHT EFFECTS
Light packs combine iconic Nike colors with pulsing, strobe and gradient light effects. Set how long you want your shoes to glow, or turn off the lights completely.

CHECK YOUR CHARGE
Know exactly how much power you have left, and get notified when you need to charge your shoes.

SECURELY CONNECT YOUR SHOES
The Adapt App gives you a secure connection to your Nike Adapt shoes. Once your shoes are paired, only you can control your fit.

The Adapt App allows you to remotely adjust the fit of your Nike Adapt shoes and requires data like current fit, LED color and battery level to be transmitted from the shoes to the app. For more information, go to nike.com/adapt/support.

Источник: https://play.google.com/

Nike has revealed a futuristic new self-lacing sneaker that's half the price of its original model as it charts a course for 'footwear to firmware'

  • Nike revealed a new shoe called the Nike Adapt BB on Tuesday. 
  • The shoe features the next generation of Nike's EARL self-lacing technology, as well as a companion app that can instantly change how the shoes fit using Bluetooth.
  • It will launch on February 17 and cost $350 — far cheaper than Nike's first self-lacing shoe.
  • Nike execs are calling the Adapt BB the start of the company's evolution from "footwear to firmware," with more self-lacing shoes on the way.

NEW YORK — "Say goodbye to the shoelace," Michael Donaghu, Nike's director of global footwear innovation, told a group of assembled media and influencers from a stage in the company's New York headquarters on Tuesday.

The presentation was held to reveal the Nike Adapt BB, the company's new version of a self-lacing shoe. It's a performance-focused and heavily upgraded version of Nike's first self-lacing shoe, the Hyperadapt 1.0, which was built for general consumers. 

The BB stands for "basketball," and the shoes were created to be played in, first and foremost.

The new shoe is all about fit, Donaghu said, which is something top of mind for these players.

The Adapt allows for minute changes in tightness through a companion app, leading to 40% more "lockdown" for feet in the sneaker. Unlike the Hyperadapt, which was controlled by physical buttons on the side of the shoe, the app is the only way to control how this new shoe fits.

Nike Adapt BB
Nike

The new shoe is targeted directly at basketball athletes, but that's a market that is shrinking, according adapt bb nike shoes NPD analyst Matt Powell. Fewer people are playing basketball, Powell tweeted, and sales of basketball sneakers are expected to decline this year.

The Adapt BB is smart enough, however, to adapt to a wearer's foot at the touch of a button. The app also lets users change the color of the glowing twin dots on the midsole of the shoe to 14 different colors.

Nike will begin offering the Adapt BB in February for $350 — less than half the Hyperadapt's original price of $720. It comes with a wireless charging mat, which can charge the shoes in three hours for two weeks of wear time.

A shoe that can really connect

The new shoe is also connected, unlocking its potential beyond offering exact fit.

"We'rebeginningtotalkaboutmorethanjusttheproductitself," Donaghu said.

Read more: Nike says it's going to make cooler, cheaper sneakers as sales soar

Much of that functionality won't be available at launch or in this first iteration, but it's the start of where Nike is going with its tech-enabled footwear.

The Adapt can send data about usage and analytics back to Nike, should users allow that. The data could also eventually be used to track athletes' movement and performance, which Nike says can help it offer new products or services to customers.

Nike
Business Insider/Dennis Green

"We are essentially putting in a mobile sport research lab on the feet of athletes all over the world," Donaghu said, adding that Nike will provide incentives to share this data.

Users can also update the firmware on the shoe, potentially unlocking additional functionality.

It's also the beginning of the Adapt platform, which Nike said it hopes to expand into running and lifestyle categories with different shoes. 

Nike allowed attendees hands-on experience with the shoe, along with a pre-paired smartphone for testing purposes. The first impression is that the adaptive lacing system is very comfortable, optum behavioral health level of care guidelines a very snug feeling. The interface is easy to use, and the shoes can get extremely tight.

The shoes were also surprisingly loud due to the speed at which the internal motors clamp down on the foot. For whatever reason, the experience was less disorienting than lacing up the Hyperadapt was.

Jayson Tatum regions add person to bank account the Boston Celtics will debut the shoe in his team's game against the Toronto Raptors on Wednesday. 

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/nike-new-self-lacing-sneaker-adapt-bb-2019-1
Read the article

8.0

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

The Fit Adapt system hasn't improved compared to last year, but the system still works well and is super convenient. It can be hard to find the right tightness settings that work best on-court.

Watch the video

The shoe fits nicely with the automated lace system.

Watch the video

7.0

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

I experienced some pinching pain and cramping because I wasn't able to adjust the lacing to my feet.

Watch the video

Outdoor of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

Expert Outdoor Rating: 0.0(ranks #158 of 191)

User Outdoor Rating: NA

no

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

The rubber is super soft and frays easily - definitely don't play outdoors in these.

Watch the video

The traction has frayed for me and for the price, I wouldn't take these outdoors.

Watch the video

Width of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

slightly narrow

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

slightly narrow

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

Pretty narrow fit.

Watch the video

regularly wide

For a better fit, wide footers might want to go up half a size.

Watch the video

regularly wide

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

Not nearly as narrow as adapt bb nike shoes Adapt Pro BB 1.0.

Watch the video

Size of the Nike Adapt BB 2.0:

true to size

NightWing2303 [weartesters.com]

March 7, 2020

true to size

The Sole Brothers

March 3, 2020

I went true to size which is pretty snug.

Watch the video

true to size

True to size for regular footers and go up half a size for wide footers.

Watch the video

true to size

RicheeKim

February 27, 2020

Runs true to size.

Watch the video

Источник: https://www.thehoopsgeek.com/shoe-reviews/nike-adapt-bb-20/
Featured Image

Back in 2016, Nike released its first self-lacing shoes dubbed the Nike HyperAdapt with E.A.R.L. (Electric Adaptable Reaction Lacing) built with the ability to adapt to the shape of your foot in real time. The American athletic shoe titan continues to tear away from its competition, taking their self-lacing technology and concocting an advanced basketball shoe crowned the Nike Adapt BB.

While putting your opponent in check, planting yourself to set a pick, or revving your engine to pierce down the lane, your feet can expand significantly. In order to address the changing shape of your feet during game time, the self-lacing Nike Adapt bb nike shoes BB basketball sneakers utilize a custom motor and gear train to sense the tension required to keep your feet secure. With the tensile strength of the lacing, the shoes can pull with 32 lbs of force to secure your soles in a variety of movements on the hardwood floor. Through the Nike Adapt app or manually on the shoe, you can input various shoe fit settings for different moments of the game with the ‘FitAdapt’ technology. The Nike Adapt BB shoes will be tested by NBA players prior to their February 17 release.

Purchase: $350

HiConsumption is reader-supported. When you buy through links on our site, we may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more

Источник: https://hiconsumption.com/nike-adapt-bb-shoes/
nike-adapt-bb

A faulty app has tripped up Nike's $350 self-tying shoes.

Nike released the Adapt BB, its tech-infused sneaker, on Sunday during the NBA's All-Star game, along with an app that can control the shoe's fit and light-up colors.

You're able to loosen and tighten the sneakers through two buttons on the sneaker's side, but Nike executives talked up the app experience, saying that it would also help you with your fitness activities in the future.

The Adapt BB needed a firmware update in its first week, which could only be installed via an iOS or Android app, Nike executives said in January.

Now playing:Watch this: Nike's self-lacing sneaker will be worn in the NBA

4:36

But for people using Android, the app for the self-tying sneakers hasn't been a perfect fit. Multiple reviews for the Nike Adapt app on Google's Play Store said that it hasn't connected to the left shoe, and an update rendered the sneaker's main feature useless.

You're still able to wear the sneakers and walk around in them, but all the smart features from the app stopped working with the update, frustrated users said.

"The first software update for the shoe threw an error while updating, bricking the right shoe," Asa Domolky, a reviewer, wrote on the app.

The iOS version of the app has had less trouble, with over 150 reviews and adapt bb nike shoes positive experiences.

"We are seeing isolated connectivity issues related to the setup of the Nike Adapt BB and are actively working to resolve it," a Nike spokesman said in a statement. "If a consumer experiences this, we encourage them to contact Nike Consumer Services."

Faulty updates that end up disabling wearable devices have happened before. Apple pulled its Watch OS 5.1 update after it appeared to brick Series 4 Apple Watches.

Bricking tends to render devices completely useless, but at least the Adapt BB just turns into a regular pair of sneakers. You're also still able to control the fit through the buttons on the side.

The Android app's issues have Jonathan Warner, who ordered a pair of Adapt BBs, worried that he'll mess up the $350 shoes. He said he ordered them before checking the reviews for the Android app and grew concerned once he saw the flood of complaints. 

He said he's been asking his friends to borrow an iPhone to connect his sneakers when they arrive. 

"I'm afraid to set mine up when they come, that's why I need to borrow an iPhone," Warner said in a direct message. "I've made some bad life decisions, I think."

If you're having trouble with your pair of smart sneakers, you can reset the shoe's software by holding the buttons on the side.

Nike has had self-tying shoes in the past -- the $720 HyperAdapt 1.0 -- but this is the first time it's used an app to connect to the sneakers. The app also shows you the battery life left on your shoes, and you can set profiles for situations such as whether you want them to be loose when sitting at a desk or tight for running.

Like all "smart" things, Nike's new sneakers can hit tech snafus. Connected shoes also bring privacy worries, as Nike looks to collect data from the app to develop better products.

First published Feb. 20 at 6:55 a.m. PT.
Update at 7:47 a.m.: Adds details from an Adapt BB owner. At 9:41 a.m.: Adds background information on Adapt BB's update process.
Update Feb. 21 at 10:52 a.m. PT: Adds response from Nike. 

Источник: https://www.cnet.com/tech/mobile/nikes-android-app-doesnt-run-well-with-its-adapt-bb-self-tying-shoes/