https becas agora santander com

http://biblioteca.clacso.edu.ar/clacso/becas/20141128035630/ensayom- · agelaromero.pdf. modalities, Ed. Catarata (with P. Aguirre and G. Santander). http://locuraviajes.com/blog/ 2014-05-05T09:36:30+00:00 daily 1.0 http://locuraviajes.com/blog/telluride-un-poblado-histrico-de-colorado/. The session on Friday 22 you have it here https://youtu.be/NmMZLePJ3ms https://www.becas-santander.com/es AVIA in the Jaima of the Agora.

: Https becas agora santander com

Https becas agora santander com
Ally drops savings rate
Santander bank danville pa hours
SIX FLAGS LOCATIONS USA
Sligo Glass Company
REQUEST TO REMOVEJade Industrial and scaffolding, scaffoldingmast climbers .

http://jadescaffolding.com/

Jade industrial offers scaffolding for hire and supply all over Ireland, scaffold system, mast climbers, health and safety training and courses, shoring and propping. Services . 

Owen Tinkler
REQUEST TO REMOVEContact Jade Industrial Ltd, Jade scaffolding, Jade scaffold .

http://www.jadeindustrial.ie/contact.asp

Jade industrial offers scaffolding for hire and supply all over Ireland, scaffold system, mast climbers, health and safety training and courses, shoring and propping. Services . 

Kellys Of Fantane (KOF) International
REQUEST TO REMOVEJade - Contact Us

http://www.jade.ie/contact.html

E. [email protected]: GALWAY OFFICE: Unit 5 Ballybrit Industrial Estate, Galway, Ireland T: +353 (0)91 764 107 F: +353 (0)91 764 105 E. [email protected]: CORK OFFICE: 

Camellia Landscapes / Landscaping Cork
REQUEST TO REMOVEWeb design Ireland

Revista para profesores de Inglés A ñ o 2 0 1 2 • v o l. 2 0 • n os 1 y 2



A journal for teachers of English

CONTENTS 2012 · Volume 20 · Numbers 1 and 2

EDITORIAL . 5 A journal for teachers of English

Editors/Directors Ana Mª Ortega Cebreros Mª Luisa Pérez Cañado Editorial Assistants Ángela Alameda Hernández Diego Rascón Moreno Nina Karen Lancaster Juan Ráez Padilla Graphic design Ele Medios Comunicación Cover design Manuel Calzada Pérez Published by GRETA CEP de Granada Camino de Sta. Juliana, 3 18016 Granada Tel: 617 51 75 21 Web: gretateachersassociation.org/ revista Mail to: [email protected] gmail.com ISSN: 1989-7146 Depósito Legal: Gr-494/93 The articles published in this journal are submitted to a double-

Semblanza del profesor Dr. Gabriel Tejada Molina. Antonio Bueno González . 7 INTERVIEW Entrevista a Gabriel Tejada Molina. Gloria Luque Agulló . 12 IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM Building the way towards a bilingual learners’ dictionary of English: A case in point. Alfonso Rizo-Rodríguez . 18 IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM The Phonetic Alphabet for Beginners: a revision and adaptation to English for International Communication. Jesús M. Nieto García . 29 AT UNIVERSITY La formación de los maestros de inglés a lo largo de la Historia. Daniel Madrid Fernández . 36 Información sobre becas, estudios de postgrado y empleabilidad dirigida al alumnado de titulaciones filológicas. Antonio Vicente Casas Pedrosa . 54 On the use of authentic audiovisual material in the teaching of English Studies courses. A sample of activities. Francisco Javier Díaz-Pérez . 76 CULTURE AND LITERATURE Sir Húdibras. Traducción de la Parte I, Canto 1, vv. 1-236. Luciano García García . 82 Translations of Beowulf in Spain during the seventies and the eighties: “Would you rather have me ugly and faithful or beautiful and unfaithful? Eugenio M. Olivares Merino . 90

blind review process. Scientific Board Ana Almagro Esteban (University of Jaén, Spain)

Neil McLaren (University of Granada, Spain)

Amelia Barili (UC Berkeley, California)

Carmen Pérez Basanta (University of Granada, Spain)

Sonia Casal Medinabetia (University Pablo de Olavide, Spain)

Bryan Robinson (University of Granada, Spain)

ZhaHong Han (Teachers College, Columbia University, NYC)

Adelina Sánchez Espinosa (University of Granada, Spain)

Tony Harris (University of Granada, Spain)

Ian Tudor (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium)

Elaine Horwith (University of Texas at Austin)

Jean-Pierre Van Noppen (Université Libre de Bruxelles, Belgium)

Richard Kern (UC Berkeley, California)

Paige D. Ware (Southern Mehodist University, Dallas)


Este volúmen ha sido subvencionado por el Departamento de Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Jaén.


editorial

I

t is a pleasure for the editors of GRETA Journal to dedicate its 20th volume to one of the most inspirational English teaching professionals of our academic context, Dr. Gabriel Tejada Molina. After being a Primary Education teacher, Gabriel Tejada has been working for an important number of years as a teacher of English and teacher trainer in the English Philology Department of the University of Jaén, where he has shared his invaluable expertise with several generations of pre- and in-service teachers until recently, when he retired. His retirement from the teaching profession has motivated the desire among his friends and colleagues to pay a more than deserved tribute to his academic trajectory via the pages of this journal. This 20th volume of GRETA Journal opens with a semblance of Gabriel Tejada being portrayed by one of his closest friends, Antonio Bueno González, from the times when they were both studying English Philology at the University of Granada up to more recent years. This semblance, along with the INTERVIEW conducted by one of his disciples and colleagues, Gloria Luque Agulló, offers the readership a complete view of the personal and professional life of Gabriel Tejada. Other friends and colleagues of the English Philology Department of the University of Jaén have contributed to this homage in different ways. For instance, Alfonso Rizo Rodríguez sheds light on the different aspects of use and design of an indispensable tool IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM, the bilingual dictionary, according special attention to Spanish bilingual lexicography. On the other hand, in order to address the needs of those who teach and learn English phonetics IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM, Jesús M. Nieto García offers a revision and updating of the English phonetic alphabet for beginners proposed in the 1990s, taking into consideration the new reality of English as an International Language. An important group of contributions to this volume also appears related to the teaching of English AT UNIVERSITY. Within this section, Daniel Madrid Fernández (University of Granada) offers a more than welcome overview of how the issue of teacher training has been approached in our academic context from a historical perspective. Https becas agora santander com addition, Antonio Vicente Casas

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

5


Pedrosa provides very https becas agora santander com information on the wide range of study and work opportunities available to students of the degree on English Studies. On more practical grounds and closing this section of articles, Francisco Javier Díaz Pérez presents a very interesting proposal of audiovisual activities for the classroom to be used in different subject areas of the English Studies degree. Finally, the role of translation in literary studies acquires a particularly sharp relief in the CULTURE Https becas agora santander com LITERATURE section of this volume. This section features two main contributions. On the one hand, Luciano García García opens it by offering a sample of translation into Spanish of the master piece of Samuel Butler (1630-1680), Sir Húdibras. On the other hand, Eugenio M. Olivares Merino reviews three translations of Beowulf into Spanish published in the seventies and the eighties, which helped to confer real academic status to this poem in Spain. We hope GRETA Journal readers enjoy this well-deserved tribute to one the most respected, admired, and cherished colleagues in our profession. For decades, Dr. Gabriel Tejada Molina has embodied all-round excellence not only in one area, but in all pillars of university life, as an accomplished researcher, a resourceful manager, an inspirational teacher, and an exceptional colleague. Our admiration for him goes well beyond the long list of emphatic achievements in his resumé. Gabriel marries intellectual prowess with humanity, hard work with honesty, and professional rigour with unwavering support. He has been the force which has shaped many of our careers and has been a mentor, a magister, and a friend. He will always continue to be a beacon which has guided and inspired generation upon generation of successful language teachers. This special issue is but a small token –albeit a heartfelt one– of our gratitude and appreciation.

María Luisa Pérez Cañado Ana María Ortega Cebreros

6

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


SEMBLANZA DEL PROFESOR DR. GABRIEL TEJADA MOLINA Antonio Bueno González Universidad de Jaén [email protected] Antonio Bueno González es Profesor Titular de Universidad en el Departamento de Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Jaén (España). Da clases de morfología inglesa, inglés instrumental y metodología de la enseñanza del inglés. Sus líneas de investigación están relacionadas con la Lingüística Aplicada a la enseñanza del inglés, la formación del profesorado de inglés y la investigación en el aula. En estos campos ha dirigido siete Tesis Doctorales y casi una treintena de Trabajos de Fin de Máster; también ha publicado una variedad de artículos en revistas especializadas y capítulos de libros en monografías relacionadas con la enseñanza del inglés. Con Daniel Madrid y Neil McLaren coeditó TEFL in Secondary Education. Handbook (2005) y Workbook (2006) (Granada: Editorial Universidad de Granada). Ha organizado y dictado varios cursos de formación de profesorado de inglés y ha coordinado diversos Congresos nacionales e internacionales de la especialidad, entre ellos varias Jornadas en torno a AICLE. En 2009 coeditó Atención a la diversidad en la enseñanza plurilingüe (Jaén: Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad) con Jesús M. Nieto García y Domingo Cobo López. En esta merecida publicación homenaje al Dr. Gabriel Tejada Molina es para mí un placer escribir una breve semblanza de quien durante muchos años ha sido compañero de trabajo y maestro en cuestiones de Lingüística Aplicada a la enseñanza del inglés como lengua extranjera, y con el que mantengo una amistad de la que me siento orgulloso. Sirva esta modesta contribución para rendirle un sincero tributo de admiración y cariño.

A Gabriel me une una especial relación personal y académica. Compartimos la promoción 1976-1981, él desde su aula de Primaria en Guarromán (Jaén) y yo desde el Colegio Universitario de Jaén y la Facultad de Letras de Granada, cuando le pasaba los apuntes de la titulación en Filología Inglesa que ambos cursábamos (con calco, ya que entonces las fotocopias no eran tan frecuentes, ni había plataforma virtual). Él acudía fiel a los exámenes y entregaba con puntualidad sus trabajos. Terminó su Licenciatura, ingresó como profesor en la Universidad, en la recién creada Facultad de Humanidades de Jaén, todavía dependiente de Granada, presentó su Tesis Doctoral, obtuvo su plaza de Titular de Universidad y es hoy una referencia no solo en nuestro Departamento, sino también fuera de él.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

El profesor Tejada cuenta con una brillante trayectoria docente e investigadora, tanto como Profesor de Enseñanza Primaria (en los primeros 16 años de su vida profesional) como en su calidad de Profesor en el Departamento de Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Jaén (primero como Profesor Contratado y después como Profesor Titular de Universidad desde el curso 1989-90 hasta el 30 de septiembre de 2012, fecha de su jubilación). Fue, además, Decano de la Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educación desde el 22 de junio de 1999 hasta el 24 de abril de 2004. Su experiencia en el aula de Primaria, unida a su formación filológica, particularmente en Lingüística Aplicada a la enseñanza del inglés como lengua extranjera, ha dado y sigue dando muchos y abundantes frutos.

7


Maestro de Primera Enseñanza (1973) por la Escuela Normal de Magisterio de Jaén, Licenciado en Filología Inglesa por la Universidad de Granada (1984) y Doctor en Filología Inglesa por la misma Universidad en 1992, el Dr. Tejada es un ejemplo de self-made man, desde su Úbeda natal, a la que adora y a la que vuelve siempre que puede (¡cuántas veces hemos paseado por sus calles y nos la ha enseñado con pericia de guía turístico, porque ha corrido de niño por sus calles y la siente en su corazón!). El catálogo de puestos docentes desempeñados le ha permitido conocer prácticamente todas las etapas de la enseñanza desde 1973 hasta su jubilación en 2012 (prácticamente 40 años): Maestro Contratado en la Aneja, Profesor de Educación General Básica en su querido Guarromán, Profesor Bilingüe en California (Estados Unidos), Profesor Asociado en la Escuela Universitaria del Profesorado de EGB de Jaén, Profesor Titular Interino de Universidad y Profesor Titular de Universidad en el Departamento de Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Jaén. El 30 de mayo de 2013 recibió un merecido homenaje por su jubilación en el Departamento de Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Jaén por parte de sus compañeros, estudiantes, familiares y amigos como colofón a una brillante carrera. Si prolífica ha sido su docencia, no lo ha sido menos su actividad investigadora hasta ahora (porque sigue siendo un investigador inquieto). Su trayectoria se inicia con su Memoria de Licenciatura (1986), continúa con su primer libro Me and You 1. Guía Didáctica. Inglés para alumnos de Primaria (8-10) (1990) y su Tesis Doctoral (1992) y pasa por los muchos trabajos realizados en el seno de los dos grupos de investigación a los que ha pertenecido (HUM 271 “Aproximación multidisciplinar al inglés” y HUM 679 “Estudios de Lingüística Aplicada a la lengua inglesa”), algunos de los cuales resaltaré aquí. Ha dirigido cuatro Tesis Doctorales,

8

dos Tesinas y, en los últimos años, un buen número de Trabajos de Fin de Máster. Es autor de tres libros, de más de una decena de capítulos de libro, de varios artículos y reseñas en revistas especializadas y de casi una veintena de contribuciones en Actas de Congresos de la especialidad. Asimismo, ha editado o coeditado varias obras de referencia. Ha coordinado diversos Seminarios Permanentes y Encuentros de amazon prime video com de inglés y ha participado en varios proyectos de investigación e innovación docente. En la Universidad ha impartido diversas asignaturas en estudios de Diplomatura y de Licenciatura (Lengua Inglesa y su Didáctica, Lengua Inglesa y Literatura, Didáctica de la lengua inglesa, Lingüística Aplicada, entre otras), cuatro cursos de Doctorado y más de una decena de cursos de formación de profesorado. Asimismo, en su empeño por una formación continua, ha asistido a más de una veintena de cursos tanto relacionados con la enseñanza del inglés como de instrumentos estadísticos e informáticos. Por su labor ha recibido diversas ayudas, así como becas para actividades en el extranjero. Ha participado en varios Congresos de AESLA (él mismo fue Coordinador del Congreso celebrado en Jaén en 2002), GRETA, TESOL-Spain y AEDEAN. Es, igualmente, miembro de estas asociaciones. Por no ser prolijo en la enumeración de artículos y comunicaciones a Congresos, solo me referiré a varios proyectos claves en su trayectoria: • Me and You 1. Guía Didáctica. Inglés para alumnos de Primaria (8-10), Granada: Universidad de Granada, Instituto de Ciencias de la Educación, 1990. • “Input, interacción y adquisición del inglés como lengua extranjera en el aula: fase de acceso”, Tesis Doctoral, Universidad de Granada, 1992.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


• Me and You. Diseño curricular de inglés para principiantes, Jaén: Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Jaén, 1994 (que tuve la suerte de prologar). • Enfoque ecléctico y pautas del diseño curricular para la enseñanza del idioma oral: “Me first”, Jaén: Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Jaén, 2007 (brillantemente prologado por el Dr. Jesús Manuel Nieto García). • Veo veo, te escucho y leo, proyecto de primeras lecturas (Octaedro, en prensa). Ahora que tiene más tiempo, sigue leyendo y escribiendo, haciendo gala del precepto europeo de lifelong learning. A este respecto conviene citar aquí dos de sus publicaciones más recientes: “Fondo y forma de la competencia conversacional en la adquisición de lecto-escritura: L1 y L2” (2011) y “Reseña de Cielo y tierra en niños y primitivos de José Melero, 2004” (2013). Procede, aunque sea brevemente, resaltar el conocimiento que Gabriel Tejada tiene del mundo infantil, que parte del me (egocéntrico) del niño para llegar a la interacción con el you del profesor o del compañero. Para recrear ese mundo infantil de fantasía, propio de cuentos, baste recordar en las propuestas metodológicas (y en el aula) del Dr. Tejada la presencia de un sol feliz (happy sun), objetos que se mueven, manos que hablan (talking hands), la familia Potato, o un submarino amarillo. Igualmente, véanse las láminas ilustrativas de cada unidad en su primer Me and You para comprender esta escenificación del mundo infantil. En efecto, las láminas sirven para contextualizar los intercambios orales en inglés y para que los alumnos las coloreen, y suponen, evidentemente, una relación interdisciplinar con la asignatura de Expresión Plástica. Cuatro líneas maestras, presentes en su último libro, conforman el credo metodológico del Dr. Tejada: el enfoque ecléctico (mediante

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

la asunción de diversos métodos, fruto de su enciclopédica formación en Lingüística Aplicada a la enseñanza de lenguas); la enseñanza del idioma oral (sobre todo en su fase inicial en relación con el input comprensible y los mecanismos automáticos para el desarrollo oral); las pautas para el diseño curricular (como buen conocedor de programaciones y diseños curriculares); y la idea de “Me first” (asociada con la necesidad de un enfoque centrado en el alumno y, asimismo, con el protagonismo infantil, como veremos a continuación, dentro de un clima de interacción). La evolución de Me and You en los libros del profesor Tejada de los años 1990 y 1994 a la expresión Me first en su último libro (2007) trasciende lo terminológico para entrar en lo didáctico. Dice el autor que “con las formas Me and You se intenta destacar el carácter social del fenómeno comunicativo del nosotros, apuntando a la función social o interactiva propiamente dicha” (Tejada Molina, 2007: 15). El paso a Me first ha de entenderse como “la referencia coloquial de una locución infantil incipiente, que antepone su presencia Me, primera persona” y que “sintetiza no sólo su ingenuidad y frescura, indicando cierto grado de informalidad, sino el centralismo del niño” (íbidem). Así, el alumno es el punto de referencia para los intercambios lingüísticos; su mundo el que entra en juego en las preguntas y respuestas, en sus dibujos en el dictado de símbolos y en las acciones de respuesta física total. Son los elementos más cercanos a él los que aparecen en su primer diccionario de frases. Es para él para quien el input ha de hacerse comprensible e idóneo. Es él quien, en último término, tiene que desarrollar su expresión oral, aunque sea incipiente. Se da de este modo una perfecta coherencia entre enfoque y plasmación léxica en dos palabras, Me first. En ellas se sintetiza el valor instrumental de la lengua para desarrollar sus funciones

9


conativa, expresiva y referencial, dentro de una perspectiva pragmática, en la que el you está necesariamente implícito. El alumno deviene centro de la conversación, con la consiguiente motivación para el intercambio oral con el profesor y con los compañeros. Tras hablar del profesor y del investigador, hablemos del hombre. Siempre me ha sorprendido de Gabriel su carácter afable, aparentemente tranquilo pero sin bajar la guardia, sabio sin exteriorizarlo, honrado y fiel hasta la médula. Tengo la suerte de haber compartido con él muchas horas de trabajo y de conversación afable. Tiene una formación enciclopédica (en parte derivada de su profunda formación inicial en el Seminario Diocesano, donde, por cierto, con seis cursos de diferencia, nos conocimos, hace ya –digamos– un tiempo, y de la cual ambos nos sentimos orgullosos). Le gusta la charla apacible con un café o un helado delante. Siempre ha cumplido con sus obligaciones y se ha mostrado colaborador en el Departamento (lo sabemos todos sus compañeros). Por si esto no fuera suficiente, cuenta con la admiración de sus estudiantes, tanto de Magisterio como de Licenciatura, de los colegas con los que ha compartido asignaturas, y de los muchos maestros y maestras de inglés a quienes ha formado con cariño y de cuyos libros siguen aprendiendo. Es –lo sabemos y lo sabe especialmente su familia– un hombre familiar y entrañable, tímido pero resolutivo, flexible en lo accesorio pero firme en lo

esencial, a un tiempo ecléctico y crítico con la profesión y con la vida misma, formado e inquieto por seguir formándose, trabajador y amante del relax. Sirva, pues, esta semblanza como modesto homenaje al Dr. Gabriel Tejada Molina, tanto en lo personal como en lo académico. Sus cuatro décadas de dedicación a la docencia y a la investigación, en particular en relación con la Lingüística Aplicada a la enseñanza del inglés, bien lo merecen. Su conocimiento del aula de Infantil y Primaria le hizo especializarse en la enseñanza del inglés a niños. Con este conocimiento previo, privilegiado, de primera mano, y sin abandonar esas aulas como objetivo de su investigación, su labor en la Universidad se ha centrado en la formación de futuros maestros y maestras de inglés y de profesores y profesoras de Secundaria, Bachillerato y Universidad, quienes, ya en las aulas como docentes, están poniendo en práctica las enseñanzas de su maestro. Animo al Dr. Tejada a que siga en esa misma línea, a que nos deleite con publicaciones sugerentes, contrastadas con su experiencia y bien informadas por su mucha investigación; a que nos regale cursos y ponencias de los que podamos seguir aprendiendo; y a que se prodigue con su presencia en lugares comunes (Departamento, Úbeda, Jaén o Granada) para poder disfrutar de su charla amena y de su gran humanidad. Dicho sea todo con el fraternal afecto que le tengo.

REFERENCIAS Tejada Molina, G. 1990. Me and You 1. Guía Didáctica. Inglés para alumnos de Primaria (8-10). Granada: Universidad de Granada, Instituto de Ciencias de la Educación. Tejada Molina, G. 1992. “Input, interacción y adquisición del inglés como lengua extranjera en el aula: fase de acceso”. Tesis Doctoral, Universidad de Granada. Tejada Molina, G. 1994. Me and You. Diseño curricular de inglés para principiantes. Jaén: Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Jaén. Tejada Molina, G. 2007. Enfoque ecléctico y pautas del diseño curricular para la enseñanza del idioma oral: “Me first”. Jaén: Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Jaén.

10

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


Tejada Molina, G. 2011. “Fondo y forma de la competencia conversacional en la adquisición de lectoescritura: L1 y L2”. GRETA, Revista para profesores de inglés 19 / 1 y 2: 34-44. Tejada Molina, G. 2013. “Reseña de Cielo y tierra en niños y primitivos de José Melero Merlo, 2004”. Teaching by Doing: A Professional and Personal Life. Eds. Diego Rascón Moreno y Concepción Soto Palomo. Jaén: Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Jaén. 173-183.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

11


interview

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

ENTREVISTA A GABRIEL TEJADA MOLINA Gloria Luque Agulló Universidad de Jaén [email protected] El doctor Tejada Molina ha sido miembro del Departamento de Filología Inglesa de la Universidad de Jaén. Ha impartido docencia en las asignaturas de Lingüística Aplicada y Didáctica de la Lengua Inglesa. Ha trabajado como profesor bilingüe y ha impartido clases de inglés y francés. Su principal ámbito de investigación gira en torno a la adquisición del inglés en el aula y su enseñanza en Primaria. Especial mención merece su investigación sobre la influencia de la comprensión auditiva y el desarrollo conversacional hasta llegar a planteamientos de integración de competencias verbales. Ha participado en programas de doctorado, máster y formación del profesorado. Ha dirigido diferentes tesis y memorias de grado realizadas como proyectos de investigación en la acción. Son múltiples sus publicaciones especializadas en libros, capítulos, artículos y talleres sobre didáctica de idiomas.

G.L.A: Remontándonos a tu etapa de estudiante, ¿cuándo decidiste que querías ser profesor? G.T.M: Siempre he tenido a gala incluir como mérito de mi currículum ser maestro de primaria. Tras el bachillerato superior, opté por los estudios de Magisterio en la que era Escuela de Formación de Profesorado de EGB de Jaén. Los presupuestos no daban para carreras universitarias. Fue la época de la verdadera transición educativa en la formación del profesorado. Teoría y práctica aunaban dicha preparación. Mi interés por la escuela fue creciendo desde los primeros contactos con el mundo infantil en el tercer curso de prácticas. Entusiasta por la innovación docente recuerdo a mis profesores de Magisterio con gran afecto. Así, asignaturas como la Historia de la Pedagogía, la Literatura, el Dibujo e incluso la Física me motivaban en el estudio y en la experimentación. No sólo fue preparación profesional y humanista sino el estadio de maduración para los estudios universitarios en Filología Inglesa, que fueron la segunda titulación que obtuve.

12

G.L.A: ¿Cuál fue tu primer trabajo? ¿Cómo ha influido en tu posterior docencia universitaria? G.T.M: Acabé Magisterio en junio del 73 y en septiembre fui contratado como interino para dar clase de inglés en la Escuela de Prácticas, hoy Colegio Almadén. ¿Méritos? Haber hecho un curso de la BBC por radio durante el año de prácticas, que grababa diariamente en un radiocassette portátil, además de un expediente notable. La mayoría habíamos estudiado francés. En mi caso, posiblemente por una visión de futuro o por iniciativa, me incliné de forma autodidacta al inglés. Una afición, tomada de forma complementaria, me fue abriendo camino. Tras el servicio militar, me incorporé a la escuela de primaria en Villarrodrigo y posteriormente en Guarromán en el 75, ambos en la provincia de Jaén. Y ahí permanecí hasta el 87 en que fui contratado como profesor bilingüe en California. Al regreso culminé los cursos de doctorado y accedí a la Universidad como profesor contratado en el 89. Casi década y media de trabajo en la escuela, y también de estudio. Hice la licenciatura prácticamente por libre: las asignaturas comunes en el Colegio Universitario

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

de Jaén y la posterior especialidad en Granada. Quienes fueron entonces compañeros de estudios (Antonio Bueno, Jesús Nieto y Alfonso Rizo) serían con el tiempo colegas de departamento. Y fue en el aula de Primaria donde llevé a cabo mi labor de investigación que culminó con la tesina en el 86. Para la tesis, ya de profesor en Magisterio, regresé al aula de primaria en el 90 para desarrollar el proyecto de investigación en la acción. El mapa vital se ampliaba de lo rural a lo universitario y de lo local a lo internacional. Todo en un trayecto de ida y vuelta tanto en lo personal como en lo académico y en lo profesional. G.L.A: ¿Qué motivó tu interés por la metodología de enseñanza del inglés? G.T.M: En los primeros meses de trabajo como maestro de inglés hubo dos principios pedagógicos que guiaban mi actividad docente: metodología audiovisual y elaboración del propio material didáctico. Siempre he tenido claro que la enseñanza debía mejorarse y romper con el memorismo y los planteamientos centrados en la materia o en el profesor. Estas directrices eran válidas para los idiomas y para todo. Pero ciñéndonos a lo lingüístico, a la enseñanza de la lengua, tanto respecto a la materna (L1) como a la segunda (L2), una de las cuestiones prioritarias era qué papel juega la gramática en la enseñanza. Ha sido muy frecuente confundir la clase de lengua -L1 y L2- en una actividad de estudio de reglas y excepciones, dejando de lado los valores expresivos y comunicativos. Esto me revelaba y me hacía plantear cuestiones metodológicas sobre qué y cómo enseñar. Fue en Guarromán, dando clase de lengua española en segunda etapa –6º a 8º–, donde conocí a fondo el modelo generativo-transformacional de Chomsky. De la mano de Lázaro Carreter, a través de los textos de la Editorial Anaya para la segunda etapa, nos adentramos alumnos y maestro en los engranajes de la sintaxis y en los procesos de formación de oraciones nucleares y transformadas. Los niños, que habían empezado

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

con ocho años haciendo análisis sintácticos en el modelo tradicional y posteriormente estructural, dedicaban su reflexión gramatical a estos planteamientos en su pubertad. No pensaba entonces que dicha polémica iba a ser la clave en el desarrollo del concepto de competencia lingüística y el eje en torno al cual girasen los contenidos de la asignatura universitaria de Lingüística Aplicada. El carácter creativo que la gramática debería aportar se quedaba relegado a un adoctrinamiento en normas y reglas, incluso deficitariamente descritas, como veríamos con el estudio de Roulet (1972). La clave no era, pues, gramática aplicada, o sea didáctica de la gramática, sino, por lo menos, un planteamiento psicolingüístico como el que apuntaba el modelo generativo que nos haría desembocar en los estudios de adquisición de lenguas y sus implicaciones didácticas. Dichos estudios desde la perspectiva pragmática, tal como plantea Klein (1986), son prometedores. G.L.A: Introducir en el Magisterio métodos novedosos y efectivos de enseñanza de idiomas ha sido una labor muy importante en tu carrera y el fruto de una extensa reflexión personal basada en una amplia experiencia docente. Cuéntanos el origen de “Me and You”. ¿Cómo surgió la idea? G.T.M: A veces se tilda al profesorado de lanzarse a aventuras didácticas para las que no está preparado. Digamos que Me and You nació siendo maestro-licenciado y con una experiencia docente en Primaria de al menos diez cursos. Por tanto no era una simple ocurrencia. Había que combatir la desidia rutinaria y la ineficacia metodológica. ¿Por qué no son capaces los alumnos de hablar inglés tras años de estudio? Las metodologías audiolingual y audiovisual, tal como se llevaban a cabo, tampoco acababan de dar resultados. Los paradigmas léxico, morfosintáctico y fonético aparecían como contenidos en mayor o menor grado explícitos en tres estamentos estancos sin relación entre éstos ni con las destrezas que se pretendían

13


I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

desarrollar. Ilustres catedráticos universitarios trataban de iluminar la elaboración de libros de texto para niños, pero desde la torre de marfil de la Universidad, es decir, lejos de la realidad escolar. Yo me sentía privilegiado de poder vincular ambos ámbitos. Fueron los textos de Daniel Madrid y Neil McLaren con títulos tan sugestivos como Pictures and sounds, Pronounce and do, Let’s talk, Let’s read, Let’s write, y Use your English, los que me proporcionaron las primeras orientaciones con expectativa en la elaboración del propio diseño curricular. Ya he aludido al encorsetamiento que supone en muchos casos supeditarse a la programación del libro de texto. No sólo el aprendizaje del metalenguaje, inviable para niños, sino en la secuencia de contenidos que eludan cualquier planteamiento realmente competencial o comunicativo. Los alumnos se mueven con la naturalidad de quien adquiere la lengua materna que, sorprendentemente, viene marcada por principios pragmáticos y que aglutina hábitos e integra conceptos armónicamente. Éste es el germen de título ME AND YOU (1992, 1994). Yo escucho y hablo, tú me hablas y me escuchas, con lo que el valor instrumental del idioma queda garantizado. Por tanto, las funciones que promueven dicha dinámica son prioritarias. Y además partiendo de las formas más simples tipo imperativo o fórmulas abiertas. De ahí a las técnicas de respuesta corporal –Total Physical Response de Asher (1977) - y a la comprensión de preguntas un paso. Para redundar en este mensaje, a la culminación de mi tarea investigadora y docente con un enfoque ecléctico insistí en la expresión ME FIRST (2007), donde se actualiza y recopila todo el enfoque teórico. G.L.A: ¿Qué repercusión esperas que haya tenido? ¿Qué esperas haber dejado en legado a los cientos de maestros que has preparado a lo largo de tu carrera? G.T.M: La formación del profesorado de idiomas en Primaria ha sido el ámbito en que la propuesta desarrollada encuentra una acogida

14

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

más que favorable. Los comentarios y valoración de los estudiantes por estas directrices metodológicas son positivos y de agradecimiento. Encuentran un proyecto viable y adecuado para los niños de Primaria. El programa práctico de la asignatura de Magisterio es de plena vigencia y, lo que más satisfacción me da, tiene futuro, pues queda mucho por andar. Aún se siguen muchas inercias y modas sin fundamento. Lograr que el estudiante, futuro maestro, participe toda la hora de clase en inglés y que ésta variedad básica sea extrapolable al aula de Primaria es todo un avance, un verdadero deleite. Ha merecido la pena el esfuerzo y ahí está, disponible. Si se habla de las ventajas de la inmersión y se ofrecen los recursos y procedimientos que la hacen factible, lo que falta es llevarlo a cabo. El gran objetivo en la enseñanza de idiomas es conseguir un primer grado de competencia verbal, de forma que se configure un germen en que se sustente todo el sistema y en el que puedan acoplarse las sucesivas nociones y destrezas. Parafraseando a Chomsky, lograr un primer sistema generativo de expresiones nucleares –no digo oraciones que conste- y que, combinado con otros recursos no verbales, permita la creatividad que el conocimiento de la auténtica gramática preconiza. Me enorgullece participar de la creatividad que tantos alumnos de Magisterio han llevado a cabo en la elaboración de proyectos de prácticas, a los que han sumado su destreza en el uso de recursos informáticos y en la propia inventiva. Así, elementales cómics se han llegado a convertir en guiones o montajes audiovisuales que posibilitan la comprensión, la interacción oral y la integración de destrezas desde los primeros cursos. Sería una pena que todo ese bagaje se esfumara en la burocracia informatizada a la que se aboca la enseñanza. G.L.A: Durante los últimos 30 años, se han producido muchos cambios en el sistema educativo respecto a la enseñanza del inglés. Como hemos visto, tú los has experimentado. ¿Podrías destacar los cambios que como

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

participante experimentado has podido observar o “sufrir”? G.T.M: Ya hemos aludido al papel de la gramática como andamiaje de la metodología, unas veces a la antigua y otras basándose en lo más novedoso, como en su día fueron el estructuralismo o la teoría nocional-funcional. La irrupción del movimiento comunicativo, contraviniendo sus propios postulados, plagó los textos de catálogos de funciones cuya terminología incluso los estudiantes tenían que https becas agora santander com suya, y desmarañando una secuencia organizada de contenidos. Lo que es un fin se convierte en un medio. Todo este maremágnum de teorías ha confundido al profesorado y ha hecho que se refugie en el libro de texto, en su aula y en su sentido común, que no es poco. La realidad educativa es compleja y no conviene anclarse en un solo parámetro, pero el lingüístico debe ser correcto, desde el punto de vista descriptivo, y adaptado, desde el aplicado. En este sentido el gran cambio radica en la opción conversacional o presintáctica, algo que con gran intuición se incluía en toda la alternativa de métodos directos y en la memorización de mini-diálogos en un gesto audiolingual y en las tablas de sustitución de la tradición británica del método oral de Palmer (1944). G.L.A: A raíz de esos cambios, ¿cómo crees que evolucionará la enseñanza del inglés en el futuro? G.T.M: Distingamos dos ámbitos: el aula y los medios. Hoy más que nunca, se disponen de recursos que permiten el acceso al idioma oral y el intercambio en cualquiera de las modalidades. Pero es cierto que hemos de tener presente que el idioma es un herramienta viva y que ha de crecer a partir de la realidad verbal del que aprende. O sea, como forma de referencia hemos de hablar de interlengua, o de competencia verbal que se balancea entre dos sistemas, uno de partida y otro de llegada. Proponer un sistema

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

“correcto” modélico es como forzar a hablar a un niño andaluz en la forma ortográfica, tanto en la pronunciación como en las construcciones morfosintácticas. Con ello no defiendo que no se proporcionen modelos correctos sino que se relativice su papel y se contenga la inhibición en hablar un idioma incipiente. Sabemos que muchas desviaciones o errores son los primeros intentos de hipergeneralización y de transferencia, y que éstos se curan si se atienden. No debe haber ese miedo al vicio lingüístico. Por supuesto que se curan, si se trasmiten actitudes de esfuerzo y de estudio. Aunque me temo que la cosa va para largo. Cuando aprieta el zapato es cuando se ponen los medios. Es triste ver a licenciados o graduados universitarios volver a empezar para conseguir el nivel de idiomas que se les exige. Habría que convivir con el idioma extranjero como se hace con la música o el cine, con versiones originales y con material en dicha lengua, como se practica en países más desarrollados. Los estudiantes lo saben, falta ajustar las asignaturas y la praxis a dicho propósito. G.L.A: Si tuvieras que elegir un enfoque para la enseñanza del inglés, ¿cuál sería? ¿Dónde pondrías el énfasis? G.T.M: Sin duda ecléctico. O sea que aglutine nociones explícitas en implícitas en el desarrollo natural de la competencia comunicativa tal como hemos apuntado. Hay que recuperar el término comunicativo en su verdadero valor funcional. En el desarrollo conversacional se dan la mano las dimensiones psicolingüística y sociolingüística. Ocurre que a un lingüista formal le horroriza el término psico o socio, y eso es un problema. Pero es más problemático que a un profesor le horrorice la investigación y se quede embelesado en la propia contemplación de lo bien que habla y lo mal que lo hacen sus alumnos. G.L.A: Contemplando tu vida profesional, ¿cuál ha sido tu logro principal? ¿Qué eliminarías?

15


I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

G.T.M: Me da gran satisfacción haber logrado que el aula de Primaria sea un lugar de inmersión, de creatividad y de adquisición. Cuando descubrí la importancia de los procesos de comprensión, tal como refrendaba Krashen (1985) - a quien tuve la suerte de conocer personalmente en la Universidad del Sur de California (USC)- y las propuestas de método natural, auspiciadas por Krashen y Terrell (1983), me sentí como quien halla el mapa para la búsqueda del tesoro. Fue una pena que no le prestara mayor atención a Hatch (1978) por aquella década y haya sido en el salto de siglo cuando mi entusiasmo por sus iniciativas se ha ratificado. A veces, no es un tomo sesudo sino una sencilla canción o un juego infantil lo que hace saltar la chispa en el permanente estado de indagación, como ocurre con la cuestión conversacional. Who stole the cookies from the cookie jar? / You … / Who me? / Yes you/ Not me/ Then who? Mira por dónde, de una matriz dialogada tenemos todo un germen de soporte al desarrollo oracional. La interrogativa con más futuro, al permitir indagar en narrar el pasado de la propia experiencia del alumno, es precisamente la que más se parece a la de la lengua española –toda una lección de Lingüística Contrastiva. Y no se trata de una excepción a la interrogativa en lengua inglesa con la inversión auxiliar/sujeto. ¿Qué hay más fácil y productivo para un principiante que podrá sustituir el pronombre personal Who por el sujeto en cuestión sin más quebraderos de cabeza? Esto nos llevará al uso del pasado del verbo y a encontrarle sentido a los irregulares en el empleo de lo que a diario realiza el alumno o cualquier personaje ficticio de sus primeros textos narrativos. Toda esta dinámica de indagación, de constatación en lo recién descubierto, de utilidad

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

para la clase me ha hecho sentir en activo todo ese tiempo. Incluso en la aplicación de todas estas conclusiones en otros ámbitos como la enseñanza de la lectoescritura en español. Errores, también los ha habido, pero todo está subsanado por mi parte y nunca me ha costado trabajo reconocerlos. G.L.A: ¿Qué planes tienes para la jubilación? G.T.M: La literatura, las artes, el ocio, –otium en su sentido latino. Bastante ociosidad se percibe a diario como para aspirar a dejarse llevar por la corriente. Por lo pronto me estoy empapando de lectura que, si el tiempo lo permite, puede que me sirva de comprehensible input para lo que se tercie. Cuando acabé la licenciatura me regalé un viaje a Nueva York. Y ahora, me apetece también viajar. París o Turquía, como destinos de mi experiencia en coordinación del programa Erasmus, me hacen conectar el mundo heleno y toda la ilustración. Pero podemos pensar en Alemania o volver a California. Acabo de leer el capítulo décimo quinto de Ulysses de Joyce y me siento muy afortunado de saborear y recrearme en ese viaje. Me espera Cortázar para seguir en mi propia lengua. Probablemente sea el regreso a Ítaca. Who knows? G.L.A: Gabriel, gracias por el tiempo que le has dedicado a esta entrevista. Gracias, también, por los muchos años que has dedicado a ayudarnos a aprender y crecer. Gracias por formarnos a muchos de nosotros, maestros y filólogos, en el arte de seguir intentando enseñar, de buscar el camino correcto, la metodología adecuada, y si no, de crearla paso a paso, día a día. We miss you already.

ADENDA

Desde que se hizo esta entrevista hasta ahora ha transcurrido algún tiempo. Nuestro entrevistado ha podido ver publicado en esta revista GRETA (número 19, paginas 34 y siguientes) el título “Fondo y forma de la competencia conversacional en la adquisición de la lecto-escritura: L1 y L2”. Tal fue la reacción que experimentó que se ha visto abocado a desarrollar el ejemplo de aplicación didáctica de la lectura en enseñanza primaria. El resultado es una serie de lecturas graduadas que comienzan con las cinco vocales a partir del dominio de sílabas directas de las muestras ya recogidas en dicho artículo (M,P,D, T,N,S, L,F): Veo veo, te escucho y leo (Octaedro, en prensa). El contexto visual

16

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

I N T E R V I E W

de las ilustraciones suple el texto narrativo además de suscitar el interés por seguir en la lectura de los diálogos que mantienen sus personajes. La misma dinámica en la elaboración de textos dialogados ha dado lugar a la inclusión de dos nuevas letras (Y, H). La presencia explícita del YO está garantizada, así como el valor de Y como conjunción –o realización aislada del sonido vocálico- entre otras nociones incluso de interrogación: ¿Y x?, recurso estratégico equivalente a ¿Dónde está x? El lector que se inicia en dicha competencia lingüística –tanto en L1 como L2 en contexto bilingüe– se ve fácilmente identificado con las figuras animadas. Los fragmentos que constituyen las conversaciones mantienen un cariz claramente pre-sintáctico acorde con el desarrollo del idioma oral. Si se ha adoptado la sílaba como columna vertebral o eje formal del desarrollo del mismo, también hay que apuntar que las situaciones que se presentan se limitan a una variedad léxica elemental –lo que es una ventaja, sobre todo en principiantes, para conseguir un nivel comunicativo básico. Por otra parte, también hay que indicar que se ajusta a una variedad morfo-sintáctica nuclear, casi en los términos en que Chomsky alude a la estructura profunda; o a las construcciones empleadas como fórmulas abiertas en la llamada gramática-pivote. Dicho trabajo tiene un doble valor. En primer lugar, como producto: a modo de lecturas básicas, puede acoplarse a otras metodologías de enseñanza de la lectura tanto las analíticas como las inductivas o las globales. Se produce una inmersión en cierto modo guiada. Unas estrategias semi-inductivas que ayudan a descubrir los rasgos fonémicos del lenguaje. Se asume con esta propuesta que tanto el docente como quien comienza en la ardua tarea de aprender a leer no se encuentre perdido en un bosque de letras, sílabas, palabras y oraciones. El segundo valor, como proceso, es el de su puesta en práctica en el aula siguiendo los principios que lo inspiran. Para concluir, a medio plazo, se pretende que la edición sea bilingüe para quienes tengan un dominio oral suficiente en dos idiomas, siendo el español el necesitado de tratamiento de lecto-escritura. Téngase presente, por citar un ejemplo cercano, la dificultad del inglés en el planteamiento del aprendizaje del sistema silábico en que se apoya el habla y en la adquisición de conciencia fonémica. Es sabido que se trata de un idioma con más del doble de vocales que el español; en que hay una diferencia clara entre sílaba tónica y sus efectos en las vocales átonas, a las que oscurece acústicamente; y que irremediablemente se comienza, en métodos analíticos, con el abecedario y la amalgama de sonidos que cada grafía puede representar, por lo que continuamente se ha de recurrir a deletrear la palabra de dificultad ortográfica. Como última alusión, quisiera añadir que esta labor da respuesta a dudas metodológicas latentes desde la fase de enseñanza primaria –EGB, aquella Educación General Básica– de los setenta. La docencia e investigación en la universidad han sido de gran utilidad, como soporte teórico, para el hallazgo de dicha respuesta. Por emplear la terminología al uso, una nueva aplicación.

REFERENCIAS Asher, J. 1977/19822. Learning Another Language Through Actions. Los Gatos: Sky Oaks. Chomsky, N. 1965: Aspects of the Theory of Syntax. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. Hatch, E. 1978. “Discourse analysis and second language acquisition”. Second Language Acquisition: A Book of Readings. Ed. E. Hatch. Rowley, Mass.: Newbury House. 401-435. Klein, W. 1986. Second Language Acquisition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Krashen, S. 1985. The Input Hypothesis: Issues and Implications. New York: Longman. Krashen, S y T. Terrell. 1983. The Natural Approach: Language Acquisition in the Classroom. Oxford: Pergamon. Palmer, H. 1944. The International Course of English. Versión en español. Curso Internacional de Inglés. 1965. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Roulet, E. 1972. Théories Grammaticales, Descriptions et Enseignement des Langues. Paris: Fernand Nathan; Bruxelles: Labor. (English translation, (1975), Linguistic Theory, Linguistic Description and Language Teaching, Oxford: O.U.P.) Tejada Molina, G. 1992. Input, interacción y adquisición del inglés como lengua extranjera en el aula: Fase de acceso. Tesis doctoral. Universidad de Granada. Tejada Molina, G. 1994. Me and You. Diseño curricular de Inglés para principiantes. Jaén: Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad. Tejada Molina, G. 2007. Enfoque ecléctico y pautas del diseño curricular para la enseñanza del idioma oral: “Me first”. Jaén: Servicio de publicaciones de la Universidad de Jaén.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

17


in the english classroom

BUILDING THE WAY TOWARDS A BILINGUAL LEARNERS’ DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH: A CASE IN POINT Alfonso Rizo-Rodríguez Universidad de Jaén [email protected] Dr Rizo-Rodríguez (Ph.D., University of Granada) is a senior lecturer at the English Department, University of Jaén. His teaching experience and research interests are inextricably linked to English synchronic linguistics (syntax, semantics, lexicology, and functional grammar) as well as to the metalexicography of English, with particular attention to the use and design of monolingual learners’ dictionaries and bilingual works both in print and in electronic format. Bilingual pedagogical lexicography is currently attracting much attention among specialists, some of whom started to set out a number of conditions for a bilingual learners’ dictionary some years ago. This article focuses on current contributions and developments in the area, with particular attention to Spanish bilingual lexicography, by offering an introductory revision of the specialized bibliography and examining a particular English-Spanish dictionary for intermediate Spanish students in the light of the theoretical demands laid out by metalexicographers.

INTRODUCTION The present article is geared towards the professional readership of this journal, which mainly targets the EFL teacher, the teacher trainer, the educationalist, as well as the would-be language instructor, among others. It stems out of our interest in lexicographical resources as an essential tool for foreign language learning/teaching and is inspired by a sincere debt of gratitude to Dr Gabriel Tejada, whose help was invaluable in my first contact with English. Nowadays, after the turn of the century, Spanish and English bilingual lexicography is best represented by various dictionaries compiled mainly for the advanced user, who may not necessarily be a learner. In fact, as explained on the back cover of these works or on their introductory pages, they are aimed somewhat vaguely at teachers, students, translators, and professionals in general, without regard to

18

their specific language requirements and lookup skills, which surely are too multifarious and heterogeneous to be reconciled in a single dictionary (cf. Tomaszczyk, 1983: 47; Markic and Pihler, 2004: 550). That is precisely a notorious weakness since, as Kromann, Riiber and Rosbach (1991: 2713) note, this vagueness as to the addressee group may lead any potential user to assume that the dictionary was compiled for him/her, but their reference needs “are too diverse and incompatible to be taken care of efficiently in one type of dictionary” (Tomaszczyk, 1981: 288). A second distinctive feature of advanced bilingual dictionaries is that they are characteristically “bidirectional” (Hannay, 2003: 149; Atkins and Rundell, 2008: 24), i.e. written with a view to serving both reception-oriented and production-oriented tasks of the user groups of two language communities. In practice, however, metalexicographers note that it is rather difficult and even utopic to meet this desideratum (Marello, 1996: 34); similarly, Harrell (1975: 51) argues: “It is clearly impossible to pay equal

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

attention to both X-speakers and Y-speakers in one and the same work.” The best known, most widely used titles of this type recently launched include the latest editions of dictionaries first published in the last thirty years of the twentieth century: Collins Universal Español-Inglés, English-Spanish Dictionary (ninth edition, 2009), Gran Diccionario Oxford EspañolInglés, Inglés-Español (fourth edition, 2008), and Larousse Gran Diccionario English-Spanish, Español-Inglés (fifth edition, 2008). They represent a continuation of earlier editions with certain additions and improvements on them (RizoRodríguez, 2015). At the same time, it is not uncommon that some publishing houses market bilingual EnglishSpanish dictionaries of an intermediate level. Some of them are just abridged versions of their advanced counterparts from which they differ in various respects: number of pages, macrostructure (or word list) and microstructure (or content of the entries), clearly shorter and simpler than those of advanced works. Still, they lack an original distinctive learner-driven orientation in the conception of their microstructure, even if the dictionary text is concise and reader-friendly and incorporates a motley amalgam of appendices. In this group, mention must be made, for example, of the Collins Master Dictionary Español-Inglés, English-Spanish (7th edition, 2008) and the Concise Oxford Spanish Dictionary Español-Inglés, InglésEspañol (2009). Other well-known titles showing these characteristics but not built on advanced counterparts include the Langenscheidt Diccionario Grande Inglés Español-Inglés, Inglés-Español (2002), Diccionario Vox Advanced English-Spanish, Español-Inglés (4th edition, 2008) or Richmond Compact Dictionary Español-Inglés, English-Spanish (2010). A distinct type of reference is Password. English Dictionary for Spanish Speakers. (7th edition, 2006), a “semi-bilingual” or “bilingualized” dictionary of English specially compiled for Spanish speakers.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

Its entries include pronunciation, indication of grammatical category of the headword, definition in English, example sentences in English and usage notes plus a translation equivalent in Spanish for each of the senses of the headword. Despite its novel features and didactic potential to help intermediate students move from the bilingual to the monolingual learners’ dictionary, this type of work seems not to have gained much favour. Two intrinsic shortcomings noted by Bogaards and Hannay (2004: 463-464) are that these dictionaries are conceived of mainly as an aid to reading rather than encoding and that they disregard contrastive aspects between L1 and L2. Cf. Lew and Adamska-Salaciak (2015: 49) for a similar view. Finally, in the area of ELT materials, a new kind of bilingual is gradually making its way into the vast number of pedagogical resources at the disposal of the secondary school teacher and student, the bilingual learners’ dictionary, specifically compiled for the intermediate student. Thus, some pedagogical dictionaries adapted to the needs of speakers of various languages (e.g. Japanese, Polish, Portuguese) learning English are already available and attract the attention of the practising lexicographer (Lew and AdamskaSalaciak, 2015: 57). Metalexicographers, in turn, have strongly advocated this type of work (e.g. Tomaszczyk, 1983; Snell-Hornby, 1987; Zöfgen, 1991). In Spain, some notable attempts have been made in this area. To the best of our knowledge, currently there are three titles on the market showing this orientation: Diccionario Oxford Study para estudiantes de inglés, españolinglés, inglés-español (Judith Willis, Mark Temple, Ainara Solana. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), Diccionario Cambridge Compact EnglishSpanish, Español-Inglés para estudiantes de inglés (Concepción Maldonado, Nieves Almarza, Yolanda Lozano. Madrid: Cambridge University Press y Ediciones S.M, 2008), and Diccionario pedagógico bilingüe inglés-español, español-inglés (Francisco Sánchez Benedito. Málaga: Publicaciones Vértice, S.L., 2010).

19


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

Against the previous background, this article, centred around one of these dictionaries, aims at examining to what extent it meets some of the requirements laid out by specialists in the area and, in consequence, whether its content might be appealing and beneficial to the learner. But first we need to substantiate the main properties of bilingual learners’ dictionaries. THE BILINGUAL LEARNERS’ DICTIONARY: SOME PREREQUISITES As anticipated earlier, within the profuse bibliography on lexicography, various authors have set out a number of conditions for a bilingual dictionary aimed at learners. As we see it, an insightful starting point is provided by Atkins and Rundell (2008: 41) when they draw a basic distinction between bilingual dictionaries “for one language group” and those “for two language groups”. While the latter sell “in two markets” and their entries must be written bearing in mind the productive and receptive needs of two user groups, the former is intended only for the speakers of a source language (SL) who have English as their target language (TL). In our opinion, this is a first requirement of a bilingual pedagogical dictionary: that it addresses the linguistic needs of a specific linguistic community only. A similar point is made by various metalexicographers – Kromann et alii (1991: 2725), Haensch (1997: 190), Markic and Pihler (2004: 550) – who demand a “monodirectional” (or “unidirectional”) orientation. As will be explained below, a number of metalexicographical consequences follow from this, mainly in the design and content of the entries. This tenet, however, clashes with the view of experienced lexicographers and publishing houses alike, whose aim is to compile and publish “bidirectional” dictionaries: “A Spanish and English dictionary should be designed to fulfill four purposes, two to serve the Spanish-speaking user (the reader-listener and the writer-speaker), two

20

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

the English-speaking user and [.] therefore each of the two parts has to fulfill two purposes.” (Williams, 1959: 251). In fact, a moot point in the field of bilingual lexicography has always been, and still is, its “bidirectional” character, given that genuine bidirectionality is hard to achieve. By contrast, the bilingual learners’ dictionary should target only one language group, Spanish speakers (in our case) learning English as L2. Hence, the resulting description should contain translation equivalents which “can be accessed equally from each of the two languages” (Hartmann and James, 1998: 13) but which are mainly conceived for Spanish users. As a result, its first side (English-Spanish) will be consulted by the Spanish speaker as a decoding dictionary (i.e. to translate into their own language) and also as a source of information mainly on the grammatical features of English headwords; by contrast, the second side (Español-Inglés) will serve as an encoding tool for any kind of production-oriented task. This will also have an impact on the way the dictionary text is written. Other essential demands issued by experts on bilingual learners’ dictionaries include: a) They should have a “didactic focus”, which will have “immediate implications for the overall content and organisation” (Hannay, 2003: 150). b) This type of dictionary will offer exhaustive treatment of the “essential vocabulary” instead of wide coverage of a large number of words (Zöfgen, 1991: 2897). c) Since the reference skills of intermediate learners are quite limited, both the amount of linguistic information and the access to it must be adequate for them (Zöfgen, 1991: 2899; Atkins and Rundell, 2008: 488). d) More specifically, if the bilingual dictionary is conceived of as a tool (Atkins and Rundell, 2008: 487), two essential properties must be “findability” and “usability” (Hannay, 2003: 150), i.e. words, their meanings and uses must

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

be labelled in a clear manner so that the user can straightforwardly access the information; similarly, entries should not be excessively long or complex. By “usability” Hannay means that, once users have found an L2 word, they must be provided with relevant information about it; that includes “the lexico-grammatical frames which the word typically enters into, [i.e.] selectional restrictions, collocations, [.] as well as fixed prepositions and complement patterns” (op. cit.: 151). In short, “findability” and “usability” amount to “putting the user first” (Atkins and Rundell, 2008: 487). e) At a more concrete level, from the perspective of the Spanish user, the Español-Inglés side (i.e. the “active” dictionary – cf. Hartmann and James, 1998: 13-14) must include translation equivalents in the L2 accompanied by information on their “semantic, stylistic, syntactic, combinatory and/or pragmatic features” (Honselaar, 2003: 323). This view is also sponsored by Tomaszczyk (1983: 47) and Zöfgen (1991: 2898), who insists on the need to illustrate the constructions in L2 with example sentences and adopt a “transparent type of notation”. f) When various translation equivalents are given for an L1 term, they should be accompanied by clear meaning discriminations (Iannucci, 1975: 201), that is, semantic indications (ideally in L1) helping the user choose the most adequate equivalent for a given text: “It is one of the ancient and deadly sins of translation lexicography in bi-directional dictionaries to provide lists of equivalents […] without meaning-discriminating comments.” (Kromann et alii, 1991: 2724). g) The metalanguage employed in the dictionary text, i.e. the language “used for comments and explanations”, must be “the native language of the target group” (Honselaar, 2003: 324). This requirement, also laid down by Hannay (2003: 151), is a key feature of a genuine bilingual dictionary compiled for one speech community only.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

h) A desideratum voiced by various experts is that the bilingual learners’ dictionary should take notice of and “treat interference between native language and target language” (Zöfgen, 1991: 2889), contemplate contrastive aspects between both of them (Tomaszczyk, 1983: 45; Werner, 2015), since “a bilingual dictionary is essentially a confrontation of two cultures” (Berkov, 1990: 99; cf. Williams, 1959: 246, for a similar view), and also pay attention to culture-specific vocabulary (Tomaszczyk, 1983: 45; Lew and Adamska, 2015: 54), an area where the lexicographer has to confront problems of zero lexical equivalence between two languages (Haensch, 2003: 79). i) Similarly, relevant criteria for writing the dictionary text should come “from the teaching of vocabulary and from error analysis” (Zöfgen, 1991: 2897). This may well lead the lexicographer to intersperse common learner error notes in the dictionary text. j) A requisite of every dictionary must be the use of a clear typography, punctuation, alphanumeric systems and labels (Duval, 1986: 93-94). This will facilitate access to the various elements of an entry (Haensch, 2003: 85) and make the entry text transparent and reader-friendly, which is of most importance in a pedagogical dictionary. k) Finally, in this day and age marked by electronic technology, a very special type of asset of these bilingual works should be their accompanying compact disk, which may enhance look-up operations and, in some case, can afford more complex uses. APPLICATION: A BILINGUAL LEANERS’ DICTIONARY UNDER SCRUTINY The practical part of the article will focus on one of the works mentioned in the Introduction, a bilingual English-Spanish dictionary specially compiled for intermediate Spanish students.

21


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

As we will see, it shows a wide array of pedagogical features which single it out as an appropriate candidate for our study. Hence, our interest now is in checking to what extent it meets the requirements outlined in the second section (The bilingual learners’ dictionary). The bibliographical details of the dictionary are as follows: Diccionario Cambridge Compact English-Spanish, Español-Inglés para estudiantes de inglés. Concepción Maldonado, Nieves Almarza, Yolanda Lozano (eds.). Madrid: Cambridge University Press and Ediciones S.M, 2008. + CD-ROM. (ISBN 978-84-8323-475-4). Facts and figures The description of this work may well start with a basic characterization of its main features. In terms of format, it is a handy-sized reference with its 1,211 pages, and dimensions – 14.5 x 22.3 x 5.5 cm. According to the back cover, it includes over 120,000 headwords and phrases and over 110,000 translations. Its editors claim that it has been written for intermediate and advanced Spanish learners (though the latter group might find it too basic). Its text is based on the Cambridge English Corpus and, more specifically, on a 50-million word component of it, the Cambridge Learner Corpus. The latter is a collection of materials produced by students taking ESOL Cambridge exams all over the world. The dictionary contents are the following: introductory pages (20), English-Spanish side (626), central sections – maps and geographical names (16) and conversation guide (64) – and Español-Inglés side (485). As can be noticed, there is marked imbalance between the two sides of the dictionary which will be discussed later. As expected, there is also an accompanying CDROM which provides quick access to the whole dictionary text as well as audio recordings of all the English words in British and American accents.

22

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

Learner-driven conception We can now proceed to examine more specific elements of the dictionary which may show a pedagogical orientation. In fact, a quick look at its contents soon reveals that the Cambridge Compact seems tailored-made to suit intermediate Spanish students and has a clear didactic focus in its overall organization and content. The editors openly state it in the introduction and this is soon confirmed in various ways: a. First, the introductory pages are addressed to the Spanish student as well as a couple of central sections, one featuring maps of English-speaking countries and geographical names, and a conversation guide thematically organized which lists common spoken English formulae and expressions to be learned and practised by the student in specific contexts: e.g. “at the hotel”, “car hire”, “at the bank”, “introductions”, “greetings”, “telephoning”. The guide might easily be exploited in the EFL classroom: it is reasonably comprehensive (64 pages), the expressions listed are well suited to the level of the intermediate learner, each is accompanied by its translation equivalent in Spanish and some are visually illustrated. Moreover, the English-Spanish side comes first (which makes it more accessible – Marello, 1996: 33), probably on the assumption that Spanish learners most frequently use the dictionary as an aid to reading English texts and are in need of clear Spanish equivalents as well as example sentences. b. The 3,800 most common English words (according to the Cambridge English Corpus) are conveniently marked with a symbol. c. “Findability” (see the second section) is enhanced mainly by means of graphical design, including two-column text with right-aligned margins, colour printing, generous spacing, rich typography, use of clear numeric labels and punctuation marks. As a result, the internal structure of entries is totally transparent. Especially outstanding

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

is the use of small blue print to highlight brief indications in Spanish which draw the students’ attention to aspects of English grammar, lexis, usage, and pronunciation – see excuse, figure 1 in the Appendix. All these resources help the user discriminate between the various elements of entries (pronunciation, sense divisions, translation equivalents, example sentences, semantic indications, notes, etc.). As a result, the text, far from being tightly packed, is totally readerfriendly. d. A large number of grammar and usage notes in specific entries in both sides of the dictionary (5,000 according to the back cover) pinpoint common student errors (cf., for example, hour, news, never, jarra, suerte) – see figures 2 and 3. The source for these notes is the Cambridge Learner Corpus, as explained above. All of them are aimed at Spanish students. e. Quite often these usage notes are inspired by marked lexical differences between Spanish and English. More specifically, in the area of contrast and interference between native language and foreign language, we have observed for example that false friends receive some attention: one of the lexical boxes (page 226) highlights usual errors made by students in this area; moreover, the dictionary explains the meaning of a good number of common English false friends in their corresponding entries (cf., for example, constipated, terrific, agonize, actually, apology, embarrassed, casualty, exit). f. Likewise, the dictionary also contains some culture-specific vocabulary in both sides – e.g. haggis, muffin, leprechaun, torrija, torrezno, chorizo. In these well-known cases of zero lexical equivalence, the lexicographer unavoidably has to opt for paraphrases or explanations for want of a one-word translation equivalent. g. Interspersed in the A-Z text are also 124 grammatical and lexical boxes alphabetically listed on pages 12 and 13 for ease of

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

reference. They are also targeted at Spanish users (cf., for example, across/through, comparative and superlative forms of adjectives, decir, voces de animales, esperar) – see figures 4 and 5. h. It is rather significant that all these types of extra notes and boxes are written in Spanish in both sides of the dictionary. i. The same applies to pronunciation notes, added to some headwords in the EnglishSpanish side in order to help the Spanish learner (cf., for example, acne, accidental, chorus, contribute, condemn, denial). The use of light blue print makes them even more salient as is also the case of grammar and error notes – see figure 6. j. Illustrations are used now and again to help Spanish learners memorise vocabulary (cf., for example, egg, crockery/cutlery, to cook, collective nouns). Please note that drawings in the Español-Inglés side illustrate various English equivalents of a Spanish headword (cf., for example, hoja, sombra, reloj). k. “Usability” is also a key feature of bilingual pedagogical lexicography (see the second section), i.e. it is not enough to provide various translation equivalents; the user must be informed of their linguistic properties in order to choose the right one. At a more concrete level, since the Cambridge Compact is written for Spanish speakers, it has been confirmed that, in the second side (EspañolInglés), a modest innovative attempt has been made at offering syntactic information about English translation equivalents of some Spanish headwords: cf., for example, the entries for pensar, querer, jurar, gustar – see figure 7. In these cases, the user is informed about some complementation structures of the English equivalents of these verbs, which proves indispensable for encoding purposes. It has also been observed that these indications (in small blue print), which will surely not go unnoticed by conscientious learners and the committed teacher bent on improving their dictionary-using skills,

23


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

are reinforced with example sentences translated into English. Although some metalexicographers have cast doubt on the effectiveness of examples for L1 users in the L1-L2 part of a bilingual unidirectional dictionary (Marello, 1996: 46) or have simply opted to exclude them (Lew and Adamska-Salaciak, 2015: 54), in our opinion, including them is totally justified because they can help the L1 user to encode. l. In turn, entries in the first side (EnglishSpanish) (“passive” dictionary – cf. Hartmann and James, 1998: 13-14) contain some syntactic information about English headwords themselves, not about their translation equivalents in Spanish. This is only to be expected and confirms the unidirectional nature of the description. For example, very common English verbs are accompanied by their typical prepositions and/or by their most usual complement types, some of which are further illustrated with example sentences: cf., for example, understand, complain, try, tell, explain – see figure 8. Similarly, entries for some English adjectives (e.g. afraid, elder) explain their use. In consequence, this side of the dictionary will clearly serve decoding purposes but can also be used as a complement of the second part (Español-Inglés) for production-oriented tasks: the user may find in the English-Spanish side specific linguistic information about the translation equivalents furnished in the second side. For these reasons, it is no wonder that the English-Spanish side in the Diccionario Cambridge Compact (626 pages) is clearly longer than the second (485 pages). Some authors (cf. Hannay, 2003: 147, 152; Lew and Adamska-Salaciak, 2015: 52) have noted in this respect that a detailed L2-L1 side might compensate for the incomplete information about English equivalents characteristic of the L1-L2 part. An obvious alternative would be to use a monolingual learners’ dictionary as a source of information on English words.

24

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

m. Finally, another feature which contributes to the “usability” of the translation equivalents is the inclusion of “meaning discriminations”, or brief semantic indications in brackets which facilitate the choice of a given equivalent when more than one is offered for polysemous words. Thus, in the entry for clave, we find 1 (código) code: en clave – in code 2 (solución, explicación) key: la clave del problema – the key of the problem; solution 3 (contraseña) password 4 (en música) clef. Cf. also figures 9 (entry for band) and 10 (servir), for example. It is rather significant that these clues are in Spanish in both parts of the dictionary. Some weaknesses and limitations Although the foregoing features make the Diccionario Cambridge Compact a commendable reference, mention must citizens bank auto loan online account be made of some weak points. In the first place, considering the amount of linguistic information furnished in entries in both sides of the dictionary and in the grammar notes and boxes, we may call into question that it addresses the needs of “intermediate to advanced learners”, as claimed in its introduction. Rather, the dictionary seems best suited to lower levels, probably in the (pre)-intermediate area (or B1 in the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages); this is a plain conclusion when we compare its content with that of advanced bilingual dictionaries of the type mentioned in the Introduction of this article, and more specifically, the number of pages, the list of entries, and also the entry text. Secondly, as anticipated in the Facts and Figures section above, the Español-Inglés side (or “active” dictionary) is much shorter than the EnglishSpanish one (“passive” dictionary) – one hundred and forty-two pages less. This seems to be a common tendency in many bilinguals today (cf. Honselaar, 2003: 324). The imbalance could be addressed by adding more linguistic information on the English translation equivalents provided

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

for Spanish terms, a common demand of metalexicographers, which is not easy to put into in practice. Hence, the claim that L2 words must be provided with “semantic, stylistic, syntactic, combinatory and/or pragmatic features” (Honselaar, 2003: 323) still remains a desideratum, although, as explained above, interestingly, this dictionary includes some information of this type in the Español-Inglés part, a very positive innovation.

its characteristic unidirectional orientation: Spanish speakers (in this case) can equally access both sides of the dictionary from each of the two languages depending on their receptive or productive needs, but the dictionary text (including the content of entries as well as other elements such as extra notes, appendices, illustrations, etc.) is adapted to and written for that type of user exclusively, whatever the purpose of the look-up operations.

Finally, the accompanying compact disk does not contain any of the extra elements of the printed text (conversation guide, illustrations, grammar and usage boxes, and common mistake notes); moreover, the typography used in the entry text of its interface is rather plain and hence less reader-friendly and informative than that of its printed counterpart. Other intermediate bilingual dictionaries mentioned above clearly outdo the Diccionario Cambridge Compact in this respect. This is the case of the Diccionario Oxford Study para estudiantes de inglés (2006), which is in fact a suite of programmes incorporating a bilingual proper, a bilingual dictionary of phrasal verb and a monolingual onomasiological dictionary. Its CD-ROM also contains a variety of language games and exercises as well as a pronunciation practice utility. Another outstanding reference is the disk of the Collins Master Dictionary (2002, 3rd edition), which features an https becas agora santander com advanced search function, similar to that of advanced monolingual learners’ dictionaries on compact disk (Rizo-Rodríguez, 2008).

The analysis of the Diccionario Cambridge Compact undertaken in this article has fully confirmed that it meets a good number of prerequisites for a bilingual pedagogical dictionary. This work definitely shows both a unidirectional bias and a pedagogical conception which make it an outstanding reference within the wide array of ELT materials for intermediate Spanish students. Both its extras and the entry text in both sides unambiguously reveal that it only targets that user group, as demanded by metalexicographers. Despite some obvious limitations mentioned above, this dictionary is, without doubt, an interesting example of an innovative lexicographic project which, we hope, may set the pace for other publishing houses and may even be enhanced in subsequent editions, provided that its editors build on the features characteristic of this edition.

CONCLUSIONS In the light of the foregoing discussion, various conclusions can be obtained. It seems obvious that the type of bilingual dictionary addressed to learners definitely constitutes a valuable learning/teaching tool, not least because of its distinctive lexicographical features and its being geared to the needs of a specific user group who has English as their target language, hence

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

A final comment might well round off the previous discussion: from a more practical perspective, the benefits of a tool of this type may well go unnoticed by the inexperienced learner unless a conscientious teacher introduces its use to students appropriately, simple though it looks. It is our belief that the area of dictionaryusing skills remains the teacher’s responsibility alongside his/her developing other linguistic competences in the classroom. Teaching students how to put the dictionary to good use, raising an awareness of its contents and organization, and working with it can only be advantageous in the strenuous but engaging task of learning a foreign language.

25


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

APPENDIX: SAMPLE ENTRIES

Figure 1

Figure 2

Figure 3

Figure 5

Figure 6

Figure 4

26

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

Figure 9 Figure 7

Figure 10

Figure 8

REFERENCES Atkins, B. and M. Rundell. 2008. Oxford Guide to Practical Lexicography. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Berkov, V. 1990. “A modern bilingual dictionary – Results and prospects”. BudaLEX ’88 Proceedings. Eds. T. Magay and J. Zigány. Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó. 97-106. Bogaards, P. and M. Hannay. 2004. “Towards a new type of bilingual dictionary”. EURALEX 2004 Proceedings. Eds. G. Williams and S. Vessier. Lorient: Université de Bretagne-Sud. 463-474. Duval, A. 1986. “La métalangue dans les dictionnaires bilingues”. Lexicographica 2: 93-100. Haensch, G. 1997. Los diccionarios del español en el umbral del siglo XXI. Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca. Haensch, G. 2003. “Los diccionarios bilingües españoles en el umbral del siglo XXI”. La lexicografía hispánica ante el siglo XXI. Eds. Mª A. Martín Zorraquino and J. L. Aliaga Jiménez. Zaragoza: Departamento de Educación, Cultura y Deporte; Institución Fernando el Católico. 77-97.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

27


IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

IN THE ENGLISH CLASSROOM

Hannay, M. 2003. “Types of bilingual dictionaries”. A Practical Guide to Lexicography. Ed. P. van Sterkenburg. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 145-153. Harrell, R. 1975. “Some notes on bilingual lexicography”. Problems in Lexicography. Eds. F. Householder and S. Saporta. Third edition. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University. 51-61. Hartmann, R. and G. James. 1998. Dictionary of Lexicography. London: Routledge. Honselaar, W. 2003. “Examples of design and production criteria for bilingual dictionaries”. A Practical Guide to Lexicography. Ed. P. van Sterkenburg. Amsterdam: John Benjamins. 323-332. Iannucci, J. 1975. “Meaning discrimination in bilingual dictionaries”. Problems in Lexicography. Eds. F. Householder and S. Saporta. Third edition. Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University. 201-216. Kromann, H., T. Riiber, and P. Rosbach. 1991. “Principles of bilingual lexicography”. Dictionaries. An International Encyclopedia of Lexicography. Eds. J. Hausmann, O. Reichmann, H. Wiegand, and L. Zgusta. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. Vol. 3: 2711-2728. Lew, R. and A. Adamska-Salaciak. 2015. “A case for bilingual learners’ dictionaries”. ELT Journal 69/1: 47-57. Marello, C. 1996. “Les différents types de dictionnaires bilingues”. Les dictionnaires bilingues. Eds. H. Béjoint and P. Thoiron. Louvain-la-Neuve: Duculot. 31-52. Markic, J. and B. Pihler. 2004. “El uso de los diccionarios bilingües en la enseñanza del español como segunda lengua”. Las gramáticas y los diccionarios en la enseñanza del español como segunda lengua: deseo y realidad. Actas del XV Congreso Internacional de ASELE. Eds. M. Castillo, O. Cruz, J. García, J. Mora Sevilla: Secretariado de Publicaciones de la Universidad de Sevilla. 548-554. Rizo-Rodríguez, A. 2008. “Review of five English learners’ dictionaries on CD-ROM”. Language Learning and Technology 12/1, 23-42. http://llt.msu.edu/vol12num1/default.html Rizo-Rodríguez, A. 2015. “Aportación al estudio de los diccionarios bilingües español-inglés de inicios del siglo XXI”. A lexicografía románica no século XXI. Eds. M. Meliss, Mª. D. Sánchez Palomino, and Mª. T. Sanmarco Bande. München: Iudicium Verlag (in print). Snell-Hornby, M. 1987. “Towards a learner’s bilingual dictionary”. The Dictionary and the Language Learner. Ed. A. Cowie. Tübingen: Niemeyer Verlag. 159-170. Tomaszczyk, J. 1981. “Issues and developments in bilingual pedagogical lexicography”. Applied Linguistics 2/3: 287-296. Tomaszczyk, J. 1983. “The case for bilingual dictionaries for foreign language learners”. Lexicography: Principles and Practice. Ed. R. Hartmann. London: Academic Press. 41-51. Werner, R. 2015. “Conceptos de equivalencia y principios contrastivos en lexicografía bilingüe”. A lexicografía románica no século XXI. Eds. M. Meliss, Mª. D. Sánchez Palomino, and Mª. T. Sanmarco Bande. München: Iudicium Verlag (in print). Williams, E. 1959. “The problems of bilingual lexicography particularly as applied to Spanish and English”. Hispanic Review 27: 246-253. Zöfgen, E. 1991. “Bilingual learner’s dictionaries”. Dictionaries. An International Encyclopedia of Lexicography. Eds. J. Hausmann, O. Reichmann, H.Wiegand, and L. Zgusta. Berlin: Walter de Gruyter. Vol. 3: 2888-2903.

28

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


Jesús M. Nieto García Universidad de Jaén [email protected] Jesús M. Nieto García has been a teacher of English for the last thirty years approximately. Currently working at the English Department in Jaén University, he has written extensively on Teaching English Pronunciation, Spoken English Discourse and the Stylistics of Drama, among other topics. In the following article I want to offer a revision and updating of Gabriel Tejada’s original idea adapting the International Phonetic Alphabet for beginners in English in a non-native environment. I will seek to offer a presentation and discussion of the original proposal, by considering the paradigm of English as an International Language (EIL), followed by a series of suggestions that will make the use of a notation system easier and realistic for young learners of English. The strong points in the original suggestion are highlighted, and some new ideas are incorporated in order to adapt it to the new situation of English internationally and in the Spanish and Andalusian current teaching setting.

INTRODUCTION Back in the 1990’s, in Nieto García and Tejada Molina (1993) and in Tejada Molina and Nieto García (1995) we presented an adaptation of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) for young learners of English, regarding their needs in addressing such a complex issue as English pronunciation. I still think that the principles behind this Phonetic Alphabet for Beginners (PAB) are perfectly valid for these times, although they need some degree of adaptation, after such landmarks as Cruttenden’s (2001) rewriting of Gimson’s fundamental book (1980) and, especially, Jennifer Jenkins’ (2001) seminal work concerning the pronunciation of English as an International Language (EIL). In the next pages, I’m following our original ideas, as a warm, duly respectful homage to Gabriel Tejada’s views on TEFL and especially of the importance that teaching the spoken dimension has for young learners (Tejada Molina, 1991; 2007).

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

Probably the main need for adaptation to a new situation comes from the inclusion of a new model for pronunciation, which is not necessarily a native variety of English, as was the case in 1995, but the inclusion of English as a Lingua Franca (ELF) or, more generally speaking, English as an International Language (EIL). As we will see in the next pages, some of the ideas behind this new approach were already partially present in our previous studies, whereas others seem to be more than welcome at this moment. In recent proposals for the inclusion of a wider treatment of pronunciation from an international perspective, one of the keypoints has been the usefulness of dealing with just one variety of English or more than one. At this stage, we must be aware of our students’ origin, but also of their future use of English for international communication, so https becas agora santander com we must address English pronunciation specifically in the classroom bearing in mind that most of them will share Spanish as their common L1, but

29

in the primary classroom

THE PHONETIC ALPHABET FOR BEGINNERS: A REVISION AND ADAPTATION TO ENGLISH FOR INTERNATIONAL COMMUNICATION


IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

also thinking that they are learning English precisely because they want to communicate internationally in a more efficient way in the future. The first notion will mean that we can use some form of adapted representation of pronunciation –Hancock (1994: 3) speaks of ‘imitated pronunciation’–, whereas the second will mean that, in later stages, we should go beyond this use, to make learners understand that other forms of English should be known, and this will mean an expansion of pronunciation models in the future –actually, Celce-Murcia, Brinton and Goodwin (2010: 33) pose doubts on to what extent a single Lingua Franca Core can work equally well for all learners of English internationally. The basic principle we followed in the original notation system (Tejada Molina and Nieto García, 1995: 251-252) was the simplification and adaptation of some of the symbols employed in the IPA. For example, the enormous difficulties that we know young learners of English have to face when distinguishing between short and long vowels were simplified by incorporating just a regular set for five vowel symbols and using underlining to suggest that they could be long instead of short –a similar suggestion is included in Rogerson-Revell (2011: 11) when she presents a general view on a possible treatment of international English. Similarly, we suggested the use of up to three different forms for the /ə/ sound, depending on its position, to reflect perceptual differences, with the peculiarity that a smaller font was suggested for all these forms, so that an adaptation was offered. Some other basic ideas concerning accents of English internationally and aspects of connected speech were also present in our PAB, such as the inclusion of /r/ in all positions –we coincided in this with Jenkins’ later proposal that a rhotic pronunciation tends to be more intelligible to international speakers of English– and the presentation of

30

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

meaning groups as full chunks of information, plus the inclusion of the stress mark in a way that may be clearer, or more intuitively acceptable, to Spanish speakers of English. In the approach to consonants, finally, we again offered a simplification of some of the symbols, and also the possibility of finding variation in some sounds, depending on the position, and the linguistic context, of some of these sounds. In this study I would like to update our previous findings, and adapt them especially to EIL and the principles behind the Lingua Franca Core (LFC), establishing priorities in how we address English pronunciation for beginners. I will divide my explanation in the three blocks that we originally presented, namely vowels, consonants and prosodic features, and will offer a reflection on those adaptations that stay the same and those that should be adapted to a new approach to English pronunciation internationally. In all these cases, I will include examples of how the pronunciation of words and phrases should be presented in this new approach which, for lack of a better term, I will refer to as “PAB-r” (Phonetic Alphabet for Beginners, a revision). VOWELS There is no major difference between our initial proposal and its evolution, with some minor exceptions that affect the repertory of sounds rather than their actual presentation. We know that one of the great difficulties that most young Spanish learners of English as a Foreign Language have to face is the great number of vowels, by Spanish standards, that they have to recognize and later imitate –see, on this, among others, O’Connor (1980: 146); Kenworthy (1987: 156); Yavas (2011:188-189). Table 1, then, is a reflection on the number of vowel symbols, from the original PAB to the modified PAB-r.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

Symbol PAB i e a o u a o e a i e a o u

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

Symbol PAB-r i e a o u a o e a i e (+r) a o u

Original example “ill” “sell” “pal” “top” “put” “cut” “table” “ago” “paper” “see” “sir” “far” “saw” “too”

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

PAB íl sél pál tóp pút kát téibol egóu péipa sí sér fár só tú

PAB-r íl sél Pál tóp pút kát téibol egóu péipar sí sér fár só tú

Table 1. A list of the symbols for short and long vowels

The only significant difference here is the levelling of differences between the vocalic sound in “pal” and the one in “cut”, so that the symbol employed is the same. The general principle here is a double one: the priority established by Jenkins (2001: 159) for a neat

distinction between short and long vowels and the reliance on contextual factors to distinguish such tricky pairs as “cat” and “cut”, or “hat” and “hut”, going beyond a pure phonemic approach to EFL pronunciation, as already mentioned in Nieto García (2013: 133).

Symbol PAB

Symbol PAB-r

Original example

PAB

PAB-r

ei ai oi au ou ia ea ua eia aia oia aua oua

ei ai oi au ou i (+r) or ía e (+r) u (+r) ei (+r) ai (+r) oi (+r) au (+r) ou (+r)

“pay” “buy” “boy” “now” “know” “ear” “air” “tour” “payer” “buyer” “coyer” “power” “lower”

péi bái bói náu nóu íar éar túar péiar báiar kóiar páuar lóuar

péi bái bói náu nóu ír ér túr péir báir kóir páur lóur

Table 2. A list of the symbols for glides

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

31


IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

In the group of glides, a new theoretical reduction in the total number of symbols is introduced. This is done by limiting the number of glides, in fact, to just the five closing diphthongs, as most centring diphthongs and triphthongs are usually followed by /r/, which is anyway present both in the PAB and in the PAB-r in these sequences. Given the open nature of the proposal, in any case, in those words where the centring diphthong, or triphthong, is not followed by /r/, the suggestion is the inclusion of the full vowel plus a schwa, as in ‘idea’ and ‘enjoyable’. As a summary, if we suggested in the original PAB a reduction of the number of symbols employed to represent English vocalic sounds, Symbol PAB p t k b d g or gu ch y or ch f v or f z d s s sh sh j m n n l r or ru i u

Symbol PAB-r p t k b d g ch y or ch f v or f z d s s sh sh h m n n l r i u

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

mainly through the underlining of non-gliding long vowels, in this new version I am suggesting a further simplification, through the suppression of one symbol (“cut”) and the limitation in the total number of glides. CONSONANTS In general, we can say that the adaptation of consonants is an updating of the PAB bearing in mind the general principles outlined by Jenkins (2001: 137-144), where she suggests that the pronunciation of consonants is not really a problem for intelligibility on an international basis, although some key elements must be respected. This can be seen in detail in table 3.

Original example “put” “top” “cake” “bed” “dog” “gate” “church” “George” “five” “very” “thief” “this” “stop” “zoo” “ship” “measure” “hot” “moon” “name” “bring” “little” “run” “yes” “white”

PAB pút tóp kéik béd dóg guéit chérch yórch fáif véri zíf dís stóp sú shíp méshar jót mún néim brín lítol ruán iés uáit

PAB-r pút tóp kéik béd dóg géit chérch yórch fáif véri zíf dís stóp sú shíp méshar hót mún néim brín lítol rán iés uáit

Table 3. A list of the symbols for consonants

32

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

Just a few basic changes have been introduced in my revision of the original model, although the main features in the original model remain the same, and these include levelling the difference between possibly difficult distinctions between the pair of affricates in ‘church’ and ‘George’ and the pairs of fricatives in ‘stop’ and ‘zoo’, ship’ and ‘measure’ –see, on this last feature, similar solutions in ‘Amalgum English’, as presented by Rogerson-Revell (2011: 11)–, or the presentation of /ŋ/ as /n/. The main changes are explained next. The treatment of the plosive alveolar d sound was intended to establish a difference between this sound and /ð/, but this does not seem to be functional any more, at a time when the separate treatment of this last sound is said to be a low priority from an international perspective, given the wide variety of actual realizations that we can find, and the low weight it has in Jenkins’ LFC. The suggestion, then, is just to suppress the distinction –see, on this, for example, Jenkins (2001: 137-138) and Rogerson-Revell (2011: 11, 57), in her reflection on “Amalgum English”. The other three main changes between the original model and its updating are, again, cases of simplification, which comes closer to the way sounds are presented in standard IPA. For instance, the plosive velar /g/ sound was originally presented as /g/ or /gu/, depending on the sound following. Similarly, the glottal fricative /h/ was presented as /j/ and the flapped /r/ as either /r/ or /ru/. The suggestion is to simplify all these elements, so that young learners of English are better prepared to find these elements in the future as they will find them in standard pronunciation materials, so that no ‘alien’ elements, like the /u/ in /g/ or in /r/, may https becas agora santander com them in the actual pronunciation that many common words will have in many forms of English internationally. This is specially noticeable in the presentation of /h/ as /h/, and not /j/, as most young learners are now really used to finding the aspiration of

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

this initial sound in many common words from very early stages, like the word ‘hand’ and many others. As a summary, most of the original features are still included in the updating, including, above all, a treatment where no clear distinction is really established between most voiceless fricatives and their voiced counterparts, or the avoidance of some difficult distinctions which are affected by local or regional varieties in native and international English, like the /n/ /ŋ/ differentiation. Beyond that, the adaptation obeys some basic principles that will help young learners of English get used to the IPA model in the future. PROSODIC FEATURES The treatment of prosodic elements in the original model was probably one of its most salient features, and there are no real changes in the adaptation. I would simply like to reflect on some of its main features that provided a perfectly adequate updating of the canon of English pronunciation from an international perspective, in the early 1990’s. Probably the most salient feature in the treatment of prosodic features was the way the forming elements of speech were presented, with a factual incorporation of such aspects as elision and linking, and prominence levels, to simple English expressions. One such example might be “Point to the window” /póintu deuíndou/. An analysis of the PAB presentation will tell us the following concerning the model: a) it establishes a clear distinction between prominent and non-prominent syllables; the prominent syllables are marked with a stress symbol, and quite often presented in a larger type than the vowels in the unstressed syllables; b) there is no space between the stressed elements and the dependent non-lexical words surrounding them, so that learners do not perceive them as separate entities, in rhythmical terms; and c) the elided

33


IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

elements, such as the /t/ in “point” are not included in the PAB pronunciation, as we know Spanish speakers of English find it especially difficult to articulate some consonants in some positions. Like this, the treatment of consonant clusters coincides with Jenkins’ treatment, when she says that they should not be modified in syllable onsets but they can be made lighter in syllable codas –see, on general aspects concerning this field, Celce-Murcia, Brinton and Goodwin’s (2010: 283) reference to Gilbert’s priorities for young learners, where the following are established: linking between words, the number of syllables, word stress, prominence and thought grouping. Although it is true that EIL tends to leave many of these aspects outside the English as a Lingua Franca approach –see Walker’s (2010: 62) interesting comparison between the ELF and the EFL syllabi–, it is also true that most of them are easily incorporated to young students’ perceptions on differences between Spanish and English in general, and they will be better equipped in the future

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

to understand both varieties of English if an adequate presentation of natural speech is given to them from the start. CONCLUSION Most of the suggestions presented in the previous pages are simply an extension of the original model. This will tell us that the initial suggestion already considered international communication, and the establishment of priorities in this, as key factors in dealing with pronunciation and its importance for young learners of English. The new elements that we can find in this updating are the result of a reflection on some of the suggestions already made a number of years ago, and most of them are intended to make teachers aware of the need to approach other models that, in the future, will help learners adapt to the general systems that they are going to find in many information sources in dealing with the pronunciation of English.

REFERENCES Celce-Murcia, M., D.M. Brinton and J.M. Goodwin. 2010. Teaching Pronunciation; a course book and reference guide. New York: Cambridge University Press. 2nd Edition. Cruttenden, A. 2001. Gimson’s Pronunciation of English. London: Arnold. 6th Edition. Gimson, A.C. 1980. An Introduction to the Pronunciation of English. London: Arnold. 3rd Edition. Hancock, M. 1994. “On Using the Phonemic Script in Language Teaching”. [Internet document available at http://hancockmcdonald.com/ideas/using-phonemic-script-language-teaching]. Jenkins, J. 2001. The Phonology of English as an International Language. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Kenworthy, J. 1987. Teaching English Pronunciation. London: Longman. Nieto García, J.M. 2013. “Phonemic Transcription as a Methodological Tool for Learners of English as an International Language”. Teaching by doing; a Professional and Personal Life. Eds. D. Rascón Moreno and C. Soto Palomo. Jaén: Universidad de Jaén. 125-146. Nieto García, J.M. and Tejada Molina, G. 1993. “Sistema de transcripción fonológica para principiantes”. Greta. Actas de las VIII jornadas pedagógicas para la enseñanza del inglés. Granada, October 1992. Ed. José A. Martínez López. Granada: Greta. Asociación de Profesores de Inglés. 7593. O’Connor, J.D. 1980. Better English Pronunciation. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 2nd Edition. Rogerson-Revell, P. 2011. English Phonology and Pronunciation Teaching. London: Continuum.

34

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

IN THE PRIMARY CLASSROOM

Tejada Molina, G. 1991. Me and You 1. Guía didáctica de inglés para alumnos de primaria (8-10). Granada: Universidad de Granada. Tejada Molina, G. 2007. Enfoque ecléctico y pautas del diseño curricular para la enseñanza del idioma oral: “Me first”. Jaén: Universidad de Jaén. Tejada Molina, G. and Nieto García, J.M. 1995. “Oral communication”. A Handbook for TEFL. Eds. N. McLaren and D. Madrid. Alcoy: Marfil. 239-258. Walker, R. 2010. Teaching the Pronunciation of English as a Lingua Franca. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Yavas, M. 2011. Applied English Phonology. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. 2nd Edition.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

35


at university

LA FORMACIÓN DE LOS MAESTROS DE INGLÉS A LO LARGO DE LA HISTORIA Daniel Madrid Fernández Universidad de Granada [email protected] Daniel Madrid Fernández es Catedrático de Universidad de Didáctica de la Lengua Inglesa en la Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación de la Universidad de Granada y ha impartido también docencia en varias universidades americanas y europeas. Ha llevado a cabo varios proyectos de investigación y ha publicado numerosos trabajos sobre la enseñanza del inglés, la formación del profesorado de idiomas, el uso de “internet” como recurso didáctico y la educación bilingüe. En este artículo hacemos un breve recorrido histórico por los principales planes de formación inicial que se le ha ofrecido en España al profesorado de educación primaria desde el siglo XIV hasta nuestros días. Hemos destacado los aspectos más relevantes del Plan profesional de 1931 y de los planes de estudios de 1945, 1950, 1967, 1971, 1994/2000 y 2010, y hemos puesto de manifiesto las fortalezas y debilidades que, en nuestra opinión, han caracterizado a cada uno.

LOS COMIENZOS Parece que la primera disposición legal que regula la formación de los Maestros fue la Cédula Real de Enrique II que se promulga en el año 1370. En ella se establecen tres requisitos para presentarse a examen y poder ser aprobado como Maestro: • gozar de buena conducta, • tener limpieza de linaje y • un examen de doctrina cristiana. El organismo que controlaba y regulaba esta normativa era el Consejo de Castilla. Estos requisitos permanecen en vigor hasta el año 1667, fecha en que la Hermandad de San Casiano, organización gremial que sustituyó al organismo anterior, elabora las primeras ordenanzas y amplía los requisitos anteriores en el siglo XVIII. Para poderse presentar al examen de maestro había que tener 20 años cumplidos, haber asistido a clases de un maestro dos años continuos, saber leer perfectamente cualquier papel y saber escribir con propiedad la letra “bastarda liberal y detenida, la grifa y romanilla,

36

panzuda y todas las demás que se estilaran” (Delgado Criado, 1993: 497). En 1705, se aumenta el periodo de formación a tres años de asistencia, ayuda y supervisión por parte de un maestro y, después, a cuatro. El examen de maestro (antiguas oposiciones) se centraba en la Lengua Castellana, Gramática, Ortografía y Doctrina Cristiana. A pesar de todo, en el siglo XVIII, la consideración social del maestro y la importancia de la educación en las pequeñas localidades dejaba mucho que desear como lo demuestra la actuación de las autoridades locales de Ohanes (1734), pueblo alpujarreño de Almería, ante el deterioro del techo de la escuela (véase el Apéndice 1). Los escritos del Alcalde y del Escribiente ponen de manifiesto la falta de seriedad con la que se tomaban los problemas de las escuelas en algunas localidades. La Creación de las Escuelas Normales Posteriormente, el rey Carlos III suprimió la Hermandad de San Casiano y creó el Colegio

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

Académico del Noble Arte de Primeras Letras. Entre los objetivos de esta institución, se hallaba la apertura de Escuelas Normales o Colegios de Profesores de Primeras Letras (Ruiz Https becas agora santander com, 1980). La Academia concebía el aprendizaje de las técnicas de enseñanza como un entrenamiento junto a un maestro experimentado. Esa formación práctica se realizaría en las escuelas públicas de Madrid, denominadas Escuelas Normales. En el año de 1797, se recogió por primera vez, en documentos oficiales, el término “normales”, equivalente a escuelas “modelo” que marcarían la pauta educativa a la que debían atenerse el resto de las escuelas públicas. Con posterioridad, esta acepción se generaliza para designar los centros de formación de maestros (González Pérez, 1994). La primera Escuela Normal que hubo en España fue la Escuela Normal Central, denominada también Seminario Central de Maestros del Reino, inaugurada en 1839 (Antón Matas, 1970; Escolano Benito, 1982). Este centro se creó en régimen de internado y dependía directamente del gobierno, que nombraba al director y a los profesores, y fijaba las condiciones de admisión de los alumnos. En esta época, se promulga la Ley Moyano (9 de septiembre de 1857), que fue la primera ley de educación de nuestro país que articuló todo el sistema educativo y contempló a las Escuelas Normales como escuelas profesionales. Dispuso la creación de Escuelas Normales en todas las provincias españolas y una Escuela Normal Central en Madrid. Esta ley fue el fundamento del ordenamiento legislativo en el sistema educativo español durante más de cien años. Se intentó mejorar la deplorable condición de la educación en España, uno de los países europeos con mayor tasa de analfabetismo en esa década, organizando tres niveles de la enseñanza: • Enseñanza primaria, en teoría obligatoria hasta los 12 años y gratuita para los

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

que no pudieran pagarla, pero que en la práctica dependerá de la iniciativa de los municipios o de la iniciativa privada. • La segunda enseñanza o enseñanza media, en la que se prevé la apertura de institutos de bachillerato y escuelas normales de magisterio en cada capital de provincia, además de permitir la enseñanza privada en los colegios religiosos, que recibirán especial consideración. • La enseñanza superior a través de las universidades, cuya gestión se reserva al Estado. El artículo 68 establece que los estudios necesarios para obtener el título de Maestro de Primera Enseñanza Elemental son: Catecismo explicado de la doctrina cristiana, Elementos de Historia Sagrada, Lectura, Caligrafía, Gramática Castellana con ejercicios prácticos de composición, Aritmética, Nociones de Geometría, Dibujo Lineal y Agrimensura, Elementos de Geografía, Compendio de la Historia de España, Nociones de Agricultura, Principios de Educación y Métodos de Enseñanza y Práctica de la Enseñanza. En el artículo 70 se indica que, para ser Profesor de Escuela normal, se necesita además haber estudiado Elementos de Retórica y Poética, un curso completo de Pedagogía, en lo relativo a la primera enseñanza, con aplicación también a la de sordomudos y ciegos y Derecho Administrativo relativo a la primera enseñanza. Para ser Maestra de Primera Enseñanza (Art. 71), se requiere haber estudiado con la debida extensión en Escuela Normal las materias de la primera enseñanza de niñas, elemental o superior, según el título a que se aspire y estar instruida en principios de Educación y Método de Enseñanza. En esta época, no se contemplaba la formación de los maestros de idioma extranjero. Las líneas fundamentales de la Ley Moyano pervivieron hasta la Ley General de Educación de 1970, que

37


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

estableció la escolarización obligatoria hasta los 14 años. No obstante, a finales del siglo XIX la formación que recibían los maestros estaba siendo muy cuestionada. Las escuelas normales, carentes de recursos didácticos, no respondían a las necesidades formativas de los aspirantes al magisterio. Así describía Macías Picavea (1979: 94) la formación del maestro en las Escuelas Normales (también en Almuiña, 1987: 209): “(El maestro es) un ser horriblemente formado; mejor dicho, deformado. En las Normales nada se les enseña, pero en cambio le desquician la natural inteligencia, el buen sentido y el sano juicio de las cosas.” EL PLAN PROFESIONAL DE 1931 La formación de los maestros y el tipo de educación que se impartía a principios del siglo XX (véase Apéndice 2) dejaba mucho que desear. La situación, en los años treinta, queda reflejada en la descripción de Gerald Brenan (1957) sobre la educación en Yegen, en la Alpujarra de Granada: El Estado insistía en que debía haber una escuela, y la hubo, regentada por una maestra. Aquellos muchachos que no tenían que ayudar a sus familias pastoreando cabras, se reunían allí todas las mañanas para asimilar los rudimentos de una educación moderna. Aprendían de memoria una serie de himnos y oraciones, se familiarizaban un poco con las historias de la Biblia y, en cuanto a la aritmética, llegaban a dominar los números cardinales hasta el veinte y, si eran listos, hasta el cien. También se hacían con los nombres de los cuatro continentes mayores y las doce naciones principales, y aprendían a reconocer los animales más importantes, comenzando por el perro y el león. Esto se les facilitaba mediante una lámina de colores que colgaba de la pared, y que mostraba a una vaca junto a un caldero en el momento del ordeño, un cazador con su perro, un camello

38

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

junto a una palmera, y un león devorando a un antílope. Pero ¿y la lectura y escritura? En teoría formaban parte del programa, pero creo que únicamente como ideales cuyo alcance debía inspirar sólo a los chicos serios y estudiosos. En la práctica estaban fuera de las posibilidades de todos. Era raro que en estas escuelas cualquier chico o chica llegara más allá de reconocer unas cuantas letras. De hecho, la generación más vieja de la aldea difícilmente contaba con más de tres o cuatro personas que pudieran leer una línea, a excepción de aquellos que llevaban el don o doña delante de sus nombres. Los jóvenes habían aprendido a leer porque en el servicio militar los sargentos les daban un curso de lectura y escritura. ….En nuestra aldea no había nada que leer, de manera que incluso aquellos que habían aprendido a hacerlo lo olvidaban pronto, debido a las escasas ocasiones que se les brindaban para poner en práctica sus conocimientos (Capítulo VII: Escuela e iglesia). Sin embargo, con la II República española en 1931 se producen grandes modificaciones en el terreno educativo afectando significativamente a las Escuelas Normales del Magisterio y a los planes de formación de Maestros. En aquella época, se concebía la educación como un medio de liberación de las clases populares y se plantea como un objetivo fundamental la educación primaria para todos los niños. Para ello, se crearon muchas escuelas y se dignificó el magisterio con un sueldo de 4.000 pesetas, equiparable al de los demás funcionarios. En esta época destacó La Institución Libre de Enseñanza, que insistía en la extraordinaria responsabilidad que correspondía al Maestro y en la necesidad de que el colectivo de enseñantes estuviera bien preparado. Tanto Cossío como Giner de los Ríos destacaron la importancia de la formación del Maestro.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

Se puso en marcha un nuevo plan de estudios, conocido como Plan Profesional, que contemplaba cuatro etapas en la formación de los maestros: 1. Formación previa: para ingresar en las Normales, el candidato debía estar en posesión del título de Bachiller Superior; 2. Examen de ingreso: el acceso a las Normales quedaba regulado mediante un examenoposición, que garantizaba una plaza de maestro al finalizar los estudios; 3. Formación profesional de tres cursos académicos, con asignaturas optativas y líneas de especialización; 4. Formación práctica: un curso completo de prácticas en escuelas públicas nacionales, con responsabilidades directas en el aula. Con el Plan de 1931, la formación de los maestros adquirió rango de licenciatura universitaria y se consigue una formación de extraordinaria calidad para el magisterio. Se organizaban las materias en tres grupos: Conocimientos filosóficos, pedagógicos y sociales, Metodologías especiales y Materias artísticas y prácticas. Las materias se distribuían en tres cursos de formación: En el Primer curso, se impartía: Elementos de Filosofía, Psicología, Metodología de las Matemáticas, Metodología de la Lengua y de la Literatura española, Metodología de las Ciencias Naturales y de la Agricultura, Música, Dibujo, Trabajo Manual o Labores, Ampliación facultativa de Idiomas (Francés). En Segundo curso: Fisiología e Higiene, Pedagogía, Metodología de la Geografía, Metodología de la Historia, Metodología de la Física y de la Química, Música, Dibujo, Trabajos manuales o Labores, Ampliación facultativa de Idiomas (Francés).

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

Y en el Tercer curso: Paidología, Historia de la Pedagogía, Organización escolar, Cuestiones económicas y sociales, Trabajos de seminario, Trabajos de especialización. Las Prácticas escolares tenían lugar en el curso cuarto. Finalizado el tercer curso correspondía la realización de un examen de conjunto o Reválida que consistía en un examen teórico sobre dieciséis temas y una lección práctica a un grupo de alumnos en la escuela aneja a la Normal. LEY DE EDUCACIÓN PRIMARIA DE 1945 De acuerdo con esta ley, las Escuelas de Magisterio (Art. 59) son también las instituciones docentes dedicadas a la formación del Magisterio público y privado. El sistema docente queda regulado por el artículo sesenta que, para la organización de las Escuelas del Magisterio, establece las siguientes normas generales (BOE, 1945): A) El ingreso en la Escuela del Magisterio se verificará ante tribunales constituidos por profesores del mismo Centro. El aspirante ha de tener catorce años cumplidos al solicitar dicho examen o cumplirlos dentro del mismo año escolar. B) La escolaridad será de tres cursos. C) La formación del Maestro comprenderá: 1. Ampliación de aquellas disciplinas formativas o culturales (principalmente de la lengua nacional y de las Ciencias de la Naturaleza) estudiadas en la Enseñanza Media. 2. Intensificación de la doctrina y de las prácticas religiosas y metodología teórica y aplicada de la enseñanza de la Religión. 3. Auténtica formación en los principios que han inspirado la historia nacional que suscite en el futuro Maestro el concepto claro de la unidad de destino de España. 4. Un sistema de conocimientos y ejercicios de Educación Física y de normas de convivencia social que hagan plenamente apto al Maestro para llevar a cabo su misión.

39


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

5. Un ciclo de estudios de carácter profesional, con los siguientes grupos de conocimientos teóricos y prácticos: a) Preparación fundamental y aplicada de las ciencias generales de la educación. b) Conocimiento amplio y razonado de las técnicas pedagógicas y de sus aplicaciones en la metodología y organización escolar. c) La historia de los principales sistemas educativos y muy especialmente los de origen español. d) Las prácticas escolares en Escuelas anejas e incorporadas a las Escuelas del Magisterio, e) La asistencia a Campamentos y Albergues. La asistencia a campamentos y albergues se inicia con la ley de 1945 y se mantiene hasta el plan de 1967. Con esta ley, el sistema educativo español se propuso introducir en la escuela la enseñanza del inglés, sobre todo cuando fue refundida y actualizada en 1965: • Se divide la escolaridad en 8 cursos, desde los 5-6 años a los 13-14 y se propone, entre otros fines, regular una educación que favorezca una cultura general obligatoria y prepare para la vida del trabajo. • En el curso 8º (13-14 años) se prevé la introducción de la lengua extranjera. Se pretende dotar a los escolares de los conocimientos y hábitos que les permitan hablar, entender, leer y escribir el idioma lo más perfectamente posible. Sin embargo, el Plan de Estudios de 1950, aunque incluye idioma extranjero en el mismo, no contempla la formación del profesorado de LE.

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

curso 4º de Bachillerato y haber aprobado la Reválida, con unos 14 ó 15 años y terminaban los estudios a los 17 ó 18. El Plan de Estudios abarcaba las siguientes áreas de formación: a) Formación religiosa y moral, b) Formación político social, c) Formación física, d) La cultura general, la formación profesional teórica y la formación profesional práctica y las siguientes disciplinas, cuyo desarrollo se hacía en los siguientes cursos: Primer curso: Religión y su metodología, Lengua española, Matemáticas: Aritmética y su metodología, Geografía e Historia de España, Filosofía: Psicología, Lógica y Ética, Fisiología e higiene, Labores o Trabajos Manuales, Caligrafía, Educación Física y su Metodología, Prácticas de enseñanza, Una lección colectiva, Formación político social (alumnos), Enseñanzas del Hogar (alumnas) y su Metodología. Segundo curso: Religión y su Metodología, Matemáticas: Geometría, Trigonometría, Física y Química y su Metodología, Filosofía: Ontología general y especial, Psicología pedagógica y paidológica, Pedagogía: Educación y su Historia, Labores o trabajos manuales, Dibujo y su Metodología, Música: solfeo y cantos religiosos, patrióticos y escolares, Caligrafía, Prácticas de enseñanza, Formación político social (alumnos), Enseñanza del Hogar (alumnas), Educación física y su Metodología. Tercer curso: Religión y su metodología, Historia de la Literatura Española, Metodología de la Lengua, Geografía e Historia Universal y su metodología, Historia Natural y su metodología, Pedagogía: Metodología general y organización escolar, Agricultura e industrias rurales, Música: Cantos, Un idioma extranjero, Dibujo del natural, Educación física y su metodología, Https becas agora santander com de enseñanza, Formación político social (alumnos), Enseñanzas del Hogar (alumnas) y su metodología.

PLAN DE ESTUDIOS DE 1950 Con este Plan, los alumnos ingresaban en las escuelas de magisterio tras haber finalizado el

40

La opinión de un maestro ya jubilado sobre este plan de formación puede ser un buen testimonio sobre sus puntos fuertes y débiles:

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

Visto con la perspectiva de tantos años, pienso que la formación académica del Plan 50 no era mala para aquella época. Hay que tener en cuenta que se trataba de formar maestros de Primaria, para alumnos de 6 a 12 años de edad, y en aquella época no se pensaba en especialistas ni nada por el estilo. Teníamos asignaturas específicas como Música, Caligrafía y Trabajos Manuales que hoy pueden parecer irrisorias, pero que a mí me parecieron y me siguen pareciendo apropiadas e interesantes para un maestro. Empezábamos la formación específica, e incluso a ejercer siendo aún muy jóvenes. Mi primer destino como maestro fue cuando tenía 18 años, pero hay que tener en cuenta las circunstancias políticas y económicas de aquella época que hacían que los jóvenes alcanzáramos a temprana edad una madurez psicológica y un sentido de la responsabilidad que ahora no se alcanzan a esas edades. También teníamos una asignatura llamada Prácticas de Enseñanza. Era una asignatura fundamentalmente teórica y con cosas tan absurdas como dónde había que orientar en el plano geográfico a una escuela, qué materiales emplear para su construcción, etc. Algo fuera de tiempo y lugar. También nos fijaban una o dos sesiones de prácticas por curso en la Escuela Aneja, que a todas luces eran insuficientes para la formación práctica de un maestro. Ésta es una de las cosas que más eché en falta en mi formación inicial y que el Plan 67 resolvió tan bien haciendo que los futuros profesores hubieran de completar todo un curso en un centro escolar, pasando por los diversos niveles y tutelados por profesores con experiencia en las aulas. La falta de formación pedagógica la sufrí en mis carnes el primer año que ejercí de maestro. Me asignaron un Primer curso de EGB con alumnos de 6 años que entraban por primera vez en un aula. Había que enseñarles Lectoescritura por encima de todo, pero yo no tenía ni idea, aparte de utilizar las cartillas Palau de la época. Tuve que hacer un curso autodidacta y acelerado en muy poco tiempo buscando bibliografía en las

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

librerías y poniéndome al día por mi cuenta por las noches para poder llevar a aquellos alumnos a buen puerto. Otra cosa que eché a faltar fueron técnicas sobre cómo llevar el control y la gestión de una clase con 40 alumnos. Nada de eso se nos enseñaba y hubo que echar mano de la intuición, lo que recordabas de cómo habían actuado tus profesores y el ensayo y error. De todo ello, y con el punto de vista que da la distancia, queda un buen sabor de boca porque se actuaba con pasión y vocación. Creo que los maestros de aquella época teníamos unas enormes ganas de aprender y perfeccionarnos en nuestra profesión, ya que seguimos con la formación continuada a lo largo de nuestra vida profesional que nos permitió hacer frente a todos los cambios políticos y sociales, tan impactantes, que cambiaron por completo nuestras vidas y nuestra profesión entre los años 70 y la segunda década de los 2000 en que hemos accedido a la jubilación LOGSE. (Manuel Porcel García, Maestro jubilado del Plan 50).

EL PLAN DE ESTUDIOS DE 1967 Durante los años sesenta, los idiomas modernos experimentan un auge extraordinario que va asociado al rápido crecimiento económico, sobre todo con el turismo, y a los nuevos avances científicos y tecnológicos. Europa avanza hacia su unificación y expansión y, en este proceso, se considera que el estudio y el fomento de las lenguas europeas son fundamentales. Fue en el curso académico 1967-68 cuando entró en vigor este nuevo Plan de Estudios para la formación inicial de un magisterio renovado, más profesionalizado y más acorde con las nuevas demandas educativas de los gloriosos sesenta. El Plan de Estudios de 1967 trae aires nuevos e introduce modificaciones muy importantes. El alumnado de Magisterio ingresa en las

41


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

Escuelas Normales con mejor formación, tras haber finalizado el ciclo del Bachillerato Superior y la Reválida. Después, recibe una formación académica a través del estudio de 22 asignaturas: 9 asignaturas en el curso primero, 9 en el curso segundo y, además, habían de cursarse por la tarde: Dibujo, Música, Manualizaciones y Enseñanza del Hogar y Prácticas de enseñanza. El periodo de formación culminaba con una prueba de madurez (o Reválida) evaluada por un tribunal. Los que pasaban dicha prueba iniciaban un periodo de prácticas en escuelas, de un curso de duración, con seminarios didácticos de apoyo al final de cada jornada escolar. El Plan 67 suprime algunas asignaturas del Plan 50 (ej: Agricultura y Caligrafía) e introduce otras nuevas (ej.: el Idioma inglés y su didáctica). También se introducen cambios terminológicos importantes: desaparece la coletilla final de las asignaturas del Plan 50 “y su metodología” y se sustituye por “Didáctica de .” o “ . y su didáctica”, dotando al nuevo Plan de Estudios de una profesionalización mucho mayor. A pesar de la terminología oficial, en realidad, los contenidos de las asignaturas no eran tan didácticos como pudiera parecer. En todos los casos, se chase credit card how to dispute charge el estudio puro de cada ciencia con algunos aspectos de su metodología de enseñanza o didáctica específica, a criterio de cada profesor, pero no cabe duda de que, en general, comienza a ganar terreno un enfoque mucho más profesionalizado. En aquel entonces fuimos invadidos por algunas corrientes nuevas: fue la época de la matemática moderna, de la lingüística estructural y de la enseñanza individualizada, con la que los niños aprendían con fichas de trabajo que rellenaban valiéndose del libro de consulta y que luego reforzaban en la puesta en común. La prueba de madurez, una vez finalizado el curso segundo, consistía en: a) una prueba objetiva basada en los contenidos de las materias cursadas en la carrera;

42

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

b) el desarrollo de dos temas elegidos al azar de un temario de Letras y Ciencias, elaborado por la Dirección General de Enseñanza Primaria; c) el comentario de un texto de contenido pedagógico, que después era leído por el alumno ante el tribunal en sesión pública; d) un ejercicio práctico, que pusiera de manifiesto la habilidad manual y técnica del alumnado y su capacidad de expresión artística; e) una traducción directa sin diccionario de un texto de inglés o francés. Una formación práctica de calidad El Plan 67, lo mismo que el de 1931, ofrecía un periodo de prácticas de todo un curso escolar. Los alumnos que aprobaban la prueba de madurez (o Reválida) desarrollaban, en el curso tercero, un periodo de prácticas en escuelas, de un curso escolar de duración, que era supervisado, orientado y calificado por una Comisión a través de visitas periódicas a los centros donde se observaba y se evaluaba la docencia de cada alumno en prácticas. Además, la calificación final se matizaba con la valoración de la memoria de prácticas que cada alumno debía entregar a final de curso. Otra innovación del Plan 67 que incentivaba y motivaba el periodo de prácticas del alumnado fue su remuneración mediante el pago de 4.500 ptas. mensuales. De esta forma, el estudiantado, además de recibir una extraordinaria formación práctica, recibía con gran ilusión su primera “minipaga” (en aquella época el sueldo del maestro era de unas 7.000 pesetas mensuales). Lo más atractivo y eficaz del plan de estudios, a juicio de los maestros que lo cursaron, era: • La selección del alumnado que llegaba a las escuelas normales por medio de exámenes externos: Reválida de 4º, Reválida de 6º, y Prueba de madurez una vez finalizado el curso segundo. • La formación práctica en escuelas de todo un curso, con una modesta remuneración.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

• El ingreso directo en el cuerpo del Magisterio de aquellos alumnos con el expediente académico más alto, que motivaba a una buena parte del alumnado a lo largo de los tres años de duración. EL PLAN DE ESTUDIOS DE 1971 Este plan de estudios establece como requisito de entrada en las Escuelas Normales el haber finalizado los estudios de Bachillerato y eleva el rango de la titulación a una Diplomatura de tres años. Se pretende que el nuevo Diplomado estuviera capacitado para impartir la enseñanza globalizada de la 1ª Etapa de EGB y de la 2ª Etapa, en un Área de moderada especialización. Los estudios duraban 3 años y se distribuían en: a) Disciplinas comunes, que preparaban para ejercer como profesor generalista en la 1ª etapa. b) De especialización en un área de la EGB, que en nuestro caso, se orientaba hacia la especialización moderada en el Área Filológica (Lengua, Literatura Española e Idioma). c) Optativas, que se proponían profundizar en las especialidades (De Guzmán, 1973). Por su parte, el alumnado de la especialidad del Área Filológica compartía su formación, primero, y su docencia, después, entre la Lengua y Literatura Española y una lengua extranjera (francés o inglés), aunque en los años setenta la demanda del inglés supera por primera vez a la del francés. Los Diplomados del Área Filológica, especialidad de Filología Inglesa, cursaban 3 asignaturas de inglés anuales: Inglés 1, 2 y 3, Literatura Inglesa y Comentario de Textos (optativa cuatrimestral), Literatura Americana y Comentario de Textos (optativa cuatrimestral) y Didáctica del Inglés (optativa cuatrimestral) a razón de 3 horas por semana. La formación inicial tanto la lingüística como la didáctica se orientaba de acuerdo con los principios del método audio-lingual (Brooks, 1960; Rivers 1964, 1968), de forma que el futuro profesorado de EGB desarrollara y

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

supiera desarrollar en sus alumnos hábitos que propiciaran la habilidad compleja de escuchar, hablar, leer y escribir el inglés. Aunque el Plan de 1971 aumentaba el nivel de especialización respecto al de 1967, los resultados fueron especialmente deficitarios para los especialistas en Idioma Moderno (Delgado, 1989; Madrid, 1996, 1998 y 2001), como demuestra Vicente Guillén (1981):

Idioma moderno Música Matemáticas Lenguaje Expresión plástica

Déficit en % 46% 44% 28% 11% 10%

Fig.1: Deficiencias respecto a la formación científica o de contenido de los profesores de EGB del Plan 1971 (Vicente Guillén, 1981).

La investigación de Samuel Gento, que fue más específica y se centró exclusivamente en la formación del profesorado de inglés, también confirma una alta autoestimación de deficiencias en este profesorado (Gento, 1984:7): Autoestimación de deficiencias en: Conocimiento de la lengua inglesa Metodología de su enseñanza

62% 52%

Fig. 2: Autoestimación de deficiencias en el profesorado de inglés de EGB (Gento, 1984).

Estas deficiencias en el sistema de formación inicial (Madrid, 1996, 1998 y 2001) unidas a la falta de criterios racionales en las escuelas a la hora de asignar los cursos y las asignaturas al profesorado, explican, en parte, la mediocridad con que transcurrió la enseñanza del inglés en España durante los años setenta. El Decreto de plantillas 3.600/1975 del 5 de diciembre (BOE, 17/01/76) se suspendió y a falta de un marco legal, la asignación de profesorado, cursos y asignaturas, en la EGB, se hacía con frecuencia por antigüedad, en ocasiones, sin tener en cuenta

43


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

la especialidad del profesorado. Era frecuente que el último en llegar a un colegio tuviera que impartir lo que nadie quería, es decir, el Ciclo Inicial (¡los niños chicos!) y los más antiguos, independientemente de su especialidad y cualificación, se quedaban con las asignaturas de la 2ª etapa. Esta situación empobreció el panorama de la enseñanza de los idiomas, hecho que se puede constatar en varios artículos de la prensa especializada de los años ochenta: “La enseñanza de los idiomas en España: un desastre”, Escuela Española, 11/10/84, p.7 (903). “La enseñanza de idiomas es muy deficiente en la EGB”, Comunidad Escolar, 1/15 de mayo, 1984, p.11. “El sistema educativo descuida la enseñanza de los idiomas” y “La enseñanza de los idiomas es el aspecto más deficitario de la EGB”, Comunidad Escolar, 1/15 noviembre, 1983, pp.17 y 18. “El idioma en la EGB: un bonito adorno”, Escuela Española nº 2.740, 1-111-84, p.7 (955). Fig. 3: Opinión de la prensa especializada sobre la enseñanza del inglés en la EGB.

PLAN DE ESTUDIOS DE 1994 Este plan de estudios se diseñó para formar a los maestros de la Reforma educativa de 1990 y de la LOGSE. En Granada, la elaboración del nuevo Plan de Estudios de Idioma Extranjero comienza en el Contexto de la EU del profesorado de EGB a finales de 1991, y termina en el contexto de la Facultad de Ciencias de la Educación a principios de 1995, que es creada por Decreto 158/1992 de 1 de septiembre, por transformación de la Escuela Universitaria del Profesorado de EGB y de la Sección de Pedagogía de la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras. El Plan de Estudios de la especialidad de Lengua Extranjera comienza su andadura junto con los otros seis Títulos de Maestro, una vez que habían sido publicadas

44

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

las directrices generales propias de los Planes de Estudios, conducentes a la obtención del título universitario de Maestro en sus distintas especialidades (BOE, 11/10/1991). Estructura del Plan de Estudios de 1994 (reformado en 2000) La especialidad de Lengua Extranjera consta de dos lenguas diferenciadas: Francés e Inglés. La titulación es única (Maestro Especialista en Lengua Extranjera), debiendo elegir los alumnos una lengua extranjera u otra. El Plan de Estudios intenta cumplir los objetivos generales del Real Decreto citado con anterioridad, junto con las especificidades que dimanan del propio contexto de la Universidad de Granada. La especialidad de Lengua Extranjera es una de las especialidades que cuenta con el menor número de créditos propios: 28,5 créditos troncales, y 8 obligatorios de Universidad, 36,5 créditos en total. Porcentualmente, ello significa un 19,2%. Si añadimos los créditos optativos (16 como máximo, dado el escaso número de asignaturas optativas ofertadas), obtenemos un total de 52,5 créditos de Lengua Extranjera posibles, es decir, un porcentaje de especializacion del 27,5%. Comparativamente, a título de ejemplo, la especialidad de Educación Musical en la Universidad de Granada, contaba con 68 créditos propios (entre troncales y obligatorios), y sumando las asignaturas optativas, un total de 90 créditos, es decir prácticamente un 50%. Por tanto, el nivel de especializacion de las distintas titulaciones no estaba equilibrado ni se hizo con criterios profesionales, sino en función de los círculos de poder de la Facultad y de las circunstancias políticas locales (Madrid, 1996 y 1998). La tabla siguiente resume el Plan de Estudios de la Especialidad de Lengua Extranjera

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

de la Facultad de CC. de la Universidad de Granada donde ya figura la Didáctica

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

del idioma extranjero como asignatura troncal:

Plan de Estudios de la Especialidad de Maestro de Lengua Extranjera: Asignaturas de L.E. (Facultad de CC. de la Educación de la Universidad de Granada) (Carga lectiva global del Plan de Estudios: 190 créditos) Materias troncales de idioma: Créditos Idioma Extranjero 8 Didáctica del Idioma Extranjero 8 Fonética de la LE 4,5 Morfosintaxis y Semántica 8 Obligatorias de universidad Didáctica de la Literatura Angloamericana 8 Optativas de LE Aspectos Socio culturales de la LE 8 Comunicación Oral y Escrita en LE 8 52,5 TOTAL (27,5% de especialización) Fig.4: Asignaturas de LE del Plan de Estudios de la especialidad de Maestro de LE (Universidad de Granada).

En esta época se impone el movimiento progresista o interpretativo-simbólico, con una metodología basada en: • Un enfoque pragmático y funcional y los principios del enfoque comunicativo (Widdowson, 1972, 1978; Van Ek y Alexander, 1975, 1980; Wilkins, 1976; Brumfit y Johnson, 1979; Johnson y Morrow, 1981; Sánchez Pérez, 1987; Nunan, 1989; Vez, 1998). • Se practica una enseñanza centrada en el alumno, en sus intereses y necesidades. • Se ha de ser consecuente con los principios del constructivismo. • Se debe fomentar el aprendizaje autónomo. • Se atiende la diversidad del alumnado realizando las adaptaciones curriculares pertinentes con actividades de ampliación y refuerzo, según los casos. • Se imparten contenidos de tres tipos: conceptuales, procedimentales y actitudinales, y se organizan en tres bloques: comunicación oral, escrita y los aspectos socioculturales.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

• Además, se han de desarrollar contenidos transversales, referidos a educación cívica, vial, del medio ambiente, del consumidor, para la salud e igualdad entre sexos. • Se ha de evaluar de acuerdo con criterios de evaluación que servirán de referencia para evaluar las capacidades que han desarrollado los alumnos. • Se potencia la autoevaluación del alumno para que sea consciente de sus procesos de aprendizaje. • Además, se sigue recomendando una evaluación continua y formativa tomando como base los trabajos de los alumnos y las pruebas que se apliquen a lo largo del curso. Algunos problemas del plan de formación de 1994 A pesar de que los objetivos que solían figurar en los programas de las distintas asignaturas se basaban en las directrices oficiales y aparentaban seguirlas, en la práctica, este sistema

45


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

de formación presentaba algunos problemas que vienen arrastrándose desde décadas. Esas deficiencias se concentran en el carácter academicista de los programas de formación, su carácter excesivamente general y teórico o excesivamente especializado, la mediocridad con que transcurren las prácticas de enseñanza y la falta de colaboración de los maestros en ejercicio. PLAN DE ESTUDIOS DE 2010. LA FORMACIÓN DEL MAESTRO POR COMPETENCIAS El plan de estudios actual se diseña teniendo en cuenta las competencias profesionales que necesita el Maestro para desempeñar con eficacia su profesión docente. El término competencias tiene una larga tradición y se encuentra en cierta forma influenciado por el movimiento conductista que predominó en los años sesenta y setenta. Este enfoque se hizo popular en los Estados Unidos hacia 1970 con el movimiento de formación profesional de los docentes

46

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

llamado competency-based teacher education (CBTE). Posteriormente y de la mano de la formación profesional vuelve a ponerse de moda en la década de 1990 con el sistema nacional de cualificaciones profesionales en el Reino Unido y otros movimientos similares en diferentes países del mundo anglosajón, preocupados por definir estándares de competencia y perfiles competenciales para facilitar el desarrollo y la formación de capital humano y profesional adecuado a la competitividad de la economía global. En la actualidad, y a partir del documento de DeSeCo (Definición y Selección de Competencias fundamentales) elaborado por la Organización para la Cooperación y el Desarrollo Económico (OCDE), que apareció en el año 2000 y cuya versión definitiva se difunde en el año 2003, la mayoría de los países de la OCDE, entre ellos la Unión Europea y España, han comenzado a reformular el currículo escolar en torno al controvertido, complejo y poderoso concepto de competencias. Los diferentes autores que han tratado este enfoque (Pérez Gómez, 2007; Rial Sánchez, 2007; Madrid, 2013; Madrid y Hughes, 2013; Pérez Cañado, 2013), coinciden en señalar que las competencias están formadas por la integración de varios componentes: • conocimientos, cuya apropiación fundamentalmente está dirigida al procesamiento y aplicación de la información, • habilidades, que es saber hacer algo y estrategias, que son formas para conseguir algo y resolver problemas, • y actitudes y emociones generadoras de disposición de ánimo ante conflictos personales y situaciones determinadas y valores, los cuales representan la importancia que le damos a lo que nos rodea. Tobón (2005) y Rial Sánchez (2007) indican varios componentes estructurales de una competencia:

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

• Identificación de la competencia: nombre y descripción de la competencia mediante un verbo en infinitivo. • Criterios de desempeño: resultados que una persona debe demostrar en situaciones reales de trabajo. • Rango de aplicación: criterios de desempeño, diferentes tipos y naturalezas en las cuales se aplican los elementos de la competencia. • Problemas: problemas que la persona debe resolver. • Elementos de competencia: desempeños específicos que componen la competencia. • Saberes esenciales: saberes requeridos para que la persona pueda lograr los resultados. • Evidencias requeridas: pruebas necesarias para evaluar la competencia. Como veremos después, las competencias que establece la administración para los planes de estudios no cumplen con esas condiciones y se han redactado de forma mucho más simple.

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

en práctica integrada de https becas agora santander com, rasgos de personalidad, conocimientos y valores adquiridos. El libro Blanco de la ANECA establece tres tipos de competencias para la formación del profesorado: a) instrumentales (tienen una función de medio o herramienta para obtener un determinado fin), b) personales rockland federal credit union jobs a que las personas logren una buena interrelación social con los demás) y c) sistémicas (suponen destrezas y habilidades relacionadas con la comprensión de la totalidad de un sistema o conjunto. Dentro del paradigma de la formación por competencias, la ANECA establece una relación de competencias docentes específicas para ayudar al profesorado a conseguir los objetivos de lengua extranjera del currículo que establecen las Comunidades Autónomas. Estas competencias están agrupadas en: conocimientos disciplinares (Saber), competencias profesionales (Saber hacer) y competencias académicas, referidas al conocimiento de la cultura y a las actividades de intercambio cultural.

El profesorado que se forma en las Facultades de Educación ha de estar preparado para desarrollar en el alumnado las 8 competencias básicas del currículo de Primaria y Secundaria: 1. Competencia en comunicación lingüística, 2. Competencia matemática, 3. Competencia en el conocimiento y en la interacción con el mundo físico, 4. Tratamiento de la información y competencia digital, 5. Competencia social y ciudadana, 6. Competencia cultural y artística, 7. Competencia para aprender a aprender y 8. Autonomía e iniciativa personal.

La competencia más valorada por los encuestados en este perfil es el conocimiento de otra lengua. La plena competencia comunicativa, junto con las capacidades docentes básicas y el diseño de actividades de comunicación oral, son las dimensiones de destreza más valoradas. Sin embargo, sorprende que una de las competencias menos valoradas sea el dominio comunicativo básico de “otra” lengua extranjera distinta a la que resulta objeto de estudio en este itinerario.

Además, hay que tener en cuenta las competencias transversales que ha de desarrollar el profesorado. Llamamos competencias transversales (genéricas) las que sirven para todas las profesiones. Son aquellas competencias genéricas, comunes a la mayoría de las profesiones y que se relacionan con la puesta

Aunque cada universidad ha incluido diferentes tipos de asignaturas, los créditos asignados a los Maestros de inglés en el plan de estudios vigente son 30: 6 créditos para una asignatura genérica y obligatoria en el Grado de Primaria y 24 créditos para la mención de inglés que contiene 4 asignaturas optativas de 6 créditos cada una.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

47


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

A esta carga docente, habría que añadir las prácticas de enseñanza en escuelas: 8 créditos. En total, los futuros maestros de inglés cursan en la actualidad 38 créditos, es decir el 16% de los 240 créditos que tiene el Grado de Primaria. En algunas universidades, ni siquiera se han incluido menciones de especialización para los futuros maestros. Crítica al enfoque de formación por competencias Resulta un tanto contradictorio observar que cuando hay más necesidad de especialización en el Maestro, sobre todo para que participe en los programas de educación bilingüe de las escuelas, menor es el grado de especialización del Plan de Estudios en lengua inglesa. Una vez más, el sistema de formación no responde a las necesidades socioeducativas del momento (Madrid, 1996 y 1998; Madrid Manrique y Madrid Fernández, 2014). Además, tendríamos que añadir otras críticas que el presente plan de formación por competencias ha recibido desde varios frentes. Varios autores han criticado que: • No hay claridad en los conceptos. • Hay incoherencia entre la teoría y su aplicación en los ámbitos profesionales: a veces se reduce al uso de una palabra para enunciar una competencia. Ejemplo: Creatividad, Liderazgo. • Se concibe la educación como mercado (modelo mercantilista). • Enfoque reduccionista. Al dividir el proceso formativo en un conjunto de competencias, algunos autores han considerado el enfoque demasiado reduccionista, parcial y unilateral. • Orientación conductista. Algunos autores ven en el modelo un peso demasiado fuerte de las conductas y los comportamientos frente a capacidades relacionadas con el pensamiento o la transformación social.

48

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

• No hay un tratamiento secuenciado, coordinado y colectivo de la inclusión y seguimiento de las competencias • No se delimitan bien los criterios de evaluación. RESUMEN Y CONCLUSIONES En este trabajo nos hemos centrado en el marco administrativo e institucional de la formación del Maestro a lo largo de la historia, con especial referencia al maestro de inglés. Desde esta perspectiva, hemos hecho un breve recorrido histórico por los principales planes de estudios que han ofrecido las instituciones españolas, profundizando en los planes de formación más recientes. Uno de los mejores planes de estudios que ha tenido el Magisterio español fue el Plan Profesional de 1931, que consiguió el mejor plan de formación de la Europa y América de aquella época. Es de destacar su rango de Licenciatura, el hecho de que una vez aprobado el ingreso en la Normal se tenía garantizada la entrada en el cuerpo del Magisterio nacional y la dignificación del Magisterio con un sueldo de 4.000 pesetas, equiparable al resto de los funcionarios. Hemos visto que el Plan de Estudios de 1945 no ofrecía idioma extranjero y, por consiguiente, no preveía la formación del profesorado de LE. Sin embargo, ofrece iniciativas formativas de gran interés, tales como la creación de la Escuela Aneja a la Escuela Normal, destinada a las prácticas escolares de los alumnos y la concesión de licencias por estudios para el perfeccionamiento del profesorado. Desde nuestro punto de vista, el Plan de Estudios de 1950 supone un avance, en tanto que introduce un idioma extranjero en el curso tercero, aunque su objetivo es completar la formación académica del futuro maestro y no tiene una orientación didáctica, ya que no se estudiaba idioma en Primaria y el Maestro

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

no tenía que enseñarlo. A pesar de la doble denominación de las asignaturas referida al contenido y a su didáctica, casi todas las asignaturas incidían mucho más en los contenidos académicos que en su metodología de enseñanza, dado que la formación del alumnado era deficiente después de cuatro cursos de Bachillerato Elemental. Creemos que fue el Plan de Estudios de 1967 el que consolida el enfoque didáctico de las materias, aunque sigue ocupando un segundo plano, pues la formación académica del alumnado con 6º de Bachillerato dejaba mucho que desear y la mayor parte del tiempo se dedicaba también a los aspectos de contenido. Creemos que este Plan de Estudios ofreció, junto con el Plan Profesional de 1931, uno de los mejores periodos de prácticas que jamás haya cursado el alumnado de Magisterio (todo un curso académico en la escuela). Además, incluía el mayor incentivo que jamás ha tenido el alumnado: el ingreso directo en el cuerpo del Magisterio si se obtenía un buen expediente académico, pues el 30% de las plazas se reservaba para este fin. El Plan de Estudios de 1971 eleva el estatus académico del Maestro con el título de diplomado universitario. Fue el que introdujo por primera vez y, aunque fuera con carácter optativo, la Didáctica de la Lengua Inglesa para los futuros maestros que se formaban para impartir el Área Filológica, que incluía Lengua y Literatura Española e Idioma Extranjero. Las asignaturas de inglés del Plan de Estudios de 1971 constituían un 21,4% respecto a la carga lectiva total. Este porcentaje de especialización es importante y superaba al actual, si tenemos en cuenta que el maestro se preparaba para enseñar Lengua y Literatura Española e Inglés. A pesar de estos avances, los estudios sobre las deficiencias de la formación inicial del profesorado (Vicente Guillén, 1981; Gento, 1984) detectaron deficiencias importantes en la formación científica y en el conocimiento de la lengua

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

inglesa. Si a estas deficiencias, le añadimos la falta de criterios científicos en las escuelas a la hora de asignar los cursos al profesorado comprenderemos la mediocridad con que transcurrían estas enseñanzas y las críticas de la prensa especializada al respecto. En la formación del profesorado a partir de la Reforma de 1990, con el Plan de Estudios de 1994 y 2000, la novedad más importante, desde nuestra posición como formadores de profesores de LI, es la creación de la especialidad de LE (LOGSE, art. 16) tanto en las escuelas como en las Facultades de Educación. Ahora bien, como puso de manifiesto el Comité de Evaluación Interna y Externa de la Titulación de Lengua Extranjera en la Universidad de Granada, la especialidad de LE era una de las especialidades que contaba con el menor número de créditos propios (52,5 créditos totales, si añadimos las optativas, que suponen un 27,5 %). Evidentemente, esto dificultaba la formación especializada del profesorado de idiomas. Nuestros estudios sobre las necesidades e intereses y las demandas del alumnado de la especialidad (Madrid, 2003) demuestran que el alumnado y los profesores de inglés en ejercicio reclamaban un 63,3% de especialización para el profesorado de Primaria y un 77% para el profesorado de Secundaria. Si comparamos las necesidades del alumnado con la oferta institucional, podemos ver un desajuste considerable: el alumnado reclamaba un 67,4% de créditos específicos de la especialidad y la Facultad le ofrecía un 27,5 %. Esta falta de especialización no se circunscribe únicamente a la Universidad de Granada, era general. De nuevo, la formación de los titulados no respondía a las necesidades del sistema educativo. Como veremos después, esta situación se agrava con el Plan de Estudios actual. Finalmente tropezamos, en la actualidad, con el Plan de Estudios 2010, que intenta desarrollar las competencias profesionales que necesita

49


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

el profesorado para desempeñar con éxito su profesión docente, pero no formula con precisión esas competencias profesionales y las enuncia con un excesivo nivel de generalización y abstracción. Por tanto, no hay claridad en los conceptos y se produce cierta incoherencia entre la teoría y su aplicación en los ámbitos

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

profesionales. Además, no ofrece el nivel de especialización que necesita el profesorado para que pueda participar en los programas de educación bilingüe que aumentan cada año de forma considerable, produciéndose, una vez más, una falta de correspondencia entre la oferta de las instituciones y la demanda socioeducativa.

APÉNDICE 1 EXPEDIENTE DEL AÑO 1734 SOBRE LA ESCUELA DE OHANES DE LAS ALPUXARRAS (Disponible en: http://www.elpimo.es/Pueblos%20de%20La%20Alpujarra/Expediente%20de%201734 %20sobre%20la%20escuela%20de%20Ohanes%20de%20las%20Alpuxarras.pdf) CARTA DEL MAESTRO al Señor Alcalde: Tengo el honor de poner en su conocimiento la inquietud que me produce ver la viga que media la clase que regento, pues está partida por medio, por lo cual el terrado ha cedido y ha formado una especie de embudo que recoge las aguas de las lluvias y las deja caer a chorro tieso sobre mi mesa de trabajo, mojándome los papeles y haciéndome coger unos dolores reumáticos que no me dejan mantenerme derecho… CARTA DEL ALCALDE al Señor maestro de primeras letras: Recibo, con gran extrañeza, el oficio que ha tenido a bien dirigirme y apresuro a contestarle. Es cosa rara que los agentes de mi autoridad no me hayan dado cuenta de nada referente a la viga, y es más, pongo en duda que se encuentre en esas condiciones, puesto que según me informa el tío Sarmiento no hará sesenta años que se puso, y … una vez dadas esas explicaciones, que no tenía por qué (darlas), paso a decirle que eso no son más que excusas y pretextos para no dar golpe. En cuanto a lo de los papeles que se le mojan y el reuma que se le avecina, puede muy bien guardárselos … en el cajón o en casa, e ir a la escuela si quiere con una manta… (28 de noviembre de 1734). CARTA DEL MAESTRO al Sr. Alcalde: Tengo el honor de acusar recibo de su atento oficio de ayer, donde tiene a bien de poner en duda el estado de la viga. Desde mi oficio anterior, Sr. Alcalde, hace unos ocho meses, pasaron las lluvias del invierno, y yo siempre mirando la viga con la inquietud consiguiente, ¿caerá o no caerá? Y así un día y otro, como si en vez de una viga fuera una margarita. Si Vd. no cree lo que le estoy diciendo, puede mandar dos personas peritas, o venir Vd. mismo dando un paseíto,… (29 de noviembre de 1734). CARTA DEL ALCALDE al Señor maestro de primeras letras: … me parece excesiva tanta machaconería en el asunto de la viga. Sepa el señor maestro que, si no le conviene la escuela, puede pillar el camino e irse a otro sitio, que aquí para lo que enseña, falta no hace. ¿Qué importan a estas gentes ni a nadie donde está Marte ni las vueltas que da la Luna, ni que cuatro por seis son veintisiete, ni que Miguel de Cervantes descubrió América? Para coger un mancaje, basta y

50

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

sobra con tener fuerzas para ello. No obstante, como soy amante de la cultura, y no quiero que digan que he hablado mal al maestro y no le trato como se debe, nombraré una comisión que informe sobre el asunto de la viga, y si resulta que Vd. me ha engañado que Dios le guarde (15 de octubre de 1735). INFORME DEL ESCRIBANO Don Celedonio González García de García González. Escribano de la Villa de Ohanes, partido de Uxixar, reino de Granada, … Mi informe imparcial, desapasionado y verídico, como corresponde a mi profesión, es el siguiente: Si la viga cae, y amenaza peligro, puede ocurrir: que mate al maestro, en cuyo caso esta corporación se ahorraría los quinientos reales que se le pagan; que matase a los niños y no al maestro, en cuyo caso sobraría el maestro; que matase a los niños y al maestro, ocurriendo en este caso como suele decirse, que se mataban dos pájaros de un tiro; que no matase a nadie, en cuyo caso supuesto no hay por qué alarmarse…. INFORME DEL CRONISTA DE LA VILLA Yo, Don Joseph Sancho Mengíbar, cronista de la Villa de Ohanes de las Alpuxarras, declaro por mi honor que … El día catorce de octubre de mil setecientos cuarenta, siendo Alcalde de la villa Don Bartolomé Zancajo y González, y siendo las doce de la mañana, se hundió el techo del salón de la escuela de esta localidad, pereciendo en el siniestro el señor maestro de primeras letras Don Menón Garrido Martín y los catorce niños que en aquellos momentos daban su clase… Abierto el oportuno expediente, se ha podido comprobar que por parte de la autoridad competente se tomaban periódicamente todas las medidas encaminadas a velar por el buen funcionamiento del sagrado recinto;….quedando plenamente demostrado que únicamente un accidente fortuito fue el responsable del hundimiento. (Ohanes de las Alpuxarras, a 15 de diciembre de 1740.)

APÉNDICE 2 DOCUMENTO HISTÓRICO: Contrato de Maestras de 1923 (Disponible en: http://www.uv.es/~dones/Jackie/personas/maestras1923.htm) Este es un acuerdo entre la señorita . maestra, y el Consejo de Educación de la Escuela . por la cual la señorita . acuerda impartir clases durante un período de ocho meses a partir del . de septiembre de 1923. El Consejo de Educación acuerda pagar a la señorita . la cantidad de (*75 pesetas) mensuales. La señorita . acuerda: 1. No casarse. Este contrato queda automáticamente anulado y sin efecto si la maestra se casa. 2. No andar en compañía de hombres. 3. Estar en su casa entre las 8:00 de la tarde y las 6:00 de la mañana a menos que sea para atender función escolar. 4. No pasearse por heladerías del centro de la ciudad. 5. No abandonar la ciudad bajo ningún concepto sin permiso del presidente del Consejo de Delegados.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

51


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

6. No fumar cigarrillos. Este contrato quedará automáticamente anulado y sin efecto si se encontrara a la maestra fumando. 7. No beber cerveza, vino ni whisky. Este contrato quedará automáticamente anulado y sin efecto si se encuentra a la maestra bebiendo cerveza, vino y whisky. 8. No viajar en coche o automóvil con ningún hombre excepto su hermano o su padre. 9. No vestir ropas de colores brillantes. 10. No teñirse el pelo. 11. Usar al menos 2 enaguas. 12. No usar vestidos que queden a más de cinco centímetros por encima de los tobillos. 13. Mantener limpia el aula: a. Barrer el suelo al menos una vez al día. b. Fregar el suelo del aula al menos una vez por semana con agua caliente. c. Limpiar la pizarra al menos una vez al día. d. Encender el fuego a las 7:00, de modo que la habitación esté caliente a las 8:00 cuando lleguen los niños. 14. No usar polvos faciales, no maquillarse ni pintarse los labios.

REFERENCIAS Almuiña, C. 1987. “Ideología y enseñanza en la España contemporánea. La lucha por el control de la escuela”. Investigaciones Históricas: Época Moderna y Contemporánea 7: 209. Antón Matas, I. 1970. Evolución histórica de la educación en los tiempos modernos. Madrid: Ed. Instituto San José de Calasanz. C.S.I.C. BOE.1945. Ley de 17 de julio de 1945 sobre Educación Primaria. BOE Núm. 199, 18 de julio de 1945. Banks in pittsburgh, G. 1957/1974. Al Sur de Granada. Madrid: Siglo XXI. Brooks, N. 1960. Language and Language Learning. New York: Harcourt Brace and Co. Brumfit, C. J. y K. Johnson, eds. 1979. The Communicative Approach to Language Teaching. Oxford: Oxford University Press. De Guzmán, M. 1973. ¿Cómo se han formado los maestros? (1871 1971). Barcelona: Prima Luce. Delgado Criado, B. 1993. Historia de la Educación en España y América. Madrid: Morata y SM Ediciones. Delgado, A. 1989. “Enseñanza de idiomas: resultados poco brillantes”. Mural (Canarias 7), Las Palmas 52: 38. Escolano Benito, A. 1982. “Las escuelas normales, siglo y medio de perspectiva histórica”. Revista de Educación 269: 55-76. Gento, S. 1984. “El reto de la enseñanza del inglés en la Educación Básica”. Escuela Española 8-11-84, 2.741. 7(971). González Pérez, T. 1994. Las escuelas de Magisterio en el primer tercio del siglo XX. La formación de maestros en la Laguna. Tesis Doctoral. Universidad de la Laguna. Johnson, K. y K. Morrow, eds. 1981. Communication in the Classroom. Harlow, Essex: Longman. Macías Picavea, R. 1899. El problema nacional. Hechos, causas, remedios. Madrid: Librería General de Victoriano Suárez. Madrid, D. 1996. “Los planes de estudios para la formación inicial de los maestros de inglés”. Actas de las XII Jornadas Pedagógicas para la enseñanza del inglés. Ed. S. Hengge. GRETA, Granada. 62-92.

52

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

Madrid, D. 1998. “La función docente del profesorado de idiomas”. La función docente en educación infantil y primaria desde las nuevas especialidades. Eds. C. Gómez y M. Fernández. Granada: Grupo Editorial Universitario. 215-236. Madrid, D. 2001. “Reflexiones en torno a la Formación del Profesorado especialista en Lengua Extranjera”, Congreso Nacional de Didácticas Específicas: Las Didácticas de la Áreas Curriculares en el siglo XXI. Eds. F. J. Perales et al. Granada: Grupo Editorial Universitario. 771-778. Madrid, D. 2003. “Intereses, necesidades y expectativas del alumnado de Magisterio de Lengua Extranjera (Inglés) durante su formación inicial”. Tadea seu Liber de Amicitia. Eds. M. Moreno y M. L. Escribano. Granada: Grupo Editorial Universitario. 145-166. Madrid, D. 2013. “The new competency-based foreign language teacher education in the European context”. Digital Competence Development in Higher Education: An International Perspective. Eds. M. L. Pérez Cañado y J. Ráez Padilla. Frankfurt-am-Main: Peter Lang. 19-35. Madrid, D. y S. Hughes. 2013. “Competences and foreign language teacher education in Spain”. Competency-based Language Teaching in Higher Education. Ed. M. L. Pérez Cañado. Amsterdam: Springer. 63-75. Madrid Manrique, M. y D. Madrid Fernández. 2014. La formación inicial del profesorado para la educación bilingüe. Granada: Editorial Universidad de Granada. Nunan, D. 1989. Designing Tasks for the Communicative Classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Ohanes 1734. Expediente del Año 1734 sobre la Escuela de Ohanes de Las Alpuxarras. [Documento de internet disponible en http://www.elpimo.es/Pueblos%20de%20La%20Alpujarra/Expediente%20 de%201734%20sobre%20la%20escuela%20de%20Ohanes%20de%20las%20Alpuxarras.pdf] Pérez Cañado, M. L., ed. 2013. Competency-based Language Teaching in Higher Education. Amsterdam: Springer. Pérez Gómez, A. I. 2007. Las Competencias Básicas: su naturaleza e implicaciones pedagógicas (Cuaderno de Educación nº 1). Santander: Consejería de Educación de Cantabria. Rial Sánchez, A. 2007. “Diseño curricular por competencias: el reto de la evaluación”. Jornades d’avaluació dels aprenentatges a partir de competències. Girona: La Universitat. [Documento de internet disponible en http://hdl.handle.net/10256/819] Rivers, W. 1964. The Psychologist and the Foreign Language Teacher. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Rivers, W. M. 1968. Teaching Foreign Language Skills. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press. Sánchez Pérez, A. 1987. El método comunicativo y su aplicación a la clase de idiomas. Madrid: SGEL. Tobón, S. 2004. Formación basada en competencias. Bogotá: ECOE. Van Ek, J.A. y L. G. Alexander. 1975. Threshold Level English. Oxford: Pergamon Press. Vez, J. M. 1998. Didáctica del E/LE: Teoría y práctica de su dimensión comunicativa. Granada: Grupo Editorial Universitario. Vicente Guillén, A., dir. 1981. Las escuelas universitarias del profesorado de EGB. Universidad de Murcia: Instituto de Ciencias de la Educación. Widdowson, H. G. 1972. “The teaching of English as communication”. English Language Teaching 27/1: 15-18. Widdowson, H. G. 1978. Teaching Language as Communication. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Wilkins, D. 1976. Notional Syllabuses. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

53


at university

INFORMACIÓN SOBRE BECAS,ESTUDIOS DE POSTGRADO Y EMPLEABILIDAD DIRIGIDA AL ALUMNADO DE TITULACIONES FILOLÓGICAS Antonio Vicente Casas Pedrosa Universidad de Jaén

1

[email protected] Antonio Vicente Casas Pedrosa es Doctor por la Universidad de Jaén y Profesor Contratado Doctor temporal en el Departamento de Filología Inglesa de dicha institución. Imparte docencia tanto de grado como de postgrado. En el segundo caso está involucrado en dos programas de máster coordinados por ese mismo departamento (Máster Universitario en Profesorado de Educación Secundaria Obligatoria y Bachillerato, Formación Profesional y Enseñanza de Idiomas y Máster Universitario en Lingüística Aplicada a la Enseñanza del Inglés como Lengua Extranjera), impartiendo varios módulos, dirigiendo diversos Trabajos Fin de Máster y actuando como miembro de los tribunales de evaluación de los mismos. Además, como Vicepresidente de GRETA (Asociación de Profesores de Inglés de Andalucía), ha organizado diversos eventos formativos centrados en la enseñanza del inglés, el bilingüismo y el AICLE (Aprendizaje Integrado de Contenidos y Lenguas Extranjeras). El Dr. Casas ha participado en diferentes proyectos de investigación locales, regionales y nacionales relacionados con la enseñanza del inglés como lengua extranjera, el uso de las nuevas tecnologías para el aprendizaje y enseñanza de lenguas así como el EEES (Espacio Europeo de Educación Superior). Su principal área de investigación es la lingüística descriptiva del inglés (incluyendo la morfología, la sintaxis, la semántica y la pragmática del inglés). Además de prepararse las “famosas” oposiciones para convertirse en funcionariado docente de una lengua, un amplio abanico de opciones se abre ante el alumnado de estudios filológicos así como los/as egresados/as de esas carreras. Puesto que es imposible solicitar una beca o participar en procesos de selección para cualquier puesto si se desconoce la existencia de convocatorias, en primer lugar se aborda la importancia de acceder a la ingente cantidad de información disponible a través de las fuentes apropiadas. Luego se distinguen dos principales grupos de becas y ayudas según los requisitos exigidos: las de grado y las de postgrado. Algunas facilitan experiencias en el mundo laboral mientras que otras permiten la especialización mediante la formación continua. Finalmente también se analiza la posibilidad de cursar otros estudios de postgrado (tanto de máster como de doctorado) y se presentan algunas de las principales salidas profesionales de los estudios filológicos.

Este artículo persigue el objetivo de informar al alumnado de Estudios Ingleses y de otras titulaciones de características académicas similares (ya sean diplomaturas, grados o licenciaturas) así como a egresados/as sobre actividades formativas, becas y salidas profesionales relacionadas con sus perfiles.

las tutorías y en ellas no solo se resuelven cuestiones académicas relacionadas con la docencia impartida, sino asuntos de otras índoles. En distintos momentos de sus estudios universitarios diversos estudiantes acuden a los despachos del profesorado a plantearnos cuestiones relacionadas con su formación y su futuro profesional además de preguntas sobre la empleabilidad de sus carreras.

Entre las tareas que ha de afrontar el profesorado universitario se encuentran

En esta contribución se recoge toda la información recopilada durante más de una

INTRODUCCIÓN

54

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

década desde los puntos de vista del estudiante (y, por consiguiente, como antiguo beneficiario de algunas de las becas aquí mencionadas) y del profesor (recibiendo datos de diversas fuentes y también del propio alumnado al que hemos informado). El contacto directo con diversos representantes del profesorado y del alumnado tanto de la propia Universidad de Jaén como de otras instituciones universitarias nos ha permitido ir ampliando el listado de recursos. Tras prestar atención a la relevancia de obtener la información necesaria a través de diversos cauces, se presentan algunas opciones disponibles para el alumnado del perfil anteriormente descrito divididas entre los distintos niveles académicos (como estudiantes de grado y como graduados). A continuación se contempla la posibilidad de cursar estudios de postgrado y se esbozan algunas de las salidas profesionales disponibles para este colectivo. Por último, se incluyen las principales conclusiones y se proporcionan las referencias bibliográficas. “LA INFORMACIÓN ES PODER” Obviamente es imposible inscribirse en un curso de formación complementaria, solicitar una beca o participar en un proceso de selección si desconocemos su existencia o si los plazos ya se han cumplido cuando nos enteramos de ellos. Para evitar este tipo de situaciones frustrantes hemos de ser capaces de obtener la información de las fuentes oportunas e incluso saber seleccionar de entre los cada vez más numerosos recursos al alcance de cualquier usuario a través de Internet. A menudo el exceso de información puede llegar a provocar el efecto contrario al esperado. En primer lugar, destacaremos una posibilidad crucial: la suscripción a las listas de distribución indicadas para este perfil de usuarios. Resulta muy cómodo recibir periódicamente por correo electrónico un boletín de noticias en el que se

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

destacan las principales novedades. En algunos casos hasta se permite a los usuarios seleccionar entre varias posibilidades en función de sus intereses y de la frecuencia con la que desean recibir dichas noticias. Entre las numerosas alternativas, cabe destacar las siguientes:2 Aprendemas, Fábrica Cultural, Mastermas, Trabajar por el mundo, Universia, etc. En segundo lugar, resulta crucial participar en foros y beneficiarse de las numerosas preguntas y respuestas que se publican en diversos blogs y portales estrechamente relacionados con estas cuestiones y actualizados constantemente para prestar el mejor servicio. Sería aconsejable crear una carpeta con estos enlaces en el navegador de su preferencia para acceder a ellos con mayor agilidad y poder consultarlos periódicamente (“marcadores” en el caso de Google Chrome y Mozilla Firefox, y “favoritos”, en Internet Explorer). Entre otros, subrayaremos por su pertinencia los siguientes: “El muro de los idiomas” y “Locos por las becas” (en ambos casos se trata de perfiles de la red social Facebook), el IMEFE, el Secretariado de Becas, Ayudas y Atención al Estudiante de la Universidad de Jaén, el Servicio de Becas de la Universidad de Granada, la Subdirección de Becas y Ayudas de la Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria y el blog de Antonio Vicente Casas Pedrosa (en el último caso, se recomienda especialmente consultar las entradas clasificadas en las categorías de “Orientación Profesional” y “LifeLong Learning”).3 En este mismo apartado cabe destacar la posibilidad de convertirse en miembro de alguna asociación de profesionales relacionados con los estudios universitarios que se cursaron o se están cursando actualmente. Así, por ejemplo, GRETA (Asociación de Profesores de Inglés de Andalucía) proporciona una gran cantidad de información sobre actividades formativas (organizadas tanto por GRETA como por otras asociaciones profesionales), convocatorias, noticias destacadas, ofertas de trabajo, etc. no

55


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

sólo a través de su portal web, sino también mediante su perfil en la red social Facebook. Además la cuota de socio conlleva importantes descuentos en la inscripción a sus eventos formativos, el acceso a la publicación GRETA (Revista para Profesores de Inglés) y otras https becas agora santander com ventajas. Precisamente el ya mencionado concepto de “Life-Long Learning” o “aprendizaje permanente” resulta clave en la sociedad actual. Debido, por un lado, a la creciente competitividad existente entre los aspirantes a cualquier puesto laboral por la crisis económica y, por otro lado, dado que la preparación de la mano de obra es cada vez mayor y más cualificada, se hace imprescindible compaginar los estudios universitarios con la formación continua. Cabe advertir al lector que no es necesario esperar a graduarse para optar por este tipo de formación. Subrayaremos el polo opuesto, es decir, lo ideal es buscar siempre la manera de diferenciarnos del resto de nuestros “competidores” y destacar entre los componentes de una promoción universitaria optando por alguna de las muchas acciones formativas que se nos ofrecerán durante los estudios universitarios. Entre otras muchas destacaremos las siguientes como ideas principales y básicas a tener en cuenta en lo que se refiere a la formación continua: i) Importancia de acreditar los conocimientos de idiomas e informática mediante la obtención de certificaciones oficiales (por ejemplo, en el caso de la lengua inglesa, expedidas por Cambridge, el Centro de Estudios Avanzados en Lenguas Modernas de la Universidad de Jaén, la Escuela Oficial de Idiomas de Jaén, IELTS, TOEFL, Trinity, etc.); ii) Beneficiarse de las ventajas de participar en el Plan de Acción Tutorial de su titulación (coordinado por la Facultad de Humanidades y Ciencias de la Educación y promovido por el Vicerrectorado de Estudiantes e Inserción Laboral), pues eso les permitirá obtener

56

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

información útil de primera mano e incluso inscribirse en las actividades formativas destinadas a ese colectivo; iii) Relevancia de los cursos (de verano) y de los talleres de extensión universitaria: la asistencia y aprovechamiento de los mismos conlleva la adquisición de otras competencias que complementan las adquiridas en su titulación además de la expedición de certificados oficiales que enriquecerán sus currículum vítae e incrementarán la puntuación de los candidatos a las diversas becas a las que opten. En cuarto lugar, es indispensable exprimir al máximo todos los recursos que la institución en la que el alumnado cursa sus estudios universitarios pone a su disposición. A

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

continuación utilizaremos la Universidad de Jaén como ejemplo y mencionaremos las principales fuentes de información disponibles al respecto: • Oficina de Antiguos/as Alumnos/as y Amigos/as de la Universidad de Jaén; • Prácticas, Empleo y Emprendedores; • Programa Ícaro; • Secretariado de Becas, Ayudas y Atención al Estudiante; • Vicerrectorado de Estudiantes e Inserción Laboral; • Vicerrectorado de Internacionalización. Para estar informado de todas estas posibilidades hay que permanecer muy atento y consultar periódicamente las páginas web que se mencionan en la sección de bibliografía pues se actualizan constantemente para hacerse eco de cuantas convocatorias se publican e incluyen al alumnado universitario y/o a los/as egresados/as entre sus destinatarios/as. OPCIONES COMO ALUMNADO DE ESTUDIOS FILOLÓGICOS Tal y como ya se ha indicado en una sección anterior, no hay que esperar a tener el título de grado bajo el brazo para tomar ciertas decisiones. Aunque anteriormente nos referíamos a las actividades formativas, ahora volvemos a insistir en esta idea en el ámbito de determinadas ayudas, becas y lectorados que se pueden solicitar incluso antes de haber terminado los estudios universitarios. De hecho, en algunas convocatorias existe un porcentaje de las plazas ofertadas específicamente reservadas para aquellas personas que, por un lado, reúnan una serie de requisitos académicos y, por otro, aún no hayan concluido la titulación requerida. Presentaremos los datos de una forma esquemática siguiendo el mismo patrón en todos los casos e incluiremos el enlace de la última convocatoria publicada en el momento de redactar este artículo. Ha de tenerse presente que las fechas de publicación así como los plazos

GRETA

2012

20/1&2

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

de entrega de la documentación oscilan cada año. Además, en algunos casos, determinadas becas han estado “congeladas” durante varios años, pero, a pesar de ello, se ha optado por su inclusión con la esperanza de que se vuelvan a convocar en el futuro y para permitir la lectura de sus condiciones y características. Cuando es necesario ir consultando distintos detalles de la misma beca en distintos pasos, han de visitarse las diversas páginas siguiendo el orden en el que se facilitan, pues siempre se presentan yendo de los aspectos más generales a los más específicos. Obviamente, se recomienda encarecidamente la lectura detenida del texto completo de cada convocatoria para conocer en profundidad los detalles de cada una. 1. Ayudas para cursos de inmersión en lengua inglesa (U.I.M.P.)4 Organismo: Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte. Duración: 5 días (en régimen de internado; 40 horas). Última convocatoria: 13 de enero de 2014 (BOE). Cuantía: gastos de enseñanza, material, manutención y alojamiento (excepto 100€ de reserva de plaza). Enlaces: • https://sede.educacion.gob.es/catalogotramites/becas-ayudas-subvenciones/paraestudiar/idiomas/beca-inmersion-menendezpelayo.html (información general). • http://www.boe.es/boe/dias/2014/01/13/ pdfs/BOE-A-2014-349.pdf (convocatoria de 2014). 2. Ayudas para cursos de inmersión en lengua inglesa (U.I.M.P.)5 Organismo: Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte. Duración: 5 días (en régimen de internado; 40 horas). Última convocatoria: 13 de enero de 2014 (BOE).

57


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

Cuantía: gastos de enseñanza, material, manutención y alojamiento (excepto 100€ de reserva de plaza). Enlaces: • https://sede.educacion.gob.es/catalogotramites/becas-ayudas-subvenciones/paraestudiar/idiomas/beca-inmersion-menendezpelayo-master.html (información general). • http://www.boe.es/boe/dias/2014/01/13/ pdfs/BOE-A-2014-350.pdf (convocatoria de 2014). 3. Ayudas para cursos de lengua inglesa, alemana o francesa en el extranjero Organismo: Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte. Duración: 3 semanas como mínimo (con 15 horas lectivas/semana). Última convocatoria: 12 de marzo de 2012 (BOE). Cuantía: variable según el país de destino. Enlaces: • https://sede.educacion.gob.es/catalogotramites/becas-ayudas-subvenciones/paraestudiar/idiomas/beca-frances-aleman-superextr.html (información general). • http://www.boe.es/boe/dias/2012/03/12/ pdfs/BOE-A-2012-3495.pdf (convocatoria de 2012). 4. Beca de Colaboración en Departamentos Universitarios Organismo: Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte. Duración: anual (un curso académico completo). Última convocatoria: 12 de julio de 2014 (BOE). Cuantía: 2.000 €. Enlaces: • https://sede.educacion.gob.es/catalogotramites/becas-ayudas-subvenciones/paraestudiar/grado/beca-colaboracion.html (información general). • www.boe.es/boe/dias/2014/07/12/pdfs/ BOE-A-2014-7404.pdf (convocatoria de 2014).

58

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

5. Otras becas no gestionadas por la Universidad de Jaén Organismo: Varios (no se gestionan a través de la Universidad de Jaén, aunque se difunden a través de su página web y de su perfil en redes sociales como Facebook); se trata de becas locales, provinciales, regionales, nacionales y europeas. Duración: varía según la beca y el programa al que pertenece. Última convocatoria: las convocatorias se publican a lo largo de todo el año. Cuantía: variable. Enlaces: • http://www10.ujaen.es/conocenos/organosgobierno/sae/anuncios (Secretariado de Becas, Ayudas y Atención al Estudiante de la Universidad de Jaén). • https://www.facebook.com/ UniversidadDeJaenFP?fref=ts (Perfil de Facebook de la Universidad de Jaén). • http://www.juntadeandalucia.es/educacion/ webportal/web/becas-y-ayudas (Portal de Becas y Ayudas de la Junta de Andalucía). • http://www.boe.es/aeboe/consultas/bases_ datos/otras_disposiciones.php (Buscador del Boletín Oficial del Estado). • http://www.becas-ayudas.es/ (Portal de becas y ayudas para cursos de idiomas). 6. Programa Internacional de Becas Faro Global Organismo: Fundación General de la Universidad de Valladolid (con la financiación del Ministerio de Educación, Cultura y Deporte y el apoyo del programa Leonardo Da Vinci de la Unión Europea). Duración: de 4 a 12 meses en Asia, Canadá, Estados Unidos y Europa. Última convocatoria: abierta desde enero de 2010 hasta diciembre de 2013. Cuantía: varía según el puesto y el país de destino. Enlace: • http://www.becasfaro.es/ (información general).

GRETA

2012

20/1&2


AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

AT UNIVERSITY

Источник: https://issuu.com/gretagranada/docs/greta_journal_vol._20
website design, web development

Learning Pills

Do you want to learn entrepreneurial skills?

  • Analyse your strengths and skills for launching a project

  • Sign up and access free training in common entrepreneurial skills that will help you in your professional development: #DesignThinking; #BusinessModel; #LeanStartup; #Agile; #Financing

Free access to all registered users at www.becas-santander.com

Start now
img_home_banner_emprendedores.jpg

You have many opportunities waiting for you

  • +630.000

    scholarships and grants for 25 years

  • 989

    universities and institutions

  • 19

    countries with agreement

  • 398

    scholarship programs in 2020

Imagen cohete

Some of the collaborating universities

Источник: https://www.becas-santander.com/en/index.html

Categor�a

Since I was little I have been a space enthusiast… and that passion has materialized ”. Satisfied and smiling, Vicente Valero Fort, the aeronautical engineer from the Universitat Politècnica de València (UPV), who, as AIT Operations Leader (leader of assembly, integration and testing operations), has been key in putting Cheops Orbit, the satellite of the European Space Agency (ESA) that works on the characterization of planets that orbit beyond the Solar System (called exoplanets or extrasolar planets).

Acronym for Characterizing Exoplanet Satellite, Cheops is the result of “the first S-class (small) mission that ESA has launched and in which a consortium consisting of 11 countries, including Spain, has participated,” explains Valero himself. Framed in the Cosmic Vision program and with a cost of around 50 million euros, Cheops, in orbit since last December 18, weighs 280 kilos and has a useful life of just over 3 years. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AunM7EBCL7k

The success of the launch has greater merit in that the project “has had a much smaller budget than that allocated to others”, which meant that both the integration and the preparation “were executed in a very short time and with a margin of practically null error ”. In fact, a series of “inconsistencies in the third-stage launcher software” forced the postponement of the launch from the ESA base in Kourou (French Guiana) one day, which meant, “obviously, that the tension we breathe in those hours it was remarkable ”.

The platform and the integration of the instrument, made in Spain

Able to download 1.2 Gbit of daily data, Cheops “uses the ultra-high-precision transit photometry technique to measure the size of exoplanets”, which will provide relevant information on their composition, density, etc., and perhaps allow profiling the next generation of telescopes.

“The University of Bern has manufactured the high-precision photometry telescope, and both the platform and the integration of the instrument have been made in Spain,” confirms Valero. “The platform is everything that allows the satellite to operate the payload and fulfill the mission: structure, solar panels, attitude and orbit control systems, computers, power systems, data acquisition systems, antennas …”.

A team of AIT of just 4 people

The missions usually consist of one team of AIT engineers per functional chain, but this time the AIT team consisted of only 4 people. “The 4 of us had to understand in depth the operation of all the chains and subsystems of the satellite, understand it at the system level, and be able to define and execute all the tests to verify that the satellite was ready to fulfill its mission,” says Valero, whowith the role of AIT Operations Leader, was in charge “of the coordination of activities in the clean area, the preparation of test procedures and their execution, the management of the satellite’s environmental testing campaign, and the interaction with the client in official reviews ”.

“All the UPV students who took the Erasmus in Aachen obtained higher grades than the students from other countries”

Happy to have chosen the UPV to train as an aeronautical engineer, Valero believes that, in general, “we tend to underestimate the quality of education in our country because we believe that it is not up to the standards of other universities. However, my experience and that of many other colleagues who have had the opportunity to take part of our studies outside of Spain shows that we are more than prepared. ”

“The level of demand, the knowledge acquired and the content learned are superior to that of the foreign universities considered better”, he adds before pointing out that “all the UPV students who studied the Erasmus in Aachen -Vicente was an Erasmus student and free mover in the German city, where he completed his fourth and fifth year- we obtained higher grades than the students from other countries”. According to the engineer, “the knowledge acquired at the UPV is very valid and competent when facing reality in the aerospace industry, and the teaching methodology prepares the engineer to face any professional challenge”.

On May 25, at the Ground Transportation Systems division of Thales GTS Spain

When he completed his studies in aeronautical engineering in 2014, Valero did “an internship at RUAG Space, in the Launchers division, and shortly before finishing them, I was offered to participate in the Cheops project.” RUAG Space is a technology group focused on the aerospace industry that develops, manufactures and tests subsystems and equipment for satellites and launch vehicles. Headquartered in Zurich and with production plants in 14 countries, the company has become the largest provider of space technology in Europe.

For three years, Valero has worked on the project from Madrid, a city to which he initially plans to return on May 25 to join Thales GTS Spain and become part of the company’s Ground Transportation Systems division: “My supervisor He recommended it for the ESA project and despite the fact that it implied a change, with his references and after various interviews, I was one of the two selected by RUAG for the position”.

“At a professional level, the success obtained in such a short time has made me achieve a very good reputation in the sector, recognition by all the agents involved, and it has opened the doors to other positions with much more responsibility,” says Valero.

“Don’t let social pressure force you to make a decision before you are ready.”

Questioned by some advice for students, the aeronautical engineer at the UPV maintains that the most important thing “is to study something that you are passionate about and enjoy the process, that social pressure does not force you to make a decision before being prepared or based solely on the professional exit”.

Likewise, he maintains that outside of Spain “it is highly valued having practiced during the studies, having contact with the industry during the years of the degree, participating in volunteer programs, acquiring international experience and learning languages. All this enriches you as a person and opens the doors of the labor market for you”.

source: UPV

Источник: http://www.etsid.upv.es/en/category/students/
https becas agora santander com

0 Replies to “Https becas agora santander com”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *