john f kennedy pictures

The Kennedy Library assembled and holds the images in a single collection, based on how the images 1961 January 21, President Kennedy, portrait photo. Amazon.com: JFK Pictures. John F Kennedy JFK Portrait by Fabian Bachrach Photo Art Iconic American Photos 8x10. The Kennedys, who also shared daughter Caroline Kennedy, moved into the White House when JFK Jr. was only 8 weeks old. As a result of his dad's.

John f kennedy pictures -

Unseen photos of John F Kennedy and family

Never-before-published photos of John F Kennedy feature in a new illustrated memoir of the former US president.

Captured by his personal photographer Jacques Lowe, the images document the life of John ‘Jack’ Kennedy and his family, from his presidential campaign to his funeral at Arlington National cemetery.

Over five years Lowe photographed Kennedy mingling with the crowds on the campaign trail, in the White House during the Cuban missile crisis, talking with Harold Macmillan and other world leaders, and enjoying intimate moments with Jackie and Caroline.

Lowe entrusted his photographic archive, stored in a vault in the World Trade Center, to his daughter, Thomasina.

All 40,000 negatives were reduced to ashes after 9/11, but Thomasina made it her mission to restore his life’s work.

Thanks to modern technology all of Lowe’s choice prints have been scanned and restored, and his contact sheets brought to life. Many of his images have never before been published.

My Kennedy Years: A Memoir, published by Thames & Hudson, is now on sale.

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Источник: https://www.historyextra.com/period/20th-century/unseen-photos-john-f-kennedy-family-jfk/


John Fitzgerald Kennedy NHS

John Fitzgerald Kennedy NHS
Photo by Robert Perron
National Park Service


When John F. Kennedy was inaugurated 35th president of the United States, he was the youngest person and the only Catholic ever elected to the nation’s highest office.  Elected with the narrowest of margins by a nation fearful under the dark cloud of the Cold War, Kennedy summoned fellow citizens with his inaugural call to commitment and sacrifice: “Now the trumpet summons us again to…a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself…And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.”   Kennedy seized the momentum of his inauguration and tackled some of the nation’s most pressing domestic and foreign policy issues during the first one-hundred days of his administration. Though an assassin’s bullet ended Kennedy’s life in Dallas in November, 1963, before the realization of many of his far-reaching reform initiatives, his successor, Lyndon B. Johnson, won passage of the civil rights bills and voting rights laws, federal aid to education and Medicare, and the statute creating a cabinet-level housing and urban development department as a fulfillment of Kennedy’s promise of hope and progress.  In addition to these legislative memorials to Kennedy’s vision for a more prosperous and peaceful world, his mother, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, commemorated the life of her son at his birthplace in Brookline, Massachusetts.


Kennedy Family

Kennedy Family
Photo by Richard W. Sears.
Kennedy Family Collection, John F. Kennedy Library


John Kennedy’s parents, Joseph P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, were both members of politically prominent Irish Catholic families in Boston. Joseph Kennedy bought the nine-room, Colonial Revival style house at 83 Beals Street in Brookline, a streetcar suburb of Boston, shortly before his marriage to Rose Fitzgerald in 1914.  The Kennedys’ second son, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, was born in the master bedroom, on the second floor, on May 29, 1917 and spent the formative years of his childhood in this middle-class neighborhood.  Here Rose Kennedy instilled in her children a commitment to personal cultivation and public service with piano lessons in the parlor, political discussions around the dinner table, and edifying tales of adventure in the nursery.  Two servants, who lived on the third floor and whom Mrs. Kennedy supervised from her second-floor study, accomplished most of the physical labor in the kitchen, allowing the Kennedys’ to lavish time and attention on their growing family.  In 1920, with the birth of their fourth child, Rose and Joseph Kennedy felt that the family had outgrown the Beals Street house and moved nearby to a larger home, where they lived until they departed for New York in 1927. 

John F. Kennedy entered Harvard University in 1936.  In 1940, he graduated with honors in political science.  His senior thesis, published under the title of Why England Slept, became a bestseller.  Following graduation, he attended Stanford University Business School for six months.

The dining room

The dining room
Photo by Robert Perron
National Park Service

Kennedy joined the Navy in the fall of 1941 as an ensign.  After the attack on Pearl Harbor, he commanded a PT boat in the South Pacific.  When a Japanese destroyer sank his boat in 1943, he helped his crew reach safety in spite of his own wounds and chronic back pain. His actions earned him the Navy and Marine Corps Medal.

Kennedy worked briefly as a reporter for the Hearst newspapers after his military discharge in 1945.  Covering the formation of the United Nations at San Francisco, the Potsdam Conference, and the British elections whetted his appetite for politics.  Elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1946, he easily won reelection in 1948 and 1950. Two years later, he defeated long-term incumbent Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.  The next year, Kennedy married Jacqueline Bouvier.  In 1955, he wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning Profiles in Courage, while recuperating from back surgery.

In 1956, Kennedy narrowly lost a bid for the Democratic vice-presidential nomination. Two years later, he overwhelmingly won reelection to his seat in the Senate. In 1960, the Democratic National Convention selected him as its presidential candidate on the first ballot.  Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, his principal rival for the nomination, accepted the vice-presidential nomination.  Americans watched Kennedy face the Republican candidate, Richard M. Nixon, in the first televised presidential debates.  Kennedy won the general election by a very small margin.

John Kennedy meeting with Nikita Khrushchev in Vienna, June, 1961.

John Kennedy meeting with Nikita Khrushchev
in Vienna, June, 1961.
National Park Service

The Cold War dominated Kennedy’s brief presidency, as it did that of his predecessor, President Eisenhower. Soon after his inauguration in 1961, he supported a group of anti-communist Cuban exiles, equipped and trained with the assistance of the United States, in an attempt to overthrow Premier Fidel Castro. The “Bay of Pigs” invasion was an embarrassing failure, and President Kennedy publicly accepted responsibility.  The incident severely damaged American ability to negotiate with Soviet Premier Khrushchev that summer in Vienna.  In August 1961, East Germany built the Berlin Wall to prevent its own people from escaping across the border between East Berlin and West Berlin.  In retaliation, Kennedy increased U.S. forces in Berlin.  Two years later, he endeared himself to West Germans by delivering his “Ich bin ein Berliner” (“I am a Berliner”) speech at the Wall, declaring it a symbol of the failures of Soviet-style communism.  The Soviet Union and the United States subsequently enlarged their military budgets and resumed nuclear testing.  Responding to communist revolutionary movements in Southeast Asia, Kennedy achieved a negotiated settlement of the longstanding political turmoil in Laos in 1962.  That same year, he increased U.S. involvement in the conflict between North and South Vietnam, adding Special Forces units to the military advisers President Eisenhower sent during his presidency.

In October 1962, a major international crisis brought the world close to nuclear war.  Kennedy obtained aerial photographs showing that the Soviet Union had placed intermediate-range missiles capable of striking the United States mainland in Cuba.  In an emergency telecast to the nation, Kennedy announced that the U.S. Navy would quarantine any shipments of offensive arms to the island until the Soviets removed the missiles.  The tense confrontation ended when Khrushchev backed down.  The period after the “Cuban Missile Crisis” saw significant progress in improving Soviet-American relations.  In 1963, Kennedy signed the first arms-control treaty of the Cold War with the Soviet Union and Great Britain, banning aboveground nuclear testing.  He also agreed to the installation of a "hot line" for instant communication between the White House and the Kremlin.

Kennedy brought new optimism and idealism to politics, particularly among young people.  His Alliance for Progress and Peace Corps extended that idealism to helping developing countries.  He succeeded in getting Congress to pass many elements of his "New Frontier" domestic program, including aid to higher education, increases in the minimum wage and Social Security benefits, urban renewal, and aid to economically distressed areas.  His policies ushered in a sustained period of economic growth and set the stage for major reform initiatives, including the establishment of the cabinet-level Department of Urban Affairs, the provision of medical care for the aged under the Medicare program, federal assistance for public schools, and stronger regulation of farm production, that were enacted under the leadership of President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Though initially cautious, Kennedy made notable gains in civil rights.  During his first 100 days in office, Kennedy established the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity to eliminate discrimination in federal hiring, instructed his cabinet secretaries to expand opportunities for African Americans in every department, and renewed the Civil Rights Commission.  Increasingly moved to moral outrage by Southern resistance to court-ordered desegregation of public schools and facilities, President Kennedy, together with his brother, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, enforced the Supreme Court’s directives.  In 1962, Kennedy sent U.S. marshals and troops to ensure enrollment of African American James H. Meredith in the University of Mississippi.  In 1963, Kennedy federalized the Alabama National Guard to prevent violence during integration of the last segregated State university in the nation.  During a televised address June 10, 1963, President Kennedy reminded the nation that “for all its hopes and all its boasts, [it would] not be fully free until all its citizens are free” and called for commitment to the “proposition that race has no place in American life or law.”  The following week, Kennedy presented Congress with a civil rights bill which would ensure voting rights and eliminate discrimination in all places of public accommodation, a proposal for racial justice later enacted under the Civil Rights Law of 1964 and the Voting Rights Law of 1965.


The Kennedy nursery
Photo by Robert Perron
National Park Service

In the fall of 1963, Kennedy toured the nation to build support for administration programs and his reelection.  On November 22, 1963, an assassin shot Kennedy as his motorcade passed through downtown Dallas, Texas.  The president died a few hours later and, while the whole world mourned his passing, his reputed assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald’s own murder shrouded Kennedy’s death in allegations of conspiracy.

The nation responded to the tragedy with thousands of memorial tributes to the slain president, but the most intimate remains the Kennedy family’s memorial at his birthplace. In 1966, the Kennedy family repurchased the house on Beals Street; Rose Kennedy enlisted decorator Robert Luddington of the Jordan Marsh retail store, to help recreate the home’s 1917 appearance.  Working from her remembrances, Mrs. Kennedy and Mr. Luddington assembled and arranged household furnishings, photographs, and significant mementoes in the principal rooms of the house.  Mrs. Kennedy’s personal reminiscences continue to guide visitors through the home.



Plan your visit

John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site, a unit of the National Park System, is located at 83 Beals St., Brookline, MA, a residential suburb.  The birthplace has been designated a National Historic Landmark. The grounds are accessible year round; the house is open to the public seasonally.  Entrance to the Visitor Center is free; a fee is charged for visiting the house museum.  For additional information, directions, and the seasonal schedule, visit the National Park Service John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site or call 617-566-7937.  Visitors can also enjoy self-guided walking and special ranger-led tours of the neighborhood where Jack Kennedy spent his childhood. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum is located nearby in Boston.

The John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site has been documented by the National Park Service’s Historic American Buildings Survey. The home is the subject of an online lesson plan,  Birthplace of John F. Kennedy: Home of the Boy Who Would Be President. The lesson plan has been produced by the National Park Service’s Teaching with Historic Places program, which offers a series of online classroom-ready lesson plans on registered historic places. To learn more, visit the Teaching with Historic Places home page.

 
Источник: https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/presidents/john_f_kennedy_birthplace.html

John F. Kennedy Jr.’s Life in Photos

John-John’s journey! John F. Kennedy Jr. accomplished a great deal before his life was tragically cut short.

The son of John F. Kennedy and Jacqueline Kennedy was born in Washington, D.C., on November 25, 1960, two weeks after his father was elected the 35th president of the United States. The Kennedys, who also shared daughter Caroline Kennedy, moved into the White House when JFK Jr. was only 8 weeks old.

As a result of his dad’s career (and that of relatives including uncles Robert F. Kennedy and Ted Kennedy), John Jr. grew up in the spotlight.

“There’s probably no one who’s ever walked this earth that was the focus of such media attention their entire life,” close friend Steven M. Gillon wrote in the 2019 biography America’s Reluctant Prince: The Life of John F. Kennedy Jr.

Much of the interest in the political scion began after November 22, 1963, when JFK was assassinated in Dallas at age 46. Three days later, on John-John’s 3rd birthday, the president’s son touched the nation when he saluted his father’s casket en route to Arlington National Cemetery in Virginia. The heartbreaking image, taken by Stan Stearns, went on to become one of the most iconic photographs in history.

After John Sr.’s assassination, Jackie, Caroline and JFK Jr. moved away from the U.S. capital and into an apartment in New York City. She later married Greek shipping magnate Aristotle Onassis.

John Jr. attended private schools in Manhattan before completing his high school education at Phillips Academy in Massachusetts. He went on to study at Brown University and ultimately received his J.D. degree from the New York University School of Law in May 1989.

In the midst of his legal career, JFK Jr. developed an interest in journalism and wrote for The New York Times. He launched his own monthly magazine, George, in September 1995 with Michael J. Berman.

“JFK’s friends would tell Junior that his dad always wanted to be a publisher, that he never wanted to go into politics,” All the Presidents’ Children author Doug Wead tells Us Weekly. “So JFK Jr.’s great moment was publishing a magazine because of his father’s dream.”

Through the years, John-John’s good looks also attracted much attention — and led to many high-profile relationships and flings. He was linked to actresses and models such as Brooke Shields, Cindy Crawford and Sarah Jessica Parker before dating Daryl Hannah from the late ‘80s to the early ‘90s. He eventually settled down with Calvin Klein publicist Carolyn Bessette, whom he married on September 21, 1996.

Like his father, JFK Jr. met an early death. While flying to his cousin Rory Kennedy’s wedding on July 16, 1999, the 38-year-old lawyer’s plane crashed into the Atlantic Ocean near Martha’s Vineyard, Massachusetts, killing him, his wife and sister-in-law Lauren Bessette.

“JFK Jr. was a kind and brilliant man,” Denis Reggie, who photographed the Kennedy-Bessette wedding, tells Us. “He was charismatic and strong and impacted every life that he came into.”

Scroll down to see JFK Jr.’s life in photos.

Источник: https://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-news/pictures/john-f-kennedy-jr-s-life-in-photos/

John F. Kennedy is an American icon. These 21 color photos helped define his legacy

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jfk color
File photo via Reuters
  • John F. Kennedy prominent family background, elite education, and high-profile political career made him an American icon of the 1960s. 
  • Kennedy's highly publicized life came with cameras following him at his family home in Massachusetts and at work in Washington. 

After graduating from Harvard, serving in the Navy, and being elected to Congress at 29, John F. Kennedy established himself as an American legend before dying as the youngest president in history. 

Since Kennedy was born into a privileged family that was well known in American politics and society, he spent most of his life on and off the job in the public eye. 

See some of the most iconic color pictures from his life: 

Kennedy was elected to the US House of Representatives in 1947 and the Senate in 1953, where he served until 1960. Then-Senator Kennedy is pictured here at his desk in Boston, Massachusetts in August 1956.

jfk color
AP Photo

Source: US Senate

Then Senator John F. Kennedy is pictured with Jackie Lee Bouvier on June 27, 1953 in Hyannisport, Massachusetts, months before their lavish wedding.

jfk color
File photo via Reuters

Source: Town & Country

Kennedy was a rising star in the Senate, winning a Pulitzer Prize in 1957 for his book on the immense pressures and interests lawmakers confront, titled "Profiles in Courage."

jfk color
AP Photo, File

Source: US Senate

The senator and his young family were often at the Kennedy Compound in Hyannisport, pictured here in July 1960 with three-year-old daughter Caroline.

jfk color
AP Photo

Source: Town & Country

The family spent time at the compound in all seasons, and are pictured here at Hyannisport in November 1960.

jfk color
AP Photo

Some complications with Jacqueline's pregnancy largely prevented her from joining candidate Kennedy on the campaign trail, but she made one appearance in New York City in the back of an open car in October 1960.

jfk color
AP Photo

Source: INSIDER

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/21-rare-photos-of-jfk-in-color-2018-12

John F. Kennedy autopsy

Autopsy Of The 35th US PRESIDENT

The autopsy of presidentJohn Fitzgerald Kennedy was performed at the Bethesda Naval Hospital in Bethesda, Maryland. The autopsy began at about 8 p.m. EST November 22, 1963 (on the day of his assassination) and ended at about 12:30 a.m. EST November 23, 1963. The choice of autopsy hospital in the Washington, D.C. area was made by his widow, Jacqueline Kennedy. She chose the Bethesda Naval Hospital because President Kennedy had been a naval officer.[1]

Background[edit]

Following the assassination of President Kennedy, the Secret Service was concerned about the possibility of a larger plot and urged the-then President Lyndon B. Johnson to leave Parkland Memorial Hospital for Love Field so that he could return to the White House; however, Johnson refused to do so without any proof of Kennedy's death.[2] Johnson returned to Air Force One around 1:30 p.m., and shortly thereafter, he received telephone calls from McGeorge Bundy and Walter Jenkins advising him to return to Washington, D.C. immediately.[3] He replied that he would not leave Dallas without Jacqueline Kennedy and that she would not leave without Kennedy's body.[2][3] According to Esquire, Johnson did "not want to be remembered as an abandoner of beautiful widows."[3]

Dallas Countymedical examinerEarl Rose was in his office at Parkland Hospital across the corridor from Trauma Room 1 when he received the word that President Kennedy had been pronounced dead.[4] He walked across the corridor to the trauma room occupied by Jacqueline Kennedy and a priest who had been called in to administer the last rites to the president.[4] There, Rose was met by Secret Service agent Roy Kellerman and Kennedy's personal physician George Burkley who told him that there wasn't any time to perform an autopsy because Jacqueline Kennedy would not leave Dallas without her husband's body which was to be delivered promptly to the airport.[4] At the time of President Kennedy's assassination, the murder of any United States President was not under the jurisdiction of any federal organization.[5] Rose objected, insisting that the Texas state law required him to perform a post-mortem examination before the body could be removed.[4][5] A heated exchange ensued as he argued with Kennedy's aides.[4][5] Kennedy's body was placed in a coffin and, accompanied by Jacqueline Kennedy, rolled down the corridor on a gurney.[4] Rose was reported to have stood in a hospital doorway, backed by a local policeman, in an attempt to prevent anybody from removing the coffin.[4][5] According to Robert Caro's The Years of Lyndon Johnson: The Passage of Power, the President's aides "had literally shoved [Rose] and the policeman aside to get out of the building."[4] In an interview with Journal of the American Medical Association, Rose stated that he had stepped aside feeling that it was unwise to exacerbate the tension.[4]

Death certificates[edit]

Kennedy's personal physician, Rear Admiral George Gregory Burkley, signed a death certificate on November 23 and noted that the cause of death was a gunshot wound to the skull.[6][7] He described the fatal head wound as something "shattering in type causing a fragmentation of the skull and evulsion of three particles of the skull at time of the impact, with resulting maceration of the right hemisphere of the brain."[7] He also noted "a second wound occurred in the posterior back at about the level of the third thoracic vertebra".[7] A second certificate of death, signed on December 6 by Theron Ward, a Justice of the Peace in Dallas County, stated that Kennedy died "as a result of two gunshot wounds (1) near the center of the body and just above the right shoulder, and (2) 1 inch to the right center of the back of the head."[8]

Official findings of the autopsy[edit]

Drawing depicting the back wound of President Kennedy. Made from an autopsy photograph.

The gunshot wound in the back[edit]

  1. The Bethesda autopsy physicians attempted to probe the bullet hole in the base of Kennedy's neck above the scapula, but failed as it had passed through neck strap muscle. They did not perform a full dissection or persist in tracking, as throughout the autopsy they were unaware of the exit wound at the front of the throat. Emergency room physicians had obscured it while performing the tracheotomy.
  2. At Bethesda, the autopsy report of the president, Warren Exhibit CE 387,[9] described the back wound as being oval-shaped, 6 by 4 millimeters (0.24 in × 0.16 in), and located "above the upper border of the scapula" (shoulder blade) at a location 14 centimeters (5.5 in) from the tip of the right acromion process, and 14 centimeters (5.5 in) below the right mastoid process (the bony prominence behind the ear).
  3. The concluding page of the Bethesda autopsy report[9] states that "[t]he other missile [the bullet to the back] entered the right superior posterior thorax above the scapula, and traversed the soft tissues of the supra-scapular and the supra-clavicular portions of the base of the right side of the neck."
  4. The report also said that there was contusion (i.e., a bruise) of the apex (top tip) of the right lung in the region where it rises above the clavicle, and noted that although the apex of the right lung and the parietal pleural membrane over it had been bruised, they were not penetrated. This indicated passage of a missile close to them, but above them. The report pointed out that the thoracic cavity was not penetrated.
  5. This bullet produced contusions both of the right apical parietal pleura and of the apical portion of the right upper lobe of the lung. The bullet contused the strap muscles of the right side of the neck, damaged the trachea, and exited through the anterior surface of the neck.
  6. The single bullet theory of the Warren Commission Report places a bullet wound at the sixth cervical vertebra (C6) of the vertebral column, which is consistent with 5.5 inches (14 cm) below the ear. The Warren Report itself does not conclude bullet entry at the sixth cervical vertebra, but this conclusion was made in a 1979 report on the assassination by the HSCA, which noted a defect in the C6 vertebra in the Bethesda X-rays, which the Bethesda autopsy physicians had missed and did not note. The X-rays were taken by US Navy Medical Corps Commander John H. Ebersole.

Even without any of this information, the original Bethesda autopsy report, included in the Warren Commission report, concluded that this bullet had passed entirely through the President's neck, from a level over the top of the scapula and lung (and the parietal pleura over the top of the lung) and through the lower throat.

The gunshot wound to the head[edit]

A photograph of President Kennedy's head and shoulders taken at the autopsy
A drawing depicting the posterior head wound of President Kennedy, made from an autopsy photograph. The small nearly circular posterior scalp wound is at the end of the hair part, near the end of the ruler, and immediately to the right of it.
A diagram made for the House Committee showing the trajectory of the bullet through President Kennedy's skull. The rear wound corresponds with the small entry wound above. The skull fragments are shown exploded for illustrative purposes; most stayed attached to the skull by skin flaps, which are being pulled forward by the gloved hand in the drawing made from an autopsy illustration.
  1. The gunshot wound to the back of the president's head was described by the Bethesda autopsy as a laceration measuring 15 by 6 millimetres (0.59 in × 0.24 in), situated to the right and slightly above the external occipital protuberance. In the underlying bone is a corresponding wound through the skull showing beveling (a cone-shaped widening) of the margins of the bone as viewed from the inside of the skull.[10]
  2. The large and irregularly-shaped wound in the right side of the head (chiefly to the parietal bone, but also involving the temporal and occipital bone) is described as being about 13 centimetres (5.1 in) wide at the largest diameter.[10]
  3. Three skull bone fragments were received as separate specimens, roughly corresponding to the dimensions of the large defect. In the largest of the fragments is a portion of the perimeter of a roughly circular wound presumably of exit, exhibiting beveling of the exterior of the bone, and measuring about 2.5 to 3.0 centimetres (0.98 to 1.18 in). X-rays revealed minute particles of metal in the bone at this margin.[10]
  4. Minute fragments of the projectile were found by X-ray along a path from the rear wound to the parietal area defect.[11]

Later government investigations[edit]

Ramsey Clark Panel analysis[edit]

U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark appointed a panel of four medical experts in 1968 to examine photographs and X-rays from the autopsy.[12] The panel confirmed findings that the Warren Commission had published: the President was shot from behind and was hit by only two bullets. The summary by the panel stated: "Examination of the clothing and of the photographs and X-rays taken at [the] autopsy reveal that President Kennedy was struck by two bullets fired from above and behind him, one of which traversed the base of the neck on the right side without striking bone and the other of which entered the skull from behind and exploded its right side."[13]

Rockefeller Commission analysis (1975)[edit]

The five-member Rockefeller Commission, which included three pathologists, a radiologist, and a wound ballistics expert, did not address the back and throat wounds, writing in its report that "[t]he investigation was limited to determining whether there was any credible evidence pointing to CIA involvement in the assassination of President Kennedy," and that "[t]he witnesses who [had] presented evidence believed sufficient to implicate the CIA in the assassination of President Kennedy placed [too] much stress upon the movements of the President's body associated with the head wound that killed the President."

The Commission examined the Zapruder, Muchmore, and Nix films; the 1963 autopsy report, the autopsy photographs and X-rays, President Kennedy's clothing and back brace, the bullet and bullet fragments recovered, the 1968 Clark Panel report, and other materials. The five panel members came to the unanimous conclusion that President Kennedy had been hit by only two bullets, both of which were fired from the rear, including one that hit the back of the head. Three of the physicians reported that the backward and leftward motion of the President's upper body following the head shot was caused by a "violent straightening and stiffening of the entire body as a result of a seizure-like neuromuscular reaction to major damage inflicted to nerve centers in the brain."

The report added that there was "no evidence to support the claim that President Kennedy was struck by a bullet fired from either the grassy knoll or any other position to his front, right front, or right side … No witness who urged the view [before the Rockefeller Commission] that the Zapruder film and other motion picture films proved that President Kennedy was struck by a bullet fired from his right front was shown to possess any professional or other special qualifications on the subject."[14]

HSCA analysis (1979)[edit]

Main article: United States House Select Committee on Assassinations

Medical drawing of a cross-section of President Kennedy's neck and chest, showing the trajectory of the projectile from back to throat

The United States House Select Committee on Assassinations (HSCA) contained a forensic panel that undertook the unique task of reviewing original autopsy photographs and X-rays and interviewed autopsy personnel, as to their authenticity. The Panel and HSCA then went on to make some medical conclusions based on this evidence.

The HSCA's major medical-forensic conclusion was that "President Kennedy was struck by two rifle shots fired from behind him."[15] The committee found acoustic evidence of a second shooter, but concluded that this shooter did not contribute to the president's wounds, and therefore was irrelevant to the autopsy results.

The committee's forensic pathology panel included nine members, eight of whom were chief medical examiners in major local jurisdictions in the United States. As a group, they were responsible for over 100,000 autopsies, an accumulation of experience that the committee deemed invaluable in the medical evidence evaluation — including the autopsy X-rays and photographs — to determine the cause of the President's death as well as the nature and locations of his wounds.

The committee also employed experts to authenticate the autopsy materials. Neither the Clark Panel nor the Rockefeller Commission undertook to determine if the X-rays and photographs were, in fact, authentic. Considering the numerous issues that arisen over the years with respect to autopsy X-rays and photographs, the committee believed that authentication was a crucial step in the investigation. The authentication of the autopsy X-rays and photographs was accomplished by the committee assisting its photographic evidence panel as well as forensic dentists, forensic anthropologists, and radiologists working for the committee. Two questions were put to these experts:

  1. Could the photographs and X-rays stored in the National Archives be positively identified as being of President Kennedy?
  2. Was there any evidence that any of these photographs or X-rays had been altered in any manner?

To determine if the photographs of the autopsy subject were actually of the President, forensic anthropologists compared the autopsy photographs with ante-mortem pictures of him. This comparison was done based on both metric and morphological features. The metric analysis relied on various facial measurements taken from the photographs. The morphological analysis was dealt with the consistency of physical features, particularly those that could be considered distinctive, such as the shape of the nose, patterns of facial lines (i.e. once unique characteristics were identified, posterior and anterior autopsy photographs were compared to verify that they depicted the same person).

The anthropologists studied the autopsy X-rays together with premortem X-rays of the President. A sufficient number of unique anatomic characteristics were present in X-rays taken before and after the President's death to conclude that the autopsy X-rays were of President Kennedy. This conclusion was consistent with the findings of a forensic dentist employed by the committee. Since many of the X-rays taken during the course of the autopsy included Kennedy's teeth, it was possible to determine, using his dental records, that the X-rays were of the President.

As soon as the forensic dentist and anthropologists had determined that the autopsy photographs and X-rays were of the President, photographic scientists and radiologists examined the original autopsy photographs, negatives, transparencies, and X-rays for signs of alteration. They concluded that there was no evidence of the photographic or radiographic materials having been altered, so the committee determined that the autopsy X-rays and photographs were a valid basis for the conclusions of the committee's forensic pathology panel.

While the examination of the autopsy X-rays and photographs was mainly based on its analysis, the forensic pathology panel also had access to all relevant witness testimony. Furthermore, all tests and evidence analyses requested by the panel were performed. It was only after considering all of this evidence that the panel reached its conclusions.

The pathology panel concluded that President Kennedy was struck by only two bullets, each of which had been shot from behind. The panel also concluded that the President was struck by "one bullet that entered in the upper right of the back and exited from the front of [his] throat, and one bullet that entered in the right rear of [his] head near the cowlick area and exited from the right side of the head, toward the front" saying that "this second bullet caused a massive wound to the President's head upon exit." The panel concluded that there was no medical evidence that the President was struck by a bullet entering the front of the head; and the possibility of such a bullet to have struck him and yet leave no physical evidence was extremely remote.

Because this conclusion appeared to be inconsistent with the backward motion of the President's head in the Zapruder film, the committee consulted a wound ballistics expert to determine what relationship, if any, exists between the direction from which a bullet strikes the head and the subsequent head movement. The expert concluded that nerve damage caused by a bullet entering the President's head could have caused his back muscles to tighten which, in turn, could have forced his head to move toward the rear. He demonstrated the phenomenon in a filmed experiment involving the shootings of goats. Therefore, the committee determined that the rearward movement of the President's head would not have been fundamentally inconsistent with a bullet striking from the rear.[16]

The HSCA also voiced certain criticisms of the original Bethesda autopsy and handling of evidence from it. These included:

  1. the "entrance head wound location was incorrectly described."
  2. The autopsy report was "incomplete", prepared without reference to the photographs, and was "inaccurate" in a number of areas, including the entry in Kennedy's back.
  3. The "entrance and exit wounds on the back and front neck were not localized with reference to fixed body landmarks and to each other".

Document inventory analysis: Assassination Records Review Board (1992–98)[edit]

Main article: President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992

The Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB) was created by the President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act of 1992, which mandated the gathering and opening of all US government records related to the assassination.[17] The ARRB began work in 1994 and produced a final report in 1998.[18] The Board partially credited public concern about conclusions in the 1991 Oliver Stone movie JFK for passage of the legislation that developed the ARRB. The Board noted that the movie had "popularized a version of President Kennedy's assassination that featured U.S. government agents from the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), and the military as conspirators."[19]

According to Douglas P. Horne, the ARRB's chief analyst for military records,

The Review Board's charter was simply to locate and declassify assassination records, and to ensure they were placed in the new "JFK Records Collection" in the National Archives, where they would be freely available to the public. Although Congress did not want the ARRB to reinvestigate the assassination of President Kennedy, or to draw conclusions about the assassination, the staff did hope to make a contribution to future 'clarification' of the medical evidence in the assassination by conducting these neutral, non-adversarial, fact-finding depositions. All of our deposition transcripts, as well as our written reports of numerous interviews we conducted with medical witnesses, are now a part of that same collection of records open to the public. Because of the Review Board's strictly neutral role in this process, all of these materials were placed in the JFK Collection without comment.[20]

The ARRB sought additional witnesses in an attempt to compile a more complete record of Kennedy's autopsy.[21] In July 1998, a staff report released by the ARRB emphasized shortcomings in the original autopsy.[21] The ARRB wrote, "One of the many tragedies of the assassination of President Kennedy has been the incompleteness of the autopsy record and the suspicion caused by the shroud of secrecy that has surrounded the records that do exist."[21]

A staff report for the Assassinations Records Review Board contended that brain photographs in the Kennedy records are not of Kennedy's brain and show much less damage than Kennedy sustained. Boswell refuted these allegations. [22] The Board also found that, conflicting with the photographic images showing no such defect, a number of witnesses, including at both the Autopsy and Parkland hospital, saw a large wound in the back of the president's head.[23] The Board and board member, Jeremy Gunn, have also stressed the problems with witness testimony, asking people to weigh all of the evidence, with due concern for human error, rather than take single statements as "proof" for one theory or another.[24][25]

Personnel present during autopsy[edit]

List of personnel present at various times during the autopsy, with official function, taken from the Sibert-O'Neill report list, the HSCA list[26] and attorney Vincent Bugliosi, author of Reclaiming History: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Medical personnel and assistants[edit]

Official autopsy signatories[27][edit]

  • Commander J. Thornton Boswell, M.D., MC, USN: Chief of pathology at Naval Medical Center, Bethesda
  • Commander James J. Humes, M.D., MC, USN: Director of laboratories of the National Medical School, Naval Medical Center, Bethesda. Chief autopsy pathologist for the JFK autopsy. Officially conducted autopsy.
  • Lieutenant Colonel Pierre A. Finck, M.D. MC, USA: Chief of the military environmental pathology division and chief of the wound ballistics pathology branch at Walter Reed Medical Center.[28]

Other medical personnel[edit]

  • John Thomas Stringer, Jr: Medical photographer
  • Floyd Albert Riebe: Medical photographer
  • PO Raymond Oswald, USN: Medical photographer on call
  • Paul Kelly O'Connor: Laboratory technologist
  • James Curtis Jenkins: Laboratory technologist
  • Edward F. Reed: X-ray technician
  • Jerrol F. Custer: X-ray technician
  • Jan Gail Rudnicki: Dr. Boswell's lab tech assistant on the night of the autopsy
  • PO James E. Metzler, USN: Hospital Corpsman3rd Class
  • John H. Ebersole: Assistant Chief of Radiology
  • Lieutenant Commander Gregory H. Cross, M.D., MC, USN: Resident in surgery
  • Lieutenant Commander Donald L. Kelley, M.D., MC, USN: Resident in surgery
  • CPO Chester H. Boyers, USN: Chief petty officer in charge of the pathology division, visited the autopsy room during the final stages to type receipts given by FBI and Secret Service for items obtained.
  • Vice Admiral Edward C. Kenney, M.D.,MC, USN: Surgeon general of the U.S. Navy
  • Dr. George Bakeman, USN
  • Rear Admiral George Burkley, M.D., MC, USN: The president's personal physician
  • Captain James M. Young, M.D., MC, USN: The attending physician to the White House
  • Robert Frederick Karnei, M.D.: Bethesda pathologist
  • Captain David P. Osborne, M.D., MC, USN: Chief of surgery at Bethesda
  • Captain Robert O. Canada, M.D., USN: Commanding officer of Bethesda Naval Hospital

Non-medical personnel from law-enforcement/security[edit]

  • John J. O'Leary: Secret Service agent
  • William Greer: Secret Service agent
  • Roy Kellerman: Secret Service agent
  • Francis X. O'Neill: FBI special agent
  • James "Jim" Sibert: FBI special agent, assisting Francis O'Neill[29]

Additional military personnel[edit]

  • Brigadier General Godfrey McHugh, USAF: US military aide to the President on the Dallas trip
  • Rear Admiral Calvin B. Galloway, USN: Commanding officer of the U.S. Naval Medical Center, Bethesda
  • Captain John H. Stover, Jr., USN: Commanding officer of the U.S. Naval Medical School, Bethesda
  • Major General Philip C. Wehle, USA: Commanding officer of the U.S. Military District of Washington, D.C., entered to make arrangements for the funeral and lying in state.
  • 2nd Lieutenant Richard A. Lipsey, USA: Jr. aide to General Wehle[30]
  • 1st Lieutenant Samuel A. Bird, USA: Head of the Old Guard.
  • Sr CPO, Alexander Wadas: Chief on duty

Others[edit]

After the conclusion of the autopsy, the following personnel from Gawler's Funeral Home in Washington, D.C. entered the autopsy room to prepare the President's body for viewing and burial, which required 3 to 4 hours:[30]

  • John VanHoesen
  • Edwin Stroble
  • Thomas E. Robinson
  • Joe Hagen

References[edit]

  1. ^President John F Kennedy Assassination Report of the Warren Commission. 2004. p. 43. ISBN .
  2. ^ abBoyd, John W. (2015). "JFK and Parkland, 1963". Parkland. Images of America. Charleston, South Carolina: Arcadia Publishing. pp. 59, 62. ISBN . LCCN 2015950115. Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  3. ^ abcJones, Chris (September 16, 2013). "The Flight from Dallas". Esquire (published October 2013). Retrieved June 12, 2017.
  4. ^ abcdefghiStafford, Ned (July 13, 2012). "Earl Rose: Pathologist prevented from performing autopsy on US President John F Kennedy"(PDF). BMJ. 345. doi:10.1136/bmj.e4768. S2CID 220100505. Archived from the original(PDF) on November 4, 2014. Retrieved November 3, 2014.
  5. ^ abcdMunson, Kyle (April 28, 2012). "Munson: Iowan more than a footnote in JFK lore". The Des Moines Register. Indianapolis. Archived from the original on April 10, 2013. Retrieved November 3, 2014.
  6. ^WGBH Educational Foundation. "Oswald's Ghost". American Experience. PBS. Retrieved January 5, 2014.
  7. ^ abcBurkley, George Gregory (November 23, 1963). "Certificate of Death". National Archives and Records Administration. front side, back side. NAVMED Form N – via The President John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection.
  8. ^"Part IV". Appendix to Hearings before the Select Committee on Assassinations of the U.S. House of Representatives. VII. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office. March 1979. p. 190.
  9. ^ abCommission Exhibit 387
  10. ^ abcAppendix IX: Autopsy Report and Supplemental Report, Warren Commission Report, p. 541.
  11. ^Appendix IX: Autopsy Report and Supplemental Report, Warren Commission Report, p. 543.
  12. ^Wagner, Robert A. (2016). The Assassination of JFK: Perspectives Half A Century Later. Dog Ear Publishing. ISBN . Retrieved 1 January 2019.
  13. ^"Clark Panel On the Medical Evidence". Jfklancer.com. Retrieved 2013-02-07.
  14. ^Allegations That President Kennedy Was Struck in the Head by a Bullet Fired From His Right Front, Chapter 19: Allegations Concerning the Assassination of President Kennedy, Rockfeller Commission Report.
  15. ^"Findings". Archives.gov. Retrieved 2013-02-07.
  16. ^"Findings". Archives.gov. Retrieved 2013-02-07.
  17. ^Assassination Records Review Board (September 30, 1998). Final Report of the Assassination Records Review Board(PDF). Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  18. ^Final Report of the Assassination Records Review Board, Chapter 1, p=7
  19. ^Final Report of the Assassination Records Review Board, Chapter 1, p=1
  20. ^Prepared Remarks by Douglas P. Horne, Former Chief Analyst for Military Records, Assassination Records Review Board (ARRB), Press Conference at the Willard Hotel, Washington, D.C., May 15, 2006.
  21. ^ abcLardner Jr., George (August 2, 1998). "Gaps in Kennedy Autopsy Files Detailed". The Washington Post. Retrieved July 22, 2015.
  22. ^"Washingtonpost.com: JFK Assassination Report". www.washingtonpost.com.
  23. ^"Oliver Stone: JFK conspiracy deniers are in denial". USA TODAY.
  24. ^"JFK Assassination: Kennedy's Head Wound". mcadams.posc.mu.edu.
  25. ^"Clarifying the Federal Record on the Zapruder Film and the Medical and Ballistics Evidence". Federation of American Scientists.
  26. ^Section II - Performance of Autopsy
  27. ^Warren Commission Report, Appendix 9. "Autopsy Report and Supplemental Report"(PDF). The U.S. National Archives and Records Administration. Retrieved 7 July 2021.
  28. ^In an October 1992 interview with the Journal of the American Medical Association, Finck dismissed conspiracy theories that Kennedy was struck by a third bullet. "Third JFK pathologist breaks silence". UPI. October 5, 1992. Retrieved July 7, 2021.
  29. ^Miller, Glenn (November 22, 2009). "Ex-FBI agent who watched JFK autopsy reflects on death". USA Today. Retrieved March 13, 2013.
  30. ^ ab"HSCA INTERVIEW WITH RICHARD LIPSEY, 1-18-78". History-matters.com. 1939-10-07. Retrieved 2013-02-07.

Primary sources[edit]

Secondary sources[edit]

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_F._Kennedy_autopsy

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Assassination of John F. Kennedy (1963)

The Story Behind John F. Kennedy’s Favourite Image of Himself

Art & PhotographyThe Story Behind The Image

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A portrait of Jackie and JFKYellow Room, 1959

American fashion and portrait photographer Mark Shaw captured the Kennedys at home in the 1960s, john f kennedy pictures a series of unprecedented intimate images

TextBelle Hutton

In what would be his first and only foray into political photography, image-maker Mark Shaw was kevon edmonds group by LIFE magazine in 1959 to shoot Jacqueline and John F. Kennedy. The photographer had made his name capturing iconic stars and fashion shoots of the era – he’d trained his lens on the likes of Elizabeth Taylor, Pablo Picasso and Brigitte Bardot for publications like Harper’s Bazaar and LIFE. “Shaw’s images capture the Kennedy family in a relaxed and candid style, and encapsulate the memories and experiences of his close relationship with san jose house fire Kennedys at a pivotal moment in American history,” says Amy Thornett, curator of Proud Central’s exhibition Life with the Kennedys: Photographs by Mark Shaw. “The photographs from Hyannis Port are particularly reminiscent of the ‘American Dream’ and intentionally encouraged the Camelot narrative,” in which JFK is seen as a fallen hero of Arthurian legend proportions, “portraying them as the ‘perfect’ American family.”

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Jackie and JFK in Campaign Car, Wheeling, 1959

Taken over a period when JFK went from senator to president, Shaw’s photographs offer an unprecedented view of the Kennedys’ lives, which was made possible through the close relationship he fostered with the family. Indeed, the photographer was profoundly affected by the president’s assassination, but maintained a friendship with Jackie. Thornett describes a particular 1962 shot “depicting Jackie on a private cruise, leaning playfully over the side of the boat while holding Shaw’s camera. Sometime after JFK’s assassination, Jackie borrowed Shaw’s camera equipment again and returned it with a heartfelt note, confirming that their friendship was still a close one.” It’s this undeniable warmth between subject and photographer that renders Shaw’s images so unique and intimate.

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Jackie sits at JFK’s senate desk, Washington DC, 1

This was an era before presidents and politicians had official photographers to document their lives and careers; Thornett notes that “JFK was the first president to hire a Chief Official White House Photographer; Cecil Stoughton”. “Whereas in previous presidencies, all official photographs had been taken by a selection of military photographers,” she explains, “JFK understood how necessary it was to have documentation of inside the White House in a world that was becoming so strongly influenced by the media.”

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JFK on the dunes near Hyannis Port, 1959

A black and white shot of JFK that features in Life with the Kennedys, entitled JFK on the dunes near Hyannis Port, was purportedly a favourite of the president’s. “The photograph was taken as part of a larger photoshoot set around the coastal region of Hyannis Port,” where the family spent holidays. “While other images from the shoot focus on the intimate family relationships shared between the Kennedys, this image stands out for its solitary depiction of JFK amongst the reeds. We see him wistfully walking into the landscape, his back turned with his jacket casually clutched in the crook of his arm.” A hub of family events and vacations, Shaw captured the politician unusually alone at the idyllic Massachusetts retreat; the photographer describes the family there as “together, always celebrating birthdays, parties, anniversaries, conscious of outdoor life, the beach and the air” in his seminal 1964 photo-book The Kennedys.

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Jackie swings Caroline in the shallows at Hyannis

JFK, who was senator at the time, appears pensive and calm, “relaxed and glamorous”, though Thornett identifies some tension john f kennedy pictures Shaw’s photograph. Its “minimalist framing suggests a tinge of melancholy as he walks into the flat greenery,” she says. Describing how the image has become “symbolic” of JFK’s time in office, the curator continues: “Remembered for his unique charm and wit, the president seduced America with his fresh young face and willingness to rejuvenate American politics. The portrait hints at a man grappling with 1st community bank alice tx responsibilities as both the leader of the United States and as a father.”

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Jackie, JFK and Caroline, Hyannis Patio, 1959

Life with the Kennedys: Photographs by Mark Shaw is at Proud Central, London, until May 6, 2018.

Art & PhotographyThe Story Behind The ImageExhibitions

Источник: https://www.anothermag.com/art-photography/10739/the-story-behind-john-f-kennedys-favourite-image-of-himself

Unseen photos of John F Kennedy and family

Never-before-published photos of John F Kennedy feature in a new illustrated memoir of the former US president.

Captured by his personal photographer Jacques Lowe, the images document the life of John ‘Jack’ Kennedy and his family, from his presidential campaign to his funeral at Arlington National cemetery.

Over five years Lowe photographed Kennedy mingling with the crowds on the campaign trail, in the White House during the Cuban missile crisis, talking with Harold Macmillan and other world leaders, and enjoying intimate moments with Jackie and Caroline.

Lowe entrusted his photographic archive, stored in a vault in the World Trade Center, to his daughter, Thomasina.

All 40,000 negatives were reduced to ashes after 9/11, but Thomasina made it her mission to restore his life’s work.

Thanks to modern technology all of Lowe’s choice prints have been scanned and restored, and his contact sheets brought to life. Many of his images have never before been published.

My Kennedy Years: A Memoir, published by Thames & Hudson, is now on sale.

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Источник: https://www.historyextra.com/period/20th-century/unseen-photos-john-f-kennedy-family-jfk/


John Fitzgerald Kennedy NHS

John Fitzgerald Kennedy NHS
Photo by Robert Perron
National Park Service


When John F. Kennedy was inaugurated 35th president of the United States, he was the youngest person and the only Catholic ever elected to the nation’s highest office.  Elected with the narrowest of margins by a nation fearful under the dark cloud of the Cold War, Kennedy summoned fellow citizens with his inaugural call to commitment and sacrifice: “Now the trumpet summons us again to…a struggle against the common enemies of man: tyranny, poverty, disease, and war itself…And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you; ask what you can do for your country.”   Kennedy seized the momentum of his inauguration and tackled some of the nation’s most pressing domestic and foreign policy issues during the first one-hundred days of his administration. Though an assassin’s bullet ended Kennedy’s life in Dallas in November, 1963, before the realization of many of his far-reaching reform initiatives, his successor, Lyndon B. Johnson, won passage of the civil rights bills and voting rights laws, federal aid to education and Medicare, and the statute creating a cabinet-level housing and urban development department as a fulfillment of Kennedy’s promise of hope and progress.  In addition to these legislative memorials to Kennedy’s vision for a more prosperous and peaceful world, his mother, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, commemorated the life of her son at his birthplace in Brookline, John f kennedy pictures.


Kennedy Family

Kennedy Family
Photo by Richard W. Sears.
Kennedy Family Collection, John F. Kennedy Library


John Kennedy’s parents, Joseph P. and Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, were both members of politically prominent Irish Catholic families in Boston. Joseph Kennedy bought the nine-room, Colonial John f kennedy pictures style house at 83 Beals Street in Brookline, a streetcar suburb of Boston, shortly before his marriage to Rose Fitzgerald in 1914.  The Kennedys’ second son, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, was born in the master bedroom, on the second floor, on May 29, 1917 and spent the formative years of his childhood in this middle-class neighborhood.  Here Rose Kennedy instilled in her children a commitment to personal cultivation and public service with piano lessons in the parlor, political discussions around the dinner table, and edifying tales of adventure in the nursery.  Two servants, who lived on the third floor and whom Mrs. Kennedy supervised from her second-floor study, accomplished most of the physical labor in the kitchen, allowing the Kennedys’ to lavish time and attention on their growing family.  In 1920, with the birth of their fourth child, Rose and Joseph Kennedy felt that the family had outgrown the Beals Street house and moved nearby to a larger home, where they lived until they departed for New York in 1927. 

John F. Kennedy entered Harvard University in 1936.  In 1940, he graduated with honors in political science.  His senior thesis, published under the title of Why England Slept, became a bestseller.  Following graduation, he attended Stanford University Business School for six months.

The dining room

The dining room
Photo by Robert Perron
National Park Service

Kennedy joined the Navy in the fall of 1941 as an ensign.  After the attack on Pearl Harbor, he commanded a PT boat in the South Pacific.  When a Japanese destroyer sank his boat in 1943, he helped his crew reach safety in spite of his own wounds and chronic back pain. His actions earned him the Navy and Marine Corps Medal.

Kennedy worked briefly as a reporter for the Hearst newspapers after his military discharge in 1945.  Covering the formation of the United Nations at San Francisco, the Potsdam Conference, and the British elections whetted his appetite for politics.  Elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1946, he easily won reelection in 1948 and 1950. Two years later, he defeated long-term incumbent Senator Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr.  The next year, Kennedy married Jacqueline Bouvier.  In 1955, he wrote the Pulitzer Prize-winning Profiles in Courage, while recuperating from back surgery.

In 1956, Kennedy narrowly lost a bid for the Democratic vice-presidential nomination. Two years later, he overwhelmingly won reelection to his seat in the Senate. In 1960, the Democratic National Convention selected him as its presidential candidate on the first ballot.  Senator Lyndon B. Johnson, his principal rival for the nomination, accepted the vice-presidential nomination.  Americans watched Kennedy face the Republican candidate, Richard M. Nixon, in the first televised presidential debates.  Kennedy won the general election by a very small margin.

John Kennedy meeting with Nikita Khrushchev in Vienna, June, 1961.

John Kennedy meeting with Nikita Khrushchev
in Vienna, June, 1961.
National Park Service

The Cold War dominated Kennedy’s brief presidency, as it did that of his predecessor, President Eisenhower. Soon after his inauguration in 1961, he supported a group of anti-communist Cuban exiles, equipped and trained with the assistance of the United States, in an attempt to overthrow Premier Fidel Castro. The “Bay of Pigs” invasion was an embarrassing failure, and President Kennedy publicly accepted responsibility.  The incident severely damaged American ability to negotiate with Soviet Premier Khrushchev that summer in Vienna.  In August 1961, East Germany built the Berlin Wall to prevent its own people from escaping across the border between East Berlin and West Berlin.  In retaliation, Kennedy increased U.S. forces in Berlin.  Two years later, he endeared himself to West Germans by delivering his “Ich bin ein Berliner” (“I am a Berliner”) speech at the Wall, declaring it a symbol of the failures of Soviet-style communism.  The Soviet Union and the United States subsequently enlarged their military budgets and resumed nuclear testing.  Responding to communist revolutionary movements in Southeast Asia, Kennedy achieved a negotiated settlement of the longstanding political turmoil in Laos in 1962.  That same year, he increased U.S. involvement in the conflict between North and South Vietnam, adding Special Forces units to the military advisers President Eisenhower sent during his presidency.

In October john f kennedy pictures, a major international crisis brought the world close to nuclear war.  Kennedy obtained aerial photographs showing that the Soviet Union had placed intermediate-range missiles capable of striking the United States mainland in Cuba.  In an emergency telecast to the nation, Kennedy announced that the U.S. Navy would quarantine any shipments of offensive arms to the island until the Soviets removed the missiles.  The tense confrontation ended when Khrushchev backed down.  The period after the “Cuban Missile Crisis” saw significant progress in improving Soviet-American relations.  In 1963, Kennedy signed the first arms-control treaty of the Cold War with the Soviet Union and Great Britain, banning aboveground nuclear testing.  He also agreed to the installation of a "hot line" for instant communication between the White House and the Kremlin.

Kennedy brought new optimism and idealism to politics, particularly among young people.  His Alliance for Progress and Peace Corps extended that idealism to helping developing countries.  He succeeded in getting Congress to pass many elements of his "New Frontier" domestic program, including aid to higher education, increases in the minimum wage and Social Security benefits, urban renewal, and aid to economically distressed areas.  His policies ushered in a sustained period of economic growth and set the stage for major reform initiatives, including the establishment of the cabinet-level Department of Urban Affairs, the provision of medical care for the aged under the Medicare program, federal assistance for public schools, and stronger regulation of farm production, that were enacted under the leadership of President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Though initially cautious, Kennedy made notable gains in civil rights.  During his first 100 days in office, Kennedy established the Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity to eliminate discrimination in federal hiring, instructed his cabinet secretaries to expand opportunities for African Americans in every department, and renewed the Civil Rights Commission.  Increasingly moved spectrum tv pay my bill moral outrage by Southern resistance to court-ordered desegregation of public schools and facilities, President Kennedy, together with his brother, Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy, enforced the Supreme Court’s directives.  In 1962, Kennedy sent U.S. marshals and troops to ensure enrollment of African American James H. Meredith in the University of Mississippi.  In 1963, Kennedy federalized the Alabama National Guard to prevent violence during integration of the last segregated State university in the nation.  During a televised address June 10, 1963, President Kennedy reminded the nation that “for all its hopes and all its boasts, [it would] not be fully free until all its citizens are free” and called for commitment to the “proposition that race has no place in American life or law.”  The following week, Kennedy presented Congress with a civil rights bill which would ensure voting rights and eliminate discrimination in all places of public accommodation, a proposal for racial john f kennedy pictures later enacted under the Civil Rights Law of 1964 and the Voting Rights Law of 1965.


The Kennedy nursery
Photo by Robert Perron
National Park Service

In the fall of 1963, Kennedy toured the nation to build support for administration programs and his reelection.  On November 22, 1963, an assassin shot Kennedy as his motorcade passed through downtown Dallas, Texas.  The president died a few hours later and, while the whole world mourned his passing, his reputed assassin, Lee Harvey Oswald’s own murder shrouded Kennedy’s death in allegations of conspiracy.

The nation responded to the tragedy with thousands of memorial tributes to the slain president, but the most intimate remains the Kennedy family’s memorial at his birthplace. In 1966, the Kennedy family repurchased the house on Beals Street; Rose Kennedy enlisted decorator Robert John f kennedy pictures of the Jordan Marsh retail store, to help recreate the home’s 1917 appearance.  Working from her remembrances, Mrs. Kennedy and Mr. Luddington assembled and arranged household furnishings, photographs, and significant mementoes in the principal rooms of the house.  Mrs. Kennedy’s personal reminiscences continue to guide visitors through the home.



Plan your visit

John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site, a unit of the National Park System, is located at 83 Beals St., Brookline, MA, a residential suburb.  The birthplace has been designated a National Historic Landmark. The grounds are accessible year round; the house is open to the public seasonally.  Entrance to the Visitor Center is free; a fee is charged for visiting the house museum.  For additional information, directions, and the seasonal schedule, visit the National Park Service John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site or call 617-566-7937.  Visitors can also enjoy self-guided walking and special ranger-led tours of the neighborhood where Jack Kennedy spent his childhood. The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library & Museum is located nearby in Boston.

The John Fitzgerald Kennedy National Historic Site has been documented by the National Park Service’s Historic American Buildings Survey. The home is the subject of an online lesson plan,  Birthplace of John F. Kennedy: Home of the Boy Who Would Be President. The lesson plan has been produced by the National Park Service’s Teaching with Historic Places program, which offers a series of online classroom-ready lesson plans on registered historic places. To learn more, visit the Teaching with Historic Places home page.

 
Источник: https://www.nps.gov/nr/travel/presidents/john_f_kennedy_birthplace.html

Rare Images of John F. Kennedy Surface After 50 Years Forgotten in Widow's Garage

Rare photographs of John F. Kennedy left in an Arizona widow's garage for more than half a century have been released, and shedding light on the former president's legacy.

Read: Did Robert F. Kennedy Stray In His Marriage? New Book Reveals Shocking Rumors of Infidelity

The Michigan History Project released more than 90 photos of John F. Kennedy on an old-fashioned whistle-stop campaign tour through Michigan, taken just hours after making his famous Peace Corps speech at the University of Michigan on October 14, 1960.

The rare photographs of the tour through 10 cities were taken by Doug Fulton, who worked for the Ann Arbor News from the mid-1950s to the early 1980s, according to the Michigan History Project.

When Fulton retired, he moved to Arizona, where he and his wife lived until he passed away in 1996.

The organization's president, Alan Glenn, said they received a tip years later that Fulton may have possessed some worthwhile photographs from his time with the newspaper. They then got in touch with his widow, whom Glenn estimated to be about 90 years old.

"It turned out that there was a largish collection of his negatives in Arizona, being kept at his home where his widow still lived," Glenn told InsideEdition.com. "I don't think she remembered that there were any pictures of JFK in the collection. I'd guess that it was a case of something being stored away and forgotten about."

Despite finding no information other than the negatives labeled simply, "JFK," researchers were able to piece together information, and identify landmarks like the Kellogg Auditorium in Battle Creek, and the State Capitol in Lansing.

Read: 'Wizard of Oz' Fans Trying to Raise $300G to Save Dorothy's Deteriorating Ruby Red Slippers

"There's all sorts of historical treasures out there, forgotten and packed away in attics and garages," Glenn said. "You've got to go out and find this stuff before it's tossed in the trash. Because when history is lost, it's gone forever."

The photographs will be collected into a larger project with the mission of preserving the state's history for generations to come.

Watch: Marilyn Monroe's 'Happy Birthday, Mr. President' Gown Expected to Fetch $3 Million at Auction

Marilyn Monroe's Iconic Dress Worn for JFK's Birthday Could Fetch $3M At AuctionNews

Источник: https://www.insideedition.com/20217-rare-images-of-john-f-kennedy-surface-after-50-years-forgotten-in-widows-garage

The life of John F. Kennedy Jr.

  • President Kennedy and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy pose at Georgetown University Hospital in Washington in this Dec. 8, 1960 file photo, with their son, John F. Kennedy Jr., following a baptism for the infant.

    AP Photo

  • John Kennedy Jr. plays in the Oval Office at the White House in Washington, Oct. 15, 1963.

    Getty Images

  • President John F. Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy and their children John F. Kennedy, Jr., left, and Caroline Kennedy pose for a family portrait at Hammersmith Farm john f kennedy pictures Newport, R.I.,Sept. 29, 1961.

    Robert Knudsen/Getty Images

  • Little John climbs steps of helicopter after seeing his father President John Kennedy off at Otis Air Force Base, Mass., Sept. 3, 1963.

    Bob Schutz/AP Photo

  • President Kennedy approaches a helicopter at the family home in Hyannis Port, Mass., for the first leg of his journey back to Washington, Aug. 26, 1963.

    Cecil Stoughton/John F. Kennedy Library and Museum in Boston/AP Photo

  • President John F. Kennedy is shown with his son, John Jr., as they hold hands outside the White House in Washington, circa 1963.

    AP Photo

  • President John F. Kennedy, first lady Jacqueline Kennedy and their children, Caroline, right, and John Jr., seated beside his mother, with the family dogs at their home in Hyannis Port, Mass., Aug. 14, 1963.

    Cecil Stoughton/White House/AP Photo

  • Jacqueline Kennedy takes her son, John, Jr., and daughter, Caroline, for a ride on "Sardar," her gift horse from President Ayub Khan of Pakistan, Nov. 19, 1962, at Kennedy's Glen Ora estate near Middleburg, Va.

    Getty Images

  • John F. Kennedy Jr. salutes his father's flag-draped casket during the funeral procession for President John F. Kennedy in Washington, Nov. 26, 1963. From left, Edward Kennedy, Caroline Kennedy, Jacqueline Kenney, Robert Kennedy, and John F. Kennedy Jr.

    Getty Images

  • John Kennedy Jr. and Caroline Kennedy sled in Central Park in New York, Jan. 3, 1971.

    Ron Galella/Getty Images

  • The family of Sen. Edward Kennedy was joined by John F. Kennedy Jr., center, son of the late U.S. President John F. Kennedy, for a ski week, at several Massachusetts ski resorts, Feb. 1975.

    Peter Bregg/AP Photo

  • Patrick Kennedy and John F. Kennedy Jr. attend John F. Kennedy Library and Museum Dedication Ceremony, Oct. 20, 1979, in Dorchester, Mass.

    Ron Galella/Getty Images

  • John F Kennedy Jr. at Hyannis Beach in Hyannis, Mass., Aug. 30, 1980.

    Ron Galella/Getty Images

  • John F. Kennedy Jr. is seen at his graduation from Brown University in this June 4, 1983 photo.

    Russell Turiak/Getty Images

  • John F. Kennedy Jr. and Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy on their wedding day, Sept. 21, 1996.

    Denis Reggie

  • John F. Kennedy, Jr. walks his dogs in front of his Tribeca apartment, Oct., 1996, in New York.

    Dave Kotinsky/Getty Images

  • John F. Kennedy, Jr. during an interview with Jay Leno on "The Tonight Show," May 14, 1998.

    Chris Haston/NBC/Getty Images

  • John F. Kennedy Jr., son of the late President John Fitzgerald Kennedy, listens to a question from the audience during a panel discussion entitled "The Medicare Debate: Then and Now" at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government in Cambridge, Mass., in this April 29, 1997 photo.

    Stephan Savoia/AP Photo

  • John Kennedy Jr. and his wife, Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy, attend the funeral of his cousin Michael Kennedy at Our Lady of Victory Church in Centerville, Mass., Jan. 3, 1998. Michael Kennedy was killed in a skiing accident Dec. 31, 1997, in Aspen, Colo.

    Mark Lennihan/AP Photo

  • Jonh F. Kennedy Jr. stops to talk with, left to right, HBO Chairman and CEO Jeff Bewkes and HBO Senior Vice-President of Corporate Communications Richard Plepler before heading into a screening of "From Earth To The Moon," an HBO Original Production, at the Saturn Rocket Visitors Center in Kennedy Space Center, Fla., March 25, 1998.

    Scott Audette/AP Photo

  • John F. Kennedy Jr. during "Newman's Own" George Awards at U.S. Customs House in New York, May 19, 1999.

    Ron Galella/Getty Images

  • John F. Kennedy, Jr. gives Carolyn Bessette-Kennedy a kiss during the annual White House Correspondents dinner, May 1, 1999 in Washington, D.C.

    Tyler Mallory/Getty Images

  • Источник: https://abcnews.go.com/US/photos/remembering-jfk-jr-15-years-death-24555958/image-24556204
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    1 Replies to “John f kennedy pictures”

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