natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids

While there are many medical conditions that can cause anal pain, an anal fissure is usually as a result of constipation where the strain of passing hard stools. According to Earth Clinic readers, there are dozens of effective natural treatments that help shrink and heal hemorrhoids. Popular home remedies for getting. Most prolapsed internal hemorrhoids go away without at-home treatment. However, severely prolapsed or bleeding internal hemorrhoids may need medical.

Natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids -

How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids (4+ Natural Remedies)

How to get rid of hemorrhoids - Dr. Axe

Hemorrhoids are a very common anorectal condition that affects millions of people around the world. Over half of all people will develop symptomatic hemorrhoids at some point, so it’s common to wonder how to get rid of hemorrhoids. Most patients are able to get rid of hemorrhoids with a high-fiber diet, herbal supplements and non-surgical medical treatments, such as my DIY Hemorrhoid Cream with Turmeric & Tea Tree Oil. (1)

Hemorrhoids are frequently seen in primary care clinics, emergency wards, gastroenterology units and surgical clinics, but how do you know when hemorrhoids have developed and when you should see a doctor? These are common concerns among people who develop hemorrhoids and don’t know how to deal with and treat the pain. Thankfully, there are natural treatments for how to get rid of hemorrhoids fast, and starting there may help relieve these literal pains in the butt.

What Are Hemorrhoids?

Now, you might be wondering why it’s so important to know how to get rid of hemorrhoids, especially if you’ve never experienced hemorrhoid symptoms before. Well, it’s because no one is immune to hemorrhoids.

I bet you didn’t know that we all have hemorrhoids, but it’s true. Hemorrhoids are normal cushions of tissue that are filled with blood vessels and found at the end of the rectum, just inside the anus. Together with a circular muscle called the anal sphincter, hemorrhoids help control bowel movement. When people say that they “have hemorrhoids,” what they really mean is that their hemorrhoids have become enlarged. Enlarged hemorrhoids are often associated with symptoms such as itching, mucus discharge or bleeding. Bleeding happens when hard stool damages the thin walls of the blood vessels in hemorrhoids.

The two basic types include internal and external hemorrhoids. Internal hemorrhoids are more common, and external hemorrhoids tend to feel like a large lump around the outside of the anus that can make sitting painful. Bleeding is fairly common with a swollen external hemorrhoid.

Swollen internal hemorrhoids might come out of the anus and can then be seen as soft lumps of tissue. These are called protruding or prolapsed hemorrhoids. Larger hemorrhoids can make it feel like something is pushing against the anus, which can make sitting very uncomfortable. (13)

Hemorrhoids are classified by grade, which is based on how severe they are:

  • Grade 1: Slightly enlarged hemorrhoids that cannot be seen from outside the anus.
  • Grade 2: Larger hemorrhoids that may come outside of the anus at times, like when passing stool, but then go back in on their own.
  • Grade 3: Hemorrhoids that come out of the anus when passing stool or engaging in physical activity and do not go back in on their own. They can only be pushed back inside the anus.
  • Grade 4: Hemorrhoids that are always outside the anus and can no longer be pushed back inside. A small bit of the anal lining may also come down from the lower rectum and out of the anus, which is known as rectal prolapse.
Hemorrhoid classifications - Dr. Axe

The most common symptom of hemorrhoids is anal bleeding, and chief complaints include a perianal mass protruding from the anus and anal discharge. Other symptoms of hemorrhoids include:

  • irritation and itching around the anus
  • fecal leakage
  • sensitive lumps in the anus
  • painful bowel movements
  • protrusion of skin during bowel movements
  • blood on toilet paper after having a bowel movement

A particularly painful form of Grade 4 hemorrhoids comes in the form of a thrombosed hemorrhoid. This refers to a (usually) external hemorrhoid that have no blood flow because the vein connected to them has a thrombosis (blood clot). The thrombosis responsible for a thrombosed hemorrhoid will often reabsorb within two to three weeks without major treatment. Pain originating from the swelling and inflammation of the hemorrhoid is usually worst in the first 24–48 hours after it develops.

People with hemorrhoids are at an increased risk of portal hypertension. (14) According to WebMD, “Portal hypertension is an increase in the blood pressure within a system of veins called the portal venous system. Veins coming from the stomach, intestine, spleen, and pancreas merge into the portal vein, which then branches into smaller vessels and travels through the liver.”

Many people find themselves wondering, “Do hemorrhoids go away?” Most swollen hemorrhoids do go away, given that you follow a wise regimen of diet and bathroom habits, as well as any other additional treatment methods recommended by your physician.

How long do hemorrhoids last? Hemorrhoid symptoms clear up within a few days for most people, but they may reoccur and/or require medical attention in some cases. If symptoms continue for more than a week or two and haven’t been improved by home treatment, it’s probably time to visit the doctor. For those who already have frequent hemorrhoids, dietary intervention may be one of the best ways to get rid of external and internal hemorrhoids once and for all.

Although people assume that any anal pain while using the toilet is hemorrhoids, there are a number of other anorectal disorders that can cause symptoms, including dermatologic diseases, diverticulitis, abscess and fistula, fissure, sexually transmitted diseases, warts, HIV, infections and inflammatory ulcers. These conditions will be ruled out by your doctor when you go for a rectal exam if they aren’t the cause.

Diverticulitis vs. Hemorrhoids

People are sometimes confused by the difference between diverticulitis and internal hemorrhoids. Diverticulitis is a condition in which sacs or pouches within the colon walls become inflamed and press into the colon. While some of the symptoms and root problems are similar to what causes hemorrhoids, diverticulitis tends to be a bit more serious and is related closely to age and poor dietary fiber intake.

Causes of Hemorrhoids

Researchers propose that degradation (or disintegration) of the supporting tissues of the anal cushions causes hemorrhoids to develop. There are some contributing factors for hemorrhoids, including:

  • being overweight
  • regularly lifting heavy objects
  • aging
  • pregnancy and giving birth
  • heredity
  • constipation or chronic diarrhea
  • faulty bowel function due to overuse of laxatives or enemas
  • spending excessive periods of time on the toilet

An increase in intra-abdominal pressure during pregnancy or when constipated and sitting on the toilet for a prolonged period of time while straining are major contributing factors for the development of hemorrhoids. Weakening of supporting tissue as a result of aging and genetics may also serve as another cause.

Many dietary factors, including a low-fiber diet, spicy foods and alcohol intake, have been implicated as possible causes of hemorrhoids symptoms as well, but the research proving this is inconsistent. It has also been published that Caucasians of higher socioeconomic class were afflicted with a greater frequency of hemorrhoids, but this data may be limited because it’s based on people’s health care-seeking practices. (15)

Conventional Treatment for Hemorrhoids

When you go to see a doctor for enlarged hemorrhoids, he or she will look at your anus to see if it’s inflamed and whether the hemorrhoids come out of the anus when you push or if they’re already outside. Depending on the severity of your symptoms, there are a number of examinations your doctor may choose to perform in order to make a diagnosis. Doctors typically do a digital rectal examination first, which involves gently inserting a finger into the anus with gloves and lubricant. The doctor will feel the inside of the anal canal using circular movements, which allows him to examine the sphincter muscles and the texture of the membranes lining the anus.

If your doctor believes that you do have enlarged hemorrhoids, she will most likely perform a proctoscopy next. This involves inserting a short tube with a light and lens on it (the proctoscope) that exams the membranes lining the rectum. The doctor is looking to see if there are enlarged hemorrhoids and how big they are. People tend to fear the pain and discomfort that come with these procedures, but they usually don’t hurt and do help your doctor make suggestions about how to get rid of hemorrhoids.

Most of the patients suffering from hemorrhoids have their symptoms alleviated through diet therapy, fiber supplements, hemorrhoid cream and medical treatments, such as sclerotherapy, rubber band ligation and infrared coagulation.

1. Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy is a procedure that involves injecting a chemical (the sclerosant) into a vein to destroy it. The sclerosant is used to damage the innermost lining of the vessel, which results in a clot that blocks the blood circulation in the vein. Over time, the vessel turns into scar tissue and fades away.

In 2010, a group of 338 Japanese medical institutions reported good results for sclerotherapy using aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid (ALTA). Upon injecting ALTA into grade 2, 3 and 4 hemorrhoids, of 3,519 patients, 98 percent reported positive effects within 28 days. The recurrence rate after two years was 18 percent, and complications included pyrexia, low blood pressure, perineal pain and rectal ulcers, but those were mild. (16)

2. Rubber Band Ligation

This procedure is used to remove a hemorrhoid with a rubber band. Your doctor inserts a small tool called a ligator through a lighter tube into the anal canal. Then the doctor grasps the hemorrhoid with forceps, slides the ligator’s cylinder upward and releases the rubber band around the base of the hemorrhoid. The rubber band cuts off the hemorrhoid’s blood supply and causes it to wither away.

A 2000 study published in Digestive Surgery found that rubber band ligation is a useful, safe and successful method for treating symptomatic second- and third-grade hemorrhoids and can be applied successfully in fourth-grade cases but with an increased rate of recurrence and additional treatments required. (17)

3. Infrared Coagulation

Infrared coagulation is a procedure that’s used for internal hemorrhoids. The doctor uses a device that creates an intense beam of infrared light to cause scar tissue and cut off the blood supply to the hemorrhoid. When the hemorrhoid dies, a scar forms on the anal canal below the lower rectum, and the scar tissue holds nearby veins in place so they can’t bulge into the anal canal.

A 2003 study compared infrared coagulation and rubber band ligation in terms of effectiveness and discomfort. Researchers found that postoperative pain during the first week after treatment was more intense in the band ligation group; pain and a feeling of constantly having to pass stool was also more intense with band ligation. Patients in the infrared coagulation group returned to work earlier, but they also had a higher recurrence or failure rate. Researchers concluded that band ligation, although more effective in controlling symptoms and obliterating hemorrhoids, is associated with more pain and discomfort to the patient — something to keep in mind when you’re looking for ways on how to get rid of hemorrhoids. (18)

4. Hemorrhoid Surgery

Surgical intervention is now less frequently performed than in the past, but it can be considered for patients with acute complications of hemorrhoidal disease or for those who were unable to treat hemorrhoids with other measures. Surgery for hemorrhoids, known as a hemorrhoidectomy, involves removing the hemorrhoid or the clot with a small incision. Having a hemorrhoidectomy is generally an outpatient procedure and involves a two to three week recovery period.

Having hemorrhoid surgery can seem frightening, but it is a relatively minor procedure that doctors recommend when all other treatment methods have failed.

How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

1. Improve Your Diet

Eat High-Fiber Foods

To get rid of hemorrhoids, it’s important that you avoid constipation and hard stool, which can be done by eating plenty of high-fiber foods to make stools soft. For how to get rid of hemorrhoids, the recommendation is 30–35 grams of fiber daily. Eat foods such as avocados, berries, figs, Brussels sprouts, acorn squash, beans, lentils, nuts, flaxseeds, chia seeds and quinoa. In clinical studies, high-fiber diets reduced the risk of persisting symptoms and bleeding by approximately 50 percent. (2)

Drink Plenty of Water

Dehydration can lead to constipation because water or fluids are required for fiber to travel smoothly through the digestive tract. Many studies, including one published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, indicate that fluid loss and fluid restriction can increase constipation, which can worsen hemorrhoid symptoms. To relieve constipation and as a way for how to get rid of hemorrhoids, drink at least one glass of water with each meal and snack of the day. (3)

Eat Fermented Foods

Fermented foods like kefir, kimchi and raw, pastured yogurt can help provide the digestive system with healthy bacteria that are essential for proper elimination. Several studies have shown that fermented foods and probiotics improve intestinal tract health, synthesize and enhance the bioavailability of nutrients, modify gut pH and aid digestion. (4)

Limit Alcohol and Spicy Foods

Alcohol can be dehydrating and hard on the digestive system, making hemorrhoid symptoms worse. And spicy foods can intensify the symptoms of hemorrhoids. Some studies show that both alcohol and spicy foods consumption serve as risk factors for hemorrhoids, although the data isn’t consistent. To be safe, limit these foods until the hemorrhoids have cleared up. (5)

2. Practice Better “Toilet Habits”

Avoid Straining

Straining during a bowel movement can be painful and make hemorrhoid problems even worse. Don’t wait too long before going to the toilet. Pay attention to your body’s signals, and when you feel an urge to use the bathroom, go right away. Otherwise the stool will become harder, and this will automatically make you push harder. When you’re at the toilet, take your time and relax your body. (6)

Prevent Constipation

Constipation forces you to strain while using the bathroom, and that will increase the pain and inflammation of the hemorrhoid. To avoid constipation, drink plenty of fluids, engage in regular physical activity and eat high-fiber foods that make stools soft. These steps also help answer how to get rid of hemorrhoids or prevent them in the first place.

Avoid Prolonged Sitting on the Toilet

Spending too much time on the toilet can worsen hemorrhoids. Don’t read or distract yourself while using the bathroom; this only leads to more time spent straining. (Read: put the phone down.)

Clean Yourself Thoroughly

If stool is left behind after you wipe, it can aggravate hemorrhoids even more, which is why it’s important to cleanse yourself thoroughly after going to the bathroom. Do not, however, cleanse yourself too roughly or use soaps that contain harsh chemicals, alcohol or perfumes. Instead, use plain water to wipe yourself and then dry your bottom afterward. A sitz bath, which involves sitting in warm water for 10 minutes, twice daily, is helpful to patients with anal itching, aching or burning and is known as one of the best ways to get rid of hemorrhoids fast.

3. Take Helpful Supplements

Butcher’s Broom

Butcher’s broom can help reduce swelling and inflammation of hemorrhoids. A 2002 study conducted in Germany found that butcher’s broom was an effective means of treatment for patients suffering from chronic venous insufficiency, a condition where the flow of blood through the veins is inadequate, causing the blood to pool. (7)

Pycnogenol® 

A 2010 study published in Phytotherapy Research investigated the efficacy of orally and topically applied Pycnogenol® hemorrhoid cream for the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks in a controlled, randomized study with 84 subjects. Within less than 48 hours of an attack, patients were enrolled and their signs and symptoms were scored. The decrease in scores was significantly more pronounced in the Pycnogenol® group than in the control group given placebo. The study indicates that oral and topical Pycnogenol® helps to heal acute hemorrhoids. (8)

Horse Chestnut

Horse chestnut is commonly used as an herbal remedy for poor blood flow and swelling. According to research published in Alternative Medicine Review, horse chestnut has been shown to improve microcirculation, capillary flow and vascular tone, all of which are helpful for how to get rid of hemorrhoids. (9)

Witch Hazel 

Witch hazel is a plant that’s used for its skin-healing, astringent and antioxidant properties. Topical application of witch hazel can help soothe hemorrhoids by reducing inflammation and pain.

Psyllium Husk

Psyllium husk is a natural source of pure fiber that’s sold in powder form. Studies suggest that plant fibers like psyllium husk can reduce the frequency of bleeding when using the bathroom and help avoid constipation or straining. When using psyllium husk, make sure to drink plenty of water.

A 2011 animal study published in Digestive Diseases and Sciences found that psyllium husk has a gut-stimulatory and laxative effect on mice, and at higher doses it has antisecretory (reducing the normal rate of secretion of a body fluid) and antidiarrheal activity. (10)

4. Try Beneficial Essential Oils

Cypress Oil

Cypress essential oil stops excess blood flow and promotes the clotting of blood. This is due to its hemostatic and astringent properties. Cypress oil helps with the contraction of blood vessels, and it tightens tissues. It’s also known to reduce anxiety, which can help to relieve constipation for some people. Use cypress topically by adding 3 to 4 drops to a cotton ball and applying to the area of concern. (11)

Helichrysum

Helichrysum essential oil helps stimulate the secretion of gastric juices that are needed to break down food and prevent digestive issues. It also serves as an anti-inflammatory agent when applied topically. To use helichrysum, rub two to three drops into the abdomen or area of inflammation. (12)

Hemorrhoids by the Numbers

Hemorrhoids by the numbers - Dr. Axe
  • Around 20 million people in the United States suffer from hemorrhoids (12.8 percent of U.S. adults).
  • In 2004, the National Institutes of Health noted that the diagnosis of hemorrhoids was associated with 3.2 million ambulatory care visits, 306,000 hospitalizations and 2 million prescriptions in the United States.
  • The peak incidence of hemorrhoids is between the ages of 45–65. Development of hemorrhoids before the age of 20 is unusual.
  • The risk of developing hemorrhoids is higher in white adults than in black adults, higher in women than in men and higher for women who are pregnant.

Precautions on How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

A common concern is that hemorrhoids increase the risk of colorectal cancer, but that’s not true. However, the two conditions do cause similar symptoms. This is why it’s important to mention your hemorrhoids to your health care provider. Even when a hemorrhoid is healed completely, a colonoscopy may be done to rule out other causes of rectal bleeding. According to the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), every person age 50 and older should undergo a colonoscopy to screen for colorectal cancer. (19)

Final Thoughts on How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

  • Hemorrhoids are a very common anorectal condition that affects millions of people around the world.
  • Enlarged hemorrhoids are often associated with symptoms such as itching, mucus discharge or bleeding. Bleeding happens when hard stool damages the thin walls of the blood vessels in hemorrhoids.
  • Avoidance of constipation is key when trying to get rid of hemorrhoids. It’s important that you don’t strain while using the bathroom, don’t sit for an excessive period of time and clean yourself thoroughly when finished.
  • Foods and herbal supplements that help relieve constipation can alleviate the symptoms of hemorrhoids. A high-fiber diet and drinking plenty of fluids are the most helpful dietary changes that you can make when it comes to how to get rid of hemorrhoids.
  • If non-medical treatments don’t work, there are relatively painless procedures that can be done to treat hemorrhoids. For extreme cases, an outpatient surgery called a hemorrhoidectomy may be required.
Источник: https://draxe.com/health/how-to-get-rid-of-hemorrhoids/

Problems with hemorrhoids, also known as piles, are close to the top of the list of annoyances many of us would prefer not to talk about. However, they’re also one of the most common health conditions. Nearly three out of four adults experience hemorrhoids from time to time.

What many people don’t know is that hemorrhoids are actually something you’re born with, but we typically only notice them when they start acting up, says Alex Ky, M.D., a proctologist and professor of surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. “Hemorrhoids are a mixture of arteries and veins that help cushion your anal canal during bowel movements,” she explains.

Hemorrhoids can often bulge or swell due to pressure from straining, extended sitting time on the toilet, chronic diarrhea or constipation, or heavy lifting. Your risk of having them goes up if you’re pregnant thanks to the extra weight of your baby and as you age since the tissues that support the veins around your anus can become weaker over time.

“Doctors refer to symptomatic hemorrhoids as either external or internal,” says Mitchell A. Bernstein, M.D., a colon and rectal surgeon and professor of surgery at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Just as the name implies, internal hemorrhoids are inside your anus and painless but can cause bleeding during bowel movements. External hemorrhoids, on the other hand, occur when hemorrhoids are pushed just outside of the anal opening. When this happens, they can swell up, bleed, and feel seriously painful, irritated, and itchy. If blood pools and forms a clot down there, you can experience even more severe pain—and it may feel like a hard marble or solid grape, notes Dr. Bernstein.

When this particular pain pops up, one question is top of mind: How do you get rid of hemorrhoids? Here’s your guide to expert-approved hemorrhoid treatments from home remedies to in-office procedures, plus how to know when it’s time to see a doctor.

1. Try topical treatments.

Rapid Relief Hemorrhoidal Cream

Preparation Hamazon.com

SHOP NOW

For quick relief from painful and itchy external hemorrhoids, head to your pharmacy for an over-the-counter hemorrhoid cream or suppository that contains witch hazel (like Tucks pads) or hydrocortisone and lidocaine (such as Preparation H). Topical creams often have painkillers, numbing agents, and steroids which can dial down pain and swelling, says Harry J. Thomas, M.D., a board-certified gastroenterologist at Austin Gastroenterology in central Texas. Be sure to follow the label instructions carefully and don’t take topicals for more than a week, as steroids can thin your skin over time.

2. Take over-the-counter pain relievers.

While you’re at it, consider stocking up on OTC pain relievers like acetaminophen (Tylenol) or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs like aspirin and ibuprofen) and take them according to the label instructions, says Dr. Thomas. Like topicals, these meds can provide temporary relief from pain and swelling.

3. Gradually increase your fiber intake.

Most of us don’t get in enough fiber everyday, but adding more high-fiber foods like beans, broccoli, whole grains, and fresh fruit to your diet can help you avoid constipation and stay regular. This in turn reduces the chances that you’ll find yourself straining and further irritating your hemorrhoids, says Dr. Thomas. Aim for 20 to 30 grams of fiber a day, and consider taking a fiber supplement that contains psyllium (Metamucil) or methylcellulose (Citrucel) to help you hit your daily goal. If you’re typically low on fiber-rich foods, though, take your time—suddenly upping your intake may make you gassy.

4. Load up on water.

When your hemorrhoids are flaring up, another simple but essential fix is to make sure you’re drinking enough water. Getting in plenty of fluids (think: about 1.5 to 2 liters or about 6 to 8 cups a day) can help produce regular, soft stools and reduce straining, says Dr. Thomas. To ensure you’re staying hydrated throughout the day, keep a full bottle of water by your side, add a cup of tea to your self-care routine, or freshen up your hydration game with infused water.

5. Ice it.

For short-term relief from particularly painful, swollen hemorrhoids, icing can be a highly effective solution. Apply an ice pack or cold compress to your anus for about 10 minutes up to three times a day, suggests Dr. Thomas. Of course, always remember to wrap ice inside a paper towel or cloth first. No matter how bad the pain is, you want to protect your skin.

6. Soak it off in a sitz bath.

A sitz bath comes from the German word “sitzen,” meaning “sit,” and it refers to a 10 to 15 minute soak in warm water that comes just up to your bottom and hips. “Sitz baths can relieve irritation and itching as well as spasm of your anal sphincter muscles,” says Dr. Thomas. Take a shallow soak in your bathtub or buy a small plastic tub from your pharmacy to give yourself a portable sitz bath two to three times a day.

7. Move a little more.

While some exercises like weightlifting, squats, and lunges can cause or worsen painful hemorrhoids due to straining, others may help relieve your symptoms and reduce your chances of having future flare-ups. Physical exercise can help with regular bowel movements and keep pressure off of your hemorrhoids, says Dr. Thomas.

Although you might not feel up to your usual workout, try taking a brisk walk or incorporating gentle movement into your day with stretching or yoga. Make it a point to break up long periods of sitting or standing, too, as both can increase pressure on your veins and irritate hemorrhoids.

8. Consider having a clot removed.

External hemorrhoids can result in extremely painful blood clots, and while they’re not dangerous, they can take a couple of weeks to resolve on their own. If yours scores high on your personal pain scale, a doctor can remove a thrombosed hemorrhoid with a relatively simple in-office procedure under local anesthetic in about 10 minutes. Keep in mind: The first 24 to 48 hours are typically the most painful—and the best time to have a clot removed, says Dr. Ky.

9. Band it off.

For bleeding or recurrent hemorrhoids, another minimally-invasive treatment—and one of Dr. Ky’s favorites—is known as rubber band ligation. For this procedure, there’s typically no need for anesthesia. Your doctor simply wraps a tiny rubber band around the base of the hemorrhoid, and with its circulation cut off, the hemorrhoid shrivels up, shrinks, and falls off, often within a week. Complications are rare, but you might feel a little pain or tightness down there. Needless to say, it’s best to leave the banding to your doctor. Never try something like this at home.

10. For seriously bad hemorrhoids, talk to your doctor about surgical options.

If you’ve tried home remedies and in-office procedures but your hemorrhoids are still making you miserable, it might be time to ask your doctor about surgery. Recovery from the surgical removal of hemorrhoids (a.k.a. hemorrhoidectomy) can be extremely painful, notes Dr. Bernstein, but it’s one of the most effective ways to get rid of hemorrhoids for good.

Another surgical option is having your hemorrhoids stapled into place. This is a less painful procedure compared to a hemorrhoidectomy, but it does come with a greater risk of relapse and is not recommended if you have anal sex, as staples can cause injury, notes Dr. Ky.

When to see a doctor for hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids can be a massive pain, but thankfully, symptoms typically go away within a week. If you still have symptoms of hemorrhoids after a week of self-care measures or you’re experiencing severe pain or bleeding, seek medical attention immediately, says Dr. Thomas.

It’s important to note that sometimes what might seem like symptoms of hemorrhoids could indicate something more serious. Less commonly, rectal bleeding can also be a sign of diseases such as colorectal cancer or anal cancer. Make sure to get checked out if you notice large amounts of bleeding or other changes in your bowel habits like a different stool color or consistency.


Support from readers like you helps us do our best work. Go here to subscribe to Prevention and get 12 FREE gifts. And sign up for our FREE newsletter here for daily health, nutrition, and fitness advice.

Lauren KrouseLauren Krouse is a freelance writer who covers health, domestic violence, and self-advocacy.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.prevention.com/health/a34339058/how-to-get-rid-of-hemorrhoids/

Myths and Facts about Home Remedies for Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are common, but they can be an embarrassing health problem. The good news is, you can treat your hemorrhoids at home. However, not all home remedies for hemorrhoids work as well as some internet sites may claim.

Dr. Betsy Clemens, our board-certified family physician at Midwest Hemorrhoid Treatment Center in St. Louis, Missouri, specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhoids and wants to share some of the myths and facts about home remedies so you can get the relief you need without making things worse.  

Myth: All I need is a fiber supplement

Fact: Fiber is an important part of your at-home hemorrhoid treatment plan, but not from a pill or powder

Though a fiber supplement may soften your stool and alleviate constipation that causes hemorrhoids, we recommend you focus on food for fiber instead of a supplement. Adding more fiber-rich foods to your diet may help keep things regular, preventing a recurrence of your hemorrhoids. Additionally, many healthy, high-fiber foods contain other nutrients that benefit your health overall. 

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, lentils, and peas are excellent sources of fiber. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says women need 25 grams of fiber a day and men 38 grams. 

When adding fiber to your diet, whether from food or a supplement, be sure to drink plenty of water. Upping your fiber intake without enough fluids may exacerbate your constipation and worsen your anal discomfort. For general health, the Mayo Clinic recommends women drink 11.5 cups of water a day and men 15.5 cups. 

Myth: Apple cider vinegar cures hemorrhoids

Fact: Apple cider vinegar can’t cure your hemorrhoids

From weight loss to diabetes, apple cider vinegar seems to be the cure-all for whatever ails you, including hemorrhoids. Proponents of the home remedy claim that it provides instant relief from anal pain and itching. However, the Cleveland Clinic warns that the acidity of the apple cider vinegar may worsen your condition and increase inflammation and pain.

If you’re looking for a home remedy to alleviate pain and itching, we recommend a sitz bath (soaking your bottom in warm water for 15-20 minutes) several times a day. You can soak in your tub or invest in a sitz bath kit, which fits right over your toilet bowl. 

Myth: Tea tree oil relieves anal itching

Fact: Tea tree oil is unlikely to provide any relief from your anal itchiness

Also called melaleuca oil, people claim tea tree oil has antibacterial properties and they recommended it for the treatment of many common conditions, including acne and lice. For hemorrhoids, they profess that the topical antibacterial agent reduces itching and swelling. However, there’s little evidence to support these claims, and as a result, we don’t recommend using tea tree oil for your hemorrhoids.

To alleviate the pain and itching, we recommend you try witch hazel or over-the-counter hemorrhoid creams or medicated wipes.

Though at-home remedies can be effective treatments for hemorrhoids, it’s important to know the difference between myth and fact. In addition, if your symptoms persist after a week of DIY treatments, or if you have rectal bleeding, we recommend you schedule an appointment so we can step up the treatment regimen. Give us a call at 636-228-3136 or contact us online today.

All About IRC for Hemorrhoids
All About IRC for Hemorrhoids

When conservative care fails to improve your internal hemorrhoids, you may want to consider nonsurgical infrared coagulation (IRC). This quick and relatively painless procedure gets rid of hemorrhoids fast. Learn all about it here.

5 Causes of Anal Itchiness
5 Causes of Anal Itchiness

Anal itchiness is an uncomfortable and embarassing sensation that causes an intense urge to scratch the sensitive area. Knowing the cause of your anal itchiness, however, may help you get relief from your symptoms. Click here to learn more.

What the Color of Your Stool Says About Your Health
What the Color of Your Stool Says About Your Health

You may not give much thought to the color of your stool, but it can tell you a lot about your health. Before you flush, take a look. Keep reading to learn what the color of your stool says about your health.

Everything You Should Know About IRC
Everything You Should Know About IRC

When at-home care fails to alleviate your hemorrhoid symptoms, you may be wondering what medical treatments can help. Infrared coagulation (IRC) is a nonsurgical, in-office treatment for internal hemorrhoids. Click here to learn all about IRC.

Don’t Ignore These Warning Signs of Anal Fissures

Do you experience severe pain during a bowel movement that lingers for a few minutes or even a few hours? You may have an anal fissure. Don’t ignore the warning signs. Delaying care for an anal fissure may worsen your condition.

What Truck Drivers Should Know About Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are a common health problem among truck drivers. However, it’s not the long hours on the road that causes the uncomfortable condition. Keep reading to learn what you need to know about truck drivers and hemorrhoids.

Betsy F. Clemens, M.D., Creve Coeur, MO

Phone (appointments): 314-669-2758

Home remedies for piles

Piles are medically known as haemorrhoids. It is a condition wherein the veins inside or outside the anus or lower rectum gets inflamed or swollen. Symptoms of piles include feeling of soreness, irritation or pain while passing stool. As a person passes stool, piles get aggravated because of pressure on the rectal area. In some cases, when the condition is severe, bleeding can also occur. Here are some natural home remedies for seeking relief from piles:
Drinking radish juice twice a day is a common remedy for piles. Start off with 1/4 th cup and gradually increase it to half a cup, twice a day.

Soak three to four dried figs in water, overnight. Have these twice a day along with the water in which they have been soaked.
Boil the peel of pomegranate in some water. Strain and drink this water twice a day.

To reduce the pain felt due to piles, drink buttermilk to which rock salt, ginger and peppercorns has been added. Have this twice a day.

To seek relief from bleeding due to piles, powder a teaspoon of mustard seeds and mix it with half a cup of goat’s milk, adding a little sugar. Drink this early in the morning on an empty stomach.

Powder dried mango seeds. Mix two teaspoons of this powder with a little honey and eat this twice a day.

Mix one teaspoon of ginger and lime juice along with mint leaves and honey. Have this two to three times a day.

To reduce pain due to piles, mix one ripe mashed banana in a cup of milk. Have this mixture three to four times a day.

Jamblang better known as jambul fruit is effective in treating piles. This fruit is available during the summers, so make full use of their availability. Eat a handful of jambul with a little salt early in the morning on an empty stomach.

Turnip better known as shalgam, is another useful remedy. Prepare a mixture of 50 ml each of carrot, spinach and turnip leaves juice.

Add some juice of bittergourd or karela leaves mixed with some buttermilk. This should be taken every morning.

Turmeric has antiseptic and healing properties. Therefore, eat a teaspoon of ground, fresh turmeric root.

Application of coconut on the affected areas will give relief from the burning and itching.

Prepare a mix of ground, black cumin seeds better known as shahjeera and cumin seeds. Add a teaspoon of this powder to a glass of water and drink once a day, preferably in the morning.

Mix two tablespoons of honey to one grated raw onion. Have this twice a day.

Boil a handful of sesame seeds or til, in 500 ml of water, till its reduced to one-third. Make a paste of this and add a teaspoon of butter. Eat this once a day.

Please note: Consult your doctor before undertaking these remedies!
Источник: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/health-news/home-remedies-for-piles/articleshow/7347423.cms

Hemorrhoids After Giving Birth

Hemorrhoids are veins that have become swollen and engorged with blood (varicose veins). Many women experience them for the first time during pregnancy or the postpartum period for several reasons, including a rush of hormones, internal pressure, and constipation.

They can range from irritating to quite painful, but the good news is that for the most part, hemorrhoids aren't serious. Most tend to go away with attentive home treatment.

Hemorrhoid Types and Symptoms

These swollen tissues appear in the rectal area and can vary from the size of a pea to that of a grape. There are internal hemorrhoids (affected veins are inside the sphincter), as well as external hemorrhoids (affected veins protrude outside the anal opening).

Hemorrhoids may simply feel itchy, but they also can be painful. In some cases, particularly following a bowel movement, they can cause rectal bleeding. If you had hemorrhoids before you were pregnant, there's a good chance they'll come back post-delivery.

What Causes Hemorrhoids

During pregnancy and the postpartum period, hemorrhoids are often a result of stress on the perineum in the months before, and during, delivery. Veins work like valves to push blood back up to the heart, and when those "valves" become weakened, they can swell with blood.

You can probably imagine how the stress of carrying a baby and then pushing a baby out during vaginal delivery, can cause the veins to pop out. Additionally, all of the hormones going through your body during pregnancy and birth affect how these veins work. Pregnant mothers have increased production of the hormone progesterone, which also causes veins to relax.

Constipation is also common during the postpartum period. This can start a vicious cycle of needing to exert pressure to have a bowel movement, experiencing a resulting flare-up of the hemorrhoids, fearing having to go again, and retaining stool, which then hardens, starting the process all over again.

Home Treatments for Hemorrhoids

There are several things you can do to treat your hemorrhoids at home:

  • Apply ice. Wrap ice or a cold pack in a cloth and apply for about 10 minutes. If you had a hospital or birth center delivery, you may have been given postnatal ice packs to bring home.
  • Ask your doctor about over-the-counter treatments. Topical ointments and suppositories may provide relief. Discuss how long it's acceptable to use a product (most should not be used for more than one week). Only use a product approved by your healthcare provider. This is exceptionally important if you've had an episiotomy or tear.
  • Clean the area gently, but thoroughly. Use a peri-bottle (squirt bottle) filled with warm water. Rather than using dry toilet paper, pat the area with a wet wipe. Hemorrhoid pads that contain witch hazel are often recommended, as well.
  • Lie down as much as you can. Take the pressure off your backside.
  • Take Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Motrin (ibuprofen). Both are safe painkillers for breastfeeding mothers in the recommended dosages.
  • Try a sitz bath. If you don't already have one, you can purchase one at the drugstore. Sitz baths can be done several times a day. Alternatively, you could simply soak in the bathtub.
    (Alternate between the cold ice packs and the warm sitz baths.)
  • Use unscented and dye-free hygiene products. This includes toilet paper, menstrual pads, etc.
  • Add fiber to your diet. Eat lots of fruits, vegetables, and other foods with fiber. Fiber helps to increase bowel movements.

If you want to speed things along, there are a few other things you can do in addition to your home treatments:

  • Avoid and/or treat constipation.
  • Do Kegel exercises to strengthen your perineum area.
  • Use the bathroom when you have the urge to go. Don't "hold it" for fear of causing more pain. The longer you wait, the harder your stool may get, and the more going might aggravate your hemorrhoids. Avoid straining when you are passing a bowel movement.

When to Call Your Doctor

If you are being diligent in your home treatment, you should notice a gradual improvement in your hemorrhoids within the weeks following the birth. However, if your hemorrhoids are aggressively persistent or if you experience rectal bleeding, you definitely want to talk to your doctor or midwife. In extreme and rare cases, you may need to consult a specialist, and surgery may be required.

As a new mom, hemorrhoids are the last thing you want to be dealing with. But with a little bit of self-care, you should be feeling—and sitting—better in no time.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Family uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. What can I do for hemorrhoids during pregnancy?. Updated October 2020.

  2. Hollingshead JR, Phillips RK. Haemorrhoids: modern diagnosis and treatment.Postgrad Med J. 2016;92(1083):4-8. doi:10.1136/postgradmedj-2015-133328

  3. Kestřánek J. Hemorrhoid management in women: the role of tribenoside + lidocaine. Drugs Context. 2019;8:212602. doi:10.7573/dic.212602

  4. Kumar P, Magon N. Hormones in pregnancy. Niger Med J. 2012;53(4):179-183. doi:10.4103/0300-1652.107549

  5. Shirah BH, Shirah HA, Fallata AH, Alobidy SN, Hawsawi MMA. Hemorrhoids during pregnancy: sitz bath vs. ano-rectal cream: A comparative prospective study of two conservative treatment protocols. Women Birth. 2018;31(4):e272-e277. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2017.10.003

  6. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Eating, diet, and nutrition for hemorrhoids. Updated October 2016.

  7. Sandler RS, Peery AF. Rethinking what we know about hemorrhoids. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;17(1):8-15. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2018.03.020

Источник: https://www.verywellfamily.com/hemorrhoids-after-birth-284551

For many peopletalking about internal hemorrhoid can become an uncomfortable topic, especially if they are suffering from them, in which case these people often carry these annoying symptoms in silence. Others have broken taboos and are more open about it.

Hemorrhoids are venous packages or venous flexes that are found in the canal of the anus. Their function is to swell in order to prevent feces from coming in direct contact with the sphincter and injuring it.

We are all born with these packages or lumps, however, the presence of symptoms in internal hemorrhoid is common in adults over 30 years old and the elderly, but it is also possible to occur in children and even babies.

One of the main symptoms of hemorrhoids is the presence of bleeding during bowel movements, especially if these are found internally. When presenting this symptomatology it must be treated.

Although of being slight or like prevention measure it can be alleviated from house. That is why today we invite you to learn about the 10 home remedies to cure hemorrhoids.

What are hemorrhoids?

It is important to understand that hemorrhoids represent hemorrhoidal pads, these contain spleens that facilitate continence and at the same time avoid injury to the sphincter muscle.

The sphincter muscle of the anus can be controlled by opening and closing it at will. Inside the rectum there are three pads that are located on the left side, the right side, and the posterior right side.

So, hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the anus or lower rectum that are generated when pressure increases in the anal canal and these can be internal or external.

Why do hemorrhoids occur?

The causes are linked to the increase in pressure in the anal canal, this pressure can be generated by the next causes:

  • When sitting for a long time.
  • Obesity and pregnancy are reasons for increased pressure in the perineal area.
  • Prolonged constipation.
  • When straining to defecate.
  • Having a low-fiber diet.
  • Eating little or no fruits and vegetables.
  • Lack of physical activity.
  • Chronic diarrhea.
  • Other pathologies.

Symptoms

When a person goes to the doctor for this annoying problem is the result of bleeding and protrusion that represents hard lumps near the anus, these can be visible and palpable as the case may be.

Also, when bleeding in the feces is visible, it is the main characteristic sign when suffering from hemorrhoids. Other symptoms are minor discomfort and inconvenience when sitting, as well as pain when defecating, in addition to constipation.

Hemorrhoids remedies

However, the symptoms will be according to how the hemorrhoids are found:

  • Internal hemorrhoids: They are usually asymptomatic, that is, they do not reflect any symptoms. Even so, bleeding can be perceived at the time of defecation, usually not painful. In this case, they cannot be seen or felt.
  • External hemorrhoids: They can be seen, there is irritation in the area, itching, they can thrombose, there is bleeding and you can feel a lot of pain.

Diagnosis

To diagnose that it is indeed a hemorrhoid problem, the doctor must be assisted and he will make an anal inspection, performing a rectal examination to perceive if there are any lumps.

test called sigmoidoscopy is also performed to rule out possible polyps or a malignant neoplasm. The specialist doctor is known as a proctologist.

When treating a patient with hemorrhoids, the main thing is to eliminate the internal condition.

Hemorrhoid treatments

Hemorrhoids are treated in various ways according to the degree in which they are found, these can be the following:

  • Topical, when some ointment or cream is applied directly to the area.
  • Use of medications such as pills, which serve to reduce swelling in the veins.
  • Change of diet.
  • Surgical, this will depend on the degree to which the hemorrhoids are found. When constant bleeding occurs and the person presents symptoms of anemia, also when having a venous thrombosis.

The surgery can be done by laser or through conventional method using dissection. Although the surgery is not definitive, it is possible to suffer from hemorrhoids again if the appropriate care is not taken.

10 home remedies to cure hemorrhoids

Below, we provide you with 10 remedies that can be easily implemented from home, this in case the symptoms are mild or you want to prevent them.

Local use

1. Aloe vera

One of the easiest remedies available and simple to use to improve symptoms, reduce pain, inflammation and itching.

Aloe vera should be cut off and applied to the affected area several times a day, especially after bowel movements.

2. Chamomile – Horsetail – Rosemary

If you need to deflate the anal area and reduce bleeding discomfort, these medicinal plants are effective.

Boil a handful of these plants for about 5 minutes. Once the water is cold, submerge the area for 10 minutes.

3. Beetles

They should be washed very well previously and left to cool in the refrigerator to proceed to apply directly to the affected area. This can be done 3 times a day.

4. Potato

Its properties allow for a reduction in the sensation of burning and inflammation. The striped potato is taken and wrapped in cloth to be placed in the area of discomfort.

5. Essential oils (lavender, mint, cypress)

In this case we use lavender essential oil that helps to diminish inflammation; mint to diminish itching and cypress which is an intravenous tonic.

A drop of oil of each essence should be dissolved in a spoonful of vinegar, then it should be added to a glass of water, in case it is a bigger container the drops of oils are increased.

This serves to make a bath of seat, also a gauze can be used to spread it of the mixture and to apply in the area of the anus during 10 to 15 minutes.

6. Homemade rosemary cream

Place the rosemary in olive oil and lavender, this is left to macerate in a glass jar, it looks dark green. Once macerated it is applied.

The rosemary serves for the circulation and the lavender helps as a sedative and anti-inflammatory.

7. Plantain and yarrow

These two plants provide benefits to collect the skin and reduce bleeding. They can be added to the macerated oil or made into a separate oil, then filtered and beeswax added.

8. Shea butter and camphor

The oil, wax and camphor are placed in a bain-marie, dissolving it very well. Then it is packaged and it solidifies and is ready to be used in the area.

Internal use

9. Chia

The consumption of chia helps to improve constipation. It can be mixed with yogurt and cereals or fruits.

To prepare it, 2 spoonfuls of chia are used in a glass, water is placed until it is covered and it is left to rest for 2 to 3 hours. This will become a bit gelatinous, but it can be consumed this way or mixed as mentioned.

10. Prunes

It is a great remedy for those who have constipation, it can be mixed with chia.

How to prevent hemorrhoids?

The fundamental thing is that the patient takes care of the constipation, reason why it must evaluate his nutritional habits, incorporating the fiber consumption and sufficient water to the day.

Источник: https://www.tododisca.com/us/10-home-remedies-to-cure-hemorrhoids/

Natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids -

Problems with hemorrhoids, also known as piles, are close to the top of the list of annoyances many of us would prefer not to talk about. However, they’re also one of the most common health conditions. Nearly three out of four adults experience hemorrhoids from time to time.

What many people don’t know is that hemorrhoids are actually something you’re born with, but we typically only notice them when they start acting up, says Alex Ky, M.D., a proctologist and professor of surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. “Hemorrhoids are a mixture of arteries and veins that help cushion your anal canal during bowel movements,” she explains.

Hemorrhoids can often bulge or swell due to pressure from straining, extended sitting time on the toilet, chronic diarrhea or constipation, or heavy lifting. Your risk of having them goes up if you’re pregnant thanks to the extra weight of your baby and as you age since the tissues that support the veins around your anus can become weaker over time.

“Doctors refer to symptomatic hemorrhoids as either external or internal,” says Mitchell A. Bernstein, M.D., a colon and rectal surgeon and professor of surgery at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Just as the name implies, internal hemorrhoids are inside your anus and painless but can cause bleeding during bowel movements. External hemorrhoids, on the other hand, occur when hemorrhoids are pushed just outside of the anal opening. When this happens, they can swell up, bleed, and feel seriously painful, irritated, and itchy. If blood pools and forms a clot down there, you can experience even more severe pain—and it may feel like a hard marble or solid grape, notes Dr. Bernstein.

When this particular pain pops up, one question is top of mind: How do you get rid of hemorrhoids? Here’s your guide to expert-approved hemorrhoid treatments from home remedies to in-office procedures, plus how to know when it’s time to see a doctor.

1. Try topical treatments.

Rapid Relief Hemorrhoidal Cream

Preparation Hamazon.com

SHOP NOW

For quick relief from painful and itchy external hemorrhoids, head to your pharmacy for an over-the-counter hemorrhoid cream or suppository that contains witch hazel (like Tucks pads) or hydrocortisone and lidocaine (such as Preparation H). Topical creams often have painkillers, numbing agents, and steroids which can dial down pain and swelling, says Harry J. Thomas, M.D., a board-certified gastroenterologist at Austin Gastroenterology in central Texas. Be sure to follow the label instructions carefully and don’t take topicals for more than a week, as steroids can thin your skin over time.

2. Take over-the-counter pain relievers.

While you’re at it, consider stocking up on OTC pain relievers like acetaminophen (Tylenol) or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs like aspirin and ibuprofen) and take them according to the label instructions, says Dr. Thomas. Like topicals, these meds can provide temporary relief from pain and swelling.

3. Gradually increase your fiber intake.

Most of us don’t get in enough fiber everyday, but adding more high-fiber foods like beans, broccoli, whole grains, and fresh fruit to your diet can help you avoid constipation and stay regular. This in turn reduces the chances that you’ll find yourself straining and further irritating your hemorrhoids, says Dr. Thomas. Aim for 20 to 30 grams of fiber a day, and consider taking a fiber supplement that contains psyllium (Metamucil) or methylcellulose (Citrucel) to help you hit your daily goal. If you’re typically low on fiber-rich foods, though, take your time—suddenly upping your intake may make you gassy.

4. Load up on water.

When your hemorrhoids are flaring up, another simple but essential fix is to make sure you’re drinking enough water. Getting in plenty of fluids (think: about 1.5 to 2 liters or about 6 to 8 cups a day) can help produce regular, soft stools and reduce straining, says Dr. Thomas. To ensure you’re staying hydrated throughout the day, keep a full bottle of water by your side, add a cup of tea to your self-care routine, or freshen up your hydration game with infused water.

5. Ice it.

For short-term relief from particularly painful, swollen hemorrhoids, icing can be a highly effective solution. Apply an ice pack or cold compress to your anus for about 10 minutes up to three times a day, suggests Dr. Thomas. Of course, always remember to wrap ice inside a paper towel or cloth first. No matter how bad the pain is, you want to protect your skin.

6. Soak it off in a sitz bath.

A sitz bath comes from the German word “sitzen,” meaning “sit,” and it refers to a 10 to 15 minute soak in warm water that comes just up to your bottom and hips. “Sitz baths can relieve irritation and itching as well as spasm of your anal sphincter muscles,” says Dr. Thomas. Take a shallow soak in your bathtub or buy a small plastic tub from your pharmacy to give yourself a portable sitz bath two to three times a day.

7. Move a little more.

While some exercises like weightlifting, squats, and lunges can cause or worsen painful hemorrhoids due to straining, others may help relieve your symptoms and reduce your chances of having future flare-ups. Physical exercise can help with regular bowel movements and keep pressure off of your hemorrhoids, says Dr. Thomas.

Although you might not feel up to your usual workout, try taking a brisk walk or incorporating gentle movement into your day with stretching or yoga. Make it a point to break up long periods of sitting or standing, too, as both can increase pressure on your veins and irritate hemorrhoids.

8. Consider having a clot removed.

External hemorrhoids can result in extremely painful blood clots, and while they’re not dangerous, they can take a couple of weeks to resolve on their own. If yours scores high on your personal pain scale, a doctor can remove a thrombosed hemorrhoid with a relatively simple in-office procedure under local anesthetic in about 10 minutes. Keep in mind: The first 24 to 48 hours are typically the most painful—and the best time to have a clot removed, says Dr. Ky.

9. Band it off.

For bleeding or recurrent hemorrhoids, another minimally-invasive treatment—and one of Dr. Ky’s favorites—is known as rubber band ligation. For this procedure, there’s typically no need for anesthesia. Your doctor simply wraps a tiny rubber band around the base of the hemorrhoid, and with its circulation cut off, the hemorrhoid shrivels up, shrinks, and falls off, often within a week. Complications are rare, but you might feel a little pain or tightness down there. Needless to say, it’s best to leave the banding to your doctor. Never try something like this at home.

10. For seriously bad hemorrhoids, talk to your doctor about surgical options.

If you’ve tried home remedies and in-office procedures but your hemorrhoids are still making you miserable, it might be time to ask your doctor about surgery. Recovery from the surgical removal of hemorrhoids (a.k.a. hemorrhoidectomy) can be extremely painful, notes Dr. Bernstein, but it’s one of the most effective ways to get rid of hemorrhoids for good.

Another surgical option is having your hemorrhoids stapled into place. This is a less painful procedure compared to a hemorrhoidectomy, but it does come with a greater risk of relapse and is not recommended if you have anal sex, as staples can cause injury, notes Dr. Ky.

When to see a doctor for hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids can be a massive pain, but thankfully, symptoms typically go away within a week. If you still have symptoms of hemorrhoids after a week of self-care measures or you’re experiencing severe pain or bleeding, seek medical attention immediately, says Dr. Thomas.

It’s important to note that sometimes what might seem like symptoms of hemorrhoids could indicate something more serious. Less commonly, rectal bleeding can also be a sign of diseases such as colorectal cancer or anal cancer. Make sure to get checked out if you notice large amounts of bleeding or other changes in your bowel habits like a different stool color or consistency.


Support from readers like you helps us do our best work. Go here to subscribe to Prevention and get 12 FREE gifts. And sign up for our FREE newsletter here for daily health, nutrition, and fitness advice.

Lauren KrouseLauren Krouse is a freelance writer who covers health, domestic violence, and self-advocacy.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.prevention.com/health/a34339058/how-to-get-rid-of-hemorrhoids/

Home remedies for piles

Piles are medically known as haemorrhoids. It is a condition wherein the veins inside or outside the anus or lower rectum gets inflamed or swollen. Symptoms of piles include feeling of soreness, irritation or pain while passing stool. As a person passes stool, piles get aggravated because of pressure on the rectal area. In some cases, when the condition is severe, bleeding can also occur. Here are some natural home remedies for seeking relief from piles:
Drinking radish juice twice a day is a common remedy for piles. Start off with 1/4 th cup and gradually increase it to half a cup, twice a day.

Soak three to four dried figs in water, overnight. Have these twice a day along with the water in which they have been soaked.
Boil the peel of pomegranate in some water. Strain and drink this water twice a day.

To reduce the pain felt due to piles, drink buttermilk to which rock salt, ginger and peppercorns has been added. Have this twice a day.

To seek relief from bleeding due to piles, powder a teaspoon of mustard seeds and mix it with half a cup of goat’s milk, adding a little sugar. Drink this early in the morning on an empty stomach.

Powder dried mango seeds. Mix two teaspoons of this powder with a little honey and eat this twice a day.

Mix one teaspoon of ginger and lime juice along with mint leaves and honey. Have this two to three times a day.

To reduce pain due to piles, mix one ripe mashed banana in a cup of milk. Have this mixture three to four times a day.

Jamblang better known as jambul fruit is effective in treating piles. This fruit is available during the summers, so make full use of their availability. Eat a handful of jambul with a little salt early in the morning on an empty stomach.

Turnip better known as shalgam, is another useful remedy. Prepare a mixture of 50 ml each of carrot, spinach and turnip leaves juice.

Add some juice of bittergourd or karela leaves mixed with some buttermilk. This should be taken every morning.

Turmeric has antiseptic and healing properties. Therefore, eat a teaspoon of ground, fresh turmeric root.

Application of coconut on the affected areas will give relief from the burning and itching.

Prepare a mix of ground, black cumin seeds better known as shahjeera and cumin seeds. Add a teaspoon of this powder to a glass of water and drink once a day, preferably in the morning.

Mix two tablespoons of honey to one grated raw onion. Have this twice a day.

Boil a handful of sesame seeds or til, in 500 ml of water, till its reduced to one-third. Make a paste of this and add a teaspoon of butter. Eat this once a day.

Please note: Consult your doctor before undertaking these remedies!
Источник: https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/health-news/home-remedies-for-piles/articleshow/7347423.cms

Myths and Facts about Home Remedies for Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are common, but they can be an embarrassing health problem. The good news is, you can treat your hemorrhoids at home. However, not all home remedies for hemorrhoids work as well as some internet sites may claim.

Dr. Betsy Clemens, our board-certified family physician at Midwest Hemorrhoid Treatment Center in St. Louis, Missouri, specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhoids and wants to share some of the myths and facts about home remedies so you can get the relief you need without making things worse.  

Myth: All I need is a fiber supplement

Fact: Fiber is an important part of your at-home hemorrhoid treatment plan, but not from a pill or powder

Though a fiber supplement may soften your stool and alleviate constipation that causes hemorrhoids, we recommend you focus on food for fiber instead of a supplement. Adding more fiber-rich foods to your diet may help keep things regular, preventing a recurrence of your hemorrhoids. Additionally, many healthy, high-fiber foods contain other nutrients that benefit your health overall. 

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, lentils, and peas are excellent sources of fiber. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says women need 25 grams of fiber a day and men 38 grams. 

When adding fiber to your diet, whether from food or a supplement, be sure to drink plenty of water. Upping your fiber intake without enough fluids may exacerbate your constipation and worsen your anal discomfort. For general health, the Mayo Clinic recommends women drink 11.5 cups of water a day and men 15.5 cups. 

Myth: Apple cider vinegar cures hemorrhoids

Fact: Apple cider vinegar can’t cure your hemorrhoids

From weight loss to diabetes, apple cider vinegar seems to be the cure-all for whatever ails you, including hemorrhoids. Proponents of the home remedy claim that it provides instant relief from anal pain and itching. However, the Cleveland Clinic warns that the acidity of the apple cider vinegar may worsen your condition and increase inflammation and pain.

If you’re looking for a home remedy to alleviate pain and itching, we recommend a sitz bath (soaking your bottom in warm water for 15-20 minutes) several times a day. You can soak in your tub or invest in a sitz bath kit, which fits right over your toilet bowl. 

Myth: Tea tree oil relieves anal itching

Fact: Tea tree oil is unlikely to provide any relief from your anal itchiness

Also called melaleuca oil, people claim tea tree oil has antibacterial properties and they recommended it for the treatment of many common conditions, including acne and lice. For hemorrhoids, they profess that the topical antibacterial agent reduces itching and swelling. However, there’s little evidence to support these claims, and as a result, we don’t recommend using tea tree oil for your hemorrhoids.

To alleviate the pain and itching, we recommend you try witch hazel or over-the-counter hemorrhoid creams or medicated wipes.

Though at-home remedies can be effective treatments for hemorrhoids, it’s important to know the difference between myth and fact. In addition, if your symptoms persist after a week of DIY treatments, or if you have rectal bleeding, we recommend you schedule an appointment so we can step up the treatment regimen. Give us a call at 636-228-3136 or contact us online today.

All About IRC for Hemorrhoids
All About IRC for Hemorrhoids

When conservative care fails to improve your internal hemorrhoids, you may want to consider nonsurgical infrared coagulation (IRC). This quick and relatively painless procedure gets rid of hemorrhoids fast. Learn all about it here.

5 Causes of Anal Itchiness
5 Causes of Anal Itchiness

Anal itchiness is an uncomfortable and embarassing sensation that causes an intense urge to scratch the sensitive area. Knowing the cause of your anal itchiness, however, may help you get relief from your symptoms. Click here to learn more.

What the Color of Your Stool Says About Your Health
What the Color of Your Stool Says About Your Health

You may not give much thought to the color of your stool, but it can tell you a lot about your health. Before you flush, take a look. Keep reading to learn what the color of your stool says about your health.

Everything You Should Know About IRC
Everything You Should Know About IRC

When at-home care fails to alleviate your hemorrhoid symptoms, you may be wondering what medical treatments can help. Infrared coagulation (IRC) is a nonsurgical, in-office treatment for internal hemorrhoids. Click here to learn all about IRC.

Don’t Ignore These Warning Signs of Anal Fissures

Do you experience severe pain during a bowel movement that lingers for a few minutes or even a few hours? You may have an anal fissure. Don’t ignore the warning signs. Delaying care for an anal fissure may worsen your condition.

What Truck Drivers Should Know About Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are a common health problem among truck drivers. However, it’s not the long hours on the road that causes the uncomfortable condition. Keep reading to learn what you need to know about truck drivers and hemorrhoids.

Betsy F. Clemens, M.D., Creve Coeur, MO

Phone (appointments): 314-669-2758

Hemorrhoids After Giving Birth

Hemorrhoids are veins that have become swollen and engorged with blood (varicose veins). Many women experience them for the first time during pregnancy or the postpartum period for several reasons, including a rush of hormones, internal pressure, and constipation.

They can range from irritating to quite painful, but the good news is that for the most part, hemorrhoids aren't serious. Most tend to go away with attentive home treatment.

Hemorrhoid Types and Symptoms

These swollen tissues appear in the rectal area and can vary from the size of a pea to that of a grape. There are internal hemorrhoids (affected veins are inside the sphincter), as well as external hemorrhoids (affected veins protrude outside the anal opening).

Hemorrhoids may simply feel itchy, but they also can be painful. In some cases, particularly following a bowel movement, they can cause rectal bleeding. If you had hemorrhoids before you were pregnant, there's a good chance they'll come back post-delivery.

What Causes Hemorrhoids

During pregnancy and the postpartum period, hemorrhoids are often a result of stress on the perineum in the months before, and during, delivery. Veins work like valves to push blood back up to the heart, and when those "valves" become weakened, they can swell with blood.

You can probably imagine how the stress of carrying a baby and then pushing a baby out during vaginal delivery, can cause the veins to pop out. Additionally, all of the hormones going through your body during pregnancy and birth affect how these veins work. Pregnant mothers have increased production of the hormone progesterone, which also causes veins to relax.

Constipation is also common during the postpartum period. This can start a vicious cycle of needing to exert pressure to have a bowel movement, experiencing a resulting flare-up of the hemorrhoids, fearing having to go again, and retaining stool, which then hardens, starting the process all over again.

Home Treatments for Hemorrhoids

There are several things you can do to treat your hemorrhoids at home:

  • Apply ice. Wrap ice or a cold pack in a cloth and apply for about 10 minutes. If you had a hospital or birth center delivery, you may have been given postnatal ice packs to bring home.
  • Ask your doctor about over-the-counter treatments. Topical ointments and suppositories may provide relief. Discuss how long it's acceptable to use a product (most should not be used for more than one week). Only use a product approved by your healthcare provider. This is exceptionally important if you've had an episiotomy or tear.
  • Clean the area gently, but thoroughly. Use a peri-bottle (squirt bottle) filled with warm water. Rather than using dry toilet paper, pat the area with a wet wipe. Hemorrhoid pads that contain witch hazel are often recommended, as well.
  • Lie down as much as you can. Take the pressure off your backside.
  • Take Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Motrin (ibuprofen). Both are safe painkillers for breastfeeding mothers in the recommended dosages.
  • Try a sitz bath. If you don't already have one, you can purchase one at the drugstore. Sitz baths can be done several times a day. Alternatively, you could simply soak in the bathtub.
    (Alternate between the cold ice packs and the warm sitz baths.)
  • Use unscented and dye-free hygiene products. This includes toilet paper, menstrual pads, etc.
  • Add fiber to your diet. Eat lots of fruits, vegetables, and other foods with fiber. Fiber helps to increase bowel movements.

If you want to speed things along, there are a few other things you can do in addition to your home treatments:

  • Avoid and/or treat constipation.
  • Do Kegel exercises to strengthen your perineum area.
  • Use the bathroom when you have the urge to go. Don't "hold it" for fear of causing more pain. The longer you wait, the harder your stool may get, and the more going might aggravate your hemorrhoids. Avoid straining when you are passing a bowel movement.

When to Call Your Doctor

If you are being diligent in your home treatment, you should notice a gradual improvement in your hemorrhoids within the weeks following the birth. However, if your hemorrhoids are aggressively persistent or if you experience rectal bleeding, you definitely want to talk to your doctor or midwife. In extreme and rare cases, you may need to consult a specialist, and surgery may be required.

As a new mom, hemorrhoids are the last thing you want to be dealing with. But with a little bit of self-care, you should be feeling—and sitting—better in no time.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Family uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. What can I do for hemorrhoids during pregnancy?. Updated October 2020.

  2. Hollingshead JR, Phillips RK. Haemorrhoids: modern diagnosis and treatment.Postgrad Med J. 2016;92(1083):4-8. doi:10.1136/postgradmedj-2015-133328

  3. Kestřánek J. Hemorrhoid management in women: the role of tribenoside + lidocaine. Drugs Context. 2019;8:212602. doi:10.7573/dic.212602

  4. Kumar P, Magon N. Hormones in pregnancy. Niger Med J. 2012;53(4):179-183. doi:10.4103/0300-1652.107549

  5. Shirah BH, Shirah HA, Fallata AH, Alobidy SN, Hawsawi MMA. Hemorrhoids during pregnancy: sitz bath vs. ano-rectal cream: A comparative prospective study of two conservative treatment protocols. Women Birth. 2018;31(4):e272-e277. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2017.10.003

  6. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Eating, diet, and nutrition for hemorrhoids. Updated October 2016.

  7. Sandler RS, Peery AF. Rethinking what we know about hemorrhoids. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;17(1):8-15. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2018.03.020

Источник: https://www.verywellfamily.com/hemorrhoids-after-birth-284551

How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids (4+ Natural Remedies)

How to get rid of hemorrhoids - Dr. Axe

Hemorrhoids are a very common anorectal condition that affects millions of people around the world. Over half of all people will develop symptomatic hemorrhoids at some point, so it’s common to wonder how to get rid of hemorrhoids. Most patients are able to get rid of hemorrhoids with a high-fiber diet, herbal supplements and non-surgical medical treatments, such as my DIY Hemorrhoid Cream with Turmeric & Tea Tree Oil. (1)

Hemorrhoids are frequently seen in primary care clinics, emergency wards, gastroenterology units and surgical clinics, but how do you know when hemorrhoids have developed and when you should see a doctor? These are common concerns among people who develop hemorrhoids and don’t know how to deal with and treat the pain. Thankfully, there are natural treatments for how to get rid of hemorrhoids fast, and starting there may help relieve these literal pains in the butt.

What Are Hemorrhoids?

Now, you might be wondering why it’s so important to know how to get rid of hemorrhoids, especially if you’ve never experienced hemorrhoid symptoms before. Well, it’s because no one is immune to hemorrhoids.

I bet you didn’t know that we all have hemorrhoids, but it’s true. Hemorrhoids are normal cushions of tissue that are filled with blood vessels and found at the end of the rectum, just inside the anus. Together with a circular muscle called the anal sphincter, hemorrhoids help control bowel movement. When people say that they “have hemorrhoids,” what they really mean is that their hemorrhoids have become enlarged. Enlarged hemorrhoids are often associated with symptoms such as itching, mucus discharge or bleeding. Bleeding happens when hard stool damages the thin walls of the blood vessels in hemorrhoids.

The two basic types include internal and external hemorrhoids. Internal hemorrhoids are more common, and external hemorrhoids tend to feel like a large lump around the outside of the anus that can make sitting painful. Bleeding is fairly common with a swollen external hemorrhoid.

Swollen internal hemorrhoids might come out of the anus and can then be seen as soft lumps of tissue. These are called protruding or prolapsed hemorrhoids. Larger hemorrhoids can make it feel like something is pushing against the anus, which can make sitting very uncomfortable. (13)

Hemorrhoids are classified by grade, which is based on how severe they are:

  • Grade 1: Slightly enlarged hemorrhoids that cannot be seen from outside the anus.
  • Grade 2: Larger hemorrhoids that may come outside of the anus at times, like when passing stool, but then go back in on their own.
  • Grade 3: Hemorrhoids that come out of the anus when passing stool or engaging in physical activity and do not go back in on their own. They can only be pushed back inside the anus.
  • Grade 4: Hemorrhoids that are always outside the anus and can no longer be pushed back inside. A small bit of the anal lining may also come down from the lower rectum and out of the anus, which is known as rectal prolapse.
Hemorrhoid classifications - Dr. Axe

The most common symptom of hemorrhoids is anal bleeding, and chief complaints include a perianal mass protruding from the anus and anal discharge. Other symptoms of hemorrhoids include:

  • irritation and itching around the anus
  • fecal leakage
  • sensitive lumps in the anus
  • painful bowel movements
  • protrusion of skin during bowel movements
  • blood on toilet paper after having a bowel movement

A particularly painful form of Grade 4 hemorrhoids comes in the form of a thrombosed hemorrhoid. This refers to a (usually) external hemorrhoid that have no blood flow because the vein connected to them has a thrombosis (blood clot). The thrombosis responsible for a thrombosed hemorrhoid will often reabsorb within two to three weeks without major treatment. Pain originating from the swelling and inflammation of the hemorrhoid is usually worst in the first 24–48 hours after it develops.

People with hemorrhoids are at an increased risk of portal hypertension. (14) According to WebMD, “Portal hypertension is an increase in the blood pressure within a system of veins called the portal venous system. Veins coming from the stomach, intestine, spleen, and pancreas merge into the portal vein, which then branches into smaller vessels and travels through the liver.”

Many people find themselves wondering, “Do hemorrhoids go away?” Most swollen hemorrhoids do go away, given that you follow a wise regimen of diet and bathroom habits, as well as any other additional treatment methods recommended by your physician.

How long do hemorrhoids last? Hemorrhoid symptoms clear up within a few days for most people, but they may reoccur and/or require medical attention in some cases. If symptoms continue for more than a week or two and haven’t been improved by home treatment, it’s probably time to visit the doctor. For those who already have frequent hemorrhoids, dietary intervention may be one of the best ways to get rid of external and internal hemorrhoids once and for all.

Although people assume that any anal pain while using the toilet is hemorrhoids, there are a number of other anorectal disorders that can cause symptoms, including dermatologic diseases, diverticulitis, abscess and fistula, fissure, sexually transmitted diseases, warts, HIV, infections and inflammatory ulcers. These conditions will be ruled out by your doctor when you go for a rectal exam if they aren’t the cause.

Diverticulitis vs. Hemorrhoids

People are sometimes confused by the difference between diverticulitis and internal hemorrhoids. Diverticulitis is a condition in which sacs or pouches within the colon walls become inflamed and press into the colon. While some of the symptoms and root problems are similar to what causes hemorrhoids, diverticulitis tends to be a bit more serious and is related closely to age and poor dietary fiber intake.

Causes of Hemorrhoids

Researchers propose that degradation (or disintegration) of the supporting tissues of the anal cushions causes hemorrhoids to develop. There are some contributing factors for hemorrhoids, including:

  • being overweight
  • regularly lifting heavy objects
  • aging
  • pregnancy and giving birth
  • heredity
  • constipation or chronic diarrhea
  • faulty bowel function due to overuse of laxatives or enemas
  • spending excessive periods of time on the toilet

An increase in intra-abdominal pressure during pregnancy or when constipated and sitting on the toilet for a prolonged period of time while straining are major contributing factors for the development of hemorrhoids. Weakening of supporting tissue as a result of aging and genetics may also serve as another cause.

Many dietary factors, including a low-fiber diet, spicy foods and alcohol intake, have been implicated as possible causes of hemorrhoids symptoms as well, but the research proving this is inconsistent. It has also been published that Caucasians of higher socioeconomic class were afflicted with a greater frequency of hemorrhoids, but this data may be limited because it’s based on people’s health care-seeking practices. (15)

Conventional Treatment for Hemorrhoids

When you go to see a doctor for enlarged hemorrhoids, he or she will look at your anus to see if it’s inflamed and whether the hemorrhoids come out of the anus when you push or if they’re already outside. Depending on the severity of your symptoms, there are a number of examinations your doctor may choose to perform in order to make a diagnosis. Doctors typically do a digital rectal examination first, which involves gently inserting a finger into the anus with gloves and lubricant. The doctor will feel the inside of the anal canal using circular movements, which allows him to examine the sphincter muscles and the texture of the membranes lining the anus.

If your doctor believes that you do have enlarged hemorrhoids, she will most likely perform a proctoscopy next. This involves inserting a short tube with a light and lens on it (the proctoscope) that exams the membranes lining the rectum. The doctor is looking to see if there are enlarged hemorrhoids and how big they are. People tend to fear the pain and discomfort that come with these procedures, but they usually don’t hurt and do help your doctor make suggestions about how to get rid of hemorrhoids.

Most of the patients suffering from hemorrhoids have their symptoms alleviated through diet therapy, fiber supplements, hemorrhoid cream and medical treatments, such as sclerotherapy, rubber band ligation and infrared coagulation.

1. Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy is a procedure that involves injecting a chemical (the sclerosant) into a vein to destroy it. The sclerosant is used to damage the innermost lining of the vessel, which results in a clot that blocks the blood circulation in the vein. Over time, the vessel turns into scar tissue and fades away.

In 2010, a group of 338 Japanese medical institutions reported good results for sclerotherapy using aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid (ALTA). Upon injecting ALTA into grade 2, 3 and 4 hemorrhoids, of 3,519 patients, 98 percent reported positive effects within 28 days. The recurrence rate after two years was 18 percent, and complications included pyrexia, low blood pressure, perineal pain and rectal ulcers, but those were mild. (16)

2. Rubber Band Ligation

This procedure is used to remove a hemorrhoid with a rubber band. Your doctor inserts a small tool called a ligator through a lighter tube into the anal canal. Then the doctor grasps the hemorrhoid with forceps, slides the ligator’s cylinder upward and releases the rubber band around the base of the hemorrhoid. The rubber band cuts off the hemorrhoid’s blood supply and causes it to wither away.

A 2000 study published in Digestive Surgery found that rubber band ligation is a useful, safe and successful method for treating symptomatic second- and third-grade hemorrhoids and can be applied successfully in fourth-grade cases but with an increased rate of recurrence and additional treatments required. (17)

3. Infrared Coagulation

Infrared coagulation is a procedure that’s used for internal hemorrhoids. The doctor uses a device that creates an intense beam of infrared light to cause scar tissue and cut off the blood supply to the hemorrhoid. When the hemorrhoid dies, a scar forms on the anal canal below the lower rectum, and the scar tissue holds nearby veins in place so they can’t bulge into the anal canal.

A 2003 study compared infrared coagulation and rubber band ligation in terms of effectiveness and discomfort. Researchers found that postoperative pain during the first week after treatment was more intense in the band ligation group; pain and a feeling of constantly having to pass stool was also more intense with band ligation. Patients in the infrared coagulation group returned to work earlier, but they also had a higher recurrence or failure rate. Researchers concluded that band ligation, although more effective in controlling symptoms and obliterating hemorrhoids, is associated with more pain and discomfort to the patient — something to keep in mind when you’re looking for ways on how to get rid of hemorrhoids. (18)

4. Hemorrhoid Surgery

Surgical intervention is now less frequently performed than in the past, but it can be considered for patients with acute complications of hemorrhoidal disease or for those who were unable to treat hemorrhoids with other measures. Surgery for hemorrhoids, known as a hemorrhoidectomy, involves removing the hemorrhoid or the clot with a small incision. Having a hemorrhoidectomy is generally an outpatient procedure and involves a two to three week recovery period.

Having hemorrhoid surgery can seem frightening, but it is a relatively minor procedure that doctors recommend when all other treatment methods have failed.

How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

1. Improve Your Diet

Eat High-Fiber Foods

To get rid of hemorrhoids, it’s important that you avoid constipation and hard stool, which can be done by eating plenty of high-fiber foods to make stools soft. For how to get rid of hemorrhoids, the recommendation is 30–35 grams of fiber daily. Eat foods such as avocados, berries, figs, Brussels sprouts, acorn squash, beans, lentils, nuts, flaxseeds, chia seeds and quinoa. In clinical studies, high-fiber diets reduced the risk of persisting symptoms and bleeding by approximately 50 percent. (2)

Drink Plenty of Water

Dehydration can lead to constipation because water or fluids are required for fiber to travel smoothly through the digestive tract. Many studies, including one published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, indicate that fluid loss and fluid restriction can increase constipation, which can worsen hemorrhoid symptoms. To relieve constipation and as a way for how to get rid of hemorrhoids, drink at least one glass of water with each meal and snack of the day. (3)

Eat Fermented Foods

Fermented foods like kefir, kimchi and raw, pastured yogurt can help provide the digestive system with healthy bacteria that are essential for proper elimination. Several studies have shown that fermented foods and probiotics improve intestinal tract health, synthesize and enhance the bioavailability of nutrients, modify gut pH and aid digestion. (4)

Limit Alcohol and Spicy Foods

Alcohol can be dehydrating and hard on the digestive system, making hemorrhoid symptoms worse. And spicy foods can intensify the symptoms of hemorrhoids. Some studies show that both alcohol and spicy foods consumption serve as risk factors for hemorrhoids, although the data isn’t consistent. To be safe, limit these foods until the hemorrhoids have cleared up. (5)

2. Practice Better “Toilet Habits”

Avoid Straining

Straining during a bowel movement can be painful and make hemorrhoid problems even worse. Don’t wait too long before going to the toilet. Pay attention to your body’s signals, and when you feel an urge to use the bathroom, go right away. Otherwise the stool will become harder, and this will automatically make you push harder. When you’re at the toilet, take your time and relax your body. (6)

Prevent Constipation

Constipation forces you to strain while using the bathroom, and that will increase the pain and inflammation of the hemorrhoid. To avoid constipation, drink plenty of fluids, engage in regular physical activity and eat high-fiber foods that make stools soft. These steps also help answer how to get rid of hemorrhoids or prevent them in the first place.

Avoid Prolonged Sitting on the Toilet

Spending too much time on the toilet can worsen hemorrhoids. Don’t read or distract yourself while using the bathroom; this only leads to more time spent straining. (Read: put the phone down.)

Clean Yourself Thoroughly

If stool is left behind after you wipe, it can aggravate hemorrhoids even more, which is why it’s important to cleanse yourself thoroughly after going to the bathroom. Do not, however, cleanse yourself too roughly or use soaps that contain harsh chemicals, alcohol or perfumes. Instead, use plain water to wipe yourself and then dry your bottom afterward. A sitz bath, which involves sitting in warm water for 10 minutes, twice daily, is helpful to patients with anal itching, aching or burning and is known as one of the best ways to get rid of hemorrhoids fast.

3. Take Helpful Supplements

Butcher’s Broom

Butcher’s broom can help reduce swelling and inflammation of hemorrhoids. A 2002 study conducted in Germany found that butcher’s broom was an effective means of treatment for patients suffering from chronic venous insufficiency, a condition where the flow of blood through the veins is inadequate, causing the blood to pool. (7)

Pycnogenol® 

A 2010 study published in Phytotherapy Research investigated the efficacy of orally and topically applied Pycnogenol® hemorrhoid cream for the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks in a controlled, randomized study with 84 subjects. Within less than 48 hours of an attack, patients were enrolled and their signs and symptoms were scored. The decrease in scores was significantly more pronounced in the Pycnogenol® group than in the control group given placebo. The study indicates that oral and topical Pycnogenol® helps to heal acute hemorrhoids. (8)

Horse Chestnut

Horse chestnut is commonly used as an herbal remedy for poor blood flow and swelling. According to research published in Alternative Medicine Review, horse chestnut has been shown to improve microcirculation, capillary flow and vascular tone, all of which are helpful for how to get rid of hemorrhoids. (9)

Witch Hazel 

Witch hazel is a plant that’s used for its skin-healing, astringent and antioxidant properties. Topical application of witch hazel can help soothe hemorrhoids by reducing inflammation and pain.

Psyllium Husk

Psyllium husk is a natural source of pure fiber that’s sold in powder form. Studies suggest that plant fibers like psyllium husk can reduce the frequency of bleeding when using the bathroom and help avoid constipation or straining. When using psyllium husk, make sure to drink plenty of water.

A 2011 animal study published in Digestive Diseases and Sciences found that psyllium husk has a gut-stimulatory and laxative effect on mice, and at higher doses it has antisecretory (reducing the normal rate of secretion of a body fluid) and antidiarrheal activity. (10)

4. Try Beneficial Essential Oils

Cypress Oil

Cypress essential oil stops excess blood flow and promotes the clotting of blood. This is due to its hemostatic and astringent properties. Cypress oil helps with the contraction of blood vessels, and it tightens tissues. It’s also known to reduce anxiety, which can help to relieve constipation for some people. Use cypress topically by adding 3 to 4 drops to a cotton ball and applying to the area of concern. (11)

Helichrysum

Helichrysum essential oil helps stimulate the secretion of gastric juices that are needed to break down food and prevent digestive issues. It also serves as an anti-inflammatory agent when applied topically. To use helichrysum, rub two to three drops into the abdomen or area of inflammation. (12)

Hemorrhoids by the Numbers

Hemorrhoids by the numbers - Dr. Axe
  • Around 20 million people in the United States suffer from hemorrhoids (12.8 percent of U.S. adults).
  • In 2004, the National Institutes of Health noted that the diagnosis of hemorrhoids was associated with 3.2 million ambulatory care visits, 306,000 hospitalizations and 2 million prescriptions in the United States.
  • The peak incidence of hemorrhoids is between the ages of 45–65. Development of hemorrhoids before the age of 20 is unusual.
  • The risk of developing hemorrhoids is higher in white adults than in black adults, higher in women than in men and higher for women who are pregnant.

Precautions on How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

A common concern is that hemorrhoids increase the risk of colorectal cancer, but that’s not true. However, the two conditions do cause similar symptoms. This is why it’s important to mention your hemorrhoids to your health care provider. Even when a hemorrhoid is healed completely, a colonoscopy may be done to rule out other causes of rectal bleeding. According to the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), every person age 50 and older should undergo a colonoscopy to screen for colorectal cancer. (19)

Final Thoughts on How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

  • Hemorrhoids are a very common anorectal condition that affects millions of people around the world.
  • Enlarged hemorrhoids are often associated with symptoms such as itching, mucus discharge or bleeding. Bleeding happens when hard stool damages the thin walls of the blood vessels in hemorrhoids.
  • Avoidance of constipation is key when trying to get rid of hemorrhoids. It’s important that you don’t strain while using the bathroom, don’t sit for an excessive period of time and clean yourself thoroughly when finished.
  • Foods and herbal supplements that help relieve constipation can alleviate the symptoms of hemorrhoids. A high-fiber diet and drinking plenty of fluids are the most helpful dietary changes that you can make when it comes to how to get rid of hemorrhoids.
  • If non-medical treatments don’t work, there are relatively painless procedures that can be done to treat hemorrhoids. For extreme cases, an outpatient surgery called a hemorrhoidectomy may be required.
Источник: https://draxe.com/health/how-to-get-rid-of-hemorrhoids/

Similar video

Home Treatment for Piles - StreamingWell.com

: Natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids

INB CERTIFIED
AMAZON CUSTOMER CARE NUMBER USA
COMENITY BANK CENTURY 21 CREDIT CARD
Natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids

Book an Appointment

Haemorrhoids are more popularly known as piles. Although piles are not dangerous or fatal they can still be very painful and disrupt your daily activities. Piles affect the lowest part of your abdomen – the rectum (internal piles) and the anus icici bank personal loan pay online piles).

When the blood vessels and veins in the rectum or anus swell up and trigger the formation of lumps, such a condition is known as piles. This inflammation occurs when your rectum and anus suffer from a constant strain, pressure and stretching. That is why sitting for too long, lifting heavy weights regularly, anal intercourse and chronic constipation or diarrhoea can irritate the muscles of your lower body to the extent of inflammation; ultimately leading to painful and itchy piles. Even pregnant women can be at risk of developing haemorrhoids, as when the uterus enlarges it compresses the muscles and veins of the rectum and anus.

Swelling and itching of the anus, bleeding, soreness and discomfort/pain during bowel movement – are the common symptoms of haemorrhoids. Thankfully, there are certain home remedies that can help you get rid of this painful and embarrassing condition or can at least reduce the intensity of the symptoms to a great extent.

Here are 6 natural treatments for haemorrhoids:

Laxatives

An improper diet can often lead to constipation or hardened faeces. Including natural laxatives in your daily diet can improve your fibre intake. Consuming psyllium husk, Triphala powder, etc. twice a day can help soften your stool and lead to a smoother bowel movement that doesn’t hurt your inflamed rectum or anus.

Castor Oil

It has been known for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory university of arkansas fort smith careers antibacterial qualities for centuries.  It can be used both externally and internally. As an external treatment, you can dip/ soak a cotton ball in some castor oil and apply it on the haemorrhoids. Doing so daily can bring down the swelling and itchiness within a week. As an internal treatment, castor oil can be used as a laxative. Consuming 3 ml of castor oil along with a glass of milk every night can help ease out constipation.

Epsom salt baths

Epsom salt or magnesium sulphate is known for its soothing properties. If you don’t have a bathtub at home you can always use a sitz tub that allows you to bathe your lower body while sitting on the commode. Just warm some water and mix some Epsom salt and soak your buttocks in it for 20 minutes. Remember to indulge in this relaxing bath after you have visited the corner room. This will help reduce the irritation and pain.

Aloe Vera

Applying aloe vera gel on haemorrhoids can help reduce the soreness and inflammation to a large extent. It’s a safe option to use on a routine basis.

Ice packs

Apply an ice pack to your inflamed piles if the swelling and pain gets too much. Make sure you don’t apply the ice directly on the skin. Always wrap the ice in a cloth or a plastic bag and then apply it for 15 minutes.

Avoid toilet paper

Toilet papers are rough and harsh. Using them will only worsen your symptoms. Use wet wipes instead to clean up but make sure the wipes are free from irritants like alcohol, perfume, etc.

 

On an average, these remedies should help you treat the symptoms of piles within 2 to 3 weeks. As these are natural treatments for haemorrhoids, they are safe and easily available. If you still experience severe pain, bleeding and discomfort despite these home-remedies, consult a doctor immediately. For a successful and a safe treatment, it is always advisable to consult a renowned gastroenterologist or a proctologist. To get in touch with the experts near you, visit Apollo Spectra



Consult Our Surgeons

Источник: https://www.apollospectra.com/blog/what-are-haemorrhoids-what-are-the-6-natural-treatments-for-haemorrhoids/

How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids (4+ Natural Remedies)

How to get rid of hemorrhoids - Dr. Axe

Hemorrhoids are a very common anorectal condition that affects millions of people around the world. Over half of all people will develop symptomatic hemorrhoids at some point, so it’s common to wonder how to get rid of hemorrhoids. Most patients are able to get rid of hemorrhoids with a high-fiber diet, herbal supplements and non-surgical medical treatments, such as my DIY Hemorrhoid Cream with Turmeric & Tea Tree Oil. (1)

Hemorrhoids are frequently seen in primary care clinics, emergency wards, gastroenterology units and surgical clinics, but how do you know when hemorrhoids have developed and when you should see a doctor? These are common concerns among people who develop hemorrhoids and don’t know how to deal with and treat the pain. Thankfully, there are natural treatments for how to get rid of hemorrhoids fast, and starting there may help relieve these literal pains in the butt.

What Are Hemorrhoids?

Now, you might be wondering why it’s so important to know how to get rid of hemorrhoids, especially if you’ve never experienced hemorrhoid symptoms before. Well, it’s because no one is immune to hemorrhoids.

I bet you didn’t know that we all have hemorrhoids, but it’s true. Hemorrhoids are normal cushions of tissue natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids are filled with blood vessels and found at the end of the rectum, just inside the anus. Together with a circular muscle called the anal sphincter, hemorrhoids help control bowel movement. When people say that they “have hemorrhoids,” what they really mean is that their hemorrhoids have become enlarged. Enlarged hemorrhoids are often associated with symptoms such as itching, mucus discharge or bleeding. Bleeding happens when hard stool damages the thin walls of the blood vessels in hemorrhoids.

The two basic types include internal and external hemorrhoids. Internal hemorrhoids are more common, and external hemorrhoids tend to feel like a large lump around the outside of the anus that can make sitting painful. Bleeding is fairly common with a swollen external hemorrhoid.

Swollen internal hemorrhoids might come out of the anus and can then be seen as soft lumps of tissue. These are called protruding or prolapsed hemorrhoids. Larger hemorrhoids can make it feel like something is pushing against the anus, which can make sitting very uncomfortable. (13)

Hemorrhoids are classified by grade, which is based on how severe they are:

  • Grade 1: Slightly enlarged hemorrhoids that cannot be seen from outside the anus.
  • Grade 2: Larger hemorrhoids that may come outside of the anus at times, like when passing stool, but then go back in on their own.
  • Grade 3: Hemorrhoids that come out of the anus when passing stool or engaging in physical activity and do not go back in on their own. They can only be pushed back inside the anus.
  • Grade 4: Hemorrhoids that are always outside the anus and can no longer be pushed back inside. A small bit of the anal lining may also come down from the lower rectum and out of the anus, which is known as rectal prolapse.
Hemorrhoid classifications - Dr. Axe

The most common symptom of hemorrhoids is anal bleeding, and chief complaints include a perianal mass protruding from the anus and anal discharge. Other symptoms of hemorrhoids include:

  • irritation and itching around the anus
  • fecal leakage
  • sensitive lumps in the anus
  • painful bowel movements
  • protrusion of skin during bowel movements
  • blood on toilet paper after having a bowel movement

A particularly painful form of Grade 4 hemorrhoids comes in the form of a thrombosed hemorrhoid. This refers to a (usually) external hemorrhoid that have no blood flow because the vein connected to them has a thrombosis (blood clot). The suntrust locations and hours of operation responsible for a thrombosed hemorrhoid will often reabsorb within two to three weeks without major treatment. Pain originating from the swelling and inflammation of the hemorrhoid is usually worst in the first 24–48 hours after it develops.

People with hemorrhoids are at an increased risk of portal hypertension. (14) According to WebMD, “Portal hypertension is an increase in the blood pressure within a system of veins called the when did judy holliday die venous system. Veins coming from the stomach, intestine, spleen, and pancreas merge into the portal vein, which then branches into smaller vessels and travels through the liver.”

Many people find themselves wondering, “Do hemorrhoids go away?” Most swollen hemorrhoids do go away, given that you follow a wise regimen of diet and bathroom habits, as well as any other additional treatment methods recommended by your physician.

How long do harvest org last? Hemorrhoid symptoms clear up within a few days for most people, but they may reoccur and/or require medical attention in some cases. If symptoms continue for more than a week or two and haven’t been improved by home treatment, it’s probably time to visit the doctor. For those who already have frequent hemorrhoids, dietary intervention may be one of the best ways to get rid of external and internal hemorrhoids once and for all.

Although people assume that any anal pain while using the toilet is hemorrhoids, there are a number of other anorectal disorders that first mortgage payment calculator cause symptoms, including dermatologic diseases, diverticulitis, abscess and fistula, fissure, sexually transmitted diseases, warts, HIV, infections and inflammatory ulcers. These conditions will be ruled out by your doctor when you go for a rectal exam if they aren’t the cause.

Diverticulitis vs. Hemorrhoids

People are sometimes confused by the difference between diverticulitis and internal hemorrhoids. Diverticulitis is a condition in which sacs or pouches within the colon walls become inflamed and press into the colon. While some of the symptoms and root problems are similar to what causes hemorrhoids, diverticulitis tends to be a bit capital one car loan status serious and is related closely to age and poor dietary fiber intake.

Causes of Hemorrhoids

Researchers propose that degradation (or disintegration) of the supporting tissues of the anal cushions causes hemorrhoids to develop. There are some contributing factors for hemorrhoids, including:

  • being overweight
  • regularly lifting heavy objects
  • aging
  • pregnancy and giving birth
  • heredity
  • constipation or chronic diarrhea
  • faulty bowel function due to overuse of laxatives or enemas
  • spending excessive periods of time on the toilet

An increase in intra-abdominal pressure during pregnancy or when constipated and sitting on the toilet for a prolonged period of time while straining are major contributing factors for the development of hemorrhoids. Weakening of supporting tissue as a result of aging and genetics may also serve as another cause.

Many dietary factors, including a low-fiber diet, spicy foods and alcohol intake, have been implicated as possible causes of hemorrhoids symptoms as well, but the research proving this is inconsistent. It has also been published that Caucasians of higher socioeconomic class were afflicted with a greater frequency of hemorrhoids, but this data may be limited because it’s based capital one secured credit card online payment people’s health care-seeking practices. (15)

Conventional Treatment for Hemorrhoids

When you go to see a doctor for enlarged hemorrhoids, he or she will look at your anus to see if it’s inflamed and whether the hemorrhoids come out of the anus when you push or if they’re already outside. Depending on the severity of your symptoms, there are a number of examinations your doctor may choose to perform in order to make a diagnosis. Doctors typically do a digital rectal examination first, which involves gently inserting a finger into the anus with gloves and lubricant. The doctor will feel the inside of the anal canal using circular movements, which allows him to examine the sphincter muscles and the texture of the membranes lining the anus.

If your doctor believes that you do have enlarged hemorrhoids, she will most likely perform a proctoscopy next. This involves inserting a short tube with a light and lens on it (the proctoscope) that exams the membranes lining the rectum. The doctor is looking to see if natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids are enlarged hemorrhoids and how big they are. People tend to fear the pain and discomfort that come with these procedures, but they usually don’t hurt and do help your doctor bank of america update address suggestions about how to get rid of hemorrhoids.

Most of the patients suffering from hemorrhoids have their symptoms alleviated through diet therapy, fiber supplements, hemorrhoid cream and medical treatments, such as sclerotherapy, rubber band ligation and infrared coagulation.

1. Sclerotherapy

Sclerotherapy is a procedure that involves injecting a chemical (the sclerosant) into a vein to destroy it. The sclerosant is used to damage the innermost lining of the vessel, which results in a clot that blocks the blood circulation in the vein. Over time, the vessel turns into scar tissue and fades away.

In 2010, a group of 338 Japanese medical institutions reported good results for sclerotherapy using aluminum potassium sulfate and tannic acid (ALTA). Upon injecting ALTA into grade 2, 3 and 4 hemorrhoids, of 3,519 patients, 98 percent reported positive effects within 28 days. The recurrence rate after two years was 18 percent, and complications included pyrexia, low blood pressure, perineal pain and rectal ulcers, but those were mild. (16)

2. Rubber Band Ligation

This procedure is used to remove a hemorrhoid with a rubber band. Your doctor inserts a small tool called a ligator through a lighter tube into the anal canal. Then the doctor grasps the hemorrhoid with forceps, slides the ligator’s cylinder upward and releases the rubber band around the base of the hemorrhoid. The rubber band cuts off the hemorrhoid’s blood supply and causes it to wither away.

A 2000 study published in Digestive Surgery found that rubber band ligation is a useful, safe and successful method for treating symptomatic second- and third-grade hemorrhoids and can be applied successfully in fourth-grade cases but with an increased rate of recurrence and additional treatments required. (17)

3. Infrared Coagulation

Infrared coagulation is a procedure that’s used for internal hemorrhoids. The doctor uses a device that creates an intense beam of infrared light to cause scar tissue and cut off the blood supply to the hemorrhoid. When the hemorrhoid dies, a scar forms on the anal canal below the lower rectum, and the scar tissue holds nearby veins in place so they can’t bulge into the anal canal.

A 2003 study compared infrared coagulation and rubber band ligation in terms of effectiveness and discomfort. Researchers found that postoperative pain during the first week after treatment was more intense in the band ligation group; pain and a feeling of constantly having to pass stool was also more intense with band ligation. Patients in the infrared coagulation group returned to work earlier, but they also had a higher recurrence or failure rate. Researchers concluded that band ligation, although more effective in controlling symptoms and obliterating hemorrhoids, is associated with more natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids and discomfort to the patient — something to keep in mind when you’re looking for ways on how to get rid of hemorrhoids. (18)

4. Hemorrhoid Surgery

Surgical intervention is now less frequently performed than in the past, but it can be considered for patients with acute complications of hemorrhoidal disease or for those who were unable to treat hemorrhoids with other measures. Surgery for hemorrhoids, known as a hemorrhoidectomy, involves removing the hemorrhoid or the clot with a small incision. Having a hemorrhoidectomy is generally an outpatient procedure and involves a two to three week recovery period.

Having hemorrhoid surgery can seem frightening, but it is a relatively minor procedure that doctors recommend when all other treatment methods have failed.

How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

1. Improve Your Diet

Eat High-Fiber Foods

To get rid of hemorrhoids, it’s important that you avoid constipation and hard stool, which can be done by eating plenty of high-fiber foods to make stools soft. For how to get rid of hemorrhoids, the recommendation is 30–35 grams of fiber daily. Eat foods such as avocados, berries, figs, Brussels sprouts, acorn squash, beans, lentils, nuts, flaxseeds, chia seeds and quinoa. In clinical studies, high-fiber diets reduced the risk of persisting symptoms and bleeding by approximately 50 percent. (2)

Drink Plenty of Water

Dehydration can lead to constipation because water or fluids are required for fiber to travel smoothly through the digestive tract. Many studies, including one published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, indicate that fluid loss and fluid restriction can increase constipation, which can worsen hemorrhoid symptoms. To relieve constipation and as a way for how to get rid of hemorrhoids, drink at least one glass of water with each meal and snack of the day. (3)

Eat Fermented Foods

Fermented foods like kefir, kimchi and raw, pastured yogurt can help provide the digestive system with healthy bacteria that are essential for proper elimination. Several studies have shown that fermented foods and probiotics improve intestinal tract health, synthesize and enhance the bioavailability of nutrients, modify gut pH and aid digestion. (4)

Limit Alcohol and Spicy Foods

Alcohol can be dehydrating and hard on the digestive system, making hemorrhoid symptoms worse. And spicy foods can intensify the symptoms of hemorrhoids. Some studies show that both alcohol and spicy foods consumption serve as risk factors for hemorrhoids, although the data isn’t consistent. To be safe, limit these foods until the hemorrhoids have cleared up. (5)

2. Practice Better “Toilet Habits”

Avoid Straining

Straining during a bowel movement can be painful and make hemorrhoid problems even worse. Don’t wait too long before going to the toilet. Pay attention to your body’s signals, and when you first african slaves arrived in virginia an urge to use the bathroom, go right away. Otherwise the stool will become harder, and this will automatically make you push harder. When you’re at the toilet, take your time and relax your body. (6)

Prevent Constipation

Constipation forces you to strain while using the bathroom, and that will increase the pain and inflammation of the hemorrhoid. To avoid constipation, drink plenty of fluids, engage in regular physical activity and eat high-fiber foods that make stools soft. These steps also help answer how to get rid of hemorrhoids or prevent them in the first place.

Avoid Prolonged Sitting on the Toilet

Spending too much time on the toilet can worsen hemorrhoids. Don’t read or distract yourself while using the bathroom; this only leads to more time spent straining. (Read: put the phone down.)

Clean Yourself Thoroughly

If stool is left behind after you wipe, it can aggravate hemorrhoids even more, which is why it’s important to cleanse yourself thoroughly after going to the bathroom. Do not, however, cleanse yourself too roughly or use soaps that contain harsh chemicals, alcohol or perfumes. Instead, use plain water to wipe yourself and then dry your bottom afterward. A sitz bath, which involves sitting in warm water for 10 minutes, twice daily, is helpful to patients with anal itching, aching or burning and is known as one of the best ways to get rid of hemorrhoids fast.

3. Take Helpful Supplements

Butcher’s Broom

Butcher’s broom can help reduce swelling and inflammation of hemorrhoids. A 2002 study conducted in Germany found that butcher’s broom was an effective means of treatment for patients suffering from chronic venous insufficiency, a condition where the flow of blood through the veins is inadequate, causing the blood to pool. (7)

Pycnogenol® 

A 2010 study published in Phytotherapy Research investigated the efficacy of orally and topically applied Pycnogenol® hemorrhoid cream for the management of acute hemorrhoidal attacks in a controlled, randomized study with 84 subjects. Within less than 48 hours of an attack, patients were enrolled and their signs and symptoms were scored. The decrease in scores was significantly more pronounced in the Pycnogenol® group than in the control group given placebo. The study indicates that oral and microsoft 360 teams login Pycnogenol® helps to heal acute hemorrhoids. (8)

Horse Chestnut

Horse chestnut is commonly used as an herbal remedy for poor blood flow and swelling. According to research published in Alternative Medicine Review, horse chestnut has been shown to improve microcirculation, capillary flow and vascular tone, all of which are helpful for how to get rid of hemorrhoids. (9)

Witch Hazel 

Witch hazel is a plant that’s used for its skin-healing, astringent and antioxidant properties. Topical application of witch hazel can help soothe hemorrhoids by reducing inflammation and pain.

Psyllium Husk

Psyllium husk is a natural source of pure fiber that’s sold in powder form. Studies suggest that plant fibers like psyllium husk can reduce the frequency of bleeding when using the bathroom and help avoid constipation or straining. When using psyllium husk, make sure to drink plenty of water.

A 2011 animal study published in Digestive Diseases and Sciences found that psyllium husk has a gut-stimulatory and laxative effect on mice, and at higher doses it has antisecretory (reducing the normal rate of secretion of a body fluid) and antidiarrheal activity. (10)

4. Try Beneficial Essential Oils

Cypress Oil

Cypress essential oil stops excess blood flow and promotes the clotting of blood. This is due to its hemostatic and astringent properties. Cypress natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids helps with the contraction of blood vessels, and it tightens tissues. It’s also known to reduce anxiety, which can help to relieve constipation for some people. Use cypress topically by adding 3 to 4 drops to a cotton ball and applying to the area of concern. (11)

Helichrysum

Helichrysum essential oil helps stimulate the secretion of gastric juices that are needed to break down food and prevent digestive issues. It also serves as an anti-inflammatory agent when applied topically. To use helichrysum, rub two to three drops into the abdomen or area of inflammation. (12)

Hemorrhoids by the Numbers

Hemorrhoids by the numbers - Dr. Axe
  • Around 20 million people in the United States suffer from hemorrhoids (12.8 percent of U.S. adults).
  • In 2004, the National Institutes of Health noted that the diagnosis of hemorrhoids was associated with 3.2 million ambulatory care visits, 306,000 hospitalizations and 2 million prescriptions in the United States.
  • The peak incidence of hemorrhoids is between the ages of 45–65. Development of hemorrhoids before the age of 20 is unusual.
  • The risk of developing hemorrhoids is higher in white adults than in black adults, higher in women than in duck nc boat rentals and higher for women who are pregnant.

Precautions on How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

A common concern is that hemorrhoids increase the risk of colorectal cancer, but that’s not true. However, the two conditions do cause similar symptoms. This is why it’s important to mention your hemorrhoids to your health care provider. Even when a hemorrhoid is healed completely, a colonoscopy may be done to rule out other causes of rectal bleeding. According to the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons (ASCRS), every person age 50 and older should undergo a colonoscopy to screen for colorectal cancer. (19)

Final Thoughts on How to Get Rid of Hemorrhoids

  • Hemorrhoids are a very common anorectal condition that affects millions of people around the world.
  • Enlarged hemorrhoids are often associated with symptoms such as itching, mucus discharge or bleeding. Bleeding happens when hard stool damages the thin walls of the blood vessels in hemorrhoids.
  • Avoidance of constipation is key when trying to get rid of hemorrhoids. It’s important that you don’t strain while using the bathroom, don’t sit for an excessive period of time and clean yourself thoroughly when finished.
  • Foods and herbal supplements that help relieve constipation can alleviate the symptoms of hemorrhoids. A high-fiber diet and drinking plenty of fluids are the most helpful dietary changes that you can make when it comes to how to get rid of hemorrhoids.
  • If non-medical treatments don’t work, there are relatively painless procedures that can be done to treat hemorrhoids. For extreme cases, an outpatient surgery called a hemorrhoidectomy may be required.
Источник: https://draxe.com/health/how-to-get-rid-of-hemorrhoids/

Hemorrhoids After Giving Birth

Hemorrhoids are veins that have become swollen and engorged with blood (varicose veins). Many women experience them for the first time during pregnancy or the postpartum period for several reasons, including a rush of hormones, internal pressure, and constipation.

They can range from irritating to quite painful, but the good news is that for the most part, hemorrhoids aren't serious. Most tend to go away with attentive home treatment.

Hemorrhoid Types and Symptoms

These swollen tissues appear in the rectal area and can vary from the size of a pea to that of a grape. There are internal hemorrhoids (affected veins are inside the sphincter), as well as external hemorrhoids (affected veins protrude outside the anal opening).

Hemorrhoids may simply feel itchy, but they also can be painful. In some cases, particularly following a bowel movement, they can cause rectal bleeding. If you had hemorrhoids before you were pregnant, there's a good chance they'll come back post-delivery.

What Causes Hemorrhoids

During pregnancy and the postpartum period, hemorrhoids are often a result of stress on the perineum in the months before, and during, delivery. Veins work like valves to push blood back up to the heart, and when those "valves" become weakened, they can swell with blood.

You can probably imagine how the stress of carrying a baby and then pushing a baby out during vaginal delivery, can cause the veins to pop out. Additionally, all of the hormones going through your body during pregnancy and birth affect how these veins work. Pregnant mothers have increased production of the hormone progesterone, which also causes veins to relax.

Constipation is also common during the postpartum period. This can start a vicious cycle of needing to exert pressure to have a bowel movement, experiencing a resulting flare-up of the hemorrhoids, fearing having to go again, and retaining stool, which then hardens, starting the process all over again.

Home Treatments for Hemorrhoids

There are several things you can do to treat your hemorrhoids at home:

  • Apply ice. Wrap ice or a cold pack in a cloth and apply for about 10 minutes. If you had a hospital or birth center delivery, you may have been given postnatal ice packs to bring home.
  • Ask your doctor about over-the-counter treatments. Topical ointments and suppositories may provide relief. Discuss how long it's acceptable to use a product (most should not be used for more than one week). Only use a product approved by your healthcare provider. This is exceptionally important if you've had an episiotomy or tear.
  • Clean the area gently, but thoroughly. Use a peri-bottle (squirt bottle) filled with warm water. Rather natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids using dry toilet paper, pat the area with a wet wipe. Hemorrhoid pads that contain witch hazel are often recommended, as well.
  • Lie down as much as you can. Take the pressure off your backside.
  • Take Tylenol (acetaminophen) or Motrin (ibuprofen). Both are safe painkillers for breastfeeding mothers in the recommended dosages.
  • Try a sitz bath. If you don't already have one, you can purchase one at the drugstore. Sitz baths can be done several times a day. Alternatively, you could simply soak in the bathtub.
    (Alternate between the cold ice natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids and the warm sitz baths.)
  • Use unscented and dye-free hygiene products. This includes toilet paper, menstrual pads, etc.
  • Add fiber to your diet. Eat lots of fruits, vegetables, and other foods with fiber. Fiber helps to increase bowel movements.

If you want to speed things along, there are a few other things you can do in addition to your home treatments:

  • Avoid and/or treat constipation.
  • Do Kegel exercises to strengthen your perineum area.
  • Use the bathroom when you have the urge to go. Don't "hold it" for fear of causing more pain. The longer you wait, the harder your stool may get, and the more going might aggravate your hemorrhoids. Avoid straining when you are passing a bowel movement.

When to Call Your Doctor

If you are being diligent in your home treatment, you should notice a gradual improvement in north carolina vacation rental laws hemorrhoids within the weeks following the birth. However, if your hemorrhoids are aggressively persistent or if you experience rectal bleeding, you definitely want to talk to your doctor or midwife. In extreme and rare cases, you may need to consult a specialist, and surgery may be required.

As a new mom, hemorrhoids are the last thing you want to be dealing with. But with a little bit of self-care, you should be feeling—and sitting—better in no time.

Thanks for your feedback!

Verywell Family uses only high-quality sources, including peer-reviewed studies, to support the facts within our articles. Read our editorial process to learn more about how we fact-check and keep our content accurate, reliable, and trustworthy.

  1. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. What can I do for hemorrhoids during pregnancy?. Updated October 2020.

  2. Hollingshead JR, Phillips RK. Haemorrhoids: modern diagnosis and treatment.Postgrad Med J. 2016;92(1083):4-8. doi:10.1136/postgradmedj-2015-133328

  3. Kestřánek J. Hemorrhoid management in women: the role of tribenoside + lidocaine. Drugs Context. 2019;8:212602. doi:10.7573/dic.212602

  4. Kumar P, Magon N. Hormones in pregnancy. Niger Med J. 2012;53(4):179-183. doi:10.4103/0300-1652.107549

  5. Shirah BH, Shirah HA, Fallata AH, Alobidy SN, Hawsawi MMA. Hemorrhoids during pregnancy: sitz bath vs. ano-rectal cream: A comparative prospective study of two conservative treatment protocols. Women Birth. 2018;31(4):e272-e277. doi:10.1016/j.wombi.2017.10.003

  6. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Eating, diet, and nutrition for hemorrhoids. Updated October 2016.

  7. Sandler RS, Peery AF. Rethinking what we know about hemorrhoids. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2019;17(1):8-15. doi:10.1016/j.cgh.2018.03.020

Источник: https://www.verywellfamily.com/hemorrhoids-after-birth-284551

Problems with hemorrhoids, also known as piles, are close to the top of the list of annoyances many of us would prefer not to talk about. However, they’re also one of the most common health conditions. Nearly three out of four adults experience hemorrhoids from time to time.

What many people don’t know is that hemorrhoids are actually something you’re born with, but we typically only notice them when they start acting up, says Alex Ky, M.D., a proctologist and professor of surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York. “Hemorrhoids are a mixture of arteries and veins that help cushion your anal canal during bowel movements,” she explains.

Hemorrhoids can often bulge or swell due to pressure from straining, extended sitting time on the toilet, chronic diarrhea or constipation, or heavy lifting. Your risk of having them goes up if you’re pregnant thanks to the extra weight of your baby and as you age since the tissues that support the veins around your anus can become weaker over time.

“Doctors refer to symptomatic hemorrhoids as either external or internal,” says Mitchell A. Bernstein, M.D., a colon and rectal surgeon and professor of surgery at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Just as the name implies, internal hemorrhoids are inside your anus and painless but can cause bleeding during bowel movements. External hemorrhoids, on the other hand, occur when hemorrhoids are pushed just outside of the anal opening. When this happens, they can swell up, bleed, and feel seriously painful, irritated, and itchy. If blood pools and forms a clot down there, you can experience even more severe pain—and it may feel like a hard marble or solid grape, notes Dr. Bernstein.

When this particular pain pops up, one question is top of mind: How do you get rid of hemorrhoids? Here’s your guide to expert-approved hemorrhoid treatments from home remedies to in-office procedures, plus how to know when it’s time to see a doctor.

1. Try topical treatments.

Rapid Relief Hemorrhoidal Cream

Preparation Hamazon.com

SHOP NOW

For quick relief from painful and itchy external hemorrhoids, head to your pharmacy for an over-the-counter hemorrhoid cream or suppository that contains witch hazel (like Tucks pads) or hydrocortisone and lidocaine (such as Preparation H). Topical creams often have painkillers, numbing agents, and steroids which can dial down pain and swelling, says Harry J. Thomas, M.D., a board-certified gastroenterologist at Austin Gastroenterology in central Texas. Be sure to follow the label instructions carefully and don’t take topicals for more than a week, as steroids can thin your skin over time.

2. Take over-the-counter pain relievers.

While you’re at it, consider stocking up on OTC pain relievers like acetaminophen (Tylenol) or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs like aspirin and ibuprofen) and take them according to the label instructions, says Dr. Thomas. Like topicals, these meds can provide temporary relief from pain and swelling.

3. Gradually increase your fiber intake.

Most of us don’t get in enough fiber everyday, but adding more high-fiber foods like beans, broccoli, whole grains, and fresh fruit to your diet can help you avoid constipation and stay regular. This in turn reduces the chances that you’ll find yourself straining and further irritating your hemorrhoids, says Dr. Thomas. Aim for 20 to 30 grams of fiber a day, and consider taking a fiber supplement that contains psyllium (Metamucil) or methylcellulose (Citrucel) to help you hit your daily goal. If you’re typically low on fiber-rich foods, though, take your time—suddenly upping your intake may make you gassy.

4. Load up on water.

When your hemorrhoids are flaring up, another simple but essential fix is to make sure you’re drinking enough water. Getting in plenty of fluids (think: about 1.5 to 2 liters or about 6 to 8 cups a day) can help produce regular, soft stools and reduce straining, says Dr. Thomas. To ensure you’re staying hydrated throughout the day, keep a full bottle of water by your side, add a cup of tea to your self-care routine, or freshen up your hydration game with infused water.

5. Ice it.

For short-term relief from particularly painful, swollen hemorrhoids, icing can be a highly effective solution. Apply an ice pack or cold compress to your anus for about 10 minutes up to three times a day, suggests Dr. Thomas. Of course, always remember to wrap ice inside a paper towel or cloth first. No matter how bad the pain is, you want to protect your skin.

6. Soak it off in a sitz bath.

A sitz bath comes from the Natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids word “sitzen,” meaning “sit,” and it refers to a 10 to 15 minute soak in warm water that comes just up to your bottom and hips. “Sitz baths can relieve irritation and itching as well as spasm of your anal sphincter muscles,” says Dr. Thomas. Take a shallow soak in your bathtub or buy a small plastic tub from your pharmacy to give yourself a portable sitz bath two to three times a day.

7. Move a little more.

While some exercises like weightlifting, squats, and lunges can cause or worsen painful hemorrhoids due to straining, others may help relieve your symptoms and reduce your chances of having future flare-ups. Physical exercise can help with regular bowel movements natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids keep pressure off of your hemorrhoids, says Dr. Thomas.

Although you might not feel up to your usual workout, try taking a brisk walk or incorporating gentle movement into your day with stretching or yoga. Make it a point to break up long periods of sitting or standing, too, as both can increase pressure on your veins and irritate hemorrhoids.

8. Consider having a clot removed.

External hemorrhoids can result in extremely painful blood clots, and while they’re not dangerous, they can take a couple of weeks to resolve on their own. If yours scores high on your personal pain scale, a doctor can remove a thrombosed hemorrhoid with a relatively simple in-office procedure under local anesthetic in about 10 minutes. Keep in mind: The first 24 to 48 hours are typically the most painful—and the best time to have a clot removed, says Dr. Ky.

9. How to load cash app card in store it off.

For bleeding or recurrent hemorrhoids, another minimally-invasive treatment—and one of Dr. Ky’s favorites—is known as rubber band ligation. For this procedure, there’s typically no need for anesthesia. Your doctor simply wraps a tiny rubber band around the base of the beach house rentals on outer banks nc, and with its circulation cut off, the hemorrhoid shrivels up, shrinks, and falls off, often within a week. Complications are rare, but you might feel a little pain or tightness down there. Needless to say, it’s best to leave the banding to your doctor. Never try something like this at home.

10. For seriously bad hemorrhoids, talk to your doctor about surgical options.

If you’ve tried home remedies and in-office procedures but your hemorrhoids are still making you miserable, it might be time to ask your doctor about surgery. Recovery from the surgical removal of hemorrhoids (a.k.a. hemorrhoidectomy) can be extremely painful, notes Dr. Bernstein, but it’s one of the most effective ways to get rid of hemorrhoids for good.

Another surgical option is having your hemorrhoids stapled into place. This is a less painful procedure compared to a hemorrhoidectomy, but it does come with a greater risk of relapse and is not recommended if you have anal sex, as staples can cause injury, notes Dr. Ky.

When to see a doctor for hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids can be a massive pain, but thankfully, symptoms typically go away within a week. If you still have symptoms of hemorrhoids after a week of self-care measures or you’re experiencing severe pain or bleeding, seek medical attention immediately, says Dr. Thomas.

It’s important to note that sometimes what might seem like symptoms of hemorrhoids could indicate something more serious. Less commonly, rectal bleeding can also be a sign of diseases such as colorectal cancer or anal cancer. Make sure to get checked out if you notice large amounts of bleeding or other changes in your bowel habits like a different stool color or consistency.


Support from readers like you helps us do our best work. Go here to subscribe to Prevention and get 12 FREE homes for sale austin tx 78741. And sign up for our FREE newsletter here for daily health, nutrition, and fitness advice.

Lauren KrouseLauren Krouse is a freelance writer who covers health, domestic violence, and self-advocacy.

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Источник: https://www.prevention.com/health/a34339058/how-to-get-rid-of-hemorrhoids/
13 Best Home Remedies for Piles

When you bring up the subject of piles, people often feel embarrassed to talk about it. But if you just ignore the problem, it will blow up and become worse and the pain may become unbearable. The good news is that you can treat it naturally at home – if it’s in its initial stages. This is why early treatment and intervention is the key to reversing it. Let’s talk about the natural remedies for piles.

How to Treat Piles Naturally at Home?

Here’s a list of home remedies for haemorrhoids you can try out before paying a visit to your doctor.

1. Sitz Bath

The Sitz bath is another term for a lukewarm bath. This works because the water gently relaxes the muscles in your anal canal, providing you with the relief you need.

Sitz Bath

What You Will Need:

What to Do:

  • Fill up the bathtub with lukewarm water.
  • Soak your anal canal and genitals by sitting in the water for about 15 minutes.
  • Pat dry the area carefully natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids you’re done and remember to do this thrice a day for best results.

2. Witch Hazel

Witch hazel is a powerful remedy for soothing inflammation in the muscles and has astringent properties. It can be used for piles treatment at home.

Witch Hazel

What You Will Need:

  • Witch hazel
  • A few cotton balls

What to Do:

  • Soak the cotton balls in the witch hazel solution.
  • Apply them gently to the affected anal areas for a few minutes.
  • Repeat this up to four times a day for best results.

3. Tea Tree Oil

Tea tree oil is known to cleanse germs and bacteria from your anal area. It also soothes inflammation and is great for your skin.

Tea Tree Oil

What You Will Need:

  • Two to three drops of tea tree oil
  • A teaspoon of olive oil
  • Cotton balls

What to Do:

  • Combine the tea tree oil with the olive oil to make a natural blend.
  • Soak cotton balls in this and apply this to the affected area.
  • Wipe and repeat this up to three times a day.

4. Aloe Vera Gel

Aloe vera for piles is known to possess anti-inflammatory and soothing properties, thus relieving inflammation and pain stemming from haemorrhoids.

Aloe Vera Gel

What You Will Need:

What to Do:

  • If you’ve got a case of external haemorrhoids, just extract the gel from the leaf and apply it to the affected areas, letting it sit for about 15 minutes.
  • If your haemorrhoids are internal, remove the thorns of the leaves and cut them up into strips. Refrigerate them in the freezer compartment and insert these into your anus to relieve inflammation.
  • Do this treatment at least three times per day.

5. Coconut Oil

Coconut oil has analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties which help relieve pain. They fight against bacteria to help speed up the healing process.

Coconut Oil

What You Will Need:

What to Do:

  • Simply apply coconut oil directly to the affected areas using your fingers.
  • Make sure they are clean before applying.
  • Do this remedy three times a day until the lumps go away.

6. Organic Radish Juice

Organic radish juice is one of the best ways to get rid of piles naturally. The fresh juice cleanses your system, relieves pain and constipation, and boosts digestion too.

Organic Radish Juice

What You Will Need:

What to Do:

  • Grate the radishes and run pink vs credit card through a blender or juicer.
  • Start by drinking a quarter cup of this juice every day and work your way up to half a cup.
  • Drink twice a day until you notice the pain going away.

7. Garlic

Garlic works wonders for piles as it can not only heal it but also prevent it. It lessens the pain in the anal area and soothes inflammation.

Garlic

What You Will Need:

  • Fresh cloves of raw garlic
  • One cup of water
  • Gauze

What to do

  • Boil the garlic cloves and strain the water. Refrigerate, soak cotton balls in this, and apply to external haemorrhoids.
  • For internal haemorrhoids, unpeel the clove and place it in the rectum. Squeeze to get the juices flowing and let it stay inside overnight.
  • Do this garlic remedy three times a day for best results.

8. Eat High-Fibre Foods

Wondering how to avoid piles? Low fibre intake is one of the biggest reasons for constipation and pain. The extra roughage will help soothe inflammation and get your bowels moving smoother.

High Fibre Foods

What You Will Need:

  • About 30 grams or more of fibre intake every day
  • Fresh fruits and vegetables

What to Do:

  • Go to your farmer’s market and buy organic fresh produce.
  • You ideally want fresh fruits and vegetables for your diet.
  • You can also add nuts and seeds but skip the dairy and meats since these make piles worse.
  • Make salads, soups, or delicious recipes of these fibre-rich foods and eat two to three servings a day and repeat every day for good results.

9. Black Tea

The tannic acid content in black tea is known to soothe haemorrhoids by getting rid of the inflammation and swelling. It also improves blood clotting and prevents excessive bleeding.

Black Tea

What You Will Need:

What to Do:

  • Bring the water to a boil and soak the tea bags for a few minutes.
  • Remove and let the black tea cool down.
  • Apply this lukewarm remedy to your anal regions for 10 minutes and repeat thrice a day to relieve the pain.

10. Black Cumin Seed Oil

Black seed oil contains a compound known as thymoquinone which possesses antioxidant, analgesic and anti-inflammatory properties. That helps with piles.

Black Cumin Seed Oil

What You Will Need:

  • Half a teaspoon of black seed oil
  • A teaspoon of vinegar

What to Do:

  • Blend the black seed oil with the vinegar and use it on the affected areas.
  • You can also drink this remedy by adding to black tea for pain relief.
  • Repeat the remedy thrice a day and drink the tea concoction at least twice a day for best results.

11. Green Tea

Green tea is loaded with beneficial antioxidants that speed up the healing process.

Green Tea

What You Will Need:

  • Green tea bags
  • A cup of hot water
  • Half a teaspoon of lime juice
  • Half a teaspoon of honey

What to Do:

  • Dip the green tea bags in hot water and let them sit for a few minutes.
  • Add the honey and lime juice to it.
  • Drink it at least three times a day.
  • You can also skip adding the honey and lime juice. Alternatively, you can apply green tea water on the affected areas a few times a day for relief.

12. Milk and Lemons

Milk gives your body a host of beneficial vitamins and minerals that speed up the healing process. Lemons have Vitamin C which boost nutrient absorption, prevent constipation, and lessen the swelling.

Milk and Lemons

What You Will Need:

  • A glass of milk (hot)
  • Half a lemon

What to Do:

  • Extract the juice from the lemon by natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids and add it to a glass of hot milk.
  • Drink up instantly since you don’t want it to curdle.
  • Drink every few hours to prevent excessive bleeding and treat your piles naturally.

13. Dried Figs

Dried figs are natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids to help ally financial telephone number the pain and swelling that comes with piles. This remedy is also excellent for cases of constipation since figs produce a laxative effect on your digestive system.

Dried Figs

What You Will Need:

  • Three to four freshly dried figs
  • Some water

What to Do:

  • Rinse the figs in water to remove dust and grime. Soak them overnight and eat two to three every day early in the morning (preferably, on an empty stomach).
  • You can run the figs through a blender and add it to your fruit and veggie smoothies too.
  • Drink every day and see your piles go away.

What Foods to Eat wwe ladder money in the bank Avoid for Haemorrhoids?

Your first mission is to make sure you get 25 to 35 walmart pharmacy rogers ave fort smith ar of fibre every day through your diet. For what and what not to eat to worsen your condition, we’ve got you covered below:

1. Start with Beans and Whole Grains

Beans and whole grains are healthy and natural sources of dietary fibre. The fibre stimulates regular bowel movements which brings relief from swelling and constipation. Eat foods like barley, bran flakes, black beans, adzuki beans, and lima beans.

2. Eat Fruits and Vegetables

For fruits, we recommend loading up on antioxidant-rich fruits like blueberries, strawberries, Indian gooseberry, bananas, and pears. Vegetables like artichokes, green peas, broccoli, tyra b Brussels sprouts are also good for treating piles naturally.

3. Drink More Water

At least eight to ten glasses a day, every day. It’s free, gets your bowels moving, and is a fantastic way to relieve constipation.

4. Don’t Take Too Many Laxative Supplements

If your doctor advises it, then fine. Don’t take too many of these if you don’t want to tax your digestive system and force your rectum muscles to work harder. Osmotic laxative supplements are the best in this regard since they don’t cause constipation.

How to Prevent Piles?

It doesn’t take a lot to prevent piles but it starts with developing healthy habits. Here’s your checklist to preventing piles:

1. Don’t Hold It In

If you’ve got the urge, visit the washroom. Don’t hold it in since it can worsen your piles by putting pressure on the veins in your rectum.

2. Don’t Strain

When you go to the bathroom, don’t force your bowel movements or try to push it out on your own. This could lead to excessive bleeding following more inflammation. Let your bowels move naturally and take your time.

3. Exercise

Exercising moves your lymphatic system and keeps your colon working. This relieves pressure and lowers the burden on your rectum. Avoid sitting for long hours allegany first federal credit union move more.

How to Prevent Piles

When to Visit the Doctor?

You should visit the doctor if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Your stools look maroon in colour or tarry.
  • You experience excessive bleeding, including rectal.
  • Your symptoms don’t go away despite using OTC creams, medications, and any of the above remedies we’ve listed. If your symptoms worsen, last longer, or don’t show any signs of improvement, then that’s a telltale sign.
  • If fibre supplements seem to have no effect on the condition of your haemorrhoids.

FAQs

Here are some frequently asked questions about haemorrhoids and their answers below:

1. What Yoga Asanas Should I Perform to Get Rid of Piles at Home?

For relief from piles (haemorrhoids) and to get your colon functioning optimally, you can do the following asanas at home.

  • Sarvanga Asana
  • Child’s Pose
  • Squatting Pose
  • Ashwini Mudra
  • Padhastasana (hand-under-foot posture)
  • Vajrasana
  • Malasana

2. What Should  I Wear If I am Suffering from Piles?

Don’t wear tight or restrictive clothing that strains the muscles in the rectum area. Go for loose, cotton clothing and wear clothes that absorb moisture. Opt for clothing crafted from natural fibres instead of synthetic ones. For women, avoid wearing pantyhose, spandex clothing, garters, and any tight pants that don’t go well with your contours or aren’t form-fitting.

Piles may be an embarrassing subject to talk or read about but it is imperative you know about it for your benefit. If your flare-ups get worse, don’t hesitate to get the medical treatment or professional help you need. Home remedies work best only if piles is in its mild or initial stages which means you will require a professional medical treatment plan if your condition is in its advanced stages.

Also Read:

Home Remedies for Summer Cold You Should Consider
Effective Home Remedies for Chickenpox
Working Remedies to Ease Your Asthma at Home

Vaishnavi Nagaraj

Источник: https://parenting.firstcry.com/articles/magazine-13-best-home-remedies-for-piles/
Phone (general inquiries): (314) 991-9888

Address: 450 N New Ballas Road, 266N, Creve Coeur, MO63141

Источник: https://www.mwhtc-stl.com/blog/myths-and-facts-about-home-remedies-for-hemorrhoids

Myths and Facts about Home Remedies for Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are common, but they can be an embarrassing health problem. The good news is, you can treat your hemorrhoids at home. However, not all home remedies for hemorrhoids work as well as some internet sites may claim.

Dr. Betsy Clemens, our board-certified family physician at Midwest Hemorrhoid Treatment Center in St. Louis, Missouri, specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of hemorrhoids and wants to share some of the myths and facts about home remedies so you can get the relief you need without making things worse.  

Myth: All I need is a fiber supplement

Fact: Fiber is an important part of your at-home hemorrhoid treatment plan, but not from a pill or powder

Though a fiber supplement may soften your stool and alleviate constipation that causes hemorrhoids, we recommend you focus on food for fiber instead of a supplement. Adding more fiber-rich foods to your diet may help keep things regular, preventing a recurrence of your hemorrhoids. Additionally, many healthy, high-fiber foods contain other nutrients that benefit your health overall. 

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, beans, lentils, and peas are natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids sources of fiber. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics says women need 25 grams of fiber a day and men 38 grams. 

When adding fiber to your diet, whether from food or a supplement, be sure to drink plenty of water. Upping your fiber intake without enough fluids may exacerbate your constipation and worsen your anal discomfort. For general health, the Mayo Clinic recommends women drink 11.5 cups of water a day and men 15.5 cups. 

Myth: Apple cider vinegar cures hemorrhoids

Fact: Apple cider vinegar can’t cure your hemorrhoids

From weight loss to diabetes, apple cider vinegar seems to be the cure-all for whatever ails you, including hemorrhoids. Proponents of the home remedy claim that it provides instant relief from anal pain and itching. However, the Cleveland Clinic warns that the acidity of the apple cider vinegar may worsen your condition and increase inflammation and pain.

If you’re looking for a home remedy to alleviate pain and itching, we recommend a sitz bath (soaking your bottom in warm water for 15-20 minutes) several times a day. You can soak in your tub or invest in a sitz bath kit, which fits right over your toilet bowl. 

Myth: Tea tree oil relieves anal itching

Fact: Victoria secret pink hoodie sherpa tree oil is unlikely to provide any relief from your anal itchiness

Also called melaleuca oil, people claim tea tree oil has antibacterial properties and they recommended it for the treatment of many common conditions, including acne and lice. For hemorrhoids, they profess that the topical antibacterial agent reduces itching and swelling. However, there’s little evidence to support these claims, and as a result, we don’t recommend using tea tree oil for your hemorrhoids.

To alleviate the pain and itching, we recommend you try witch hazel or over-the-counter hemorrhoid creams or medicated wipes.

Though at-home remedies can be effective treatments for hemorrhoids, it’s important to know the difference between myth and fact. In addition, if your symptoms persist after a week of DIY treatments, or if you have rectal bleeding, we recommend you schedule an appointment so we can step up the treatment regimen. Give us a call at 636-228-3136 or contact us online today.

All About IRC for Hemorrhoids
All About IRC for Hemorrhoids

When conservative care fails to improve your internal hemorrhoids, you may want to consider nonsurgical infrared coagulation (IRC). This quick and relatively painless procedure gets rid of hemorrhoids fast. Learn all about it here.

5 Causes of Anal Itchiness
5 Causes of Anal Itchiness

Anal itchiness www amazon com careers login an uncomfortable and embarassing sensation that causes an intense urge to scratch the sensitive area. Knowing the cause of your anal itchiness, however, may help you get relief from your symptoms. Click here to learn more.

What the Color of Your Stool Says About Your Health
What the Color of Your Stool Says About Your Health

You may not give much thought to the color of your stool, but it can tell you a lot about your health. Before you flush, take a look. Keep reading to learn what the color of your stool says about your health.

Everything You Should Know About IRC
Everything You Should Know About IRC

When at-home care fails to alleviate your hemorrhoid symptoms, you may be wondering what medical treatments can help. Infrared coagulation (IRC) is a nonsurgical, in-office treatment for internal hemorrhoids. Click here to learn all about IRC.

Don’t Ignore These Warning Signs of Anal Fissures

Do you experience severe pain during a bowel movement that lingers for a few minutes or even a few hours? You may have an anal fissure. Don’t ignore the warning signs. Delaying care for an anal fissure may worsen your condition.

What Truck Drivers Should Know About Hemorrhoids

Hemorrhoids are a common health problem among truck drivers. However, it’s not the long hours on the road that causes the uncomfortable condition. Keep reading to learn what you need to know about truck drivers and hemorrhoids.

Betsy F. Clemens, M.D., Creve Coeur, MO

Phone (appointments): 314-669-2758

4 Replies to “Natural home remedies for internal hemorrhoids”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *