us bank stadium will call location

Seating capacity for U.S. Bank Stadium is 66,200, but expandable up to 72,000 seats. The Minnesota Vikings ticket office is located is located at. 1005 4th Street South Minneapolis, MN 55415. U.S. Bank Stadium, owned by the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority, is a multi-purpose stadium located in the. Get directions, reviews and information for U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, MN. Got a last minute ticket to the ncaa championship and after passing on.

Us bank stadium will call location -

As Vikings Prepare To Welcome Back Fans, U.S. Bank Stadium Unveils New Foods

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — We are two days away from the Minnesota Vikings’ first home opener in two years, with people in the stands. During a year without fans in the stand, the team made safety a priority for everyone entering U.S. Bank Stadium.

“We partnered with Ecolab and made the stadium a science-certified venue. We partnered with 3M and have microbial film on certain surfaces. The building has gone cashless,” Andrew Miller, chief operating officer for the Vikings, said.

Miller added the team also encourages wearing masks.

“(It’s an) indoor, public venue. We strongly encourage our fans to wear masks,” said Miller.

They’ll be scanning only digital tickets at the door, and the bag policy remains the same. The Vikings are expecting a sellout, but limited tickets remain.

As if the first game with fans in 636 days wasn’t enough, on Thursday the Vikings, with help from Aramark, gave the Purple Faithful a taste of what else is waiting for them.

“We have a wonderful display of foods and the chefs are busy working right now,” said chef Toufik Halimi.”We have a slider and we have what we call a turkey stack on a baguette.”

In the suites, fans will find a new take on walleye cakes. In the concourse, local vendors include Revival’s chicken sandwich, cheese curds from Curds and Cakes, wings from Heritage wings, and T-Rex cookies. Be Graceful Cafe is also offering a vegan option for game day.

“It’s a Sloppy Joe with homemade ingredients — onions, peppers, some spices and a kick. It really has a very good taste,” Lisa Buckhalton, of Be Graceful Café, said.

Fans can find a full list of concessions on the U.S. Bank Stadium website.

“Last year we had no fans at our home games, and our number-one business priority this year has been to find and welcome Vikings fans back to our regular season home games. The time is upon us and we couldn’t be more excited,” said Miller.

The Vikings say some tickets remain on Ticket Exchange and Stub Hub. They are encouraging fans to get in their seats by 3 p.m. for a special pregame show on Sunday.

Источник: https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2021/09/23/as-vikings-prepare-to-welcome-back-fans-u-s-bank-stadium-unveils-new-foods/

The first change in U.S. Bank Stadium that any Vikings fan — especially one still smarting from Sunday's loss — would notice are the end zones.

"The Norseman is out and we put in the blanks and then we do all the artwork for the teams," NFL field director Ed Mangan said.

That would be artwork for the Patriots and the Eagles.

In fact, the Vikings logo will mostly be scrubbed from the stadium over the next several days. Super Bowl LII logos will be put over team insignias that surround the field, as well as throughout the stands.

Two construction workers prepare US Bank Stadium

Inside the downtown Minneapolis stadium, hundreds of workers are setting up huge lighting trusses and rigs that will hang above Justin Timberlake's halftime show, putting up risers for NBC's commentators and changing the seating.

Eric Finkelstein, senior director of event operations for the NFL, said the league started work in Minneapolis just after the first of the year, even when it wasn't clear when they could start on the stadium because the Vikings had a postseason. NFL officials had in mind what they needed to do well before the stadium opened in July 2016.

"When we first started coming here and talking through the different elements, [we were] trying to figure out how best to lay everything out and make it work properly for the Super Bowl," Finkelstein said.

There will be more booths for play-by-play announcers from all over the world. One section of seats in the upper deck is being converted to an auxiliary press area. The Vikings store will become a Super Bowl store. And outside there will be a security checkpoint to screen ticket-holders located 300 feet from the doors. That's about 200 feet farther than where regular season attendees check in.

A panorama of US Bank Stadium

This is Finkelstein's 19th Super Bowl setup. He said it's different than any other he's done.

"It's the most urban setting of any NFL stadium in the league. So you have to work around all of those factors and elements in order to try and make it work," Finkelstein said. "In many years we have large parking lots that are surrounding the building so it gives us plenty of work space. Here it's not possible, but that's OK, we're able to be creative and find other ways to work around that and make all of that work."

The workarounds have led to some road closures and restrictions already in effect downtown, and in public areas like Nicollet Mall being used for Super Bowl events.

Gallery

1 of 2

Workers prepare the upper decks of US Bank Stadium

2 of 2

Eric Finkelstein, Senior Director of Event Operations for the NFL

You make MPR News possible. Individual donations are behind the clarity in coverage from our reporters across the state, stories that connect us, and conversations that provide perspectives. Help ensure MPR remains a resource that brings Minnesotans together.

Donate today. A gift of $17 makes a difference.

Источник: https://www.mprnews.org/story/2018/01/24/nfl-transforms-us-bank-stadium-into-neutral-super-bowl-home

A new chapter in the history of the Minnesota Vikings began in 2016 when US Bank Stadium opened. The Vikings have been a part of the Minnesota sports scene since 1961 when they began playing at Metropolitan Stadium.  Throughout their history the Vikings have never had a stadium of their own, sharing both stadiums with baseball’s Minnesota Twins (until 2010 when Target Field opened). In the early 2000s the Vikings lobbied numerous times to secure support from the State of Minnesota to fund the construction of a new stadium. On March 1, 2012 the Vikings were successful as Minnesota Governor Mark Dayton announced that a new stadium would be built on the site of the Metrodome. Built at a cost of $1.1 billion, the stadium financed by the Vikings, the City of Minneapolis and the State of Minnesota.

For two seasons the Vikings played at TCF Bank Stadium, home of the NCAA’s Minnesota Golden Gophers, while the Metrodome was demolished and their new stadium was constructed. Construction began in late 2013 and in June 2015 US Bank purchased the naming rights for $220 million over 25 years.

US Bank Stadium opened in July 2016 and the Vikings played their first game here on September 18, 2016 against the Green Bay Packers. Located in downtown Minneapolis, US Bank Stadium is a bold and iconic building. The structure is like no-other in the NFL. It features a fixed, slanted roof that is 60% transparent allowing natural light to filter inside giving it an outdoor feel. Featuring a black zinc façade, the majority of fans enter the stadium through the west side, known as the Medtronic Plaza, a three-acre gateway to the stadium that contains one of the most iconic features at US Bank Stadium, a 160 foot long legacy Vikings ship. Modeled after an ancient Viking’s ship, it features a 2,000 square foot curved LED videoboard that serves as the ships 55 foot tall sail. The plaza provides a great gathering spot for fans before and after games. Once inside US Bank Stadium, there is no question you are at the home of the Vikings as over 66,000 purple seats surround the playing field. The stadium consists of multiple seating tiers, with the lower deck surrounding the field. The best seats in the house is right on the field, as US Bank Stadium has 23 Turf Suites where fans are only 25 feet from the action of the field. Approximately 6,000 seats in the lower level on the north side of the stadium are retractable allowing US Bank Stadium to host numerous events, including the Minnesota Golden Gophers baseball team. One of the most unique features at US Bank Stadium is located beyond the lower level seats on the west side. Here are five, 95 foot high, pivoting glass doors. Not only do these doors allow fans to see the Minneapolis skyline, but opens the stadium to the outside elements when the weather is warm. Many amenities can be found at US Bank Stadium, including multiple 131 luxury suites, 9,000 club seats, numerous club areas, and Club Purple, a fantasy football lounge. Two 50′ x 120′ HD video/scoreboards are located at both endzones. Not only does it host football, but US Bank Stadium is one of the most versatile stadium in the NFL as it hosts baseball, basketball, motocross, concerts and more. It has hosted Super Bowl LII in February 2018 and the 2019 Men’s NCAA Basketball Final Four.

Aerial of US Bank Stadium, home of the Minnesota Vikings

 

Источник: https://www.stadiumsofprofootball.com/stadiums/us-bank-stadium/

US Bank Stadium - Minneapolis, MN

A 137,000-square-foot fixed-roof stadium envisioned to be a premier sports and entertainment center in Minneapolis, U.S. Bank Stadium is the home of the NFL’s Minnesota Vikings. Opened in 2016, the uniquely designed stadium quickly became an iconic part of the city’s skyline. Its interior is equipped with state-of the-art facilities with wide concourses opening to the field, and a transparent roof that gives fans the feeling of being outdoors—without having to worry about Minnesota’s famously cold weather.

The first event held at U.S. Bank Stadium Minneapolis was a soccer match between AC Milan and Chelsea FC. Besides Vikings home games, it’s hosted a number of family shows, sporting events and conventions as well as concerts by Luke Bryan, Metallica and Coldplay. The stadium was the site for Super Bowl LII and hosted the 2019 NCAA Final Four.

Located in central Minneapolis, the stadium is easily accessible by public transportation or private car. For drivers, there are more than 20,000 parking spaces within a 20-minute walk of the stadium. It’s also accessible by light rail and various bus routes. Dozens of hotels and restaurants are nearby, along with attractions like Gold Medal Park and Target Field, home of the Minnesota Twins.

Gates to the stadium open two hours before events, and guests are encouraged to arrive early to avoid the traffic and long lines. Still cameras, small clutch bags and one clear bag may be brought into the stadium. An express lane located at each gate is provided for fans who are not bringing anything into the stadium. Use Event Tickets Center to get US Bank Stadium tickets, or check out US Bank Stadium seating charts to find your seats to US Bank Stadium events!

Who is playing at US Bank Stadium this weekend?

Scroll through upcoming Football games and concerts at US Bank Stadium to find out who will be playing near you this weekend in Minneapolis.

Who is playing at US Bank Stadium tonight?

You can shop last minute tickets for games and concerts happening at US Bank Stadium tonight or scroll to view the full schedule.

What time do doors open at US Bank Stadium?

Doors typically open anywhere between 90 minutes to 2 hours prior to showtime at US Bank Stadium. Be sure to check the listing on your ticket as showtimes will vary.

What time do games end at US Bank Stadium?

Every NFL game and concert will typically end at a different time. Set times and ending times for US Bank Stadium are usually not established.

Who plays at US Bank Stadium?

The Minnesota Vikings are the home team at the US Bank Stadium.

Official Site:Click Here

Источник: https://www.eventticketscenter.com/

A COVID-19 outbreak has turned the Dallas Cowboys preparation for its upcoming game upside down.

Right tackle Terence Steele, strength and conditioning coordinator Harold Nash, offensive line assistant Jeff Blasko and offensive assistant Scott Tolzien have all been added to the COVID-19 list. Those three join offensive line coach Joe Philbin, who was added to the list ahead of the Thanksgiving Day game against Las Vegas. None of the five will travel to New Orleans for Thursday’s game.

This swells the number of players and coaches placed into the protocol to 11 over the last 10 days.

“COVID is always something we have to think about this year,’’ running back Ezekiel Elliott said. “We’re having a little outbreak right now, so I mean, guys just have to make sure we’re taking that extra precaution, make sure we’re keeping ourselves, our families and our teammates safe.’’

After learning of the latest positive tests and consulting with officials at the league level, the Cowboys dramatically altered their schedule.

The players conducted a walk-thru late Sunday afternoon at The Star in Frisco. They will practice on Monday.

Everything else over those two days is virtual.

Every player and coach is required to be tested daily at least through Tuesday. Those who showed up for their tests Sunday morning were provided a box breakfast and sent home to conduct meetings virtually.

“This is the best plan for us to move forward,’’ head coach Mike McCarthy told reporters in a virtual conference call. “We will be in a virtual format today and be in a virtual format tomorrow. Tuesday is undecided at this point.

“We’re paying close attention to it.’’

Tight end coach Lunda Wells has been spending time with the offensive line while Philbin and Blasko are out. Guard Zack Martin said Lunda has done a nice job of keeping the group on track.

McCarthy will also shift additional time there in the days leading up to the game with the Saints.

“Definitely, I’ll be where I need to be this week,’’ McCarthy said. “We have some moving parts.’’

Before the season began, McCarthy said all of the coaches on his staff had been vaccinated. That means every coach who shows up on the list is a breakthrough case.

“Obviously, it’s more challenging,’’ rookie Micah Parsons said of Sunday’s virtual format. “You’ve got to key on being more focused than you would in person.

“It’s challenging for everybody. But, you’ve got to get the job done.’’

Amari Cooper returns: Receiver Amari Cooper should come off the COVID-19 list Monday and is expected to practice.

How much he does remains to be seen.

Cooper, one of the few players on the team sources confirm wasn’t vaccinated, was placed on the list the day before the team left for Kansas City to face the Chiefs. He missed that game and the Thanksgiving game against the Las Vegas Raiders.

The Cowboys lost both games.

McCarthy said he’s unaware of the severity of Cooper’s case or what he did while he was away from the team for 10 days.

“I don’t have the details of it,’’ McCarthy said. “I talked to [trainer] Jim Maurer this morning about Amari particularly and he just felt the conditioning was going to be something that we’re going to have to get a hold of for any player coming off of a 10-day stretch.

“We’ll know more [Monday] after we have a chance to work with him.’’

Briefly: Receiver CeeDee Lamb, who suffered a concussion on the final play of the first half of the team’s loss to Kansas City and missed the following game against Las Vegas, was at the facility for Sunday’s walkthrough. He’s been cleared and is expected to play against New Orleans.

Catch David Moore on The Ticket (KTCK-AM 1310 and 96.7 FM) with The Musers at 9:35 a.m. every Monday, Wednesday and Friday, The Hang Zone every Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. and The Hardline every Tuesday and Friday at 4:30 p.m. during the regular season.

Dallas Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott blows water as the team warms up before an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers at AT&T Stadium on Sunday, Oct. 3, 2021, in Arlington.

Find more Cowboys coverage from The Dallas Morning News here.

Источник: https://www.dallasnews.com/sports/cowboys/2021/11/28/cowboys-to-miss-starting-right-tackle-terence-steele-for-saints-game-due-covid-19/

The first change in U.S. Bank Stadium that any Vikings fan — especially one still smarting from Sunday's loss — would notice are the end zones.

"The Norseman is out and we put in the blanks and then we do all the apply for an employer identification number ein for the teams," NFL field director Ed Mangan said.

That would be artwork for the Patriots and the Eagles.

In fact, the Vikings logo will mostly be scrubbed from the stadium over the next several days. Super Bowl LII logos will be put over team insignias that surround the field, as well as throughout the stands.

Two construction workers prepare US Bank Stadium

Inside the downtown Minneapolis stadium, hundreds of workers are setting up huge lighting trusses and rigs that will hang above Justin Timberlake's halftime show, putting up risers for Fidelity investments customer service phone number commentators and changing the seating.

Eric Finkelstein, senior director of event operations for the NFL, said the league started work in Minneapolis just after the first of the year, even when it wasn't clear when they could start on the stadium because the Vikings had a postseason. NFL officials had in mind what they needed to do well before the stadium opened in July 2016.

"When we first started coming here and talking through the different elements, [we were] trying to figure out how best to lay everything out and make it work properly for the Super Bowl," Finkelstein said.

There will be more booths for play-by-play announcers from all over the world. One section of seats in the us bank stadium will call location deck is being converted to an auxiliary press area. The Vikings store will become a Super Bowl store. And outside there will be a security checkpoint to screen ticket-holders located 300 feet from the doors. That's about 200 feet farther than where regular season attendees check in.

A panorama of US Bank Stadium

This is Finkelstein's 19th Super Bowl setup. He said it's different than any other he's done.

"It's the most urban setting of any NFL stadium in the league. So you have to work around all of those factors and elements in order to try and make it work," Finkelstein said. "In many years we have large parking lots that are surrounding the building so it gives us plenty of work space. Here it's not possible, but that's OK, we're able to be creative and find other ways to work around that and make all of that work."

The workarounds have led to some road closures and restrictions already in effect downtown, and in public areas like Nicollet Mall being used for Super Bowl events.

Gallery

1 of 2

Workers prepare the upper decks of US Bank Stadium

2 of 2

Eric Finkelstein, Senior Director of Event Operations for the NFL

You make MPR News possible. Individual donations are behind the clarity in coverage from our reporters across the state, stories that connect us, and conversations that provide perspectives. Help ensure MPR remains a resource that brings Minnesotans together.

Donate today. A gift of $17 makes a difference.

Источник: https://www.mprnews.org/story/2018/01/24/nfl-transforms-us-bank-stadium-into-neutral-super-bowl-home

U.S. Bank Stadium Panels to be Replaced

U.S. Bank Stadium exterior

Panels on the exterior us bank stadium will call location U.S. Bank Stadium are to be replaced over the next two years to address to problems that include leaking, under the terms of a settlement announced Friday.

Home to the Minnesota Vikings since its 2016 opening, U.S. Bank Stadium features a design that includes the use of black zinc panels that form its exterior. A total of 250,000 square feet of the exterior will be replaced over the next two years at a cost of $21 million, the result of a settlement between stadium owner the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority (MSFA) and eight firms that were involved in the stadium project.

Under the terms of the settlement, the cost of the repairs will be paid for by general contractor M.A. Mortenson Co. and seven other firms that were involved in the stadium’s design, engineering and construction. Plans call for the new paneling to have a similar look and feel to what is currently on us bank stadium will call location building, while being designed to repel water. Furthermore, a second waterproof membrane will be added to the venue’s shield before replacement panels are installed.

Officials from the parties involved in the settlement, including Mortenson vice president John Wood and MSFA chairman Michael Vekich, billed the agreement as the best way to ensure that the problem is addressed and help keep U.S. Bank Stadium in good condition for the long run. More from the Star Tribune:

Wood said the leaks weren’t substantial. Water wasn’t gushing into the building, and it could easily be mopped up.

“Nonetheless, it gave everyone reason to be concerned,” he said. “We could see some repetition of these problems.”

Vekich said when he arrived in the summer of 2017, the panels had been reinforced, but questions remained about whether that would be enough to address the leaks long term….

The mediated settlement came out of closed-door talks with the Mortenson Co., architect HKS Inc., M.G. McGrath Inc., Custom Drywall Inc., TRI-Construction, Larson Engineering Inc., Thornton Tomasetti Inc. and Studio Five Architects.

The Vikings were not a party in this settlement. Repair work is to take place in a fashion that allows U.S. Bank Stadium to remain open throughout the process, including for Vikings home games and other events.

Image courtesy U.S. Bank Stadium.

Источник: https://footballstadiumdigest.com/2020/03/u-s-bank-stadium-panels-to-be-replaced/

US Bank Stadium - Minneapolis, MN

A 137,000-square-foot fixed-roof stadium envisioned to be a premier sports and entertainment center in Minneapolis, U.S. Bank Stadium is the home of the NFL’s Minnesota Vikings. Opened in 2016, the uniquely designed stadium quickly became an iconic part of the city’s skyline. Its interior is equipped with state-of the-art facilities with wide concourses opening to the field, and a transparent roof that gives fans the feeling of being outdoors—without having to worry about Minnesota’s famously cold weather.

The first event held at U.S. Bank Stadium Minneapolis homes for sale in strafford nh a soccer match between AC Milan and Chelsea FC. Besides Vikings home games, it’s hosted a number of family shows, sporting events and conventions as well as concerts by Luke Bryan, Metallica and Coldplay. The stadium was the site for Super Bowl LII and hosted the 2019 NCAA Final Four.

Located in central Minneapolis, the stadium is easily accessible by public transportation or private car. For drivers, there are more than 20,000 parking spaces within a 20-minute walk of the stadium. It’s also accessible by light rail and various bus routes. Dozens of hotels and restaurants are nearby, along with attractions like Gold Medal Park and Target Field, home of the Minnesota Twins.

Gates to the stadium open two hours before events, and guests are encouraged to arrive early to avoid the traffic and long lines. Still cameras, small clutch bags and one clear bag may be brought into the stadium. An express lane located at each gate is provided for fans who are not bringing anything into the stadium. Use Event Tickets Center to get US Bank Stadium tickets, or check out US Bank Stadium seating charts to find your seats to US Bank Stadium events!

Who is playing at US Bank Stadium this weekend?

Scroll through upcoming Football games and concerts at US Bank Stadium to find out who will be playing near you this weekend in Minneapolis.

Who is playing at US Bank Stadium us bank stadium will call location can shop last minute tickets for games and concerts happening at US Bank Stadium tonight or scroll to view the full schedule.

What time do doors open at US Bank Stadium?

Doors typically open anywhere between 90 minutes to 2 hours prior to showtime at US Bank Stadium. Be sure to check the listing on your ticket as showtimes will vary.

What time do games end at US Bank Stadium?

Every NFL game and concert will typically end at a different time. Set times and ending times for US Bank Stadium are usually not established.

Who plays at US Bank Stadium?

The Minnesota Vikings are the home team at the US Bank Stadium.

Official Site:Click Here

Источник: https://www.eventticketscenter.com/

As Vikings Prepare To Welcome Back Fans, U.S. Bank Stadium Unveils New Foods

MINNEAPOLIS (WCCO) — We are two days away from the Minnesota Vikings’ first home opener in two years, with people in the stands. During a year without fans in the stand, the team made safety a priority for everyone entering U.S. Bank Stadium.

“We partnered with Ecolab and made the stadium a science-certified venue. We partnered with 3M and have microbial film on certain surfaces. The building has gone cashless,” Andrew Miller, chief operating officer for the Vikings, said.

Miller added the team also encourages wearing masks.

“(It’s an) indoor, public venue. We strongly encourage our fans to wear masks,” said Miller.

They’ll be scanning only digital tickets at the door, and the bag policy remains the same. The Vikings are expecting a sellout, but limited tickets remain.

As if the first game with fans in 636 days wasn’t enough, on Thursday the Vikings, with help from Aramark, gave the Purple Faithful a taste of what else is waiting for them.

“We have a wonderful display of foods and the chefs are busy working right now,” said chef Toufik Halimi.”We have a slider and we have what we call a turkey stack on a baguette.”

In the suites, fans will find a new take on walleye cakes. In the concourse, local vendors include Revival’s chicken sandwich, cheese curds from Curds and Cakes, wings from Heritage wings, and T-Rex cookies. Be Graceful Cafe is also offering a vegan option for game day.

“It’s a Sloppy Joe with homemade ingredients — onions, peppers, some spices and a kick. It really has a very good taste,” Lisa Buckhalton, of Be Graceful Café, said.

Fans can find a full list of concessions on the U.S. Bank Stadium website.

“Last year we had no fans at our home games, and our number-one business priority this year has been to find and welcome Vikings fans back to our regular season home games. The time is upon us and we couldn’t be more excited,” said Miller.

The Vikings say some tickets remain on Ticket Exchange and Stub Hub. They are encouraging fans to get in their seats by 3 p.m. for a special pregame show on Sunday.

Источник: https://minnesota.cbslocal.com/2021/09/23/as-vikings-prepare-to-welcome-back-fans-u-s-bank-stadium-unveils-new-foods/

U.S. Bank Stadium is indoor stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota currently serves home field for the Minnesota Vikings of the National Football League (NFL). Located on the site of the former the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in Downtown East, the 68,000 capacity stadium is their third.[1] It has been referred to as Metrodome Next.

It is the first new fixed roof stadium in the NFL since Ford Field opened in 2002. Ford Field is home to the Detroit Lions, which like the Vikings, play in the NFC North. 0001/minnesota-vikings-unveil-glass-centric-design-new-stadium</ref> 0000

Current Metrodome lease

The Vikings' lease with the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission (MSFC), as signed by both parties in August 1979, kept them in the Metrodome until 2011.[2] The lease was considered one of the least lucrative among NFL teams; it includes provisions where the commission owns the stadium, and the Vikings were locked into paying rent until the end of the 2011 season. For the past 9 seasons, however, the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission has been waiving the team's nearly $4 million rent.[3] The Vikings pay the MSFC 9.5 percent of its ticket sales; the commission "reserves all rights to sell or lease advertising in any part of the Stadium" and the team cannot use the scoreboard for any ads and does not control naming rights for the building; the commission controls the limited parking and its revenue; and the commission pays the team 10 percent of all concession sales, which in 2004 and 2005, amounted to just over half a million for the team each year while the MSFC takes roughly 35 percent of concessions sold during Vikings games.[4] The Vikings were 30th out of 32 NFL teams in local revenues in 2005.[4] The Vikings, as well as the stadium's other tenants, have continually turned down any proposals for renovating the Metrodome itself.[4] A plan for a joint Vikings/University of Minnesota football stadium was proposed in 2002, but differences us bank stadium will call location how the stadium would be designed and run, as well as state budget constraints, led to the plan's failure.[5] The university would eventually open its own TCF Bank Stadium in 2009.

Downtown Minneapolis

From the outset, Zygi Wilf, a billionaire from New Jersey and principal owner of the Vikings since 2005,[6] had stated he was interested in redeveloping the downtown site of the Metrodome no matter where the new facility was built.[4] Taking into consideration downtown Minneapolis' growing mass transit network, cultural institutions, and growing condo and office markets, Wilf considered underdeveloped areas on the Downtown's east side, centered on the Metrodome, to be a key opportunity and began discussing the matter with neighboring landholders, primarily the City of Minneapolis and the Star Tribune.[4] An unrelated 2008 study explains that the effect of the media, in this case an uncritical Star Tribune, matters a great deal in helping a stadium initiative.[7] As a result, once the negotiations for the Anoka County location had been put aside, the Vikings focused on proposing a stadium that would be the centerpiece of a larger urban redevelopment project.[4]

Wilf's Vikings began acquiring significant land holdings in the Downtown East neighborhood around the Metrodome in June 2007, the Vikings acquired four blocks of mostly empty land surrounding the Star Tribune headquarters from Avista Capital Partners (the private equity owner of the Star Tribune) for $45 million; it is also believed the Vikings have first right of refusal to later buy the paper's headquarters building.[8] In May 2007, the Vikings also church food pantry open today three other downtown parking lots for a total of $5 million, and have made a bid for a city-owned, underground parking ramp next to the neighborhood's light rail station.[8]

Proposal timeline

2007

On April 19, 2007, the Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission (MSFC) and Vikings unveiled their initial plans for the stadium and surrounding urban area, with an estimated opening of 2012.[9] The plan included substantial improvements to the surrounding area, including an improved light rail stop, 4,500 residential units, hotels with a combined 270 rooms, 1,700,000 square feet (Expression error: Unexpected < operator. m2) of office space and substantial retail space.[9]

As of 2007, the stadium would have held approximately 73,600 people and was to have been complete by August 2011. The initial proposal did not have the final architectural design renderings, but did include key features that were to have been included in any final plan, including the plans for neighboring urban development. These included demands for a retractable roof, an open view of the surroundings (particularly the downtown skyline), a glass-enclosed Winter Garden alongside the already-existing adjacent Metrodome light-rail stop, leafy urban square with outdoor cafés and dense housing around its edges, aesthetic improvements to roads connecting the stadium to nearby cultural institutions, and adaptive reuse of neighboring historic buildings.[10] The roof would have allowed Minneapolis to remain a potential venue for the Super Bowl and Final Four, both of which had been held at the Metrodome. The proposed urban plan itself was received with cautious welcome.[11]

The 2007 proposed cost estimate for the downtown Minneapolis stadium was $953,916,000.[12] The total broke down to $616,564,000 for the stadium, $200,729,000 for a retractable roof, $58,130,000 for parking, $8,892,000 for adjacent land right-of-way, and $69,601,000 to take into account inflation by 2010.[12] The estimate compared to then-upcoming stadiums in Indianapolis at $675 million (retractable roof, completed 2008), Dallas at $932 million (retractable roof, completed 2009) and New York at $1.7 billion (open-air, completed in 2010).[12] In addition, according to Wilf, taking into account the costs for the surrounding urban developments put forth in the proposal would have brought the estimated total to $2 billion.[8] The estimated costs were based on projected 2008 construction and material costs, so it would have been possible that the stadium costs could have hovered near $1 billion if the Minnesota State Legislature had not approved the project in the 2008 session.[13]Template:Update after

No proposals were made, at that time, for paying for the stadium.[9] The MSFC and Vikings made initial pitches to the Minnesota State Legislature during the end of the 2007 session, but expected to make serious efforts during the 2008 legislative session.[14] The Vikings proposed creating a Minnesota Football Stadium Task Force, which they expect would take 24 months to plan the stadium.[14]

2008

Following the September 2008 MSFC vote to start feasibility studies for re-using the Metrodome, an unrelated study released for 38 U.S. cities[15] found that "when a [NFL] team wins, people's moods improve,"[16] and that personal income for residents of a city with an NFL team with 10 wins increases about $165 per year.[16] While true for NFL football, for comparison, professional baseball and basketball gain no personal income for residents.[16]

2009

Feasibility studies for Dallas-based design and local construction of a new stadium were expected in early 2009.[17] Roy Terwilliger, a former Republican state victoria secret pink lace leggings from Edina, Ray Waldron, an AFL-CIO leader, and the Dome engineering expert and CEO, Bill Us bank stadium will call location and Steve Maki of the MSFC selected architectural firm HKS of Dallas and construction manager Mortenson of Minnesota over the objections of Paul Thatcher and Timothy Rose of Minneapolis-St. Paul, who preferred Ellerbe Beckett and Kraus-Anderson, both of Minnesota. Loanne Thrane of Saint Paul, the sole female member of the commission, voiced opposition and later voted with the majority.[18]

In December 2009, commission chairman Terwilliger said, "We know what the art of the possible is at this particular location." A new proposal for 65,000 seats with a sliding roof was unveiled at $84 million less than the previous proposal, but with $50 million per year more scheduled for each year that construction is delayed.[19] Vikings officials boycotted the presentation which estimated the total cost at $870 million, or $770 million if the sliding roof is omitted.[19]

2010

The 2010 Vikings stadium proposal was dealt a setback on May 5, 2010, when a Minnesota House panel defeated the proposal by a 10-9 vote.

The stadium debate was revived in the aftermath of the Metrodome's roof deflation on December 12, 2010; which forced the relocation of the Vikings' final two home games of the 2010 season and led to more calls for a new stadium from various sources in the local and national media.[20][21] Minnesota Us bank stadium will call location Mark Dayton discussed the matter with NFL commissioner Roger Goodell, but said "any new stadium must first benefit the people of Minnesota".[22]

2011

City of Minneapolis Proposal

After Hennepin County stopped their pursuit of a Vikings stadium,[23] the city of Minneapolis submitted a plan for a Vikings' stadium at the downtown Metrodome site. The Minneapolis plan is for a fixed-roof stadium us bank stadium will call location an estimated $895 million. The proposal also included funding solutions for $95 million in renovations to the Minnesota Timberwolves' Target Center. The team reacted with skepticism to the proposal and did not want to play at nearby 50,000 seat capacity University of Minnesota TCF Bank Stadium during three years of construction.[24] Because the Minneapolis dome site is a cheaper option, football fans were expected to return to the Minneapolis plan if the shortfall in the Ramsey County plan were not realized.[25]

Ramsey County Proposal

In May 2011, Ramsey County officials announced they had reached an agreement with the Minnesota Vikings to be the team’s local partner for a new stadium, subject to approval by the Minnesota Legislature and to approval of us bank stadium will call location sales tax by the Ramsey County Board.[26] The site of the stadium would be the former Twin Cities Army Ammunitions Plant in Arden Hills, which is about 10 miles from the Metrodome in Minneapolis and is a Superfund clean up site. The agreement called for an $884 million stadium and an additional $173 million for on-site infrastructure, parking and environmental costs.[27]

Ramsey County said the Vikings would commit $407 million to the project, which would have been about 44 percent of the stadium cost and 39 percent of the overall cost. The county's cost would have been $350 million, to be financed by a half-cent sales tax increase.[27] The state of Minnesota's cost would have been $300 million.[26] This totalled about $1.057 billion, leaving at least a $131 million shortfall.[25] Minnesota Vikings and the State of Minnesota agreed the total of fixing roads would have been $131 million.[28]

2012

On March 1, 2012, an agreement was announced by Minnesota governor Mark Dayton for a new stadium to be built on the site of the Metrodome, pending approval by the state legislature and the Minneapolis city council.[29] The $975 million project, half of which will be publicly funded, will be patterned after Lucas Oil Stadium. It will utilize part of the footprint of the Metrodome and will only require the Vikings to play at TCF Bank Stadium during the final year of construction.[30] The agreement met with mixed reaction, and some criticized the proposal as being unfair to taxpayers and a giveaway to team owners.[31]

On May 10, 2012, the Minnesota Legislature approved funding for a new Vikings stadium on that site. The project is projected to have a $975 million price tag, with the Vikings covering $477 million, the state covering $348 million, and $150 million covered by a hospitality tax in Minneapolis. The city of Minneapolis must pay a total of $678 million over the thirty year life of the deal, including interest, operations and construction costs.[32] The bill was signed by Gov. Dayton,[33] and received the approval real estate online classes sc the Minneapolis City Council on May 25, 2012.[34][35] The Vikings will play in the Metrodome through the 2013 season, as construction would not require the immediate demolition of the Metrodome. The Vikings will then move to TCF Bank Stadium on the University of Minnesota campus until the new stadium is complete.

2013

On May 13, 2013, The Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority (MSFA), the Minnesota Vikings and HKS Sports & Entertainment Group together unveiled the design of chase bank routing number tucson az State’s new multi-purpose stadium, a major milestone in getting the $975 million stadium built on time and on budget. The design bbt branch locations will now be submitted to the Minneapolis Stadium Implementation Committee and the City of Minneapolis for review.

Charitable gambling funding shortfall

The State of Minnesota's portion of the cost of the stadium was to be funded by revenue from a proposed new charitable gambling source, which was dubbed electronic pulltabs. When the stadium funding bill was passed in the legislature and signed by the governor on May 14, 2012 the new revenue from the games was estimated to be $34 million for 2013, and rising each year thereafter.

November 2012 revenue forecast

Six months later, the first budget estimate from the Minnesota Office of Management and Budget was released, revising the projected revenue from the electronic pulltab games. This first revision cut the estimated revenue from the game for 2013 by 51%, to $16 million (versus the legislation's estimate of $34 million)

From page 15 of the Minnesota Management and Budget Complete Forecast, November 2012: "For FY 2013, the projected reserve balance has been reduced from $34 to $16 million. Projected new gambling revenues from stadium legislation are expected to be $18 million (51 percent) below end of session estimates." -- "The forecast reduction reflects a slower than expected implementation of electronic gaming options and reduced estimates for daily revenue per gaming device."[36]

February 2013 revenue forecast

In March of 2013, the Minnesota Office of Management and Budget released another updated budget forecast for Fiscal Year 2013 to 2017. Included in this forecast was another revision in the projected revenue from charitable gambling sources, from the previous estimate of $16 million, down to $1.7 million. A further 90% reduction in the estimate for 2013 revenue. This total a 95% reduction from what was estimated in the stadium bill passed in May of 2012.

From page 12 of the Minnesota Management and Budget Complete Forecast, February 2013: "The forecast for lawful gambling revenue has been reduced $15 million in FY 2013 and $46 million in FY 2014-15. Slower than expected implementation of electronic gambling options and a reduction in estimates for daily revenue per gambling location were the reasons for the revenue reduction".[37]

Political fallout from projected shortfall

As a result of the projected shortfall, members of the Minnesota Legislature and the Governors office began discussing ideas to fix the shortfall.[38] The legislature decided to impose a tax on cigarettes to make up for any shortfall over the next two years of construction.

Construction

In August, 2012, the Minnesota Sports Facilities Authority (MSFA)—the stadium's newly created owner—received bids and plans from five architectural and engineering firms, all nationally recognized stadium designers, including Populous, AECOM, EwingCole, and HNTB.[39][40] On September 28, 2012, the MSFA selected the Dallas firm of HKS, Inc., which had designed both Cowboys Stadium and Lucas Oil Stadium within the previous decade, to serve as the project's architect.[41] HKS Huntington bank states. also designed Rangers Ballpark in Arlington, home of the Texas Rangers; the Milwaukee Brewers’ Miller Park in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; and renovations to the Chicago White Sox’s U.S. Cellular Field. Initial design plans have not been released to the public, but Viking officials say they hope the budget will allow the new stadium to include a retractable roof, walls or windows. The design team also plans to incorporate interactive technology into some elements to create a more engaging fan experience.[42]

On December 7, 2012, the MSFA announced that construction of the facility was slated to begin in October 2013.[43]

Soccer Friendly

There has been discussion about making the us bank stadium will call location soccer-friendly, conforming to FIFA standards and recommendations, thereby making the field slightly larger to accommodate United States Men's National Soccer Team matches, international friendlies from large European soccer clubs, soccer tournaments (regional or international), as well as even attracting a Major League Soccer (MLS) team. Those reports have mentioned Minnesota's current NASL team, Minnesota United FC, playing at the site either as part of the NASL (minor league), or with promotion to MLS. If designed properly and a financial fit, it could match CenturyLink Field, home of the Seattle Sounders, a team also promoted from the NASL. This would provide the Minneapolis–Saint Paul metro area with another sports team, Is there a home remedy for dog ear infection with a presence in the upper Midwest outside of the Chicago Fire, and another tenant for year-round activity at the stadium.

References

  1. ↑Metrodome Next. Metropolitan Sports Facilities Commission. Archived from the original on February 10, 2010. Retrieved on March 15, 2010.
  2. ↑Scheck, Tom. "Anoka County Walks Away From Vikings' Plan", Minnesota Public Radio, November 20, 2006. Retrieved on November 20, 2006. 
  3. ↑Weiner, Jay. "As Interim Solution, Stadium Commission Offering New Deal to Keep Vikings in Dome", November 17, 2009. Retrieved on December 23, 2009. 
  4. 4.04.14.24.34.44.5Anderson, Jr., G.R. (January 3, 2007) Eye of the Beholder, City Pages. Retrieved January 3, 2007
  5. ↑Scheck, Tom. "Committee Kills Vikings stadium plan", Minnesota Public Radio, February 18, 2002. Retrieved on March 18, 2013. 
  6. ↑Borzi, Pat. "Vikings' Owner Makes a Name for Himself", August 19, 2005. Retrieved on December 23, 2009. 
  7. ↑Delaney, Kevin and Eckstein, Rick (February 2008). Local Media Coverage of Sports Stadium Initiatives Journal of Sport & Social Issues pp. 72–93. Retrieved on December 23, 2009.
  8. 8.08.18.2Levy, Paul. "Vikings, Star Tribune Close Land Deal", June 21, 2007. Retrieved on June 21, 2007. 
  9. 9.09.19.2Levy, Paul. "Vikings Stadium: Great View, But Who Pays?", April 19, 2007. Retrieved on April 17, 2007. 
  10. ↑"The Plan's Key Ingredients", April 19, 2007. Retrieved on April 19, 2007. 
  11. ↑Peterson, David. "Urban Planners See Sketches As First Step", April 19, 2007. Retrieved on April 19, 2007. 
  12. 12.012.112.2"Cost Comparison", April 19, 2007. Retrieved on April 19, 2007. 
  13. ↑Levy, Paul. "Stadium Could Cost $1 Billion", June 21, 2007. Retrieved on June 21, 2007. 
  14. 14.014.1Paul Levy, No Vikings stadium bill now, but next year, maybe?, Star Tribune, May 19, 2007.
  15. ↑Davis, Michael and End, Christian M. (undated). A Winning Proposition: The Economic Impact of Successful NFL Franchises (PDF). Economic Inquiry (planned) via Copley Press. Retrieved on October 4, 2008.
  16. 16.016.116.2Stetz, Michael. "Winning Football Cit group sec filings is Found to Convert Into Cash", Copley Press, October 4, 2008. Retrieved on October 4, 2008. 
  17. ↑Vomhof, John. "Commission Picks Designers for Metrodome Project", September 26, 2008. Retrieved on September 28, 2008. 
  18. ↑Weiner, Jay. "New Vikings Stadium: High Drama at Stadium Commission", September 26, 2008. Retrieved on September 28, 2008. 
  19. 19.019.1Bakst, Brian. "New Vikings Stadium Proposal: $870M, No Pay Plan", Google News, December 18, 2009. Retrieved on December 23, 2009. Archived from the original on December 24, 2009. 
  20. ↑Erskine, Chris. "Metrodome Roof Collapse Had to Be a Sign From Above", December 13, 2010. Retrieved on December 14, 2010. 
  21. ↑Borzi, Pat. "With Their Dome Deflated, the Vikings Still Need a Home", December 14, 2010. Retrieved on December 14, 2010. 
  22. ↑Kaszuba, Mike. "Dayton Meeting with NFL Commissioner", December 17, 2010. Retrieved on December 17, 2010. “On December 26, 2010 the Zigi Wilf the Vikings owner agreed to accept an outdoor stadium.” 
  23. ↑Duchschere, Kevin. "Vikings' Stadium Options Narrow", May 5, 2011. Retrieved on May 5, 2011. 
  24. ↑http://www.startribune.com/local/minneapolis/121518294.html
  25. 25.025.1Lambert, Brian. "Plenty of Doubts Ramsey County Can Pull off Stadium Deal", May 11, 2011. Retrieved on May 12, 2011. 
  26. 26.026.1Duchschere, Kevin. "Ramsey County Vikings? $1 Billion Stadium Agreement Says Yes", May 10, 2011. Retrieved on May 10, 2011. 
  27. 27.027.1Associated Press. "Vikings, Ramsey Co. Announce Stadium Deal", May 10, 2011. Retrieved on May 10, 2011. 
  28. ↑"MnDOT: Stadium Road Upgrades to Cost $131 Million", May 18, 2011. Retrieved on March 18, 2013. 
  29. ↑Template:Cite press release
  30. ↑Dyste, Leslie. "Vikings to Play 2 Cold Seasons at TCF Bank Stadium", KSTP, February 15, 2013. Retrieved on March 18, 2013. 
  31. ↑Goldstein, Tom (March 4, 2012). New Vikings Stadium Proposal Isn't For The People. City Pages. Retrieved us bank stadium will call location March 4, 2012.
  32. ↑Ozanian, Mike. "Minneapolis City Council President Uses Bizarre Math To Push New Stadium For Vikings", Forbes, May 23, 2012. Retrieved on May 25, 2012. 
  33. ↑2012 Minn. Laws Ch. 299
  34. ↑Hall, Brian. "Vikings Stadium Approved by State Lawmakers", Fox Sports North, May 10, 2012. Retrieved on May 10, 2012. 
  35. ↑Roper, Eric. "Stadium Gets Final Sign-Off", May 25, 2012. Retrieved on May 25, 2012. 
  36. ↑Minnesota Management and Budget. Minnesota Financial Report November 2012 (pdf). Archived from the original on 28 April 2013. Retrieved on 28 April 2013.
  37. ↑Minnesota Management and Budget. February 2012 Forecast (pdf). Archived from the original on 28 April 2013. Retrieved on 28 April 2013.
  38. ↑Richard Meryhew. "Time for a Plan B for Vikings stadium financing?". Retrieved on 28 April 2013. Archived from the original on 28 April 2013. 
  39. ↑Meryhew, Richard. "Bids Are in on Vikings Stadium Project", August 31, 2012. Retrieved on Us bank stadium will call location 31, 2012. 
  40. ↑Nelson, Tim. "Architects Make Pitches for Vikings Stadium Contract", Minnesota Public Radio, September 7, 2012. Retrieved on September 7, 2012. 
  41. ↑Meryhew, Richard. "Dallas Firm Chosen to Design Viking Stadium", September 28, 2012. Retrieved on September 28, 2012. 
  42. ↑Keller, Tracy (October 17, 2012). Minnesota Vikings to Build New Stadium for Team, Fans, Community. Concordia University. Retrieved on October 17, 2012.
  43. ↑Cite error: Invalid tag; no text was provided for refs named

External links

Источник: https://americanfootball.fandom.com/wiki/U.S._Bank_Stadium

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