val kilmer doc holliday images

Now, together with Wyatt's best friend, Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer), the brothers [img]http://images.rottentomatoes.com/images/user/icons/icon14.gif[/img]. Funko Pop Tombstone figures checklist, set gallery, buying guide, exclusives list, chase variants, release date. Movies set has Doc Holliday. Val Kilmer deserved an Oscar for his portrayal of Doc Holiday in Tombstone. GeorgeBaumes3 sep · It looks like he was skin and bones by the end.

Val kilmer doc holliday images -

Tombstone Ending Explained: What Happened To Each Main Character

There have been more movies and television shows about icon of the Old West Wyatt Earp and his brothers than shootouts in towns on the frontier, but few hold a candle to the 1993 Kurt Russell-led western Tombstone. For nearly 30 years now, George P. Cosmatos' masterpiece has remained one of the most popular westerns thanks to its timeless story, intense gun battles, those luscious mustaches, and classic one-liners from from the famed lawman and his allies.

But with so much time passing since the film's initial release way back when, some may have forgotten how things shake out for Wyatt Earp, his brothers Virgil and Morgan, the charismatic Doc Holiday, and the rest of the characters who show up on either side of the central conflict in Tombstone. That being said, let's talk about the Tombstone ending and how things wrapped up for everyone.

Wyatt Earp (Kurt Russell)

Kurt Russell's Wyatt Earp isn't just front and center throughout the events of Tombstone, he's often the most interesting character on the screen not named Doc Holliday. After taking on the Cowboys at the O.K. Corral and then again multiple times, resulting in the deaths of his most hated enemies, Earp goes to see about Josephine Marcus and attempts to find some peace and harmony in his life after years of the fighting crime, running gambling joints, and going after all those curs with red sashes. Before that, however, he goes to have one last visit with his old friend Doc Holliday, whose health is quickly deteriorating in a Colorado sanatorium.

Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer)

Doc Holiday, who is played masterfully in Tombstone by an in-his-prime Val Kilmer, is often considered the best character in the whole movie, and those people who think that wouldn't be wrong. Even as he's dying of tuberculosis, the gambler and old friend of Wyatt Earp who is unmatched behind the gun and spends much of the movie sedated, playing poker, or poking the fire that is Johnny Ringo. And after Earp said he would take down Ringo, a dying Holliday musters up his remaining strength to prove once and for all that he can't be beat. And as he lay dying in that Colorado sanatorium, Holliday looks down at his bootless feet and says "This is funny."

This final meeting, however, is reportedly the stuff of legend as multiple historians, including Elena Sandridge, have stated that Wyatt Earp only learned of his friend's passing months later.

Virgil Earp (Sam Elliott)

Virgil Earp, played here by Sam Elliott and his legendary mustache, is the oldest and wisest of the Earp brothers and appoints himself the marshal of Tombstone, a decision that brings more trouble to the small town. Following the shootout at the O.K. Corral, Virgil, and other members of the Earps' group, is injured and left handicapped, which ultimately leads to the surviving brothers' decision to leave town once and for all. And even though Wyatt Earp stays back to settle things for good, Virgil is able to escape with his new wife and make a new life for himself.

Morgan Earp (Bill Paxton)

Not to be outdone by older brothers, Morgan Earp, portrayed by the late, great Bill Paxton, is right there in thick of it throughout much of Tombstone, including the famous shootout at the O.K. Corral. Following the events of the showdown with the Cowboys, life seems to go back to normal, but one night while Morgan is playing pool, he is ambushed and shot in the back. The bullet, having done too much damage to Morgan's already weakened body, takes the youngest Earp as his brother, Wyatt, tries to save his life. And although Morgan's story ends here, it's just the beginning of things to come.

Curly Bill Brocius (Powers Boothe)

On the other side of the central conflict in Tombstone is Curly Bill Brocius, one of the senior members of the outlaw gang, the Cowboys. As soon as Brocius, played by Powers Boothe, comes into the picture in the opening minutes of the movie, you know he will meet a painful and justified death for his actions. And we get just that in the final act of the movie when he, and most of his men, are taken out by a vengeful Wyatt Earp after the lawman's brother, Morgan, is viciously murdered. No more carrying out massacres for this cowboy with a hole in his gut.

Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn)

The first time we see Michael Biehn's Johnny Ringo and Doc Holliday encounter one another, we know these will have one final showdown before everything is said and done. And that becomes the case in the final act of Tombstone when Holliday, wanting to finish what the two adversaries had started earlier on, challenges Ringo to one final duel, but not before getting out one more "I'm your huckleberry."

As iconic as a scene it is, in reality, the death of Johnny Ringo remains a mystery to this day, with no one really knowing if the outlaw was brought down by Doc Holliday, Wyatt Earp, or his own gun, as his 1882 death was ruled a suicide.

Ike Clanton (Stephen Lang)

Ike Clanton, one the outlaws in the ranks of the Cowboys who finds himself at odds with Wyatt Earp, is played by Stephen Lang, who is a treat in this role. Whenever trouble is brewing throughout Tombstone, Clanton is involved one way or another, but after the death of essentially every member of his gang, Clanton turns his back on his old lifestyle and convinces Earp to let him live. In the final narration of the film, however, it is revealed that Clanton was killed two years after the events that unfolded in Tombstone.

Billy Clanton (Thomas Haden Church)

Billy Clanton, Ike's younger brother, played here by Thomas Haden Church, isn't so lucky and isn't afforded the opportunity to throw down his red sash. Instead, Clanton is killed during the epic shootout at O.K. Corral, when he, and his fellow Cowboys, refuse to lay down their arms.

Josephine Marcus (Dana Delany)

Josephine Marcus, portrayed by Dana Delany, is the apple of Wyatt Earp's eye for much of Tombstone, and after everything is said and done and the Cowboys have been dealt with, the two end up together in a warm embrace under a blanket of snow. Marcus would join Earp on the rest of the journeys life threw his way, and remained with the legendary law man until his death in 1929.

Allie Earp (Paula Malcomson)

Allie Earp, played by future Deadwood star Paula Malcomson, is last seen leaving Tombstone with her husband, Virgil, following the assassination of Morgan Earp and not long after her own husband was targeted and left with a paralyzed arm. The real Allie Earp remained with Virgil Earp until his passing in 1905, and she would follow more than 40 years later at the age of 97 or 98.

Those are just some of the real-life characters who played a prominent role in the events of Tombstone. With so many more to explore like Henry Hooker (Charlton Heston), Billy Breakenridge (Jason Priestley), Sheriff Johnny Behan (Jon Tenney), and numerous others, it's never a bad idea to go back and look at the lives and times of those who were turned into some of the most iconic western characters in the past 30 years.

Philip grew up in Louisiana (not New Orleans) before moving to St. Louis after graduating from Louisiana State University-Shreveport. When he's not writing about movies or television, Philip can be found being chased by his three kids, telling his dogs to stop yelling at the mailman, or yelling about professional wrestling to his wife. If the stars properly align, he will talk about For Love Of The Game being the best baseball movie of all time.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2558811/tombstone-ending-explained-what-happened-to-each-main-character

Doc Holliday is a figure from the Old West, a gunman and a gambler who was part of the legendary shootout at the O.K. Corral.

Who Was Doc Holliday?

A dentist by trade, Doc Holliday became an icon of the American West and was close friends with fellow gunslinger Wyatt Earp. They were the two most famous faces in what is regarded as the most legendary battle of the West: the gunfight at the O.K. Corral, which cemented Holliday's status as a legend.

Early Years

John Henry ("Doc") Holliday was born August 14, 1851, in Griffin, Georgia. His birth was a celebrated event for his parents, Henry Burroughs Holliday and Alice Jane Holliday, who just a year before had buried their first child, an infant daughter.

He hailed from middle-class stock. His father made his living as a druggist in Griffin, a booming Georgia city that had become a central point for the South's most important export: cotton.

Holliday was adored by his parents, particularly his mother. Born with a cleft palate, Holliday had undergone corrective surgery, but his speech needed considerable work. Ever mindful of her son's condition and what others might say of his birth condition or the way he talked, she spent hours working with him to correct his speech. In addition, she imparted to her son the Southern etiquette and manners that would forever reflect his demeanor.

By all accounts, Holliday was a bright student who excelled at school. His devotion to his books accelerated in 1866 when his mother died of tuberculosis. Her death devastated Holliday, and he poured himself into math and science as a way to cope with her loss.

In 1870, Holliday moved to Philadelphia to attend what is now called the University of Pennsylvania Dental School, where he graduated in 1872.

New Life Out West

For a time, Holliday returned to the South to begin his dental career. But at the age of 23, he fled to Dallas, Texas. The reason for this abrupt move isn't entirely clear, but historical research strongly suggests that Holliday, who'd contracted tuberculosis, thought he'd fare better in the drier air.

Holliday continued with his dental career in his new home, but the Dallas nightlife, especially its drinking and card games, called to him. Soon, his gambling habits directed his life. By the mid-1870s, he'd already developed a strong reputation for card playing and fighting.

After escaping a charge of murder in Dallas, Holliday went on the move. He relocated to a number of different cities before settling down in Dodge City, Kansas, a hot spot for gunfighters and the city where he befriended Wyatt Earp. He later followed Earp to Tombstone, Arizona, a booming mining and frontier town near the Mexican border.

Wyatt Earp And The O.K. Corral

It was in Tombstone that the Holliday legend that would be passed down from one generation to the next was made. On October 26, 1881, Holliday and the Earps found themselves in an intense firefight with cowboys Ike and Billy Clanton, and Frank McLaury and his brother Tom. More than 30 shots were fired in a 30-second battle that came to be known as the shootout at the O.K. Corral. It's arguably the most legendary gunfight ever fought in the American West.

The battle left three men dead and several others wounded, including Holliday. Both Holliday and Earp were arrested for murder but quickly released of the charges.

Following the fight, Morgan Earp was killed, setting his brother Wyatt off on the Earp Vendetta Ride. Holliday accompanied his friend on the ride, which went well into 1882 and saw an assortment of killings.

Final Years and Death

After splitting from Earp, Holliday moved to Glenwood Springs, Colorado. His health continued to deteriorate, and he died of tuberculosis at the Hotel Glenwood on November 8, 1887.

His death reverberated around the country. Despite his lawless ways and his quick temper, Holliday's character was augmented by the same Southern etiquette his mother had taught as a child.

"Few men have been better known to a certain class of sporting people, and few men of his character had more friends or stronger companions," wrote the Denver Republican after his passing. "He represented a class of men who are disappearing in the new West. He had the reputation of being a bunco man, desperado, and bad-man generally, yet he was a very mild-mannered man, was genial and companiable, and had many excellent qualities."

Источник: https://www.biography.com

Tom Stratton

SOME YEARS AGO, Val Kilmer began selling his original artwork on the Internet. Kilmer has been making art for a long time. He takes photographs and creates scrapbook-style media collages with atmospheric abstract paintings resembling blooms of underwater lava. His neon sculpture of a dyspeptic-looking Mahatma Gandhi hung for a while in the restaurant of a fancy hotel in South Beach, and he once cast a tumbleweed in 22-karat gold.

But the project he’s become most famous for is an ongoing series of quasi-self-portraits—Warholian pop-art images of Kilmer in character as Batman or Doc Holliday or Jim Morrison, rendered using stencils and brightly colored enamel paint on 12-inch-by-12-inch squares of reclaimed steel. Sometimes he’ll superimpose a stenciled word like love on the image, or a variation of a quote from one of his movies, such as chicks dig the car. His website didn’t have any Doc Holliday paintings at press time, but for a fan-friendly $150, you could still acquire a portrait of Kilmer as Tom “Iceman” Kazansky—Tom Cruise’s nemesis and beach-volleyball rival in Top Gun—in a range of colors, from neon green to red and blue to eerie red-on-black.

These are not the most technically complex or conceptually weighty paintings. They are not even technically complex or conceptually weighty by the standards of other paintings by Val Kilmer. But there’s an additional layer of meaning to them, because they’re portraits of Val Kilmer by Val Kilmer.

The pictures feel like a sincere effort on his part to use the tools at his disposal
to make sense of his own relationship to a postmodern character called “Val Kilmer,” who is less a person than a collection of symbolic echoes, and who casts a long shadow over the real Val Kilmer’s life despite existing solely in the media landscape and the public’s mind. There is nothing inherently interesting about a piece of steel with a stenciled image of Val Kilmer as Batman on it, but a piece of steel on which Val Kilmer himself has painted a stenciled image of Val Kilmer as Batman as part of a project involving the painting of dozens of Val Kilmer-as-Batman images becomes an act of introspection, a commentary, a reflection on reflections and the indelibility of iconicity.

One afternoon in early March, I discussed all of this with Val Kilmer over the phone. “Yes,” he said. “By repainting the exact same thing using a stencil, it was a way of contemplating the subject while being very strict with what I was inviting myself to do.”

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I asked him if the paintings were a way for him to work through the feeling of being known without being known, to help process the weirdness that comes with everyone looking at you and seeing Iceman or the Lizard King. “It’s not so much me thinking about myself,” he said. “It’s more about the icon. The icon of the warrior. Or the gunslinger—that black-and-white justice that’s part of American history. That’s Doc Holliday. And then Jim Morrison is an iconic rock ’n’ roller, a poet.

“I also found there was a surprising number of fans who wanted original paintings,” he continued, as if to puncture the self-importance of talking about this work in this way. “I sold an embarrassing number of them.”

I think he laughed when he said this; I’m not positive. It was a strange conversation, because there was no way for it not to be. Kilmer, now 60, was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2015. In the opening pages of his new memoir, I’m Your Huckleberry, (Simon & Schuster, April 21, 2020) he has lost his New Mexico home as a result of the 2008 financial crisis and finds himself convalescing at an ex-girlfriend’s place. This is a book of absurd juxtapositions; the home happens to be an Italian Renaissance–style palazzo in Malibu overlooking the ocean, because the ex-girlfriend happens to be Cher. He is there when his condition takes a fateful turn.

“Cher dipped out for afternoon errands,” he writes. “Night fell, and I fell asleep. Suddenly I awoke vomiting blood that covered the bed like a scene out of The Godfather. I prayed immediately, then called 911.” Eventually he endures two tracheotomies. “The cancer miraculously healed much faster than any of the doctors predicted,” he writes, but adds, “It has taken time, and taken a toll. . . . Speaking, once my joy and lifeblood, has become an hourly struggle.” He describes his new voice as sounding “like Marlon Brando after a couple of bottles of tequila. It isn’t a frog in my throat. More like a buffalo.”

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Kilmer and I both live in Los Angeles. COVID-19 had not yet rendered in-person interactions verboten, so I suggested we could talk in person, but he wanted to speak over the phone, through an interpreter—his high school friend and business partner, Brad Koepenick. I would ask a question, I’d hear some indistinct buffalo growls on the other end of the line, and then Koepenick would repeat Kilmer’s response to me in his own voice. We spoke to each other this way for about an hour.

At first there were a few people speaking in the room, and I asked Koepenick if he could identify himself. “I’m Brad Koepenick,” he said. After that, I heard Kilmer speaking—rarrrggh rarrrggh rarrrggh—and then, speaking for Kilmer, Koepenick said, “I am Spartacus.” For all his responses, for clarity, when Koepenick is speaking Kilmer’s words, I’ve attributed them to Kilmer, and I’ve attributed Koepenick’s occasional comments to Koepenick.

To understand Val Kilmer, in all his incarnations, it’s important to recognize that he has been a Christian Scientist since the age of seven or eight. Founded in 1879 by the author Mary Baker Eddy, Christian Science is a form of metaphysical Christianity whose adherents believe, among other things, that physical illness and infirmity result from mental misconception or “negative thinking.” All of Kilmer’s answers to questions regarding physical matters reflect these beliefs—as he writes in his memoir, his physical difficulties have led him deeper into spiritual practice: “When one sense weakens, another grows strong. I have more time to play in the metaphysical forests.”

Simon & Schuster

It says something important about Val Kilmer’s mind, however, that the only historical figure who seems to loom as large in his personal pantheon as Mary Baker Eddy is Mark Twain. Twain was a contemporary of Eddy’s, and while he spoke approvingly of Christian Science’s core principles on occasion, he saw its founder as a charlatan.

In 2012, Kilmer began portraying Twain—whom he views as “the first media-literacy educator”—in a one-man stage show, Citizen Twain, and has spent years working on the script for a movie depicting a fictional meeting between Twain and Eddy, which he still hopes to direct. “Twain is the antagonist in the story,” Kilmer says. “Mary Baker Eddy is the protagonist. Mark Twain can’t help his pride and ego, his madness.”

Simon & Schuster

I asked if this was what Kilmer related to about Twain as a character.

“His madness?” Kilmer asked, and then Koepenick, the interpreter, laughed.

Sure, I said. His pride, his ego, his madness. “Yeah,” Kilmer said. “We all have pride to work through.”

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I WANTED TO TALK to Val Kilmer about pride. When he was young, he was beautiful, and moved through the world with the ease of someone beautiful, from school plays to Juilliard to the movies, such as 1984’s Top Secret!, which instantly made him a movie star for playing a rock star. One year later, with Real Genius, he was already a hyper-opinionated pain in the ass on set—he admits as much in his book—and a year after that came Top Gun, and with it great fortune.

Kilmer was a stage-trained actor with grand aspirations—he writes with chagrin about turning down the lead in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet due to the script’s sexual content and cops to badgering Stanley Kubrick for a meeting he never got. But by the mid-’90s, he’d become an A-list leading man who was reportedly receiving $6 million per picture, which was a different kind of grand.

His movie career hit its zenith in the first five years of the ’90s, when he played Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone’s The Doors, Elvis’s ghost in True Romance, the gunfighter Doc Holliday in Tombstone, Robert De Niro’s demolitions-expert partner in Michael Mann’s bank-heist epic Heat, and Batman in Joel Schumacher’s goofy, garish Batman Forever. Those last two came out in 1995, and after that the going got weird. Whether Kilmer walked away or was released from his contractual obligation to play Batman again due to difficult behavior is unclear. His next projects were the film version of the 1960s TV series The Saint—in which he disappears behind a series of increasingly ludicrous wigs and glasses like somebody who really, really wants you to know he went to Juilliard—and a remake of The Island of Dr. Moreau, which became one of the decade’s most infamously cursed productions.

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In the pages of Huckleberry, Kilmer is equivocal about his reputation as a temperamental collaborator (“In an unflinching attempt to empower directors, actors, and other collaborators to honor the truth and essence of each project . . . I had been deemed difficult and alienated the head of every major studio”), but he talks straight about much of the work that followed (“I have here described myself as a man with lofty goals, and I have a solid two decades’ worth of work that I’d describe as less than lofty”).

There are true gems in Kilmer’s post-Moreau filmography, like the David Mamet human-trafficking thriller Spartan, Shane Black’s manically inventive Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, and MacGruber, in which Kilmer plays a Bond-style villain named Dieter Von Cunth. His hazy-eyed performance as the doomed ’70s porn star John Holmes in 2003’s Wonderland is a riff on his Morrison but funnier and sadder, the Lizard King as lost soul. But for all intents and purposes, Batman was his farewell to franchise-hero parts. Having grown up watching Kilmer in blockbuster movies and then appreciating his work in smaller films, I never thought of him as a cautionary tale about hubris or ego, but Huckleberry points in that direction. His last thought on turning down Lynch is a poignant plea: “Maybe it’s not too late,” he writes. “Maybe one day we can finally work together. A character who lives up on Mulholland and doesn’t speak much? David, I am so sorry I never explained myself.”

valkilmer.com

We never got around to talking about Lynch, though, because we started talking about death, which led us to God, which left no time for much else. Shortly after a 17-year-old Kilmer left his home in L. A. for Juilliard, his younger brother, Wesley, suffered an epileptic seizure in the family’s Jacuzzi and died on the way to the hospital. I asked Kilmer about how he managed to avoid letting this loss define him.

“You have to not see it as a loss,” Kilmer told me. He writes in the book that he’s heard Wesley’s voice on occasion, admonishing him from beyond the grave: “No one wants to see or hear a handsome, successful, talented writer-actor-director who gets the most impossible-to-get girls in the world complain about a damn thing.”

“I’ve had experiences with lots of people that are departed,” Kilmer said on the phone. “For instance, my mother passed on recently, and a few days after, I was aware of her—you could call it her spirit. And she wanted me to be happy, because she was having a reunion with her son Wesley and the love of her life, Bill, her second husband. And they were just all so happy. It was a great release of a burden—because my mom, I felt, wasn’t so happy sometimes, here on earth.”

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Kilmer’s access to the unexplained and extrasensory is a major through line in his book. At 24, in New Mexico, he encounters a black-robed figure in a vision, whom he recognizes as the Angel of Death’s opposite, the Angel of Life, who pulls out Kilmer’s heart and gives him a bigger one. At a comic-book convention, across a table where he’s signing Batman stuff for Batman fans, Kilmer meets a Native American fan who asks him, “What is acting?”—a question that unlocks the meaning of a recurring dream Kilmer’s father had about dying in battle with another Native American man on the frontier. On a backpacking trip in Kenya with his then wife, Joanne Whalley, Kilmer steps outside his tent, and there’s a nine-foot-long monitor lizard sitting there.

I asked Kilmer if he’s thought much about why these messengers and symbols appeared to him, if he believes they were put in his path for a reason, and if all of us could interact with the metaphysical world in this way if we paid closer attention to its manifestations.

“Yes,” Kilmer said. “I do think it has to do with paying attention. And also asking for [those signs]. I’ve always had a very strong relationship with wild animals, especially animals like the kudu, which are very hard to spot, or the badger, or the black leopard, or the black panther.”

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Kilmer said something else after this, and Koepenick, confused, repeated it back to Kilmer as a question: “Kanye forever?” Kilmer said the words again, clarifying, and Koepenick, to me, said, “Wakanda forever.”

“My translator’s higher than hell,” Kilmer said.

“I’ve got to lay off the ganja, you’re right,” Koepenick said.

Is it possible, I asked, to summon these things into your life? To seek these encounters with animals and other spiritual beings?

Simon & Schuster

“I think so, yeah,” Kilmer said. “I mean, I’ve never been interested in hunting. But at the same time—this is a true story that sounds unreal, but I’ve been back to the same spot in South Africa, a hunters’ spot that you have to rent. It’s very expensive because all the animals there are very mature, so their horns are very big. And I’m not a hunter, but I rent the whole area so I can have as wild an experience as possible with very big game. And the most vindictive animal out there is the Cape buffalo. The Cape buffalo has a phenomenal memory, much better than the famed elephant.

“And I’ve been to the same spot three times. And the second time I went there, [a Cape buffalo] smelled me, even though I was the third in a line of humans, and he trotted over until he was right in front of me. And then he stared at me for half an hour, as if to say, ‘Your move—I’m ready.’ And then the third time I went, he did the exact same thing. Except it was more extreme because the wind was blowing harder. And he was very specifically putting his nose in the air, as if he was displaying—I’m smelling, I’m smelling. But this time it was almost like a playful kind of dance over to me. And I had the same guides [as before], and the guides were freaking out. They were babbling in their native tongue: He knows you, he knows you. He’s coming to say hello. They were freaking. And I was like, ‘I know.’

“But that happens a lot,” Kilmer said. “Like honey badgers, you know? Impossible to see in the daytime. I’ve seen them in both the daytime and the nighttime.”

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YOU'VE PLAYED ALL these heroes over the course of your career, I said to Kilmer. There’s a tendency in our culture to frame illness in heroic terms, as a fight for life or an occasion for bravery, particularly when we’re talking about someone we think of as heroic in another context. We make shirts about kicking cancer’s ass and write headlines like "val kilmer battles cancer." For someone who’s been through it, is the idea of a brave battle with cancer the wrong way to think about it?

Kilmer answered without really answering. He talked about mental attitude. “It’s half of the healing—making sure the mind is free, in the morning, of limitations.”

Later, at the end of the call, Kilmer gave me his email address in case I had any follow-up questions. After a week or so, I wrote him an email in which I asked him a few fact-checking questions about the timing of his diagnosis and his recovery, and whether it was difficult to balance his Christian Scientist beliefs with traditional medicine. He didn’t answer, though this might be because I also asked him, very gently, if he had any regrets about being a jerk on movie sets.

That day on the phone, I let the conversation go where it wanted to, reluctant to steer it back to Moreau’s island. I asked Kilmer if it was hard to get to that place of being free and clear, if it was something he had to cultivate. Kilmer said no, that his spiritual practice had been part of his life since childhood. Then he asked, “Alex, do you believe in God?”

Simon & Schuster

I stammered something about being a skeptic, because suddenly I felt guilty telling Christian Science Batman that God does not play a role in my life.

“The infinite,” Kilmer said. “Have you had a sense of the infinite?”

I confirmed to Val Kilmer that I have had a sense of the infinite and stammered again about psychedelics and the notion that something must exist outside the boundaries of our consciousness.

“And I think the physical science is catching up with that,” he said. I asked Kilmer if having cancer tested his faith, if there were moments when he wanted to give up hope. He quoted what turned out to be a line from the Gospel According to Mark, about faith in the face of doubt, about doubt as a specific crucible for faith: “Lord, I believe. Help thou mine unbelief.”

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What you can tell about Kilmer even throughout an odd and stilted back-and-forth is that he’s been through something and emerged from it that much more certain of the one thing he believes most strongly, which is that mental attitude can have transformative effects. As an inveterate doubter, I wanted Kilmer to express doubt or regret or otherwise admit to a sense of powerlessness, which I suppose is contraindicated in a worldview based on the all-importance of mental attitude. It was the paintings conversation all over again—I wanted him to talk about the gulf between our heroic notion of the movie star and the actual flawed human behind it, but he couldn’t, or wouldn’t, see it in those terms.

So I asked him what the most surprising thing was about his illness. He paused for a minute and then said, “Well, something that was reaffirmed to me—on such a level, it was almost shocking—was a sense of universal love, a kind of power and a different sense of love. It was coming into my consciousness and my body while I was at the hospital.”

At one point, Kilmer said, one of his doctors saw him and became animated, even overjoyed. This specific doctor, he said, turned out to have been present during a moment when Kilmer almost slipped away. “He lost me for a while, and he was just so happy I was back. He wanted me to be happier. I was grateful, but I was not surprised.”

Why not?

“Because I don’t believe in death,” Kilmer said.

I asked him how he managed to shake a belief that defines life itself in a fundamental way for so many people on this planet. He spoke again about his little brother’s death, how even though he’d spent years by that point reading and thinking and praying on the Christian Scientist concept of death as an illusion, “having to live it out becomes quite a different proposition.”

Christian Scientists believe any malady can be overcome through mental effort, death included. “And this is what Mrs. Eddy meant when she talked about reinstating primitive Christianity. That’s how she thought Jesus was teaching—teaching others to heal themselves. And that’s what made him a dangerous man. Because he taught people how to be independent, and that’s always a very, very radical thing to do in society.”

Rob Kim

I don’t know enough about science, much less about faith, to argue with Kilmer. And yet, sitting there on the phone, I realized I envied his ability to believe, his confidence in the face of cosmic uncertainty. I envied the security he derives from what he thinks he knows.

It’s extremely human, when faced with adversity, to fall into wallowing and selfishness and sadness and not wanting to go on, I said to Kilmer. How do you avoid surrendering to those feelings?

“Sometimes you have to be aggressive about finding a way to be courageous,” he said, “and not believing what your physical picture may be demanding you accept as real. Like if someone came into the room, and they were sleepwalking, and they were screaming that their feathers were on fire, what would you do?”

Well, you’re not supposed to wake a sleepwalker, I started to say, and then Kilmer interjected.

“You have to find a way to wake them up,” he said, “because they don’t have feathers, and so they’re not on fire.”

Alex PappademasAlex Pappademas has written about pop culture for Esquire, GQ, Grantland, and others.

Источник: https://www.menshealth.com/trending-news/a32162764/val-kilmer-career-cancer-interview/

Val Kilmer Reveals The Real Story Behind Tombstone and Kurt Russell

Setting The Scene

A cult classic, Tombstone chronicles the story of an infamous gunfight that took place in 1881 on the streets of Tombstone, Arizona. While Wyatt Earp (portrayed by actor Kurt Russell) and his brothers attempt to leave their gun-slinging ways behind to start a new life in Arizona, trouble follows them and they become the targets of a rowdy gang of cowboys.

Tombstone movie val kilmer

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The drama in the movie looks like something only Hollywood would be able to come up with, but it all actually happened. And unbeknownst to many, this drama wasn’t only limited to on-screen. Val Kilmer who played the role of Doc Holliday, revealed the turmoil that went on behind the scenes — and what role Kurt Russell played in all of it.

Drama On And Off Screen

Viewers who watch Tombstone are treated to an epic tale of nonstop drama that unfolds before their eyes on-screen. But what few people know is that the film’s drama actually began long before the movie even hit the big screen that one fateful Christmas day in 1993. It all started with who was in charge of directing the film.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

IMDb via Hollywood Pictures and Cingergi Pictures

The original man chosen was Kevin Jarre, a well-respected screenwriter and movie producer who allegedly had a résumé long enough to impress even the most powerful people in Hollywood. Jarre hand-picked the actors and single-handedly wrote the script. For someone with such an impressive portfolio, no one expected what would happen later. First, actor Val Kilmer spoke to the brilliance of Jarre’s script by making a big claim.

The Power Of Words

It’s hard to imagine anyone else playing Doc Holliday. But according to Kilmer, Kevin Jarre’s script was the single thing that sold him on taking the part in the first place. In particular, Kilmer accredits the line “I’m your huckleberry” — which Doc mutters in the O.K. Corral gunfight scene that takes place between the lawmen and outlaw cowboys — as having won him over.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

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Legend has it that this Southern phrase means, “If you want to fight, I’m your man to tangle with.” While a notable line, this isn’t Doc’s most quoted saying. And speaking of which, fans were shocked to hear the truth behind his most famous on-screen line — just as they were shocked to hear what Kilmer later revealed about Russell.

A Shockingly Accurate Line

Chances are, if you’ve seen the film Tombstone, then you definitely remember the exchange between Doc Holliday and a cowboy during the O.K. Corral shootout scene. Fires blaze in the background while shots are fired and people holler in fright.

Tombstone movie

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When a cowboy turns to Doc and tells him, “I’ve got you now, Doc” followed by a slew of curse words, Doc cheerfully responds, “You’re a daisy if you do.” It’s hard to imagine someone saying these words in a moment as intense as this, but according to newspaper reports, this line is, in fact, historically accurate. What’s more, amazingly, this wasn’t the only authentic dialogue Jarre included in the script.

Final Words

Another intense moment in the film takes place when Doc Holliday lies on his deathbed in the emotional final scene. He looks towards his bare feet and mutters, “I’ll be damned.” According to historians, these may well have been the final words of John Henry “Doc” Holliday. Other sources claim he said, in a similar context, “Well, this is funny.”

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

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People have long debated why Doc may have said this, with some arguing it was because he always believed he would die while wearing his boots. Others argue it was because he believed he would die in a gunfight, not in a bed due to tuberculosis. While the exact reasoning behind his words is unknown, one thing that is known for sure is that actor Val Kilmer prepared for this scene in an unusual — and highly uncomfortable — way.

A Dedicated Actor

Before filming the gripping final scene that shows Doc Holliday on his deathbed, actor Val Kilmer was said to have laid down on a bed full of ice. Brr! An ode to his dedication as an actor, Kilmer believed this would force his body into shakes, making it seem more realistic to a viewer that Doc was indeed on his way out of this world.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

Hollywood Pictures/Cinergi Pictures

Kilmer’s tactic worked and many fans believed his performance deserved an Oscar. As for the minority of viewers who thought his performance was overdone, diehard fans will argue they are wrong — just as most people are wrong about another key scene in the film.

The Height Of Thrills

In what is considered by some to be one of film’s most cinematically-arresting scenes, Wyatt Earp (played by Kurt Russell) approaches outlaw Curly Bill by the river. Valiantly risking his life, Wyatt storms into the line of fire of the Cowboys’ leaders.

Tombstone movie val kilmer

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Wyatt miraculously dodges all of Bill’s bullets before he unloads his own shotgun into the famed outlaw. Many critics have contended that this scene is too over-the-top and unrealistic, something that is merely the product of Hollywood fantasies. But Johnny Barnes, one of the Cowboys who survived the actual 1881 gunfight, told the story exactly as it is shown in the movie. And this wasn’t the only authentic part of the film.

Attention to Costuming

Screenwriter Kevin Jarre is widely considered to be the chief mastermind behind Tombstone, for he is the one who was responsible for translating real-life events from 1880s Tombstone, Arizona onto the big screen. Part of keeping with the times’ historical accuracy was ensuring the authenticity of the costumes.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

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According to Val Kilmer, this meant the actors were made to wear real wool ensembles. He alleged that while filming the Birdcage Theater scene, an on-set thermometer read 134 degrees Fahrenheit. Kilmer joked that it gave reason behind why his character, Doc Holliday may have killed people, saying, “It’s just, like, he wore wool in the summer, in the Arizona Territory, and that made him mad.” Apparently, acting in 134 degree weather isn’t the only trick Kilmer brought to set.

It’s All In The Wrist…Or Knuckles

Remember the scene in Tombstone where Doc Holliday is shown playing a game of poker? The camera focuses on his hand and viewers are shown an up-close view of a trick where he is able to essentially roll a coin across his knuckles.

Tombstone movie

Hollywood Pictures/Cingergi Pictures

Unbeknownst to many, this is actually a signature move of Val Kilmer. The actor also performed a similar “finger-walking” trick in two other films: Real Genius and Top Gun. In Real Genius, he used quarters, while in Top Gun he toyed with a pen. This trick certainly added a nice touch to his portrayal of Doc’s gun-fighting, heavy-gambling, hard-drinking character. It’s hard to imagine Doc played by anyone aside from Kilmer, but that was very nearly the case.

A Different Cast

Tombstone could have turned out completely different had the casting been done with anyone other than the final lineup we know today. For example, acclaimed actor Willem Dafoe was nearly cast as Doc Holliday. Wondering what got in the way? The casting crew apparently decided against it after he starred in the controversial Scorsese film, The Last Temptation of Christ.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

Entertainment Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo

But that’s not all. Known for his history of acting in the Western genre, actor Glenn Ford was set to play Marshall White before he fell ill. What’s more, beloved Hollywood leading man Richard Gere was said to have been tapped for Wyatt Earp and Mickey Rourke for Johnny Ringo. But even if the actors changed, one thing is for sure: they would have all still had a certain quality in common.

Mustache Madness

If you look closely at what all the male characters share, you’ll recognize that they all sport perfectly-maintained mustaches. This was a result of writer Kevin Jarre, who, according to actor Michael Biehn, was very particular about the way he wanted the men’s mustaches to look. In fact, he apparently added to the script that he wanted each mustache to curl up at the corners.

Tombstone movie val kilmer

Hollywood Pictures/Cinergi Pictures

And according to Biehn, every male actor with the exception of Jon Tenney (who played Behan) grew their own mustaches. He added, “I think [Tenney] always felt a little bit like the small dog of the group. Because it wasn’t his real mustache.” Aside from the costumes and facial hair, many fans were also surprised to hear about this next legitimate element in the film.

Filming During Monsoon Season

While some films and television series shoot scenes in extreme weather to make the setting seem more real, production crew can’t count on the weather working in their favor. For this reason, they often rely on adding special effects in post-production editing.

Tombstone movie

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With respect to Tombstone, it turned out filming during what’s called the Southwest monsoon season in Arizona had its perks. The lightning and thunder that appear in the background of a number of scenes are actually real and weren’t created artificially. Speaking of which, there’s another spooky element in the film that doesn’t come down to movie magic, but was instead based on something real.

Here Lies Lester Moore

In an early scene where the Earps enter town, a headstone is shown in a cemetery. It reads, “Here lies Lester Moore, Four slugs from a .44, No Les No More.” If you get spooky vibes just from reading it, just wait until you hear the far creepier truth behind the prop.

Tombstone Arizona headstone

David Litschel/Alamy Stock Photo

The epitaph wasn’t made up by producers, but was instead taken from a real tombstone located in — you guessed it — none other than Tombstone, Arizona itself. A replica of the original can also be found at Knott’s Berry Farm, which is where this scene — along with a number of others — was filmed. But beyond the staging, some of the minds behind Tombstone gave it a credibility like no other.

Nods To Hollywood Westerns

Just like historical accuracy, Tombstone has nods to Hollywood Westerns woven into its plot. For example, veteran Western actor Harry Carey Jr. plays lawman Marshal Fred White, while Charlton Heston plays rancher Henry Hooker. But above all of its other ingredients, perhaps most key in setting Tombstone‘s tone and authentic feel is the film’s narrator, Hollywood legend Robert Mitchum.

Robert Mitchum

Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

Mitchum was originally meant to play the role of Old Man Clanton. Unfortunately, as fate would have it, on the first day of filming he fell off a horse and hurt his back. He was forced to withdraw from the role but instead became the narrating voice at the beginning and end of the film. While most things in Tombstone were planned and scripted, Mitchum’s role change wasn’t. Such was also the case for another key performance.

Directed To Improvise

In Tombstone, renowned Hollywood actor Billy Bob Thornton makes an appearance in the iconic poker game scene, where he plays the part of a bellyaching card player. But instead of receiving scripted lines, Thornton was directed to improvise. He was allegedly told by the filmmakers to act like a disgruntled bully — and from the looks of it, he delivered.

Tombstone movie

Hollywood Pictures/Cinergi Pictures

Fans of Thornton say this is a true testament to his abilities as an actor, and we couldn’t agree more. Not only that, but it speaks to why Tombstone turned out to be such a great film. The actors, filling roles both big and small, were an incredible collection of undeniable talents. That’s what helped them land big roles after appearing in the film –and in the case of one actor in particular, it directly contributed to a major career move.

Doc Holliday And Batman

True Val Kilmer fans know that the actor played the role of both Doc Holliday in Tombstone and the role of Gotham City’s famous caped crusader in Batman Forever. But what few know is that Kilmer allegedly landed the role of Batman as a result of director Joel Schumacher having seen his performance in Tombstone. Schumacher decided he had to be cast.

Tombstone movie val kilmer kurt russell

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Not only that, but the connection between the two movies runs deeper than what meets the eye. Rumor has it that the original Batman, Adam West, also played Doc in three different 1959 television Westerns — which just so happens to be the same year Val Kilmer was born. And just like Batman, Tombstone became a financial success — despite the considerable odds that had been stacked against it.

Conflicting Visions

In a 2017 blog post by Val Kilmer, he revealed all the drama that took place behind the scenes of Tombstone. He detailed how the original director, Kevin Jarre, had a vision of the tale being filmed exactly like an old 1940s Western. However, this went against the desires of the production crew, who wanted a “modern retelling of an old story.”

George Cosmatos, Tombstone movie

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Jarre was fired because of this, causing a wave of panic among the actors, who feared the production studio might scrap the movie instead of finding a new director. Thankfully, actor Kurt Russell, who played Wyatt Earp, stepped up to the plate. Per the recommendation of one Sylvester Stallone, he helped hire George P. Cosmatos as director. Val Kilmer challenged Cosmatos’ role, however — and would divulge a secret that left everyone shocked.

A Well-Kept Secret Revealed

According to Kilmer, Russell hired Cosmatos to essentially act as the “yes man” on set. In other words, Cosmatos wasn’t the film’s true director; Russell was. And the two of them had a promise that they would keep Russell’s role as “ghost director” a secret. Kilmer alleged that Russell sacrificed his own role, pulling from his character’s dialogue and losing sleep over “draw[ing] up shot lists.”

Tombstone movie

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He wrote, “Everyone cared, don’t get me wrong, but Kurt put his money where his mouth was, and not a lot of stars extend themselves for the cast and crew. Not like he did.” In Kilmer’s words, “Kurt is solely responsible for Tombstone‘s success, no question.” And these next stats certainly speak to the film’s success.

Proving The Skeptics Wrong

During its production, Tombstone garnered the attention of its fair share of skeptics who believed the film would fail. Besides, with all the chaos that surrounded finding a director, could they really be blamed? Luckily, they didn’t have to be heeded, as the movie became a financial success.

Tombstone movie

Photo 12/Alamy Stock Photo

Following its release on December 25, 1993 by Hollywood Pictures, the film grossed $56.5 million in ticket sales in the United States. And according to Box Office Mojo, it stands as the 16th highest-grossing Western film released since 1979. Talk about a turn-around from when it was first getting started! So what did the actors have to say about their time on set?

The Biggest Challenge

While actor Michael Biehn admitted that “the biggest challenge for everybody in [the] picture, and particularly Kurt Russell, was that they got rid of Kevin Jarre,” he still said he greatly enjoyed his time on set. He even claimed his character, Johnny Ringo, was one of his favorite roles to play.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

Michael Biehn/IMDb via Hollywood Pictures and Cingergi Pictures

Biehn admittedly connected with Johnny Ringo’s character, who he said loved “living life on the edge” and engaging in activities that gave him an adrenaline rush. The actor added, “He was just a drunk guy, as you can imagine living back then in the Old West. You think about all the saloons and the all the warm beers, no air conditioning.” Biehn doesn’t blame Johnny’s thirst for adventure, arguing there was little to do in Tombstone aside from drink. Speaking of which, one actor in particular had a bit of a problem on set.

Method Acting

Member of The Cowboys outlaw group, Ike Clanton is often shown on screen clashing with the different famous lawmen: Wyatt, Virgil, and Morgan Earp, as well as Doc Holliday. He appears to be crazed though cowardly, and often seems drunk.

Tombstone movie

Hollywood Pictures/Cinergi Pictures

A member of the Tombstone production crew gave insight into the actor who played Ike, Stephen Lang. He reportedly said that Lang was actually drunk for much of the movie’s filming. That is, he spent a lot of his time on set acting under the influence. Some may call it reckless, others may call it method acting. But all we’re thinking is: no wonder Ike’s behavior looked so real! And the same can be said about this next scene. 

A Painful Bar Fight

Remember the scene where Virgil Earp (played by Sam Elliott) is shot and then teeters into a bar, only to fall down in excruciating pain and require his brothers’ help to get up? Apparently, some of the pain that viewers see on screen is actually real.

Tombstone movie val kilmer kurt russell

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If you watch it over again, you might be able to see Wyatt Earp (played by Kurt Russell) accidentally slam Virgil (Sam Elliott)’s head into the bar while attempting to help him get back on all fours. While also a climactic scene in the film, it wasn’t the only one. According to one actor, another scene in particular had fans everywhere up in arms, and for all the wrong reasons.

Reeling Johnny Ringo Fans

One of the film’s most intense moments is when Doc Holliday shoots Johnny Ringo. While it left dedicated Johnny fans reeling, the actor portraying him, Michael Biehn, later admitted in an interview that he believed it was the right thing to do.

Tombstone movie val kilmer

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He said of Val Kilmer (Doc Holliday) shooting him: “I wanted him to shoot me!” Virgil Earp actor Sam Elliott also added, “That thing was just incredible…and you just know this moment is coming all the way through the film. You’re salivating by the time it does come.” And we bet you didn’t know the scoop behind this next scene, either.

Train 5150

One of the most iconic scenes in the film is undoubtedly when Wyatt Earp surprises Stillwell and Ike Clanton at the train station. Almost instantaneously, Wyatt shoots Stillwell and leaves Ike on the floor practically beginning for mercy. Wyatt then delivers his famous line, “You tell ’em I’m coming, and Hell’s coming with me!”

Tombstone movie

mauritius images GmbH/Alamy Stock Photo

While a memorable scene, many viewers were left unaware of its aspects. There’s allegedly a carefully-placed Easter egg hidden in one of the shots: the train Wyatt stands in front of reads “5150,” which is the police code in California that is used to signify a crazy person. But nothing’s as cool as this next fun fact.

Real-Life Wyatt Earp

By now, you’ve probably realized that those in charge of bringing Tombstone to life put a lot of effort into making it historically accurate. But did you know that they even cast Wyatt Earp’s actual real-life fifth cousin, who also happens to be named Wyatt Earp himself? That’s right: he’s the actor who plays outlaw Billy Claiborne in the film.

Tombstone movie

Photo 12/Alamy Stock Photo

His character Billy was at O.K. Corral during the shootout, yet ran from the scene because he was unarmed. After filming Tombstone, the actor went on to appear in the TV series Sordid Lives: The Series, as well as doing voiceover work.

Sources:Trend Chaser, Movie Web, New Ravel

Источник: https://www.directexpose.com/val-kilmer-story-tombstone/

Tombstone’s Resident Photographers Caught The Wild West In All Its Gritty Glory

How do we know so much about the Old West? There are Western movies, of course. But what of the people behind that popular image of wild frontiers and tobacco-spitting cowboys…?

Messy Nessy Chic looked behind the scenes at Fly’s Photography, based in the legendary location of Tombstone, Arizona.

Vintage photography in Tombstone was done on the Fly

Fly's Photography in Tombstone

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Run by Camillus “Buck” Fly and his wife Mary “Mollie” Goodrich, the business was part studio, part boarding house.

Messy Nessy Chic writes that, as well as “capturing Tombstone’s residents and daily life,” the Flys produced “the only known images of Native Americans before they lost the war to the white man.”

Without the enterprising couple, we wouldn’t have these vintage photos depicting what life was really like back then.

The people of Tombstone, Arizona

Meet Semantha Fallon, from an image taken in 1879. Fallon was a business owner and, according to Messy Nessy Chic, dated the founder of the town himself!

Semantha (or Samantha) Fallon

Semantha (or Samantha) Fallon, owner of a hotel and millinery shop in Tombstone, Arizona.

Tombstone historian George Parsons in full, off-duty cowboy mode.

George W. Parsons

George W. Parsons, 1883.

This photo is of Apache May, a Native American child reportedly found and raised by John Slaughter of Tombstone.

Apache May Slaughter, baby photo taken by Fly's Photography

Apache May Slaughter, the adopted daughter of John and Viola Slaughter.

Notable names of the Old West associated with the Flys

Doc Holliday and his spouse, the vividly named Big Nose Kate — or Mary Katherine Horony-Cummings — apparently laid their hats at the Flys’ boarding house.

A portrait believed to be of Doc Holliday.

Portrait of Doc Holliday

Portrait of Doc Holliday

While initially listed at auction as a photo of Josephine Sarah Marcus (Wild West gunslinger Wyatt Earp’s wife), it is now speculated that the photo could be of Big Nose Kate.

Picture of woman -- may be Big nose Kate or Josephine Sarah Marcus

This photo was listed at auction as Josephine Sarah Marcus, common-law wife of Wyatt Earp, but may be Big Nose Kate, common-law wife of Doc Holliday.

Camillus “Buck” Fly was on the scene for the Gunfight At The O.K. Corral

One advantage — if you want to see it that way — of living in proximity to the likes of Doc Holliday is you witness history in the making.

1881’s Gunfight At The O.K. Corral saw Wyatt and Virgil Earp, plus fellow gunslingers, go up against the Clanton boys and their trigger-happy associates. The whole bloody event was over in 30 seconds.

om McLaury, Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton (left to right) lie dead after the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Tom McLaury, Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton (left to right) lie dead after the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Buck was on hand to take a picture of the losing side. Tom and Frank McLaury are shown here, alongside Billy Clanton. Messy Nessy Chic states that this is the only photographic reference historians have for Clanton, who was 19 at the time of his death.

Was Buck tempted to get in the thick of the action, photojournalist style? Reportedly, there was pressure on him not to.

Legends of America writes that he “did not photograph the aftermath of the shootout, but legend has it that he was threatened by one of the Earp’s if he did.”

Interestingly, Buck found himself taking a more proactive role as Sheriff of Cochise County between 1894-6.

Major peace negotiations between Geronimo and Gen George Crook were captured on film

It wasn’t all shootouts in the Wild West. At times, people tried to avoid reaching for their holsters.

Here we see the famous Apache Chief Geronimo sitting down with his men and those of General George Crook in 1886. There to record the moment was Camillus “Buck” Fly.

Geronimo poses with members of his tribe and General George Crook's staff during peace negotiations on March 27, 1886.

Geronimo poses with members of his tribe and General George Crook’s staff during peace negotiations on March 27, 1886.

What happened to the Flys?

The negotiations didn’t go well. And things didn’t turn out great for Buck and Mollie, either. They eventually separated, with Mollie running things in Tombstone and Buck relocating to the Arizona town of Bisbee.

Fly’s Photography suffered not just one but two fires. Mollie snapped the blaze here in 1912.

Fly's Photography fire

1912 blaze at Fly’s Photography

Camillus passed away in 1901, aged 52. Mollie passed in 1925. Thankfully, she made a generous donation of photos to the Smithsonian Institution.

You can visit their gallery today, though it’s a modern recreation.

modern-day flys photography

Photo Credit: Marine 69-71 / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0

Tombstone made its mark on American history

Another permanent tribute to the Wild West is this statue of Wyatt Earp. It stands in Tombstone next to the house where he lived.

This statue is a depiction of the famous lawman Wyatt Earp situated beside the Earp House in Tombstone, AZ.

Photo Credit: Mikeparrish410 / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0

Earp has been brought to life on film by actors such as Henry Fonda (My Darling Clementine, 1946), Burt Lancaster (Gunfight At The O.K. Corral, 1957), and Kevin Costner (Wyatt Earp, 1994).

Costner’s Wyatt Earp was not a box office success. More luck was had the previous year with Tombstone.

This time Kurt Russell played Earp, with Sam Elliott and Bill Paxton as brothers Virgil and Morgan. It was also notable for Val Kilmer’s performance as Doc Holliday.

Photo Credit: Superyesito / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0

Photo Credit: Superyesito / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0

More from us:We’re Not In Kansas Anymore: Judy Garland’s Dress From ‘The Wizard Of Oz’ Found In Shoebox

Camillus “Buck” Fly himself had his own brush with the movies, albeit nearly a century after his death. He was featured in the 1989 TV movie Desperado: The Outlaw Wars.

Popular character actor Brad Dourif, better known as the voice of Chucky in Child’s Play, took the role.

Источник: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2021/07/14/vintage-tombstone-photos/

Tombstone (film)

1993 film

Tombstone is a 1993 American Western film directed by George P. Cosmatos, written by Kevin Jarre (who was also the original director, but was replaced early in production[5][6]), and starring Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer, with Sam Elliott, Bill Paxton, Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, and Dana Delany in supporting roles, as well as narration by Robert Mitchum.

The film is loosely based on events in Tombstone, Arizona, including the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and the Earp Vendetta Ride, during the 1880s. It depicts a number of Western outlaws and lawmen, such as Wyatt Earp, William Brocius, Johnny Ringo, and Doc Holliday.

Tombstone was released by Hollywood Pictures in theatrical wide release in the United States on December 25, 1993, grossing $56.5 million in domestic ticket sales. The film was a financial success, and for the Western genre, it ranks number 16 in the list of highest-grossing films since 1979. Six months later, the similarly themed film Wyatt Earp was released with far less commercial success.[7] Critical reception was generally positive, with Kilmer's performance receiving critical acclaim. The film has become a cult classic since its release.[8]The Making of Tombstone, a book about the film, was published in 2018.[9]

Plot[edit]

In 1879, members of an outlaw gang known to wear red sashes called the Cowboys, led by "Curly Bill" Brocius, ride into a Mexican town and interrupt a local police officer's wedding. They then proceed to massacre the assembled policemen in retribution for killing two of their fellow gang members. Shortly before being shot, a local priest warns them that their acts of murder and savagery will be avenged, referencing the biblical fourth horseman.

Wyatt Earp, a retired peace officer with a notable reputation, reunites with his brothers Virgil and Morgan in Tucson, Arizona, where they venture on toward Tombstone to settle down. There they encounter Wyatt's long-time friend Doc Holliday, who is seeking relief in the dry climate from his worsening tuberculosis. Josephine Marcus and Mr. Fabian are also newly arrived with a traveling theater troupe. Meanwhile, Wyatt's common-law wife, Mattie Blaylock, is becoming dependent on laudanum. Wyatt and his brothers begin to profit from a stake in a gambling emporium and saloon when they have their first encounter with the Cowboys.

As tensions rise, Wyatt is pressured to help rid the town of the Cowboys, though he is no longer a lawman. Curly Bill begins shooting at the sky after a visit to an opium den and is told by Marshal Fred White to relinquish his firearms. Curly Bill instead shoots the marshal dead, and is forcibly taken into custody by Wyatt. The arrest infuriates Ike Clanton and the other Cowboys. Curly Bill stands trial, but is found not guilty due to a lack of witnesses. Virgil, unable to tolerate lawlessness, becomes the new marshal and imposes a weapons ban within the city limits. This leads to a gunfight at the O.K. Corral, in which Billy Clanton and the McLaury brothers are killed. Virgil and Morgan are wounded, and the allegiance of county sheriff Johnny Behan with the Cowboys is made clear. As retribution for the Cowboy deaths, Wyatt's brothers are ambushed; Morgan is killed, while Virgil is left handicapped. A despondent Wyatt and his family leave Tombstone and board a train, with Ike Clanton and Frank Stilwell close behind, preparing to ambush them. Wyatt sees that his family leaves safely, and then surprises the assassins. He kills Stilwell, but lets Clanton live to send a message: Wyatt announces that he is a U.S. marshal, and that he intends to kill any man he sees wearing a red sash. Wyatt, Doc, a reformed Cowboy named Sherman McMasters, Texas Jack Vermillion, and Turkey Creek Jack Johnson, form a posse to seek revenge.

Wyatt and his posse are ambushed in a riverside forest by the Cowboys. Wyatt walks into the creek, miraculously surviving the enemy fire, and kills Curly Bill along with many of his men. Curly Bill's second-in-command, Johnny Ringo, becomes the new head of the Cowboys. When Doc's health worsens, the group is accommodated by Henry Hooker at his ranch. Ringo lures McMasters into the Cowboys' clutches under the pretense of parley and then sends a messenger (dragging McMasters' corpse) to tell Wyatt that he wants a showdown to end the hostilities; Wyatt agrees. Wyatt sets off for the showdown, not knowing that Doc has already arrived at the scene. Doc confronts a surprised Ringo, who was expecting Wyatt, and challenges him to a duel to finish their "game," which Ringo accepts (Doc and Ringo have already had a couple of stand offs in Tombstone that were ultimately broken up). Wyatt runs when he hears a gunshot, only to encounter Doc, who has killed Ringo. They then press on to complete their task of eliminating the Cowboys, although Clanton escapes their vengeance by renouncing his red sash. Doc is sent to a sanatorium in Colorado, where he dies of his illness. At Doc's urging, Wyatt pursues Josephine to begin a new life.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The film was shot primarily on location in Arizona. Shooting began in May 1993. The film was supposed to be screenwriter Kevin Jarre's first job as director, but he was quickly overwhelmed by the job–failing to get needed shots and falling behind the shooting schedule. A month into filming, he was fired by producer Andrew Vajna and replaced with George P. Cosmatos. Michael Biehn, a close friend of Jarre, considered quitting. Biehn recalled feeling (director) Cosmatos "...had no understanding or appreciation of the screenplay."[10] By the time of Cosmatos' arrival, though, all actors stayed on board.[11] The new director brought a demanding, hard-nosed sensibility to the set, which led to conflicts with some of the crew members (most famously with cinematographer William Fraker). Meanwhile, Kurt Russell worked quickly with producer James Jacks to pare down Jarre's sprawling script, deleting subplots and emphasizing the relationship between Wyatt and Doc.[12]

Russell has stated that it was he, and not Cosmatos, who actually directed the film, as Jarre's departure led to the studio's request.[13] Russell stated that Cosmatos was brought in as a "ghost director" as a front man because Russell did not want it to be known that he was directing.[13] Co-star Val Kilmer has supported Russell's statements about working heavily behind the scenes and stating that Russell "essentially" directed the film, but stopped short of saying that Russell did the actual directing.[14] Biehn stated that Russell never directed him personally.[15]

Cosmatos was highly focused on accurate historical detail, including the costumes, props, customs, and scenery, to give them authenticity. All the mustaches in the movie were real. Val Kilmer practiced for a long time on his quick-draw speed, and gave his character a Southern Aristocrat accent. Two locations were used to make the town of Tombstone look bigger. The scene in which Wyatt throws an abusive card dealer (Billy Bob Thornton) out of a saloon was to show that Wyatt was a man who used psychology to intimidate. Thornton's lines in the scene were ad-libbed, as he was only told to "be a bully".[16]

Music[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

Tombstone: Complete Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
ReleasedMarch 16, 2006
Length1:25:29
LabelIntrada

The original motion picture soundtrack for Tombstone was originally released by Intrada Records on December 25, 1993.[17] On March 16, 2006, an expanded two-disc version of the film score was also released by Intrada Records.[18] The score was composed and produced by Bruce Broughton, and performed by the Sinfonia of London. David Snell conducted most of the score (although Broughton normally conducts his own scores, union problems mandated another conductor here), while Patricia Carlin edited the film's music.[19]

The score contains strong echoes of Max Steiner's music for John Ford's The Searchers (1956) with variations on the 'Indian Traders' theme used midway through the Ford movie. The album begins with the Cinergi logo, composed by Jerry Goldsmith and conducted by Broughton.

Release[edit]

Home media[edit]

Following its cinematic release in theaters, the film was released on VHS video format on November 11, 1994.[20] The Region 1 Codewidescreen edition of the film was released on DVD in the United States on December 2, 1997. Special features for the DVD only include original theatrical trailers.[21] A director's cut of Tombstone was also officially released on DVD on January 15, 2002. The DVD version includes a two-disc set and features "The Making of Tombstone" featurette in three parts; "An Ensemble Cast"; "Making an Authentic Western"; and "The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral". Other features include an audio commentary by director George P. Cosmatos, an interactive Tombstone timeline, the director's original storyboards for the O.K. Corral sequence, the Tombstone "Epitaph" – an actual newspaper account, the DVD-ROM feature "Faro at the Oriental: Game of Chance", and a collectible Tombstone map.[22]

The widescreen high-definition Blu-ray Disc edition of the theatrical cut was released on April 27, 2010, featuring the making of Tombstone, director's original storyboards, trailers, and TV spots.[23] A supplemental viewing option for the film in the media format of video-on-demand is available, as well.[24]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Tombstone premiered in movie theaters six months before Costner and Kasdan's version, Wyatt Earp, on December 24, 1993, in wide release throughout the United States. During its opening weekend, the film opened in third place, grossing $6,454,752 in business showing at 1,504 locations.[4][25] The film's revenue increased by 35% in its second week of release, earning $8,720,255. For that particular weekend, the film stayed in third place, screening in 1,955 theaters. The film went on to earn $56,505,065 in total ticket sales in the North American market.[4] It ranks 20th out of all films released in 1993.[26]

Critical response[edit]

Rotten Tomatoes reported that 74% of 46 sampled critics gave the film a positive review, with an average score of 6.30/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "If you're seeking a stylish modern western with a solid story and a well-chosen ensemble cast, Tombstone is your huckleberry.".[27] Following its cinematic release in 1993, Tombstone was named "one of the 5 greatest Westerns ever made" by True West Magazine. The film was also called "One of the year's 10 best!" by KCOP-TV in Los Angeles, California.[28]

Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert of Siskel & Ebert originally thought they would have to miss reviewing the film, as they could not get a screening, but as Ebert explained, "... a strange thing started to happen. People started telling me they really liked Val Kilmer's performance in Tombstone, and I heard this everywhere I went. When you hear this once or twice, it's interesting, when you hear it a couple of dozen times, it's a trend. And when you read that Bill Clinton loved the performance, you figured you better catch up with the movie." Ultimately, Ebert recommended the movie while Siskel did not.

Ebert was later to refer to Tombstone in future reviews, comparing it favorably to Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp ("It forced the comparison upon me.") and, in his review of Wild Bill, singling out Val Kilmer's portrayal as "the definitive saloon cowboy of our time."[29][30] In his review of Kurt Russell's Dark Blue, he stated, "Every time I see Russell or Val Kilmer in a role, I'm reminded of their Tombstone, which got lost in the year-end holiday shuffle and never got the recognition it deserved."[31]

Grafted onto this traditional framework, the film's meditative aspects are generally too self-conscious to fit comfortably. Especially when the movie tries to imagine a more enlightened role for women in the Old West, the screenplay begins to strain.
—Stephen Holden, The New York Times[32]

In a mixed review, Chris Hicks writing in the Deseret News said, "aside from Russell and Val Kilmer's scene-stealing, sickly, alcoholic Doc Holliday, there are so many characters coming and going, with none of them receiving adequate screen time, that it becomes difficult to keep track of them all." But he did comment, "some very entertaining moments here, with Russell spouting memorable tough-guy lines". Overall, he felt, "Taken on its own terms, with some lowered expectations, Western fans will have fun."[33]Emanuel Levy of the Variety staff believed the film was a "tough-talking but soft-hearted tale" which was "entertaining in a sprawling, old-fashioned manner." Regarding screenwriter Jarre's dialogue, he noted, "Despite the lack of emotional center and narrative focus, his script contains enough subplots and colorful characters to enliven the film and ultimately make it a fun, if not totally engaging, experience." He also singled out Val Kilmer as the standout performance.[34] The film, however, was not without its detractors. James Berardinelli writing for ReelViews offered a mixed-to-negative review, recalling how he thought, "The first half of Tombstone isn't an example of great filmmaking, but it is engaging. There's a sense of growing inevitability as events build to the shoot-out at the OK Corral. The melodramatic "serious" moments are kept to a minimum, and the various gunfights are choreographed with style and tension. Then, at the one-hour ten-minute mark, the Clanton gang and the Earps square off. From there, things get progressively worse. Not only is the last hour anticlimactic, but it's dull. Too many scenes feature lengthy segments of poorly-scripted dialogue, and, in some cases, character motivation becomes unclear. The gunplay is more repetitious than exciting. The result—a cobbled-together morass of silly lines and shoot- outs—doesn't work well."[35]

Stephen Holden writing in The New York Times saw the film as being a "capacious Western with many modern touches, the Arizona boom town and site of the legendary O.K. Corral has a seedy, vaudevillian grandeur that makes it a direct forerunner of Las Vegas." He expressed his satisfaction with the supporting acting, saying, "[the] most modern psychological touch is its depiction of Josephine (Dana Delany), the itinerant actress with whom Wyatt falls in love at first sight, as the most casually and comfortably liberated woman ever to set foot in 1880s Arizona."[32] Critic Louis Black, writing for The Austin Chronicle, viewed Tombstone as a "mess" and that there were "two or three pre-climaxes but no climax. Its values are capitalist rather than renegade, which is okay if it's metaphoric rather than literal. Worse, as much as these actors heroically struggle to focus the film, the director more successfully hacks it apart."[36]Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a C– rating, calling it "preposterously inflated" at "135 minutes long". He observed the film as being a "three-hour rough cut that's been trimmed down to a slightly shorter rough cut" with "all that holds the film together is Kurt Russell's droll machismo."[37] Author Geoff Andrew of Time Out commented, "Kilmer makes a surprisingly effective and effete Holliday". He negatively acknowledged that there was "a misguided romantic subplot and the ending rather sprawls" but ultimately exclaimed the film was "'rootin', tootin' entertainment with lots of authentic facial hair."[38]

Richard Harrington of The Washington Post highlighted the film's shortcomings by declaring, "too much of Tombstone rings hollow. In retrospect, not much happens and little that does seems warranted. There are so many unrealized relationships you almost hope for redemption in a longer video version. This one is unsatisfying and unfulfilling."[39] Alternately though, columnist Bob Bloom of the Journal & Courier openly remarked that the film "May not be historically accurate, but offers a lot of punch for the buck." He concluded by saying it was "A tough, guilty-pleasure Western."[40]

Although Val Kilmer’s performance as Doc Holliday was praised, he did not get an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. But he did however get nominated for Best Male Performance and Most Desirable Male at the MTV Movie Awards.

Other media[edit]

Novelization[edit]

A paperback novel of the same name adapted from Kevin Jarre's screenplay, written by Giles Tippette and published by Berkley Publishers, was released on January 1, 1994. The book dramatizes the real-life events of the gunfight at the O.K. Corral and Earp Vendetta Ride, as depicted in the film. It expands on Western genre ideas in Jarre's screenplay.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^"DVD Reviews – Tombstone – Director's Cut & Original Versions". The Digital Bits. Archived from the original on January 1, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  2. ^"Tombstone". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  3. ^"Tombstone". The Numbers. Archived from the original on November 18, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  4. ^ abc"Tombstone". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  5. ^Myrna Oliver (April 27, 2005). "George P. Cosmatos, 64; Director Was Known for Saving Troubled Projects". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 21, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  6. ^Richard Harrington (December 12, 1993). "'Tombstone' (R)". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 2, 2019. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  7. ^"Genres Western 1979–present". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  8. ^Spangenberger, Phil. "Tombstone 25—A Western Classic's Reunion". True West Magazine. True West Publishing. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  9. ^The Making of Tombstone: Behind the Scenes of the Classic Modern Western (2018), by John Farkis, ISBN 9781476675862
  10. ^Biehn, Michael; Anderson, Jim. "Shooting Tombstone". Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  11. ^Jason Priestley (May 6, 2014). Jason Priestley: A Memoir. HarperOne. ISBN 978-0062357892. Retrieved November 7, 2015.
  12. ^"SHOOT FIRST (ASK QUESTIONS LATER)". ew.com. Archived from the original on September 14, 2018. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  13. ^ ab"The Western Godfather". True West. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  14. ^Parker, Ryan. "Val Kilmer Says Kurt Russell Essentially Directed 'Tombstone'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on July 9, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  15. ^“Everything Had to Go Right”: What Happened to ‘Terminator’ Star Michael Biehn
  16. ^George P. Cosmatos. Tombstone DVD Audio Commentary.
  17. ^"Tombstone Original Motion Picture Soundtrack". Archived from the original on March 20, 2021. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  18. ^"Tombstone Soundtrack". Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  19. ^"Tombstone (1993)". Yahoo! Movies. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  20. ^Tombstone VHS Format. ASIN 6303109950.
  21. ^"Tombstone DVD". Video.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  22. ^"Tombstone Vista Series DVD". Video.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  23. ^"Tombstone Widescreen Blu-ray". Barnes & Noble. Archived from the original on July 7, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  24. ^"Tombstone: VOD Format". Archived from the original on September 19, 2015. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  25. ^"December 24–26, 1993 Weekend". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  26. ^"1993 Domestic Grosses". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  27. ^Tombstone (1993)Archived June 5, 2020, at the Wayback Machine. Rotten Tomatoes. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  28. ^Tombstone – DVD AcclaimArchived July 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Video.com. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  29. ^Ebert, Roger (June 24, 1994). Wyatt EarpArchived February 7, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  30. ^Ebert, Roger (December 1, 1995). Wild BillArchived February 7, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  31. ^Ebert, Roger (February 21, 2003). Dark BlueArchived February 6, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  32. ^ abHolden, Stephen (December 24, 1993). A Fractious Old West in a Modern Moral UniverseArchived August 10, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  33. ^Hicks, Chris (December 28, 1993). TombstoneArchived August 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Deseret News. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  34. ^Levy, Emanuel (December 22, 1993). TombstoneArchived November 8, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Variety. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  35. ^Berardinelli, James (December 25, 1993). TombstoneArchived February 24, 2021, at the Wayback Machine. ReelViews. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  36. ^Black, Louis (December 31, 1993). TombstoneArchived June 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  37. ^Gleiberman, Owen (January 14, 1994). Tombstone (1993)Archived October 21, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  38. ^Andrew, Geoff (1993). TombstoneArchived October 19, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Time Out. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  39. ^Harrington, Richard (December 25, 1993). Tombstone (R)Archived January 2, 2019, at the Wayback Machine. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  40. ^Bloom, Bob (September 20, 2003). Tombstone. Journal & Courier. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  41. ^Tippette, Giles (January 1, 1994). Tombstone. Berkley. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tombstone_(film)

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Review: ‘Val’ offers a deep portrait of the actor Val Kilmer

In his latest film, Val Kilmer gets an unusual screen credit for a bona fide Hollywood movie star: cinematographer.

That’s because the documentary “Val” is built on thousands of hours Kilmer filmed since he was a boy — growing up, on movie sets, in cars, in hospitals. This is a lifetime-in-the-making cinematographer’s credit.

Thanks to Kilmer’s relentless drive to document things, “Val” is a remarkably intimate film and a moving one, too. For a performer who has come off as chilly and difficult, this doc doesn’t counter those perceptions as much as explain them.

“I have behaved poorly. I have behaved bravely. I have behaved bizarrely to some. I deny none of this and have no regrets because I have lost and found parts of myself that I never knew existed,” he says toward the end. “And I am blessed.”

Full Coverage: Film Reviews

Actually, he leaves much of the talking to his son. The elder Kilmer’s voice has been impaired from throat cancer treatments and Jack Kilmer narrates the majority of the film using his father’s words, naturally while being filmed. “Now that it’s more difficult to speak, I want to tell my story more than ever,” says the elder Kilmer.

“Val” would not be the film it is if Kilmer hadn’t been an early adopter of hand-held video cameras, giving us home movies, audition tapes and live auditions. “I’ve kept everything,” he confides. His is a legitimate reason to be a hoarder.

Kilmer’s screen credits include Batman in “Batman Forever” in 1995, brash fighter pilot Lt. Tom “Iceman” Kazansky in the 1986 hit “Top Gun,” and rock icon Jim Morrison in the 1991 Oliver Stone film, “The Doors.”

The film lingers on each of those roles but perhaps the most intriguing parts are Kilmer’s earnest auditions for roles he never got. For “Full Metal Jacket,” he filmed himself using multiple voices to try to seduce director Stanley Kubrick and also made an audition video to play Henry Hill in “Goodfellas.” He got neither part.

Directors Ting Poo and Leo Scott have spun a mostly chronological profile, starting with Kilmer’s childhood and then giving us an unvarnished look at the star’s career, marriage and fatherhood, and ending it post-surgery as Kilmer struggles to be heard.

The filmmakers have a tendency to bring Kilmer to the scene of a favorite place — say, The Juilliard School in New York or a former family home — and then melt back in time by using the old movies. They’ll show images of Kilmer’s family hiking in the ’80s and then revisit the same area with the middle-aged Kilmer. Sometimes the images are forced, as when father and son dress up in cheap Batman and Robin costumes.

This is no glamour project. He and his estranged wife bicker over custody of their two children, he is shown laconically slapping bugs with a flyswatter poolside in middle age, and he looks fragile at a Comic-Con, puking at a signing station, a towel over his head as he’s rushed out in a wheelchair.

Kilmer — enigmatic to the rest of us — is portrayed as a quirky soul. He is shown shooting Silly String at his loved ones, sobbing as he puts on his late mother’s jewelry and pretending to pass out to freak out his son. He is much funnier than we expect and forces us to question why we thought him difficult at all.

The film leans on Kilmer’s 2020 bestselling autobiography “I’m Your Huckleberry” — like the line “The distance between heaven and hell is the distance between faith and doubt” — but has more punch because of the footage.

In one of the rawest scenes, Kilmer attends a fan event for “Tombstone” signing photos and memorabilia. “I don’t look great and I’m selling basically my old self, my old career,” he says to the camera.

Tune in to see backstage video from “Slab Boys” on Broadway, with co-stars Kevin Bacon and Sean Penn slowly mooning the camera. He calls an early role in “Top Secret” just “fluff” and documents why “The Island of Dr. Moreau” was “doomed.” He’s such a Method actor that he constructed a backstory for the arrogant Iceman in “Top Gun.”

Kilmer is an intense actor, to be sure. When he played Doc Holliday in “Tombstone,” he filled his bed with ice for the final scene to mimic the feeling of dying from tuberculosis. To play Morrison, he wore leather pants all the time and blasted The Doors for a year, neither of which helped his marriage.

The film is bookended by tragedy. The weight of loss after Kilmer’s younger brother Wesley died accidentally at age 15 hangs over the actor and the documentary returns again and again to home movies the two made, heartbreakingly. And the loss of Kilmer’s voice means he must grapple with legacy and death in his 60s.

Even so, a relentless optimism comes through, especially his relationship with his adult children, who clearly adore their dad. “I’ve lived a magical life,” Kilmer concludes. It’s hard to argue back.

“Val,” a Amazon Studios release, is rated R for language. It hits theaters on Friday and is available on Prime Video on Aug. 6. Running time: 109 minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.

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MPAA definition of R: Restricted. Under 17 requires accompanying parent or adult guardian.

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Online: https://www.amazon.com/VAL-Val-Kilmer/dp/B09888KKZK

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Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

Источник: https://apnews.com/article/entertainment-arts-and-entertainment-film-reviews-val-kilmer-be7ad44335e5016b9a5436f73ed80e9f

Tombstone Ending Explained: What Happened To Each Main Character

There have been more movies and television shows about icon of the Old West Wyatt Earp and his brothers than shootouts in towns on the frontier, but few hold a candle to the 1993 Kurt Russell-led western Tombstone. For nearly 30 years now, George P. Cosmatos' masterpiece has remained one of the most popular westerns thanks to its timeless story, intense gun battles, those luscious mustaches, and classic one-liners from from the famed lawman and his allies.

But with so much time passing since the film's initial release way back when, some may have forgotten how things shake out for Wyatt Earp, his brothers Virgil and Morgan, the charismatic Doc Holiday, and the rest of the characters who show up on either side of the central conflict in Tombstone. That being said, let's talk about the Tombstone ending and how things wrapped up for everyone.

Wyatt Earp (Kurt Russell)

Kurt Russell's Wyatt Earp isn't just front and center throughout the events of Tombstone, he's often the most interesting character on the screen not named Doc Holliday. After taking on the Cowboys at the O.K. Corral and then again multiple times, resulting in the deaths of his most hated enemies, Earp goes to see about Josephine Marcus and attempts to find some peace and harmony in his life after years of the fighting crime, running gambling joints, and going after all those curs with red sashes. Before that, however, he goes to have one last visit with his old friend Doc Holliday, whose health is quickly deteriorating in a Colorado sanatorium.

Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer)

Doc Holiday, who is played masterfully in Tombstone by an in-his-prime Val Kilmer, is often considered the best character in the whole movie, and those people who think that wouldn't be wrong. Even as he's dying of tuberculosis, the gambler and old friend of Wyatt Earp who is unmatched behind the gun and spends much of the movie sedated, playing poker, or poking the fire that is Johnny Ringo. And after Earp said he would take down Ringo, a dying Holliday musters up his remaining strength to prove once and for all that he can't be beat. And as he lay dying in that Colorado sanatorium, Holliday looks down at his bootless feet and says "This is funny."

This final meeting, however, is reportedly the stuff of legend as multiple historians, including Elena Sandridge, have stated that Wyatt Earp only learned of his friend's passing months later.

Virgil Earp (Sam Elliott)

Virgil Earp, played here by Sam Elliott and his legendary mustache, is the oldest and wisest of the Earp brothers and appoints himself the marshal of Tombstone, a decision that brings more trouble to the small town. Following the shootout at the O.K. Corral, Virgil, and other members of the Earps' group, is injured and left handicapped, which ultimately leads to the surviving brothers' decision to leave town once and for all. And even though Wyatt Earp stays back to settle things for good, Virgil is able to escape with his new wife and make a new life for himself.

Morgan Earp (Bill Paxton)

Not to be outdone by older brothers, Morgan Earp, portrayed by the late, great Bill Paxton, is right there in thick of it throughout much of Tombstone, including the famous shootout at the O.K. Corral. Following the events of the showdown with the Cowboys, life seems to go back to normal, but one night while Morgan is playing pool, he is ambushed and shot in the back. The bullet, having done too much damage to Morgan's already weakened body, takes the youngest Earp as his brother, Wyatt, tries to save his life. And although Morgan's story ends here, it's just the beginning of things to come.

Curly Bill Brocius (Powers Boothe)

On the other side of the central conflict in Tombstone is Curly Bill Brocius, one of the senior members of the outlaw gang, the Cowboys. As soon as Brocius, played by Powers Boothe, comes into the picture in the opening minutes of the movie, you know he will meet a painful and justified death for his actions. And we get just that in the final act of the movie when he, and most of his men, are taken out by a vengeful Wyatt Earp after the lawman's brother, Morgan, is viciously murdered. No more carrying out massacres for this cowboy with a hole in his gut.

Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn)

The first time we see Michael Biehn's Johnny Ringo and Doc Holliday encounter one another, we know these will have one final showdown before everything is said and done. And that becomes the case in the final act of Tombstone when Holliday, wanting to finish what the two adversaries had started earlier on, challenges Ringo to one final duel, but not before getting out one more "I'm your huckleberry."

As iconic as a scene it is, in reality, the death of Johnny Ringo remains a mystery to this day, with no one really knowing if the outlaw was brought down by Doc Holliday, Wyatt Earp, or his own gun, as his 1882 death was ruled a suicide.

Ike Clanton (Stephen Lang)

Ike Clanton, one the outlaws in the ranks of the Cowboys who finds himself at odds with Wyatt Earp, is played by Stephen Lang, who is a treat in this role. Whenever trouble is brewing throughout Tombstone, Clanton is involved one way or another, but after the death of essentially every member of his gang, Clanton turns his back on his old lifestyle and convinces Earp to let him live. In the final narration of the film, however, it is revealed that Clanton was killed two years after the events that unfolded in Tombstone.

Billy Clanton (Thomas Haden Church)

Billy Clanton, Ike's younger brother, played here by Thomas Haden Church, isn't so lucky and isn't afforded the opportunity to throw down his red sash. Instead, Clanton is killed during the epic shootout at O.K. Corral, when he, and his fellow Cowboys, refuse to lay down their arms.

Josephine Marcus (Dana Delany)

Josephine Marcus, portrayed by Dana Delany, is the apple of Wyatt Earp's eye for much of Tombstone, and after everything is said and done and the Cowboys have been dealt with, the two end up together in a warm embrace under a blanket of snow. Marcus would join Earp on the rest of the journeys life threw his way, and remained with the legendary law man until his death in 1929.

Allie Earp (Paula Malcomson)

Allie Earp, played by future Deadwood star Paula Malcomson, is last seen leaving Tombstone with her husband, Virgil, following the assassination of Morgan Earp and not long after her own husband was targeted and left with a paralyzed arm. The real Allie Earp remained with Virgil Earp until his passing in 1905, and she would follow more than 40 years later at the age of 97 or 98.

Those are just some of the real-life characters who played a prominent role in the events of Tombstone. With so many more to explore like Henry Hooker (Charlton Heston), Billy Breakenridge (Jason Priestley), Sheriff Johnny Behan (Jon Tenney), and numerous others, it's never a bad idea to go back and look at the lives and times of those who were turned into some of the most iconic western characters in the past 30 years.

Philip grew up in Louisiana (not New Orleans) before moving to St. Louis after graduating from Louisiana State University-Shreveport. When he's not writing about movies or television, Philip can be found being chased by his three kids, telling his dogs to stop yelling at the mailman, or yelling about professional wrestling to his wife. If the stars properly align, he will talk about For Love Of The Game being the best baseball movie of all time.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2558811/tombstone-ending-explained-what-happened-to-each-main-character

Tombstone (film)

1993 film

Tombstone is a 1993 American Western film directed by George P. Cosmatos, written by Kevin Jarre (who was also the original director, but was replaced early in production[5][6]), and starring Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer, with Sam Elliott, Bill Paxton, Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, and Dana Delany in supporting roles, as well as narration by Robert Mitchum.

The film is loosely based on events in Tombstone, Arizona, including the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and the Earp Vendetta Ride, during the 1880s. It depicts a number of Western outlaws and lawmen, such as Wyatt Earp, William Brocius, Johnny Ringo, and Doc Holliday.

Tombstone was released by Hollywood Pictures in theatrical wide release in the United States on December 25, 1993, grossing $56.5 million in domestic ticket sales. The film was a financial success, and for the Western genre, it ranks number 16 in the list of highest-grossing films since 1979. Six months later, the similarly themed film Wyatt Earp was released with far less commercial success.[7] Critical reception was generally positive, with Kilmer's performance receiving critical acclaim. The film has become a cult classic since its release.[8]The Making of Tombstone, a book about the film, was published in 2018.[9]

Plot[edit]

In 1879, members of an outlaw gang known to wear red sashes called the Cowboys, led by "Curly Bill" Brocius, ride into a Mexican town and interrupt a local police officer's wedding. They then proceed to massacre the assembled policemen in retribution for killing two of their fellow gang members. Shortly before being shot, a local priest warns them that their acts of murder and savagery will be avenged, referencing the biblical fourth horseman.

Wyatt Earp, a retired peace officer with a notable reputation, reunites with his brothers Virgil and Morgan in Tucson, Arizona, where they venture on toward Tombstone to settle down. There they encounter Wyatt's long-time friend Doc Holliday, who is seeking relief in the dry climate from his worsening tuberculosis. Josephine Marcus and Mr. Fabian are also newly arrived with a traveling theater troupe. Meanwhile, Wyatt's common-law wife, Mattie Blaylock, is becoming dependent on laudanum. Wyatt and his brothers begin to profit from a stake in a gambling emporium and saloon when they have their first encounter with the Cowboys.

As tensions rise, Wyatt is pressured to help rid the town of the Cowboys, though he is no longer a lawman. Curly Bill begins shooting at the sky after a visit to an opium den and is told by Marshal Fred White to relinquish his firearms. Curly Bill instead shoots the marshal dead, and is forcibly taken into custody by Wyatt. The arrest infuriates Ike Clanton and the other Cowboys. Curly Bill stands trial, but is found not guilty due to a lack of witnesses. Virgil, unable to tolerate lawlessness, becomes the new marshal and imposes a weapons ban within the city limits. This leads to a gunfight at the O.K. Corral, in which Billy Clanton and the McLaury brothers are killed. Virgil and Morgan are wounded, and the allegiance of county sheriff Johnny Behan with the Cowboys is made clear. As retribution for the Cowboy deaths, Wyatt's brothers are ambushed; Morgan is killed, while Virgil is left handicapped. A despondent Wyatt and his family leave Tombstone and board a train, with Ike Clanton and Frank Stilwell close behind, preparing to ambush them. Wyatt sees that his family leaves safely, and then surprises the assassins. He kills Stilwell, but lets Clanton live to send a message: Wyatt announces that he is a U.S. marshal, and that he intends to kill any man he sees wearing a red sash. Wyatt, Doc, a reformed Cowboy named Sherman McMasters, Texas Jack Vermillion, and Turkey Creek Jack Johnson, form a posse to seek revenge.

Wyatt and his posse are ambushed in a riverside forest by the Cowboys. Wyatt walks into the creek, miraculously surviving the enemy fire, and kills Curly Bill along with many of his men. Curly Bill's second-in-command, Johnny Ringo, becomes the new head of the Cowboys. When Doc's health worsens, the group is accommodated by Henry Hooker at his ranch. Ringo lures McMasters into the Cowboys' clutches under the pretense of parley and then sends a messenger (dragging McMasters' corpse) to tell Wyatt that he wants a showdown to end the hostilities; Wyatt agrees. Wyatt sets off for the showdown, not knowing that Doc has already arrived at the scene. Doc confronts a surprised Ringo, who was expecting Wyatt, and challenges him to a duel to finish their "game," which Ringo accepts (Doc and Ringo have already had a couple of stand offs in Tombstone that were ultimately broken up). Wyatt runs when he hears a gunshot, only to encounter Doc, who has killed Ringo. They then press on to complete their task of eliminating the Cowboys, although Clanton escapes their vengeance by renouncing his red sash. Doc is sent to a sanatorium in Colorado, where he dies of his illness. At Doc's urging, Wyatt pursues Josephine to begin a new life.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The film was shot primarily on location in Arizona. Shooting began in May 1993. The film was supposed to be screenwriter Kevin Jarre's first job as director, but he was quickly overwhelmed by the job–failing to get needed shots and falling behind the shooting schedule. A month into filming, he was fired by producer Andrew Vajna and replaced with George P. Cosmatos. Michael Biehn, a close friend of Jarre, considered quitting. Biehn recalled feeling (director) Cosmatos "...had no understanding or appreciation of the screenplay."[10] By the time of Cosmatos' arrival, though, all actors stayed on board.[11] The new director brought a demanding, hard-nosed sensibility to the set, which led to conflicts with some of the crew members (most famously with cinematographer William Fraker). Meanwhile, Kurt Russell worked quickly with producer James Jacks to pare down Jarre's sprawling script, deleting subplots and emphasizing the relationship between Wyatt and Doc.[12]

Russell has stated that it was he, and not Cosmatos, who actually directed the film, as Jarre's departure led to the studio's request.[13] Russell stated that Cosmatos was brought in as a "ghost director" as a front man because Russell did not want it to be known that he was directing.[13] Co-star Val Kilmer has supported Russell's statements about working heavily behind the scenes and stating that Russell "essentially" directed the film, but stopped short of saying that Russell did the actual directing.[14] Biehn stated that Russell never directed him personally.[15]

Cosmatos was highly focused on accurate historical detail, including the costumes, props, customs, and scenery, to give them authenticity. All the mustaches in the movie were real. Val Kilmer practiced for a long time on his quick-draw speed, and gave his character a Southern Aristocrat accent. Two locations were used to make the town of Tombstone look bigger. The scene in which Wyatt throws an abusive card dealer (Billy Bob Thornton) out of a saloon was to show that Wyatt was a man who used psychology to intimidate. Thornton's lines in the scene were ad-libbed, as he was only told to "be a bully".[16]

Music[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

Tombstone: Complete Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
ReleasedMarch 16, 2006
Length1:25:29
LabelIntrada

The original motion picture soundtrack for Tombstone was originally released by Intrada Records on December 25, 1993.[17] On March 16, 2006, an expanded two-disc version of the film score was also released by Intrada Records.[18] The score was composed and produced by Bruce Broughton, and performed by the Sinfonia of London. David Snell conducted most of the score (although Broughton normally conducts his own scores, union problems mandated another conductor here), while Patricia Carlin edited the film's music.[19]

The score contains strong echoes of Max Steiner's music for John Ford's The Searchers (1956) with variations on the 'Indian Traders' theme used midway through the Ford movie. The album begins with the Cinergi logo, composed by Jerry Goldsmith and conducted by Broughton.

Release[edit]

Home media[edit]

Following its cinematic release in theaters, the film was released on VHS video format on November 11, 1994.[20] The Region 1 Codewidescreen edition of the film was released on DVD in the United States on December 2, 1997. Special features for the DVD only include original theatrical trailers.[21] A director's cut of Tombstone was also officially released on DVD on January 15, 2002. The DVD version includes a two-disc set and features "The Making of Tombstone" featurette in three parts; "An Ensemble Cast"; "Making an Authentic Western"; and "The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral". Other features include an audio commentary by director George P. Cosmatos, an interactive Tombstone timeline, the director's original storyboards for the O.K. Corral sequence, the Tombstone "Epitaph" – an actual newspaper account, the DVD-ROM feature "Faro at the Oriental: Game of Chance", and a collectible Tombstone map.[22]

The widescreen high-definition Blu-ray Disc edition of the theatrical cut was released on April 27, 2010, featuring the making of Tombstone, director's original storyboards, trailers, and TV spots.[23] A supplemental viewing option for the film in the media format of video-on-demand is available, as well.[24]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Tombstone premiered in movie theaters six months before Costner and Kasdan's version, Wyatt Earp, on December 24, 1993, in wide release throughout the United States. During its opening weekend, the film opened in third place, grossing $6,454,752 in business showing at 1,504 locations.[4][25] The film's revenue increased by 35% in its second week of release, earning $8,720,255. For that particular weekend, the film stayed in third place, screening in 1,955 theaters. The film went on to earn $56,505,065 in total ticket sales in the North American market.[4] It ranks 20th out of all films released in 1993.[26]

Critical response[edit]

Rotten Tomatoes reported that 74% of 46 sampled critics gave the film a positive review, with an average score of 6.30/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "If you're seeking a stylish modern western with a solid story and a well-chosen ensemble cast, Tombstone is your huckleberry.".[27] Following its cinematic release in 1993, Tombstone was named "one of the 5 greatest Westerns ever made" by True West Magazine. The film was also called "One of the year's 10 best!" by KCOP-TV in Los Angeles, California.[28]

Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert of Siskel & Ebert originally thought they would have to miss reviewing the film, as they could not get a screening, but as Ebert explained, "... a strange thing started to happen. People started telling me they really liked Val Kilmer's performance in Tombstone, and I heard this everywhere I went. When you hear this once or twice, it's interesting, when you hear it a couple of dozen times, it's a trend. And when you read that Bill Clinton loved the performance, you figured you better catch up with the movie." Ultimately, Ebert recommended the movie while Siskel did not.

Ebert was later to refer to Tombstone in future reviews, comparing it favorably to Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp ("It forced the comparison upon me.") and, in his review of Wild Bill, singling out Val Kilmer's portrayal as "the definitive saloon cowboy of our time."[29][30] In his review of Kurt Russell's Dark Blue, he stated, "Every time I see Russell or Val Kilmer in a role, I'm reminded of their Tombstone, which got lost in the year-end holiday shuffle and never got the recognition it deserved."[31]

Grafted onto this traditional framework, the film's meditative aspects are generally too self-conscious to fit comfortably. Especially when the movie tries to imagine a more enlightened role for women in the Old West, the screenplay begins to strain.
—Stephen Holden, The New York Times[32]

In a mixed review, Chris Hicks writing in the Deseret News said, "aside from Russell and Val Kilmer's scene-stealing, sickly, alcoholic Doc Holliday, there are so many characters coming and going, with none of them receiving adequate screen time, that it becomes difficult to keep track of them all." But he did comment, "some very entertaining moments here, with Russell spouting memorable tough-guy lines". Overall, he felt, "Taken on its own terms, with some lowered expectations, Western fans will have fun."[33]Emanuel Levy of the Variety staff believed the film was a "tough-talking but soft-hearted tale" which was "entertaining in a sprawling, old-fashioned manner." Regarding screenwriter Jarre's dialogue, he noted, "Despite the lack of emotional center and narrative focus, his script contains enough subplots and colorful characters to enliven the film and ultimately make it a fun, if not totally engaging, experience." He also singled out Val Kilmer as the standout performance.[34] The film, however, was not without its detractors. James Berardinelli writing for ReelViews offered a mixed-to-negative review, recalling how he thought, "The first half of Tombstone isn't an example of great filmmaking, but it is engaging. There's a sense of growing inevitability as events build to the shoot-out at the OK Corral. The melodramatic "serious" moments are kept to a minimum, and the various gunfights are choreographed with style and tension. Then, at the one-hour ten-minute mark, the Clanton gang and the Earps square off. From there, things get progressively worse. Not only is the last hour anticlimactic, but it's dull. Too many scenes feature lengthy segments of poorly-scripted dialogue, and, in some cases, character motivation becomes unclear. The gunplay is more repetitious than exciting. The result—a cobbled-together morass of silly lines and shoot- outs—doesn't work well."[35]

Stephen Holden writing in The New York Times saw the film as being a "capacious Western with many modern touches, the Arizona boom town and site of the legendary O.K. Corral has a seedy, vaudevillian grandeur that makes it a direct forerunner of Las Vegas." He expressed his satisfaction with the supporting acting, saying, "[the] most modern psychological touch is its depiction of Josephine (Dana Delany), the itinerant actress with whom Wyatt falls in love at first sight, as the most casually and comfortably liberated woman ever to set foot in 1880s Arizona."[32] Critic Louis Black, writing for The Austin Chronicle, viewed Tombstone as a "mess" and that there were "two or three pre-climaxes but no climax. Its values are capitalist rather than renegade, which is okay if it's metaphoric rather than literal. Worse, as much as these actors heroically struggle to focus the film, the director more successfully hacks it apart."[36]Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a C– rating, calling it "preposterously inflated" at "135 minutes long". He observed the film as being a "three-hour rough cut that's been trimmed down to a slightly shorter rough cut" with "all that holds the film together is Kurt Russell's droll machismo."[37] Author Geoff Andrew of Time Out commented, "Kilmer makes a surprisingly effective and effete Holliday". He negatively acknowledged that there was "a misguided romantic subplot and the ending rather sprawls" but ultimately exclaimed the film was "'rootin', tootin' entertainment with lots of authentic facial hair."[38]

Richard Harrington of The Washington Post highlighted the film's shortcomings by declaring, "too much of Tombstone rings hollow. In retrospect, not much happens and little that does seems warranted. There are so many unrealized relationships you almost hope for redemption in a longer video version. This one is unsatisfying and unfulfilling."[39] Alternately though, columnist Bob Bloom of the Journal & Courier openly remarked that the film "May not be historically accurate, but offers a lot of punch for the buck." He concluded by saying it was "A tough, guilty-pleasure Western."[40]

Although Val Kilmer’s performance as Doc Holliday was praised, he did not get an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. But he did however get nominated for Best Male Performance and Most Desirable Male at the MTV Movie Awards.

Other media[edit]

Novelization[edit]

A paperback novel of the same name adapted from Kevin Jarre's screenplay, written by Giles Tippette and published by Berkley Publishers, was released on January 1, 1994. The book dramatizes the real-life events of the gunfight at the O.K. Corral and Earp Vendetta Ride, as depicted in the film. It expands on Western genre ideas in Jarre's screenplay.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^"DVD Reviews – Tombstone – Director's Cut & Original Versions". The Digital Bits. Archived from the original on January 1, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  2. ^"Tombstone". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  3. ^"Tombstone". The Numbers. Archived from the original on November 18, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  4. ^ abc"Tombstone". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  5. ^Myrna Oliver (April 27, 2005). "George P. Cosmatos, 64; Director Was Known for Saving Troubled Projects". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 21, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  6. ^Richard Harrington (December 12, 1993). "'Tombstone' (R)". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 2, 2019. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  7. ^"Genres Western 1979–present". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  8. ^Spangenberger, Phil. "Tombstone 25—A Western Classic's Reunion". True West Magazine. True West Publishing. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  9. ^The Making of Tombstone: Behind the Scenes of the Classic Modern Western (2018), by John Farkis, ISBN 9781476675862
  10. ^Biehn, Michael; Anderson, Jim. "Shooting Tombstone". Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  11. ^Jason Priestley (May 6, 2014). Jason Priestley: A Memoir. HarperOne. ISBN 978-0062357892. Retrieved November 7, 2015.
  12. ^"SHOOT FIRST (ASK QUESTIONS LATER)". ew.com. Archived from the original on September 14, 2018. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  13. ^ ab"The Western Godfather". True West. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  14. ^Parker, Ryan. "Val Kilmer Says Kurt Russell Essentially Directed 'Tombstone'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on July 9, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  15. ^“Everything Had to Go Right”: What Happened to ‘Terminator’ Star Michael Biehn
  16. ^George P. Cosmatos. Tombstone DVD Audio Commentary.
  17. ^"Tombstone Original Motion Picture Soundtrack". Archived from the original on March 20, 2021. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  18. ^"Tombstone Soundtrack". Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  19. ^"Tombstone (1993)". Yahoo! Movies. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  20. ^Tombstone VHS Format. ASIN 6303109950.
  21. ^"Tombstone DVD". Video.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  22. ^"Tombstone Vista Series DVD". Video.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  23. ^"Tombstone Widescreen Blu-ray". Barnes & Noble. Archived from the original on July 7, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  24. ^"Tombstone: VOD Format". Archived from the original on September 19, 2015. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  25. ^"December 24–26, 1993 Weekend". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  26. ^"1993 Domestic Grosses". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  27. ^Tombstone (1993)Archived June 5, 2020, at the Wayback Machine. Rotten Tomatoes. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  28. ^Tombstone – DVD AcclaimArchived July 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Video.com. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  29. ^Ebert, Roger (June 24, 1994). Wyatt EarpArchived February 7, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  30. ^Ebert, Roger (December 1, 1995). Wild BillArchived February 7, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  31. ^Ebert, Roger (February 21, 2003). Dark BlueArchived February 6, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  32. ^ abHolden, Stephen (December 24, 1993). A Fractious Old West in a Modern Moral UniverseArchived August 10, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  33. ^Hicks, Chris (December 28, 1993). TombstoneArchived August 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Deseret News. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  34. ^Levy, Emanuel (December 22, 1993). TombstoneArchived November 8, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Variety. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  35. ^Berardinelli, James (December 25, 1993). TombstoneArchived February 24, 2021, at the Wayback Machine. ReelViews. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  36. ^Black, Louis (December 31, 1993). TombstoneArchived June 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  37. ^Gleiberman, Owen (January 14, 1994). Tombstone (1993)Archived October 21, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  38. ^Andrew, Geoff (1993). TombstoneArchived October 19, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Time Out. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  39. ^Harrington, Richard (December 25, 1993). Tombstone (R)Archived January 2, 2019, at the Wayback Machine. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  40. ^Bloom, Bob (September 20, 2003). Tombstone. Journal & Courier. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  41. ^Tippette, Giles (January 1, 1994). Tombstone. Berkley. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tombstone_(film)

Val Kilmer Reveals The Real Story Behind Tombstone and Kurt Russell

Setting The Scene

A cult classic, Tombstone chronicles the story of an infamous gunfight that took place in 1881 on the streets of Tombstone, Arizona. While Wyatt Earp (portrayed by actor Kurt Russell) and his brothers attempt to leave their gun-slinging ways behind to start a new life in Arizona, trouble follows them and they become the targets of a rowdy gang of cowboys.

Tombstone movie val kilmer

PictureLux/The Hollywood Archive/Alamy Stock Photo

The drama in the movie looks like something only Hollywood would be able to come up with, but it all actually happened. And unbeknownst to many, this drama wasn’t only limited to on-screen. Val Kilmer who played the role of Doc Holliday, revealed the turmoil that went on behind the scenes — and what role Kurt Russell played in all of it.

Drama On And Off Screen

Viewers who watch Tombstone are treated to an epic tale of nonstop drama that unfolds before their eyes on-screen. But what few people know is that the film’s drama actually began long before the movie even hit the big screen that one fateful Christmas day in 1993. It all started with who was in charge of directing the film.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

IMDb via Hollywood Pictures and Cingergi Pictures

The original man chosen was Kevin Jarre, a well-respected screenwriter and movie producer who allegedly had a résumé long enough to impress even the most powerful people in Hollywood. Jarre hand-picked the actors and single-handedly wrote the script. For someone with such an impressive portfolio, no one expected what would happen later. First, actor Val Kilmer spoke to the brilliance of Jarre’s script by making a big claim.

The Power Of Words

It’s hard to imagine anyone else playing Doc Holliday. But according to Kilmer, Kevin Jarre’s script was the single thing that sold him on taking the part in the first place. In particular, Kilmer accredits the line “I’m your huckleberry” — which Doc mutters in the O.K. Corral gunfight scene that takes place between the lawmen and outlaw cowboys — as having won him over.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

Entertainment Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo

Legend has it that this Southern phrase means, “If you want to fight, I’m your man to tangle with.” While a notable line, this isn’t Doc’s most quoted saying. And speaking of which, fans were shocked to hear the truth behind his most famous on-screen line — just as they were shocked to hear what Kilmer later revealed about Russell.

A Shockingly Accurate Line

Chances are, if you’ve seen the film Tombstone, then you definitely remember the exchange between Doc Holliday and a cowboy during the O.K. Corral shootout scene. Fires blaze in the background while shots are fired and people holler in fright.

Tombstone movie

Entertainment Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo

When a cowboy turns to Doc and tells him, “I’ve got you now, Doc” followed by a slew of curse words, Doc cheerfully responds, “You’re a daisy if you do.” It’s hard to imagine someone saying these words in a moment as intense as this, but according to newspaper reports, this line is, in fact, historically accurate. What’s more, amazingly, this wasn’t the only authentic dialogue Jarre included in the script.

Final Words

Another intense moment in the film takes place when Doc Holliday lies on his deathbed in the emotional final scene. He looks towards his bare feet and mutters, “I’ll be damned.” According to historians, these may well have been the final words of John Henry “Doc” Holliday. Other sources claim he said, in a similar context, “Well, this is funny.”

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

RGR Collection/Alamy Stock Photo

People have long debated why Doc may have said this, with some arguing it was because he always believed he would die while wearing his boots. Others argue it was because he believed he would die in a gunfight, not in a bed due to tuberculosis. While the exact reasoning behind his words is unknown, one thing that is known for sure is that actor Val Kilmer prepared for this scene in an unusual — and highly uncomfortable — way.

A Dedicated Actor

Before filming the gripping final scene that shows Doc Holliday on his deathbed, actor Val Kilmer was said to have laid down on a bed full of ice. Brr! An ode to his dedication as an actor, Kilmer believed this would force his body into shakes, making it seem more realistic to a viewer that Doc was indeed on his way out of this world.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

Hollywood Pictures/Cinergi Pictures

Kilmer’s tactic worked and many fans believed his performance deserved an Oscar. As for the minority of viewers who thought his performance was overdone, diehard fans will argue they are wrong — just as most people are wrong about another key scene in the film.

The Height Of Thrills

In what is considered by some to be one of film’s most cinematically-arresting scenes, Wyatt Earp (played by Kurt Russell) approaches outlaw Curly Bill by the river. Valiantly risking his life, Wyatt storms into the line of fire of the Cowboys’ leaders.

Tombstone movie val kilmer

Entertainment Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo

Wyatt miraculously dodges all of Bill’s bullets before he unloads his own shotgun into the famed outlaw. Many critics have contended that this scene is too over-the-top and unrealistic, something that is merely the product of Hollywood fantasies. But Johnny Barnes, one of the Cowboys who survived the actual 1881 gunfight, told the story exactly as it is shown in the movie. And this wasn’t the only authentic part of the film.

Attention to Costuming

Screenwriter Kevin Jarre is widely considered to be the chief mastermind behind Tombstone, for he is the one who was responsible for translating real-life events from 1880s Tombstone, Arizona onto the big screen. Part of keeping with the times’ historical accuracy was ensuring the authenticity of the costumes.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

Photo 12/Alamy Stock Photo

According to Val Kilmer, this meant the actors were made to wear real wool ensembles. He alleged that while filming the Birdcage Theater scene, an on-set thermometer read 134 degrees Fahrenheit. Kilmer joked that it gave reason behind why his character, Doc Holliday may have killed people, saying, “It’s just, like, he wore wool in the summer, in the Arizona Territory, and that made him mad.” Apparently, acting in 134 degree weather isn’t the only trick Kilmer brought to set.

It’s All In The Wrist…Or Knuckles

Remember the scene in Tombstone where Doc Holliday is shown playing a game of poker? The camera focuses on his hand and viewers are shown an up-close view of a trick where he is able to essentially roll a coin across his knuckles.

Tombstone movie

Hollywood Pictures/Cingergi Pictures

Unbeknownst to many, this is actually a signature move of Val Kilmer. The actor also performed a similar “finger-walking” trick in two other films: Real Genius and Top Gun. In Real Genius, he used quarters, while in Top Gun he toyed with a pen. This trick certainly added a nice touch to his portrayal of Doc’s gun-fighting, heavy-gambling, hard-drinking character. It’s hard to imagine Doc played by anyone aside from Kilmer, but that was very nearly the case.

A Different Cast

Tombstone could have turned out completely different had the casting been done with anyone other than the final lineup we know today. For example, acclaimed actor Willem Dafoe was nearly cast as Doc Holliday. Wondering what got in the way? The casting crew apparently decided against it after he starred in the controversial Scorsese film, The Last Temptation of Christ.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

Entertainment Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo

But that’s not all. Known for his history of acting in the Western genre, actor Glenn Ford was set to play Marshall White before he fell ill. What’s more, beloved Hollywood leading man Richard Gere was said to have been tapped for Wyatt Earp and Mickey Rourke for Johnny Ringo. But even if the actors changed, one thing is for sure: they would have all still had a certain quality in common.

Mustache Madness

If you look closely at what all the male characters share, you’ll recognize that they all sport perfectly-maintained mustaches. This was a result of writer Kevin Jarre, who, according to actor Michael Biehn, was very particular about the way he wanted the men’s mustaches to look. In fact, he apparently added to the script that he wanted each mustache to curl up at the corners.

Tombstone movie val kilmer

Hollywood Pictures/Cinergi Pictures

And according to Biehn, every male actor with the exception of Jon Tenney (who played Behan) grew their own mustaches. He added, “I think [Tenney] always felt a little bit like the small dog of the group. Because it wasn’t his real mustache.” Aside from the costumes and facial hair, many fans were also surprised to hear about this next legitimate element in the film.

Filming During Monsoon Season

While some films and television series shoot scenes in extreme weather to make the setting seem more real, production crew can’t count on the weather working in their favor. For this reason, they often rely on adding special effects in post-production editing.

Tombstone movie

PictureLux/The Hollywood Archive/Alamy Stock Photo

With respect to Tombstone, it turned out filming during what’s called the Southwest monsoon season in Arizona had its perks. The lightning and thunder that appear in the background of a number of scenes are actually real and weren’t created artificially. Speaking of which, there’s another spooky element in the film that doesn’t come down to movie magic, but was instead based on something real.

Here Lies Lester Moore

In an early scene where the Earps enter town, a headstone is shown in a cemetery. It reads, “Here lies Lester Moore, Four slugs from a .44, No Les No More.” If you get spooky vibes just from reading it, just wait until you hear the far creepier truth behind the prop.

Tombstone Arizona headstone

David Litschel/Alamy Stock Photo

The epitaph wasn’t made up by producers, but was instead taken from a real tombstone located in — you guessed it — none other than Tombstone, Arizona itself. A replica of the original can also be found at Knott’s Berry Farm, which is where this scene — along with a number of others — was filmed. But beyond the staging, some of the minds behind Tombstone gave it a credibility like no other.

Nods To Hollywood Westerns

Just like historical accuracy, Tombstone has nods to Hollywood Westerns woven into its plot. For example, veteran Western actor Harry Carey Jr. plays lawman Marshal Fred White, while Charlton Heston plays rancher Henry Hooker. But above all of its other ingredients, perhaps most key in setting Tombstone‘s tone and authentic feel is the film’s narrator, Hollywood legend Robert Mitchum.

Robert Mitchum

Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

Mitchum was originally meant to play the role of Old Man Clanton. Unfortunately, as fate would have it, on the first day of filming he fell off a horse and hurt his back. He was forced to withdraw from the role but instead became the narrating voice at the beginning and end of the film. While most things in Tombstone were planned and scripted, Mitchum’s role change wasn’t. Such was also the case for another key performance.

Directed To Improvise

In Tombstone, renowned Hollywood actor Billy Bob Thornton makes an appearance in the iconic poker game scene, where he plays the part of a bellyaching card player. But instead of receiving scripted lines, Thornton was directed to improvise. He was allegedly told by the filmmakers to act like a disgruntled bully — and from the looks of it, he delivered.

Tombstone movie

Hollywood Pictures/Cinergi Pictures

Fans of Thornton say this is a true testament to his abilities as an actor, and we couldn’t agree more. Not only that, but it speaks to why Tombstone turned out to be such a great film. The actors, filling roles both big and small, were an incredible collection of undeniable talents. That’s what helped them land big roles after appearing in the film –and in the case of one actor in particular, it directly contributed to a major career move.

Doc Holliday And Batman

True Val Kilmer fans know that the actor played the role of both Doc Holliday in Tombstone and the role of Gotham City’s famous caped crusader in Batman Forever. But what few know is that Kilmer allegedly landed the role of Batman as a result of director Joel Schumacher having seen his performance in Tombstone. Schumacher decided he had to be cast.

Tombstone movie val kilmer kurt russell

Entertainment Pictures/Alamy Stock Photo

Not only that, but the connection between the two movies runs deeper than what meets the eye. Rumor has it that the original Batman, Adam West, also played Doc in three different 1959 television Westerns — which just so happens to be the same year Val Kilmer was born. And just like Batman, Tombstone became a financial success — despite the considerable odds that had been stacked against it.

Conflicting Visions

In a 2017 blog post by Val Kilmer, he revealed all the drama that took place behind the scenes of Tombstone. He detailed how the original director, Kevin Jarre, had a vision of the tale being filmed exactly like an old 1940s Western. However, this went against the desires of the production crew, who wanted a “modern retelling of an old story.”

George Cosmatos, Tombstone movie

TCD-Prod.DB/Alamy Stock Photo

Jarre was fired because of this, causing a wave of panic among the actors, who feared the production studio might scrap the movie instead of finding a new director. Thankfully, actor Kurt Russell, who played Wyatt Earp, stepped up to the plate. Per the recommendation of one Sylvester Stallone, he helped hire George P. Cosmatos as director. Val Kilmer challenged Cosmatos’ role, however — and would divulge a secret that left everyone shocked.

A Well-Kept Secret Revealed

According to Kilmer, Russell hired Cosmatos to essentially act as the “yes man” on set. In other words, Cosmatos wasn’t the film’s true director; Russell was. And the two of them had a promise that they would keep Russell’s role as “ghost director” a secret. Kilmer alleged that Russell sacrificed his own role, pulling from his character’s dialogue and losing sleep over “draw[ing] up shot lists.”

Tombstone movie

Moviestore Collection Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo

He wrote, “Everyone cared, don’t get me wrong, but Kurt put his money where his mouth was, and not a lot of stars extend themselves for the cast and crew. Not like he did.” In Kilmer’s words, “Kurt is solely responsible for Tombstone‘s success, no question.” And these next stats certainly speak to the film’s success.

Proving The Skeptics Wrong

During its production, Tombstone garnered the attention of its fair share of skeptics who believed the film would fail. Besides, with all the chaos that surrounded finding a director, could they really be blamed? Luckily, they didn’t have to be heeded, as the movie became a financial success.

Tombstone movie

Photo 12/Alamy Stock Photo

Following its release on December 25, 1993 by Hollywood Pictures, the film grossed $56.5 million in ticket sales in the United States. And according to Box Office Mojo, it stands as the 16th highest-grossing Western film released since 1979. Talk about a turn-around from when it was first getting started! So what did the actors have to say about their time on set?

The Biggest Challenge

While actor Michael Biehn admitted that “the biggest challenge for everybody in [the] picture, and particularly Kurt Russell, was that they got rid of Kevin Jarre,” he still said he greatly enjoyed his time on set. He even claimed his character, Johnny Ringo, was one of his favorite roles to play.

Tombstone movie, Val Kilmer

Michael Biehn/IMDb via Hollywood Pictures and Cingergi Pictures

Biehn admittedly connected with Johnny Ringo’s character, who he said loved “living life on the edge” and engaging in activities that gave him an adrenaline rush. The actor added, “He was just a drunk guy, as you can imagine living back then in the Old West. You think about all the saloons and the all the warm beers, no air conditioning.” Biehn doesn’t blame Johnny’s thirst for adventure, arguing there was little to do in Tombstone aside from drink. Speaking of which, one actor in particular had a bit of a problem on set.

Method Acting

Member of The Cowboys outlaw group, Ike Clanton is often shown on screen clashing with the different famous lawmen: Wyatt, Virgil, and Morgan Earp, as well as Doc Holliday. He appears to be crazed though cowardly, and often seems drunk.

Tombstone movie

Hollywood Pictures/Cinergi Pictures

A member of the Tombstone production crew gave insight into the actor who played Ike, Stephen Lang. He reportedly said that Lang was actually drunk for much of the movie’s filming. That is, he spent a lot of his time on set acting under the influence. Some may call it reckless, others may call it method acting. But all we’re thinking is: no wonder Ike’s behavior looked so real! And the same can be said about this next scene. 

A Painful Bar Fight

Remember the scene where Virgil Earp (played by Sam Elliott) is shot and then teeters into a bar, only to fall down in excruciating pain and require his brothers’ help to get up? Apparently, some of the pain that viewers see on screen is actually real.

Tombstone movie val kilmer kurt russell

Moviestore Collection Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo

If you watch it over again, you might be able to see Wyatt Earp (played by Kurt Russell) accidentally slam Virgil (Sam Elliott)’s head into the bar while attempting to help him get back on all fours. While also a climactic scene in the film, it wasn’t the only one. According to one actor, another scene in particular had fans everywhere up in arms, and for all the wrong reasons.

Reeling Johnny Ringo Fans

One of the film’s most intense moments is when Doc Holliday shoots Johnny Ringo. While it left dedicated Johnny fans reeling, the actor portraying him, Michael Biehn, later admitted in an interview that he believed it was the right thing to do.

Tombstone movie val kilmer

Moviestore Collection Ltd/Alamy Stock Photo

He said of Val Kilmer (Doc Holliday) shooting him: “I wanted him to shoot me!” Virgil Earp actor Sam Elliott also added, “That thing was just incredible…and you just know this moment is coming all the way through the film. You’re salivating by the time it does come.” And we bet you didn’t know the scoop behind this next scene, either.

Train 5150

One of the most iconic scenes in the film is undoubtedly when Wyatt Earp surprises Stillwell and Ike Clanton at the train station. Almost instantaneously, Wyatt shoots Stillwell and leaves Ike on the floor practically beginning for mercy. Wyatt then delivers his famous line, “You tell ’em I’m coming, and Hell’s coming with me!”

Tombstone movie

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While a memorable scene, many viewers were left unaware of its aspects. There’s allegedly a carefully-placed Easter egg hidden in one of the shots: the train Wyatt stands in front of reads “5150,” which is the police code in California that is used to signify a crazy person. But nothing’s as cool as this next fun fact.

Real-Life Wyatt Earp

By now, you’ve probably realized that those in charge of bringing Tombstone to life put a lot of effort into making it historically accurate. But did you know that they even cast Wyatt Earp’s actual real-life fifth cousin, who also happens to be named Wyatt Earp himself? That’s right: he’s the actor who plays outlaw Billy Claiborne in the film.

Tombstone movie

Photo 12/Alamy Stock Photo

His character Billy was at O.K. Corral during the shootout, yet ran from the scene because he was unarmed. After filming Tombstone, the actor went on to appear in the TV series Sordid Lives: The Series, as well as doing voiceover work.

Sources:Trend Chaser, Movie Web, New Ravel

Источник: https://www.directexpose.com/val-kilmer-story-tombstone/

Tombstone’s Resident Photographers Caught The Wild West In All Its Gritty Glory

How do we know so much about the Old West? There are Western movies, of course. But what of the people behind that popular image of wild frontiers and tobacco-spitting cowboys…?

Messy Nessy Chic looked behind the scenes at Fly’s Photography, based in the legendary location of Tombstone, Arizona.

Vintage photography in Tombstone was done on the Fly

Fly's Photography in Tombstone

Photo Credit: Wikimedia Commons

Run by Camillus “Buck” Fly and his wife Mary “Mollie” Goodrich, the business was part studio, part boarding house.

Messy Nessy Chic writes that, as well as “capturing Tombstone’s residents and daily life,” the Flys produced “the only known images of Native Americans before they lost the war to the white man.”

Without the enterprising couple, we wouldn’t have these vintage photos depicting what life was really like back then.

The people of Tombstone, Arizona

Meet Semantha Fallon, from an image taken in 1879. Fallon was a business owner and, according to Messy Nessy Chic, dated the founder of the town himself!

Semantha (or Samantha) Fallon

Semantha (or Samantha) Fallon, owner of a hotel and millinery shop in Tombstone, Arizona.

Tombstone historian George Parsons in full, off-duty cowboy mode.

George W. Parsons

George W. Parsons, 1883.

This photo is of Apache May, a Native American child reportedly found and raised by John Slaughter of Tombstone.

Apache May Slaughter, baby photo taken by Fly's Photography

Apache May Slaughter, the adopted daughter of John and Viola Slaughter.

Notable names of the Old West associated with the Flys

Doc Holliday and his spouse, the vividly named Big Nose Kate — or Mary Katherine Horony-Cummings — apparently laid their hats at the Flys’ boarding house.

A portrait believed to be of Doc Holliday.

Portrait of Doc Holliday

Portrait of Doc Holliday

While initially listed at auction as a photo of Josephine Sarah Marcus (Wild West gunslinger Wyatt Earp’s wife), it is now speculated that the photo could be of Big Nose Kate.

Picture of woman -- may be Big nose Kate or Josephine Sarah Marcus

This photo was listed at auction as Josephine Sarah Marcus, common-law wife of Wyatt Earp, but may be Big Nose Kate, common-law wife of Doc Holliday.

Camillus “Buck” Fly was on the scene for the Gunfight At The O.K. Corral

One advantage — if you want to see it that way — of living in proximity to the likes of Doc Holliday is you witness history in the making.

1881’s Gunfight At The O.K. Corral saw Wyatt and Virgil Earp, plus fellow gunslingers, go up against the Clanton boys and their trigger-happy associates. The whole bloody event was over in 30 seconds.

om McLaury, Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton (left to right) lie dead after the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Tom McLaury, Frank McLaury and Billy Clanton (left to right) lie dead after the gunfight at the O.K. Corral.

Buck was on hand to take a picture of the losing side. Tom and Frank McLaury are shown here, alongside Billy Clanton. Messy Nessy Chic states that this is the only photographic reference historians have for Clanton, who was 19 at the time of his death.

Was Buck tempted to get in the thick of the action, photojournalist style? Reportedly, there was pressure on him not to.

Legends of America writes that he “did not photograph the aftermath of the shootout, but legend has it that he was threatened by one of the Earp’s if he did.”

Interestingly, Buck found himself taking a more proactive role as Sheriff of Cochise County between 1894-6.

Major peace negotiations between Geronimo and Gen George Crook were captured on film

It wasn’t all shootouts in the Wild West. At times, people tried to avoid reaching for their holsters.

Here we see the famous Apache Chief Geronimo sitting down with his men and those of General George Crook in 1886. There to record the moment was Camillus “Buck” Fly.

Geronimo poses with members of his tribe and General George Crook's staff during peace negotiations on March 27, 1886.

Geronimo poses with members of his tribe and General George Crook’s staff during peace negotiations on March 27, 1886.

What happened to the Flys?

The negotiations didn’t go well. And things didn’t turn out great for Buck and Mollie, either. They eventually separated, with Mollie running things in Tombstone and Buck relocating to the Arizona town of Bisbee.

Fly’s Photography suffered not just one but two fires. Mollie snapped the blaze here in 1912.

Fly's Photography fire

1912 blaze at Fly’s Photography

Camillus passed away in 1901, aged 52. Mollie passed in 1925. Thankfully, she made a generous donation of photos to the Smithsonian Institution.

You can visit their gallery today, though it’s a modern recreation.

modern-day flys photography

Photo Credit: Marine 69-71 / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0

Tombstone made its mark on American history

Another permanent tribute to the Wild West is this statue of Wyatt Earp. It stands in Tombstone next to the house where he lived.

This statue is a depiction of the famous lawman Wyatt Earp situated beside the Earp House in Tombstone, AZ.

Photo Credit: Mikeparrish410 / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 4.0

Earp has been brought to life on film by actors such as Henry Fonda (My Darling Clementine, 1946), Burt Lancaster (Gunfight At The O.K. Corral, 1957), and Kevin Costner (Wyatt Earp, 1994).

Costner’s Wyatt Earp was not a box office success. More luck was had the previous year with Tombstone.

This time Kurt Russell played Earp, with Sam Elliott and Bill Paxton as brothers Virgil and Morgan. It was also notable for Val Kilmer’s performance as Doc Holliday.

Photo Credit: Superyesito / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0

Photo Credit: Superyesito / Wikimedia Commons CC BY-SA 3.0

More from us:We’re Not In Kansas Anymore: Judy Garland’s Dress From ‘The Wizard Of Oz’ Found In Shoebox

Camillus “Buck” Fly himself had his own brush with the movies, albeit nearly a century after his death. He was featured in the 1989 TV movie Desperado: The Outlaw Wars.

Popular character actor Brad Dourif, better known as the voice of Chucky in Child’s Play, took the role.

Источник: https://www.thevintagenews.com/2021/07/14/vintage-tombstone-photos/

Doc Holliday is a figure from the Old West, a gunman and a gambler who was part of the legendary shootout at the O.K. Corral.

Who Was Doc Holliday?

A dentist by trade, Doc Holliday became an icon of the American West and was close friends with fellow gunslinger Wyatt Earp. They were the two most famous faces in what is regarded as the most legendary battle of the West: the gunfight at the O.K. Corral, which cemented Holliday's status as a legend.

Early Years

John Henry ("Doc") Holliday was born August 14, 1851, in Griffin, Georgia. His birth was a celebrated event for his parents, Henry Burroughs Holliday and Alice Jane Holliday, who just a year before had buried their first child, an infant daughter.

He hailed from middle-class stock. His father made his living as a druggist in Griffin, a booming Georgia city that had become a central point for the South's most important export: cotton.

Holliday was adored by his parents, particularly his mother. Born with a cleft palate, Holliday had undergone corrective surgery, but his speech needed considerable work. Ever mindful of her son's condition and what others might say of his birth condition or the way he talked, she spent hours working with him to correct his speech. In addition, she imparted to her son the Southern etiquette and manners that would forever reflect his demeanor.

By all accounts, Holliday was a bright student who excelled at school. His devotion to his books accelerated in 1866 when his mother died of tuberculosis. Her death devastated Holliday, and he poured himself into math and science as a way to cope with her loss.

In 1870, Holliday moved to Philadelphia to attend what is now called the University of Pennsylvania Dental School, where he graduated in 1872.

New Life Out West

For a time, Holliday returned to the South to begin his dental career. But at the age of 23, he fled to Dallas, Texas. The reason for this abrupt move isn't entirely clear, but historical research strongly suggests that Holliday, who'd contracted tuberculosis, thought he'd fare better in the drier air.

Holliday continued with his dental career in his new home, but the Dallas nightlife, especially its drinking and card games, called to him. Soon, his gambling habits directed his life. By the mid-1870s, he'd already developed a strong reputation for card playing and fighting.

After escaping a charge of murder in Dallas, Holliday went on the move. He relocated to a number of different cities before settling down in Dodge City, Kansas, a hot spot for gunfighters and the city where he befriended Wyatt Earp. He later followed Earp to Tombstone, Arizona, a booming mining and frontier town near the Mexican border.

Wyatt Earp And The O.K. Corral

It was in Tombstone that the Holliday legend that would be passed down from one generation to the next was made. On October 26, 1881, Holliday and the Earps found themselves in an intense firefight with cowboys Ike and Billy Clanton, and Frank McLaury and his brother Tom. More than 30 shots were fired in a 30-second battle that came to be known as the shootout at the O.K. Corral. It's arguably the most legendary gunfight ever fought in the American West.

The battle left three men dead and several others wounded, including Holliday. Both Holliday and Earp were arrested for murder but quickly released of the charges.

Following the fight, Morgan Earp was killed, setting his brother Wyatt off on the Earp Vendetta Ride. Holliday accompanied his friend on the ride, which went well into 1882 and saw an assortment of killings.

Final Years and Death

After splitting from Earp, Holliday moved to Glenwood Springs, Colorado. His health continued to deteriorate, and he died of tuberculosis at the Hotel Glenwood on November 8, 1887.

His death reverberated around the country. Despite his lawless ways and his quick temper, Holliday's character was augmented by the same Southern etiquette his mother had taught as a child.

"Few men have been better known to a certain class of sporting people, and few men of his character had more friends or stronger companions," wrote the Denver Republican after his passing. "He represented a class of men who are disappearing in the new West. He had the reputation of being a bunco man, desperado, and bad-man generally, yet he was a very mild-mannered man, was genial and companiable, and had many excellent qualities."

Источник: https://www.biography.com
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Tombstone Ending Explained: What Happened To Each Main Character

There have been more movies and television shows about icon of the Old West Wyatt Earp and his brothers than shootouts in towns on the frontier, but few hold a candle to the 1993 Kurt Russell-led western Tombstone. For nearly 30 years now, George P. Cosmatos' masterpiece has remained one of the most popular westerns thanks to its timeless story, intense gun battles, those val kilmer doc holliday images mustaches, and classic one-liners from from the famed lawman and his allies.

But with so much time passing since the film's initial release way back when, some may have forgotten how things shake out for Wyatt Earp, his brothers Virgil and Morgan, the charismatic Doc Holiday, and the rest of the characters who show up on either side of the central conflict in Tombstone. That being said, let's talk about the Tombstone ending and how things wrapped up for everyone.

Wyatt Earp (Kurt Russell)

Kurt Russell's Wyatt Earp isn't just front and center throughout the events of Tombstone, he's often the most interesting character on the screen not named Doc Holliday. After taking on the Cowboys at the O.K. Corral and then again multiple times, resulting in the deaths of his most hated enemies, Earp goes to see about Josephine Marcus and attempts to find some peace and harmony in his life after years of the fighting crime, running gambling joints, and going after all those curs with red sashes. Before that, however, he goes to have one last visit with his old friend Doc Holliday, whose health is quickly deteriorating in a Colorado sanatorium.

Doc Holliday (Val Kilmer)

Doc Holiday, who is played masterfully in Tombstone by an in-his-prime Val Kilmer, is often considered the best character in the whole movie, and those people who think that wouldn't be wrong. Even as he's dying of tuberculosis, the gambler and old friend of Wyatt Earp who is unmatched behind the gun and spends much of the movie sedated, playing poker, or poking the fire that is Johnny Ringo. And after Earp said he would take down Ringo, a dying Holliday musters up his remaining strength to prove once and for all that he can't be beat. And as he lay dying in that Colorado sanatorium, Holliday looks down at his bootless feet and says "This is funny."

This final meeting, however, is reportedly the stuff of legend as multiple historians, including Elena Sandridge, have stated that Wyatt Earp only learned of his friend's passing months later.

Virgil Earp (Sam Elliott)

Virgil Earp, played here by Sam Elliott and his legendary mustache, is the oldest and wisest of the Earp brothers and appoints himself the marshal of Tombstone, a decision that brings more trouble to the small town. Following the shootout at the O.K. Corral, Virgil, and other members of the Earps' group, is injured and left handicapped, which ultimately leads to the surviving brothers' decision to leave town once and for all. And even though Wyatt Earp stays back to settle things for good, Virgil is able to escape with his new wife and make a new life for himself.

Morgan Earp (Bill Paxton)

Not to be outdone by older brothers, Morgan Earp, portrayed by the late, great Bill Paxton, is right there in thick of it throughout much of Tombstone, including the famous shootout at the O.K. Corral. Following the events of the showdown with the Cowboys, life seems to go back to normal, but one night while Morgan is playing pool, he is ambushed and shot in the back. The bullet, having done too much damage to Morgan's already weakened body, takes the youngest Earp as his brother, Wyatt, tries to save his life. And although Morgan's story ends here, it's just the beginning of things to come.

Curly Bill Brocius (Powers Boothe)

On the other side of the central conflict in Tombstone is Curly Bill Brocius, one of the senior members of the outlaw gang, the Cowboys. As soon as Brocius, played by Powers Boothe, comes into the picture in the opening minutes of the movie, you know he will meet a painful and justified death for his actions. And we get just that in the final act of the movie when he, and most of his men, are taken out by a vengeful Wyatt Earp after the lawman's val kilmer doc holliday images, Morgan, is viciously murdered. No more carrying out massacres for this cowboy with a hole in his gut.

Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn)

The first time we see Michael Biehn's Johnny Ringo and Doc Holliday encounter one another, we know these will have one final showdown before everything is said and done. And that becomes the case in the final act of Tombstone when Holliday, wanting to finish what the two adversaries had started earlier on, challenges Ringo to one final duel, but not before getting out one more "I'm your huckleberry."

As iconic as a scene it is, in reality, the death of Johnny Ringo remains a mystery to this day, with no one really knowing if the outlaw was brought down by Doc Holliday, Wyatt Earp, or his own gun, as his 1882 death was ruled a suicide.

Ike Clanton (Stephen Lang)

Ike Clanton, one the outlaws in the ranks of the Cowboys who finds himself at odds with Wyatt Earp, is played by Stephen Lang, who is a treat in this role. Whenever trouble is brewing throughout Tombstone, Clanton is involved one way or another, but after the death of essentially every member of his gang, Clanton turns his back on his old lifestyle and convinces Earp to let him live. In the final narration of the film, however, it is revealed that Clanton was killed two years after the events that unfolded in Tombstone.

Billy Clanton (Thomas Haden Church)

Billy Clanton, Ike's younger brother, played here by Thomas Haden Church, isn't so lucky and isn't afforded the opportunity to throw down his red sash. Instead, Clanton is killed during the epic shootout at O.K. Corral, when he, and his fellow Cowboys, refuse to lay down their arms.

Josephine Marcus (Dana Delany)

Josephine Marcus, portrayed by Dana Delany, is the apple of Wyatt Earp's eye for much of Tombstone, and after everything is said and done and the Cowboys have been dealt with, the two end up together in a warm embrace under a blanket of snow. Marcus would join Earp on the rest of the journeys life threw his way, and remained with the legendary law man until his death in 1929.

Allie Earp (Paula Malcomson)

Allie Earp, played by future Deadwood star Paula Malcomson, is last seen leaving Tombstone with her husband, Virgil, following the assassination of Morgan Earp and not long after her own husband was targeted and left with a paralyzed arm. The real Allie Earp remained with Virgil Earp until his passing in 1905, and she would follow more than 40 years later at the age of 97 or 98.

Those are just some of the real-life characters who played a prominent role in the events of Tombstone. With so many more to explore like Henry Hooker (Charlton Heston), Billy Breakenridge (Jason Priestley), Sheriff Johnny Behan (Jon Tenney), and alaska usa fcu cd rates others, it's never a bad idea to go back and look at the lives and times of those who were turned into some of the most iconic western characters in the past 30 years.

Philip grew up in Louisiana (not New Orleans) before moving to St. Louis after graduating from Louisiana State University-Shreveport. When he's not writing about movies or television, Philip can be found being chased by his three kids, telling his dogs to stop yelling at the mailman, or yelling about professional wrestling to his wife. If the stars properly align, he will talk about For Love Of The Game being the best baseball movie of all time.

Источник: https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2558811/tombstone-ending-explained-what-happened-to-each-main-character

Why I'd like to be . Val Kilmer in Tombstone

Wyatt Earp is Tombstone's main character, but Doc Holliday is its hero – at least to me. Kurt Russell's Earp is tall, straight-backed and broad-shouldered. He has tanned skin and a personality as imposing as his physique. Val Kilmer's Holliday is smaller and unmistakably sickly. He has a vampiric pallor and constantly coughs, stumbles and sweats. He's dying of tuberculosis, but he's still the fastest gun in the west.

Like Doc Holliday, I am diminished and disabled by long-term illness. Like him, I spend much of my time suffering in bed, recovering from brief exertions. But my brief exertions don't include winning the gunfight at the OK Corral or 12 consecutive pots at poker. When people hear that the movie character I would most like to be is from Tombstone, they assume I mean Wyatt Earp. I can never understand why.

Wyatt Earp is good in a gunfight – he's brave and generally hits what he aims at – but he's not a gunfighter in the classic sense. He's no quick-draw specialist. In contrast, the outlaw Johnny Ringo (Michael Biehn) is a legitimate gunslinger. Ringo engineers fights he knows he will win, like a boxer hand-picking his opponents. This is why he challenges Earp to a one-on-one shoot-out. And it is why, learning of the challenge, Doc Holliday staggers from his sickbed to take Earp's place.

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For me, what follows is one of the most inspiring sights in cinema: the disabled supporting character fighting through his physical limitations to easily defeat an enemy who has the film's great able-bodied hero completely outclassed. When Ringo thinks he sees Earp approaching, he is thrilled and eager to fight. When he recognises instead the pallid, infirm figure of Doc Holliday, he is suddenly terrified and stammers that their previous disagreements don't amount to a real quarrel. "I was just foolin' about," says Ringo.

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"I wasn't," says Holliday, and his eyes announce that the reckoning has arrived. It's the average apy on savings account a chronically ill character has ever looked on screen. By this point, Wyatt Earp would already have been dead.

Growing up, I often fantasised about being one of the heroes of the old west played by Clint Eastwood or John Wayne, but I eventually realised that, if I became one, I'd have to give up my favourite pleasures. Rooster Cogburn and The Man With No Name are not noted for their sensitivity to the arts.

But if I became Kilmer's Doc Holliday, I could be a legendary gunslinger and still be a bookworm. Holliday excels at the rough business of gambling and gunfighting, more so than any of the rough men around him, and yet he is educated and elegant. He speaks Latin, quotes Coleridge and plays Chopin on a saloon piano, sending his adoring girlfriend (Joanna Pacula) into erotic reveries.

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And this is another reason I want to be him: women want to be with him. It is hard to feel attractive when you are chronically ill. Kilmer's Doc Holliday makes chronic illness look good. He's a sexy, Keats-esque consumptive. I dream of being a sexy, Keats-esque consumptive. As a long-term invalid, it's the strongest look I can reasonably hope to achieve.

Many seriously ill movie characters are inspirational, but the inspiring message they usually send to seriously ill viewers is that we can learn to make peace with our awful situations or perhaps overcome them enough to get a degree or fight a court case. As wish-fulfilment goes, that's pretty tame. Doc Holliday proves you can be chronically ill and still be an action hero.

Why I'd like to be … Hugo Weaving in The Matrix
Why I'd like to be … Michael J Fox in Back to the Future
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Источник: https://www.theguardian.com/film/filmblog/2014/jul/17/val-kilmer-doc-holliday-tombstone-role-model

Doc Holliday is a figure from the Old West, a gunman and a gambler who was part of the legendary shootout at the O.K. Corral.

Who Was Doc Holliday?

A dentist by trade, Doc Holliday became an icon of the American West and was close friends with fellow gunslinger Wyatt Earp. They were the two most famous faces in what is regarded as the most legendary battle of the West: the gunfight at the O.K. Corral, which cemented Holliday's status as a legend.

Early Years

John Henry ("Doc") Holliday was born August 14, 1851, in Griffin, Georgia. His birth was a celebrated event for his parents, Henry Burroughs Holliday and Alice Jane Holliday, who just a year before had buried their first child, an infant daughter.

He hailed from middle-class stock. His father made his living as a druggist in Griffin, a booming Georgia city that had become a central point for the South's most important export: cotton.

Holliday was adored by his parents, particularly his mother. Born with a cleft palate, Holliday had undergone corrective surgery, but his speech needed considerable work. Ever mindful of her son's condition and what others might say of his birth condition or the way he talked, she spent hours working with him to correct his speech. In addition, she imparted to her son the Southern etiquette and manners that would forever reflect his demeanor.

By all accounts, Holliday was a bright student who excelled at school. His devotion to his books accelerated in 1866 when his mother died of tuberculosis. Her death devastated Holliday, and he poured himself into math and science as a way to cope with her loss.

In 1870, Holliday moved to Philadelphia to attend what is now called the University of Pennsylvania Dental School, where he graduated in 1872.

New Life Out West

For a time, Holliday returned to the South to begin his dental career. But at the age of 23, he fled to Dallas, Texas. The reason for this abrupt move isn't entirely clear, but historical research strongly suggests that Holliday, who'd contracted tuberculosis, thought he'd fare better in the drier air.

Holliday continued with his dental career in his new home, but the Dallas nightlife, especially its drinking and card games, called to him. Soon, his gambling habits directed his life. By the mid-1870s, he'd already developed a strong reputation for card playing and fighting.

After escaping a charge of murder in Dallas, Holliday went on the move. He relocated to a number of different cities before settling down in Dodge City, Kansas, a hot spot for gunfighters and the city where he befriended Wyatt Earp. He later followed Earp to Tombstone, Arizona, a booming mining and frontier town near the Mexican border.

Wyatt Earp And The O.K. Corral

It was in Tombstone that the Holliday legend that would be passed down from one generation to the next was made. On October 26, 1881, Holliday and the Earps found themselves in an intense firefight with cowboys Ike and Billy Clanton, and Frank McLaury and his brother Tom. More than 30 shots were fired in a 30-second battle that came to be known as the shootout at the O.K. Corral. It's arguably the most legendary gunfight ever fought in the American West.

The battle left three men dead and several others wounded, including Holliday. Both Holliday and Earp were arrested for murder but quickly released of the charges.

Following the fight, Morgan Earp was killed, setting his brother Wyatt off on the Earp Vendetta Ride. Holliday accompanied his friend on the ride, which went well into 1882 and saw an assortment of killings.

Final Years and Death

After splitting from Earp, Holliday moved to Glenwood Springs, Colorado. His health continued to deteriorate, and he died of tuberculosis at the Hotel Glenwood on November 8, 1887.

His death reverberated around the country. Despite his lawless ways and his quick temper, Holliday's character was augmented by the same Southern etiquette his mother had taught as a child.

"Few men have been better known to a certain class of sporting people, and few men of his character had more friends or stronger companions," wrote the Denver Republican after his passing. "He represented a class of men who are disappearing in the new West. He had the reputation of being a bunco man, desperado, and bad-man generally, yet he was a very mild-mannered man, was genial and companiable, and had many excellent qualities."

Источник: https://www.biography.com

Tombstone (film)

1993 film

Tombstone is a 1993 American Western film directed by George P. Cosmatos, written by Kevin Jarre (who was also the original director, but was replaced early in production[5][6]), and starring Kurt Russell and Val Kilmer, with Sam Elliott, Bill Paxton, Powers Boothe, Michael Biehn, and Dana Delany in supporting roles, as well as narration by Robert Mitchum.

The film is loosely based on events in Tombstone, Arizona, including the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral and the Earp Vendetta Ride, during the 1880s. It depicts a number of Western outlaws and lawmen, such as Wyatt Earp, William Brocius, Johnny Ringo, and Doc Holliday.

Tombstone was released by Hollywood Pictures in theatrical wide release in the United States on December 25, 1993, grossing $56.5 million in domestic ticket sales. The film was a financial success, and for the Western genre, it ranks number 16 in the list of highest-grossing films since 1979. Six months later, the similarly themed film Wyatt Earp was released with far less commercial success.[7] Critical reception was generally positive, with Kilmer's performance receiving critical acclaim. The film has become a cult classic since its release.[8]The Making of Tombstone, a book about the film, was published in 2018.[9]

Plot[edit]

In 1879, members of an outlaw gang known to wear red sashes called the Cowboys, led by "Curly Bill" Brocius, ride into a Mexican town and interrupt a local police officer's wedding. They then proceed to massacre the assembled policemen in retribution for killing two of their fellow gang members. Shortly before being shot, a local priest warns them that their acts of murder and savagery will be avenged, referencing the biblical fourth horseman.

Wyatt Earp, a retired peace officer with a notable reputation, reunites with his brothers Virgil and Morgan in Tucson, Arizona, where they venture on toward Tombstone to settle down. There they encounter Wyatt's long-time friend Doc Holliday, who is seeking relief in the dry climate from his worsening tuberculosis. Josephine Marcus and Mr. Fabian are also newly arrived with a traveling theater troupe. Meanwhile, Wyatt's common-law wife, Mattie Blaylock, is becoming dependent on laudanum. Wyatt and his brothers begin to profit from a stake in a gambling emporium and saloon when they have their first encounter with the Cowboys.

As tensions rise, Wyatt is pressured to help rid the town of the Cowboys, though he is no longer a lawman. Curly Bill begins shooting at the sky after a visit to an opium den and is told by Marshal Fred White to relinquish his firearms. Curly Bill instead shoots the marshal dead, and is forcibly taken into custody by Wyatt. The arrest infuriates Ike Clanton and the other Cowboys. Curly Bill stands trial, but is found not guilty due to a lack of witnesses. Virgil, unable to tolerate lawlessness, becomes the new marshal and imposes a weapons ban within the city limits. This leads to a gunfight at the O.K. Corral, in which Billy Clanton and the McLaury brothers are killed. Virgil and Morgan are wounded, and the allegiance of county sheriff Johnny Behan with the Cowboys is made clear. As val kilmer doc holliday images for the Cowboy deaths, Wyatt's brothers are ambushed; Morgan is killed, while Virgil is left handicapped. A despondent Wyatt and his family leave Free number word worksheets for kindergarten and board a train, with Ike Clanton and Frank Stilwell close behind, preparing to ambush them. Wyatt sees that his family leaves safely, and then surprises the assassins. He kills Stilwell, but lets Clanton live to send a message: Wyatt announces that he is a U.S. marshal, and that he intends to kill any man he sees wearing a red sash. Wyatt, Doc, a reformed Cowboy named Sherman McMasters, Texas Jack Vermillion, and Turkey Creek Jack Johnson, form a posse to seek revenge.

Wyatt and his posse are ambushed in a riverside forest by the Cowboys. Wyatt walks into the creek, miraculously surviving the enemy fire, and kills Curly Bill along with many of his men. Curly Bill's second-in-command, Johnny Ringo, becomes the new head of the Cowboys. When Doc's health worsens, the group is accommodated by Henry Hooker at his ranch. Ringo lures McMasters into the Cowboys' clutches under the pretense of parley and then sends a messenger (dragging McMasters' corpse) to tell Wyatt that he wants a showdown to end the hostilities; Wyatt agrees. Wyatt sets off for the showdown, not knowing that Doc has already arrived at the scene. Doc confronts a surprised Ringo, who was expecting Wyatt, and challenges him to a duel to finish their "game," which Ringo accepts (Doc and Ringo have already had a couple of stand offs in Tombstone that were ultimately broken up). Wyatt runs when he hears a gunshot, only to encounter Doc, who has killed Ringo. They then press on to complete their task of eliminating the Cowboys, although Clanton escapes their vengeance by renouncing his red sash. Doc is sent to a sanatorium in Colorado, where he dies of his illness. At Doc's urging, What to do if i lost my pnc debit card pursues Josephine to begin a new life.

Cast[edit]

Production[edit]

The film was shot primarily on location in Arizona. Shooting began in May 1993. The film was supposed to be screenwriter Kevin Jarre's first job as director, but he was quickly overwhelmed by the job–failing to get needed shots and falling behind the shooting schedule. A month into filming, he was fired by producer Andrew Vajna and replaced with George P. Cosmatos. Michael Biehn, a close friend of Jarre, considered quitting. Biehn recalled feeling (director) Cosmatos ".had no understanding or appreciation of the screenplay."[10] By the time of Cosmatos' arrival, though, all actors stayed on board.[11] The new director brought a demanding, hard-nosed sensibility to the set, which led to conflicts with some of the crew members (most famously with cinematographer William Fraker). Meanwhile, Kurt Russell worked quickly with producer James Jacks to pare down Jarre's sprawling script, deleting subplots and emphasizing the relationship between Wyatt and Doc.[12]

Russell has stated that it was he, and not Cosmatos, who actually directed the film, as Jarre's departure led to the studio's request.[13] Russell stated that Cosmatos was brought in as a "ghost director" as a front man because Russell did not want it to be known that he was directing.[13] Co-star Val Kilmer has supported Russell's statements about working heavily behind the scenes and stating that Russell "essentially" directed the film, but stopped short of saying that Russell did the actual directing.[14] Biehn stated that Russell never directed him personally.[15]

Cosmatos was highly focused on accurate historical detail, including the costumes, props, customs, and scenery, to give them authenticity. All the mustaches in the movie were real. Val Kilmer practiced for a long time on his quick-draw speed, and gave his character a Southern Aristocrat accent. Two locations were used to make the town of Tombstone look bigger. The scene in which Wyatt throws an abusive card dealer (Billy Bob Thornton) out of a saloon was to show that Wyatt was a man who used psychology to intimidate. Thornton's lines in the scene were ad-libbed, as he was only told to "be a bully".[16]

Music[edit]

Soundtrack[edit]

Tombstone: Complete Original Motion Picture Soundtrack
ReleasedMarch 16, 2006
Length1:25:29
LabelIntrada

The original motion picture soundtrack for Tombstone was originally released by Intrada Records on December 25, 1993.[17] On March 16, 2006, an expanded two-disc version of the film score was also released by Intrada Records.[18] The score was composed and produced by Bruce Broughton, and performed by the Sinfonia of London. David Snell conducted most of the score (although Broughton normally conducts his own scores, val kilmer doc holliday images problems mandated another conductor here), while Patricia Carlin edited the film's music.[19]

The score contains strong echoes of Max Steiner's music for John Ford's The Searchers (1956) with variations on the 'Indian Traders' theme used midway through the Ford movie. The album begins with the Cinergi logo, composed by Jerry Goldsmith and conducted by Broughton.

Release[edit]

Home media[edit]

Following its cinematic release in theaters, the film was released on VHS video format on November 11, 1994.[20] The Region 1 Codewidescreen edition of the film was released on DVD in the United States on December 2, 1997. Special features for the DVD only include original theatrical trailers.[21] A director's cut of Tombstone was also officially released on DVD on January 15, 2002. The DVD version includes a two-disc set and features "The Making of Tombstone" featurette in three parts; "An Ensemble Cast"; "Making an Authentic Western"; and "The Gunfight at the O.K. Corral". Other features include an audio commentary by director George P. Cosmatos, an interactive Tombstone timeline, the director's original storyboards for the O.K. Corral sequence, the Tombstone "Epitaph" – an actual newspaper account, the DVD-ROM feature "Faro at the Oriental: Game of Chance", and a collectible Tombstone map.[22]

The widescreen high-definition Blu-ray Disc edition of the theatrical cut was released on April 27, 2010, featuring the making of Tombstone, val kilmer doc holliday images original storyboards, trailers, and TV spots.[23] A supplemental viewing option for the film in the media format of video-on-demand is available, as well.[24]

Reception[edit]

Box office[edit]

Tombstone premiered in movie theaters six months before Costner and Kasdan's version, Wyatt Earp, on December 24, 1993, in wide release throughout the United States. During its opening weekend, the film opened in third place, grossing $6,454,752 in business showing at 1,504 locations.[4][25] The film's revenue increased by 35% in its second week of release, earning $8,720,255. For that particular weekend, the film stayed in third place, screening in 1,955 theaters. The film went on to earn $56,505,065 in total ticket sales in the North American market.[4] It ranks 20th out of all films released in 1993.[26]

Critical response[edit]

Rotten Tomatoes reported that 74% of 46 sampled critics gave the film a positive review, with an average score of 6.30/10. The site's critical consensus reads, "If you're seeking a stylish modern western with a solid story and a well-chosen ensemble cast, Tombstone is your huckleberry.".[27] Following its cinematic release in 1993, Tombstone was named "one of the 5 greatest Westerns ever made" by True West Magazine. The film was also called "One of the year's 10 best!" by KCOP-TV in Los Angeles, California.[28]

Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert of Siskel & Ebert originally thought they would have to miss reviewing the film, as they could not get a screening, but as Ebert explained, ". a strange thing started to happen. People started telling me they really liked Val Kilmer's performance in Tombstone, and I heard this everywhere I went. When you hear this once or twice, it's interesting, when you hear it a couple of dozen times, it's a trend. And when you read that Bill Clinton loved the performance, you figured you better catch up with the movie." Ultimately, Ebert recommended the movie while Siskel did not.

Ebert was later to refer to Tombstone in future reviews, comparing it favorably to Kevin Costner's Wyatt Earp ("It forced the comparison upon me.") and, in his review of Wild Bill, singling out Val Kilmer's portrayal as "the definitive saloon cowboy of our time."[29][30] In his review of Kurt Russell's Dark Blue, he stated, "Every time I see Russell or Val Kilmer in a role, I'm reminded of their Tombstone, which got lost in the year-end holiday shuffle and never got the recognition it deserved."[31]

Grafted onto this traditional framework, the film's meditative aspects are generally too self-conscious to fit comfortably. Especially when the movie tries to imagine a more enlightened role for women in the Old West, the screenplay begins to strain.
—Stephen Holden, The New York Times[32]

In a mixed review, Chris Hicks writing in the Deseret News said, "aside from Russell and Val Kilmer's scene-stealing, sickly, alcoholic Doc Holliday, there are so many characters coming and going, with none of them receiving adequate screen time, that it becomes difficult to keep track of them all." But he did comment, "some very entertaining moments here, with Russell spouting memorable tough-guy lines". Overall, he felt, "Taken on its own terms, with some lowered expectations, Western fans will have fun."[33]Emanuel Levy of the Variety staff believed the film was a "tough-talking but soft-hearted tale" which was "entertaining in a sprawling, old-fashioned manner." Regarding screenwriter Jarre's dialogue, he noted, "Despite the lack of emotional center and narrative focus, his script contains enough subplots and colorful characters to enliven the film and ultimately make it a fun, if not totally engaging, experience." He also singled out Val Kilmer as the standout performance.[34] The film, however, was not without its detractors. James Berardinelli writing for ReelViews offered a mixed-to-negative review, recalling how he thought, "The first half of Tombstone isn't an example of great filmmaking, but it is engaging. There's a sense of growing inevitability as events build to the shoot-out at the OK Corral. The melodramatic "serious" moments are kept to a minimum, and the various gunfights are choreographed with style and tension. Then, at the one-hour ten-minute mark, the Clanton gang and the Earps square off. From there, things get progressively worse. Not only is the last hour anticlimactic, but it's dull. Too many scenes feature lengthy segments of poorly-scripted dialogue, and, in some cases, character motivation becomes unclear. The gunplay is more repetitious than exciting. The result—a cobbled-together morass of silly lines and shoot- outs—doesn't work well."[35]

Stephen Holden writing in The New York Times saw the film as being a "capacious Western with many modern touches, the Arizona boom town and site of the legendary O.K. Corral has a seedy, vaudevillian grandeur that makes it a direct forerunner of Las Vegas." He expressed his satisfaction with the supporting acting, saying, "[the] most modern psychological touch is its depiction of Josephine (Dana Delany), the itinerant actress with whom Wyatt falls in love at first sight, as the most casually and comfortably liberated woman ever to set foot in 1880s Arizona."[32] Critic Louis Black, writing for The Austin Chronicle, viewed Tombstone as a "mess" and that there were "two or three pre-climaxes but no climax. Its values are capitalist rather than renegade, which is okay if it's metaphoric rather than literal. Worse, as much as these actors heroically struggle to focus the film, the director more successfully hacks it apart."[36]Owen Gleiberman of Entertainment Weekly gave the film a C– rating, calling it "preposterously inflated" at "135 minutes long". He observed the film as being a "three-hour rough cut that's been trimmed down to a slightly shorter rough cut" with "all that holds the film together is Kurt Russell's droll machismo."[37] Author Geoff Andrew of Time Out commented, "Kilmer makes a surprisingly effective and effete Holliday". He negatively acknowledged that there was "a misguided romantic subplot and the ending rather sprawls" but ultimately exclaimed the film was "'rootin', tootin' entertainment with lots of authentic facial hair."[38]

Richard Harrington of The Washington Post highlighted the film's shortcomings by declaring, "too much of Tombstone rings hollow. In retrospect, not much happens and little that does seems warranted. There are so many unrealized relationships you almost hope for redemption in a longer video version. This one is unsatisfying and unfulfilling."[39] Alternately though, columnist Bob Bloom of the Journal & Courier openly remarked that the film "May not be historically accurate, but offers a lot of punch for the buck." He concluded by saying it was "A tough, guilty-pleasure Western."[40]

Although Val Kilmer’s performance as Doc Holliday was praised, he did not get an Oscar nomination for Best Supporting Actor. But he did however get nominated for Best Male Performance and Most Desirable Male at the MTV Movie Awards.

Other media[edit]

Novelization[edit]

A paperback novel of the same name adapted from Kevin Jarre's screenplay, written by Giles Tippette and published by Berkley Publishers, was released on January 1, 1994. The book dramatizes the real-life events of the gunfight at the O.K. Corral and Earp Vendetta Ride, as depicted in the film. It expands on Western genre ideas in Jarre's screenplay.[41]

References[edit]

  1. ^"DVD Reviews – Tombstone – Director's Cut & Original Versions". The Digital Bits. Archived from the original on January 1, 2016. Retrieved June 1, 2014.
  2. ^"Tombstone". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  3. ^"Tombstone". Should i open a business bank account Numbers. Archived from the original on November 18, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  4. ^ abc"Tombstone". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  5. ^Myrna Oliver (April 27, 2005). "George P. Cosmatos, 64; Director Was Known for Saving Troubled Projects". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on January 21, 2012. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  6. ^Richard Harrington (December 12, 1993). "'Tombstone' (R)". The Washington Post. Archived from the original on January 2, 2019. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  7. ^"Genres Western 1979–present". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  8. ^Spangenberger, Phil. "Tombstone 25—A Western Classic's Reunion". True West Magazine. True West Publishing. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved March 27, 2019.
  9. ^The Making of Tombstone: Behind the Scenes of the Classic Modern Western (2018), by John Farkis, ISBN 9781476675862
  10. ^Biehn, Michael; Anderson, Jim. "Shooting Tombstone". Archived from the original on January 31, 2021. Retrieved April 23, 2020.
  11. ^Jason Priestley (May 6, 2014). Jason Priestley: A Memoir. HarperOne. ISBN 978-0062357892. Retrieved November 7, 2015.
  12. ^"SHOOT FIRST (ASK QUESTIONS LATER)". ew.com. Archived from the original on September 14, 2018. Retrieved September 30, 2018.
  13. ^ ab"The Western Godfather". True West. Archived from the original on July 2, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  14. ^Parker, Ryan. "Val Kilmer Says Kurt Russell Essentially Directed 'Tombstone'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on July 9, 2020. Retrieved July 9, 2020.
  15. ^“Everything Had to Go Right”: What Happened to ‘Terminator’ Star Michael Biehn
  16. ^George P. Cosmatos. Tombstone DVD Audio Commentary.
  17. ^"Tombstone Original Motion Picture Soundtrack". Archived from the original on March 20, 2021. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  18. ^"Tombstone Soundtrack". Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  19. ^"Tombstone (1993)". Yahoo! Movies. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  20. ^Tombstone VHS Format. ASIN 6303109950.
  21. ^"Tombstone DVD". Video.com. Archived from the original on December 4, 2010. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  22. ^"Tombstone Vista Series DVD". Video.com. Archived from the original on December 4, any home remedies for strep throat. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  23. ^"Tombstone Widescreen Blu-ray". Barnes & Noble. Archived from the original on July 7, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  24. ^"Tombstone: VOD Format". Archived from the original on September 19, 2015. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  25. ^"December 24–26, 1993 Weekend". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on July 8, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  26. ^"1993 Domestic Grosses". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on March 2, 2011. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  27. ^Tombstone (1993)Archived June 5, 2020, at the Wayback Machine. Rotten Tomatoes. IGN Entertainment. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  28. ^Tombstone – DVD AcclaimArchived July 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Video.com. Retrieved March 15, 2011.
  29. ^Ebert, Roger (June 24, 1994). Wyatt EarpArchived February 7, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  30. ^Ebert, Roger (December 1, 1995). Wild BillArchived February 7, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  31. ^Ebert, Roger (February 21, 2003). Dark BlueArchived February 6, 2021, at the Wayback Machine.
  32. ^ abHolden, Stephen (December 24, 1993). A Fractious Old West in a Modern Moral UniverseArchived August 10, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The New York Times. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  33. ^Hicks, Chris (December 28, 1993). TombstoneArchived August 11, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. Deseret News. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  34. ^Levy, Emanuel (December 22, 1993). TombstoneArchived November 8, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Variety. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  35. ^Berardinelli, James (December 25, 1993). TombstoneArchived February 24, 2021, at the Wayback Machine. ReelViews. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  36. ^Black, Louis (December 31, 1993). TombstoneArchived June 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. The Austin Chronicle. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  37. ^Gleiberman, Owen (January 14, 1994). Tombstone (1993)Archived October 21, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  38. ^Andrew, Geoff (1993). TombstoneArchived October 19, 2012, at the Wayback Machine. Time Out. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  39. ^Harrington, Richard (December 25, 1993). Tombstone (R)Archived January 2, 2019, at the Wayback Machine. The Washington Post. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  40. ^Bloom, Bob (September 20, 2003). Tombstone. Journal & Courier. Retrieved March 17, 2011.
  41. ^Tippette, Giles (January 1, 1994). Tombstone. Berkley. ISBN .

External links[edit]

Источник: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tombstone_(film)

Tom Stratton

SOME YEARS AGO, Val Kilmer began selling his original artwork on the Internet. Kilmer has been making art for a long time. He takes photographs and creates scrapbook-style media collages with atmospheric abstract paintings resembling blooms of underwater lava. His neon sculpture of a dyspeptic-looking Mahatma Gandhi hung for a while in the restaurant of a fancy hotel in South Beach, and he once cast a tumbleweed in 22-karat gold.

But the project he’s become most famous for is an ongoing series of quasi-self-portraits—Warholian pop-art images of Kilmer in character as Batman or Doc Holliday or Jim Morrison, rendered using stencils and brightly colored enamel paint on 12-inch-by-12-inch squares of reclaimed steel. Sometimes he’ll superimpose a stenciled word like love on the image, or a variation of a quote from one of his movies, such as chicks dig suntrust locations in columbus ga car. His website didn’t have any Doc Holliday paintings at press time, but for a fan-friendly $150, you could still acquire a portrait of Kilmer as Tom “Iceman” Kazansky—Tom Val kilmer doc holliday images nemesis and beach-volleyball rival in Top Gun—in a range of colors, from neon green to red and blue to eerie red-on-black.

These are not the most technically complex or conceptually weighty paintings. They are not even technically complex or conceptually weighty by the standards of other paintings by Val Kilmer. But there’s an additional layer of meaning to them, because they’re portraits of Val Kilmer by Val Kilmer.

The pictures feel like a sincere effort on his part to use the tools at his disposal
to make sense of his own relationship to a postmodern character called “Val Kilmer,” who is less a person than a collection of symbolic echoes, and who casts a long shadow over the real Val Kilmer’s life despite existing solely in the media landscape and the public’s mind. There is nothing inherently interesting about a piece of steel with a stenciled image of Val Kilmer as Batman on it, but a piece of steel on which Val Kilmer himself has painted a stenciled image of Val Kilmer as Batman as part of a project involving the painting of dozens of Val Kilmer-as-Batman images becomes an act of introspection, a commentary, a reflection on reflections and the indelibility of iconicity.

One afternoon in early March, I discussed all of this with Val Kilmer over the phone. “Yes,” he said. “By repainting the exact same thing using a stencil, it was a way of contemplating the subject while being very strict with what I was inviting myself to do.”

.

I asked him if the paintings were a way for him to work through the feeling of being known without being known, to help process the weirdness that comes with everyone looking at you and seeing Iceman or the Lizard King. “It’s not so much me thinking about myself,” he said. “It’s more about the icon. The icon of the warrior. Or the gunslinger—that black-and-white justice that’s part of American history. That’s Doc Holliday. And then Jim Morrison is an iconic rock ’n’ roller, a poet.

“I also found there was a surprising number of fans who wanted original paintings,” he continued, as if to puncture the self-importance of talking about this work in this way. “I sold an embarrassing number of them.”

I think he laughed when he said this; I’m not positive. It was a strange conversation, because there was no way for it not to be. Kilmer, now 60, was diagnosed with throat cancer in 2015. In the opening pages of his new memoir, I’m Your Huckleberry, (Simon & Schuster, April 21, 2020) he has lost his New Mexico home as a result of the 2008 financial crisis and finds himself convalescing at an ex-girlfriend’s place. This is a book of absurd juxtapositions; the home happens to be an Italian Renaissance–style palazzo in Malibu overlooking the ocean, because the ex-girlfriend happens to be Cher. He is there when his condition takes a fateful turn.

“Cher dipped out for afternoon errands,” he writes. “Night fell, and I fell asleep. Suddenly I awoke vomiting blood that covered the bed like a scene out of The Godfather. I prayed immediately, then called 911.” Eventually he endures two tracheotomies. “The cancer miraculously healed much faster than any of the doctors predicted,” he writes, but adds, “It has taken time, and taken a toll.&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. Speaking, once my joy and lifeblood, has become an hourly struggle.” He describes his new voice as sounding “like Marlon Brando after a couple of bottles of tequila. It isn’t a frog in my throat. More like a buffalo.”

@valkilmerofficialInstagram

Kilmer and I both live in Los Angeles. COVID-19 had not yet rendered in-person interactions verboten, so I suggested we could talk in person, but he wanted to speak over the phone, through an interpreter—his high school friend and business partner, Brad Koepenick. I would ask a question, I’d hear some indistinct buffalo growls on the other end of the line, and then Koepenick would repeat Kilmer’s response to me in his own voice. We spoke to each other this way for about an hour.

At first there were a few people speaking in the room, and I asked Koepenick if he could identify himself. “I’m Brad Koepenick,” he said. After that, I heard Kilmer speaking—rarrrggh rarrrggh rarrrggh—and then, speaking for Kilmer, Koepenick said, “I am Spartacus.” For all his responses, for clarity, when Koepenick is speaking Kilmer’s words, I’ve attributed them to Kilmer, and I’ve attributed Koepenick’s occasional comments to Koepenick.

To understand Val Kilmer, in all his incarnations, it’s important to recognize that he has been a Christian Scientist since the age of seven or eight. Founded in 1879 by the val kilmer doc holliday images Mary Baker Bmo credit card online registration, Christian Science is a form of metaphysical Christianity whose adherents believe, among other things, that physical illness and infirmity result from mental misconception or “negative thinking.” All of Kilmer’s answers to questions regarding physical matters reflect these beliefs—as he writes in his memoir, his physical difficulties have led him deeper into spiritual practice: “When one sense weakens, another grows strong. I have more time to play in the metaphysical forests.”

Simon & Schuster

It says something important about Val Kilmer’s mind, however, that the only historical figure who seems to loom as large in his personal pantheon as Mary Baker Eddy is Mark Twain. Twain was a contemporary of Eddy’s, and while he spoke approvingly of Christian Science’s core principles on occasion, he saw its founder as a charlatan.

In 2012, Kilmer began portraying Twain—whom he views as “the first media-literacy educator”—in a one-man stage show, Citizen Twain, and has spent years working on the script for a movie depicting a fictional meeting between Twain and Eddy, which he still hopes to direct. “Twain is the antagonist in the story,” Kilmer says. “Mary Baker Eddy is the protagonist. Mark Twain can’t help his pride and ego, his madness.”

Simon & Schuster

I asked if this was what Kilmer related to about Twain as a character.

“His madness?” Kilmer asked, and then Koepenick, the interpreter, laughed.

Sure, I said. His pride, his ego, his madness. “Yeah,” Kilmer said. “We all have pride to work through.”

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I WANTED TO TALK to Val Kilmer about pride. When he was young, he was beautiful, and moved through the world with the ease of someone beautiful, from school plays to Juilliard to the movies, such as 1984’s Top Secret!, which instantly made him a movie star for playing a rock star. One year later, with Real Genius, he was already a hyper-opinionated pain in the ass on set—he admits as much in his book—and a year after that came Top Gun, and with it great fortune.

Kilmer was a stage-trained actor with grand aspirations—he writes with chagrin about turning down the lead in David Lynch’s Blue Velvet due to the script’s sexual content and cops to badgering Stanley Kubrick for a meeting he never got. But by the mid-’90s, he’d become an A-list leading man who was reportedly receiving $6 million per picture, which was a different kind of grand.

His movie career hit its zenith in the first five years of the ’90s, when he played Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone’s The Doors, Elvis’s ghost in True Romance, the gunfighter Doc Holliday in Tombstone, Robert De Niro’s demolitions-expert partner in Michael Mann’s bank-heist epic Heat, and Batman in Joel Schumacher’s goofy, garish Batman Forever. Those last two came out in 1995, and after that the going got weird. Whether Kilmer walked away or was released from his contractual obligation to play Batman again due to difficult behavior is unclear. His next projects were the film version of the 1960s TV series The Saint—in which he disappears behind a series of increasingly ludicrous wigs and glasses like somebody who really, really wants you to know he went to Juilliard—and a remake of The Island of Dr. Moreau, which became one of the decade’s most infamously cursed productions.

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In the pages of Huckleberry, Kilmer is equivocal about his reputation as a temperamental collaborator (“In an unflinching attempt to empower directors, actors, and other collaborators to honor the truth and essence of each project&thinsp.&thinsp.&thinsp. I had been deemed difficult and alienated the head of every major studio”), but he talks straight about much of the work that followed (“I have here described myself as a man with lofty goals, and I have a solid two decades’ worth of work that I’d describe as less than lofty”).

There are true gems in Kilmer’s post-Moreau filmography, like the David Mamet human-trafficking thriller Spartan, Shane Black’s manically inventive Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, and MacGruber, in which Kilmer plays a Bond-style villain named Dieter Von Cunth. His hazy-eyed performance as the doomed ’70s porn star John Holmes in 2003’s Wonderland is a riff on his Morrison but funnier and sadder, the Lizard King as lost soul. But for all intents and purposes, Batman was his farewell to franchise-hero parts. Having grown up watching Kilmer in blockbuster movies and then appreciating his work in smaller films, I never thought of him as a cautionary tale about hubris or ego, but Huckleberry points in that direction. His last thought on turning down Lynch is a poignant plea: “Maybe it’s not too late,” he writes. “Maybe one day we can finally work together. A character who lives up on Mulholland and doesn’t speak much? David, I am so sorry I never explained myself.”

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We never got around to talking about Lynch, though, because we started talking about death, which led us to God, which left no time for much else. Shortly after a 17-year-old Kilmer left his home in L. A. for Juilliard, his younger brother, Wesley, suffered an epileptic seizure in the family’s Jacuzzi and died on the way to the hospital. I asked Kilmer about how he managed to avoid letting this loss define him.

“You have to not see it as a loss,” Kilmer told me. He writes in the book that he’s heard Wesley’s voice on occasion, admonishing him from beyond the grave: “No one wants to see or hear a handsome, successful, talented writer-actor-director who gets the most impossible-to-get girls in the world complain about a damn thing.”

“I’ve had experiences with lots of people that are departed,” Kilmer said on the phone. “For instance, my mother passed on recently, and a few days after, I was aware of her—you could call it her spirit. And she wanted me to be happy, because she was having a reunion with her son Wesley and the love of her life, Bill, her second husband. And they were just all so happy. It was a great release of a burden—because my mom, I felt, wasn’t so happy sometimes, here on earth.”

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Kilmer’s access to the unexplained and extrasensory is a major through line in his book. At 24, in New Mexico, he encounters a black-robed figure in a vision, newtons 1st law examples pictures he recognizes as the Angel of Death’s opposite, the Angel of Life, who pulls out Kilmer’s heart and gives him a bigger one. At a comic-book convention, across a table where he’s signing Batman stuff for Batman fans, Kilmer meets a Native American fan who asks him, “What is acting?”—a question that unlocks the meaning of a recurring dream Kilmer’s father had about dying in battle with another Native American man on the frontier. On a backpacking trip in Kenya with his then wife, Joanne Whalley, Kilmer steps outside his tent, and there’s a nine-foot-long monitor lizard sitting there.

I asked Kilmer if he’s thought much about why these messengers and symbols appeared to him, if he believes they were put in his path for a reason, and if all of us could interact with the metaphysical world in this way if we paid closer attention to its manifestations.

“Yes,” Kilmer said. “I do think it has to do with paying attention. And also asking for [those signs]. I’ve always had a very strong relationship with wild animals, especially animals like the kudu, which are very hard to spot, or the badger, or the black leopard, or the black panther.”

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Kilmer said something else after this, and Koepenick, confused, repeated it back to Kilmer as a question: “Kanye forever?” Kilmer said the words again, clarifying, and Koepenick, to me, said, “Wakanda forever.”

“My translator’s higher than hell,” Kilmer said.

“I’ve got to lay off the ganja, you’re right,” Koepenick said.

Is it possible, I asked, to summon these things into your life? To seek these encounters with animals and other spiritual beings?

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“I think so, yeah,” Kilmer said. “I mean, I’ve never been interested in hunting. But at the same time—this is a true story that sounds unreal, but I’ve been back to the same spot in South Africa, a hunters’ spot that you have to rent. It’s very expensive because all the animals there are very mature, so their horns are very big. And I’m not a hunter, but I rent the whole area so I can have as wild an experience as possible with very big game. And the most vindictive animal out there is the Cape buffalo. The Cape buffalo has a phenomenal memory, much better than the famed elephant.

“And I’ve been to the same spot three times. And the second time I went there, [a Cape buffalo] smelled me, even though I was the third in a line of humans, and he trotted over until he was right in front of me. And then he stared at me for half an hour, as if to say, ‘Your move—I’m ready.’ And then the third time I went, he did the exact same thing. Except it was more extreme because the wind was blowing harder. And he was very specifically putting his nose in the air, as if he was displaying—I’m smelling, I’m smelling. But this time it was almost like a playful kind of dance over to me. And I had the same guides [as before], and the guides were freaking out. They were babbling in their native tongue: He knows you, he knows you. He’s coming to say hello. They were freaking. And I was like, ‘I know.’

“But that happens a lot,” Kilmer said. “Like honey badgers, you know? Impossible to see in the daytime. I’ve seen them in both the daytime and the nighttime.”

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YOU'VE PLAYED ALL these heroes over the course of your career, I said to Kilmer. There’s a tendency in our culture to frame illness in heroic terms, as a fight for life or an occasion for bravery, particularly when we’re talking about someone we think of as heroic in another context. We make shirts about kicking cancer’s ass and write headlines like "val kilmer battles cancer." For someone who’s been through it, is the idea of a brave battle with cancer the wrong way to think about it?

Kilmer answered without really answering. He talked about mental attitude. “It’s half of the healing—making sure the mind is free, in the morning, of limitations.”

Later, at the end of the call, Kilmer gave me his email address in case I had any follow-up questions. After a week or so, I wrote him an email in which I asked him a few fact-checking questions about the timing of his diagnosis and his recovery, and whether it was difficult to balance his Christian Scientist beliefs with traditional medicine. He didn’t answer, though this might be because I also asked him, very gently, if he had any regrets about being a jerk on movie sets.

That day on the phone, I let the conversation go where it wanted to, reluctant to steer it back to Moreau’s island. I asked Kilmer if it was hard to get to that place of being free and clear, if it was something he had to cultivate. Kilmer said no, that his spiritual practice had been part of his life since childhood. Then he asked, “Alex, do you believe in God?”

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I stammered something about being a skeptic, because suddenly I felt guilty telling Christian Science Batman that God does not play a role in my life.

“The infinite,” Kilmer said. “Have you had a sense of the infinite?”

I confirmed to Val Kilmer that I have had a sense of the infinite and stammered again about psychedelics val kilmer doc holliday images the notion that something must exist outside the boundaries of our consciousness.

“And I think the physical science is catching up with that,” he said. I asked Kilmer if having cancer tested his faith, if there were moments when he wanted to give up hope. He quoted what turned out to be a line from the Gospel According to Mark, about faith in the face of val kilmer doc holliday images, about doubt as a specific crucible for faith: “Lord, I believe. Help thou mine unbelief.”

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What you can tell about Kilmer even throughout an odd and stilted back-and-forth is that he’s been through something and emerged from it that much more certain of the one thing he believes most strongly, which is that mental attitude can have transformative effects. As an inveterate doubter, I wanted Kilmer to express doubt or regret or otherwise admit to a sense of powerlessness, which I suppose is contraindicated in a worldview based on the all-importance of mental attitude. It was the paintings conversation all over again—I wanted him to talk about the gulf between our heroic notion of the movie star and the actual flawed human behind it, but he couldn’t, or wouldn’t, see it in those terms.

So I asked him what the most surprising thing was about his illness. He paused for a minute and then said, “Well, something that was reaffirmed to me—on such a level, it was almost shocking—was a sense of universal love, a kind of power and a different sense of love. It was coming into my consciousness and my body while I was at the hospital.”

At one point, Kilmer said, one of his doctors saw him and became animated, even overjoyed. This specific doctor, he said, turned out to have been present during a moment when Kilmer almost slipped away. “He lost me for a while, and he was just so happy I was back. He wanted me to be happier. I was grateful, but I was not surprised.”

Why not?

“Because I don’t believe in death,” Kilmer said.

I asked him how he managed val kilmer doc holliday images shake a belief that defines life itself in a fundamental way for so many people on this planet. He spoke again about his little brother’s death, how even though he’d spent years by that point reading and thinking and praying on the Christian Scientist concept of death as an illusion, “having to live it out becomes quite a different proposition.”

Christian Scientists believe any malady can be overcome through mental effort, death included. “And this is what Mrs. Eddy meant when she talked about reinstating primitive Christianity. That’s how she thought Jesus was teaching—teaching others to heal themselves. And that’s what made him a dangerous man. Because he taught people how to be independent, and that’s always a very, very radical thing to do in society.”

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I don’t know enough about science, much less about faith, to argue with Kilmer. And yet, sitting there on the phone, I realized I envied find a sperm bank near me ability to believe, his confidence in the face of cosmic uncertainty. I envied the security he derives from what he thinks he knows.

It’s extremely human, when faced with adversity, to fall into wallowing and selfishness and sadness and not wanting to go on, I said to Kilmer. How do you avoid surrendering to those feelings?

“Sometimes you have to be aggressive about finding a way to be courageous,” he said, “and not believing what your physical picture may be demanding you accept as real. Like if someone came into the room, and they were sleepwalking, and they were screaming that their feathers were on fire, what would you do?”

Well, you’re not supposed to wake a sleepwalker, I started to say, and then Kilmer interjected.

“You have to find a way to wake them up,” he said, “because they don’t have feathers, and so they’re not on fire.”

Alex PappademasAlex Pappademas has written about pop culture for Esquire, GQ, Grantland, and others.

Источник: https://www.menshealth.com/trending-news/a32162764/val-kilmer-career-cancer-interview/

3 Replies to “Val kilmer doc holliday images”

  1. @Graham Stephan What do you mean you have no clue? You literally talk about how you do it in a video where you mention how we could do it. You pick a niche, look at what other people in the niche are doing for 'inspiration' and then you do it! Great tactic and I like your spin on things. Keep it up!

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