911 gi bill pay chart

Q: I am using Post 9/11 GI Bill (Chapter 33) benefits and still have a balance due For current pay rates, consult the VA web site at www.gibill.va.gov/. Though it's similar to a BAH, payments under the GI Bill are called Monthly Housing For Post 911 GI Bill BAH Rates, please use E-5 with Dependents to. Using Military Benefits at Duke University Post-9/11 GI Bill® and the Yellow Ribbon Program. The Yellow Ribbon GI Education Veteran Graduation Rates. 911 gi bill pay chart

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911 gi bill pay chart
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Are you a military veteran or active-duty service member of the U.S. armed forces who has served at least 30 days or more since Sept. 10, 2001? Then, under the Post-9/11 GI Bill, you’re eligible to receive education and training benefits to help you avoid student loan debt.

Understanding Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits doesn’t have to be confusing. When these benefits are broken down, it’s easy to know when, where and how you’ll be able to start receiving your GI Bill education and training benefits.

Post-9/11 GI Bill Basics

Any veteran who has served at least 90 days of active duty with the U.S. Armed Forces, starting after Sept. 10, 2001, and received an honorable discharge qualifies for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits. 

To qualify for the maximum amount of benefits payable, you have to have served for at least three years on active duty.

Tiered Eligibility Percentage Payment Structure

The Post-9/11 GI Bill program has many different payments which are structured around an eligibility tier. The length of your service determines your eligibility percentage.

Member ServesPercentage of maximum benefit payable
At least 36 months100%
At least 30 continuous days on active duty and
must be discharged due to service-connected disability or received a Purple Heart
100%
At least 30 months, but less than 36 months90%
At least 24 months, but less than 30 months80%
At least 18 months, but less than 24 months70%
At least 6 months, but less than 18 months60%
At least 90 days, but less than 6 months50%

It’s important to note that any service members who qualify for the active duty GI Bill, the reserve GI Bill, or the Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP) can choose which benefit best fits their education needs. However, the REAP program is being shut down soon because the Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits are generally much better than REAP.

What Are the Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits?

Under the Post-9/11 GI Bill, veterans are eligible to receive:

Tuition and Fee Payments

Students using the Post-9/11 GI Bill are eligible to receive all tuition and fee payments for an in-state school at the level of the maximum cost of public-university education in that state. Students attending a private or foreign university can receive benefits up to $25,162.14 during the academic year. 

Under the Yellow Ribbon Program, if you are attending a public institution of higher learning (IHL) as a non-resident student or are at a private IHL that is more expensive than the annual cap, you may be eligible for extra payments. 

Also, you may qualify for in-state tuition rates if you live in the state where you’re going to school, regardless of your former state of residence.

GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance (MHA)

The GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance is generally the same as the military Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) for “E-5 with dependents.” Your rate is based on your school’s zip code, not your personal address, and it is paid at a percentage based on your actual training time.

Essentially, this means that full-time students will receive a higher MHA than part-time students. You can use the GI Bill Comparison Tool to research MHA for the school you’re looking to attend.

There are some rules regarding MHA availability:

  • MHA is not available to active-duty service members, spouses of active-duty members using transferred benefits and those taking courses at or below half-time.
  • MHA is available to veterans taking at least a half-time load, spouses of veterans using transferred benefits, and children using transferred benefits.
  • Housing rates are determined on a case-by-case basis if your training is exclusively online with no in-classroom hours or if you are a veteran attending a foreign school, your housing rates are listed as TBD.

Additional benefits:

  • A yearly books and supplies stipend of up to $1,000 is paid proportionately based on enrollment.
  • A one-time rural benefit payment of $500 may be payable to certain veterans who are relocating from highly rural areas.

What if I Don’t Want to Earn a College Degree?

The benefits available to veterans are the same for those who wish to attend a non-college-degree-granting institution as those in a traditional college setting. For example, all net costs for tuition and fees can’t exceed maximum in-state public-college tuition. And you may still be eligible to receive MHA, the books and supplies stipend and the one-time rural benefit.

The MHA rates differ for apprenticeship and on-the-job training, however. For example, apprenticeship and on-the-job training rates are as follows, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA):

  • For the first six months of training, you can receive 100% of your applicable MHA.
  • For the second six months of training, you can receive 80% of your applicable MHA.
  • For the third six months of training, you can receive 60% of your applicable MHA.
  • For the fourth six months of training, you can receive 40% of your applicable MHA.
  • For the remainder of your pursuit of training, you can receive 20% of your applicable MHA.

Alternative Training Rates

You can also use your GI Bill benefits to pursue alternative training such as the options below.

Correspondence School

The net costs of correspondence school cannot exceed $12,221.58 per academic year.

National Testing Programs or Licensing and Certification Tests

  • You can use your GI Bill to be reimbursed up to $2,000 per test. Your entitlement will be charged one month for every $2,099.24 paid to you, rounded down to the nearest non-zero month. This basically means that you can charge even low-cost tests to your GI Bill benefits, but you’ll be charged for an entire month of GI Bill benefits per test.

Vocational Flight School Training

According to multiple flight school websites, the net costs for your flight school training cannot exceed $14,378.35 per academic bank of hawaii hawaiian miles visa credit card. This cap applies to all classes and enrollments that begin during that academic year, regardless of the year the class or enrollment is completed.

What Does The Montgomery GI Bill Offer?

Many service members sign up for Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) benefits when they join the military or are automatically eligible for the MGIB-Selected Reserve when they join the Guard or Reserves. The MGIB is different from the Post-9/11 GI Bill. In general, the Post-9/11 GI Bill is a more valuable benefit than the MGIB.

Comparing the Post-9/11 GI Bill and the Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB)

The following table provides an overview of the benefits under both GI Bill programs.

Benefits and CostsPost-9/11MGIB
Buy-in requirementNone$1,200
Minimum length of service
to qualify
90 days of active aggregate service (after Sept. 10, 2001) or 30 days continuous service if discharged due to a disabilityTwo years continuous enlistment (minimum duty varies by service date, branch, etc.)
Who receives payment?Educational institution receives tuitionVeteran receives payment
Books and supplies stipend$1,000 per year is paid to the student at the beginning of the termNone
Housing stipendBasic Allowance for Housing (BAH) rate at associated bank festival foods green bay east with Dependents;” paid monthlyNone
Expanded educational benefitsYesNo
Are benefits transferable?Yes, under limited circumstancesNo
Time limit to useNo expiration for veterans discharged on or after Jan. 1, 2013

15-year expiration for veterans discharged on or prior to Dec. 31, 2012
10 years
Yellow Ribbon ProgramYesNo

Obtaining Montgomery GI Bill Refunds

Many service members want to know if they are eligible for a refund for the $1,200 they paid into the MGIB. Montgomery GI Bill refunds are only available to service members who are eligible for both the MGIB and the Post-9/11 GI Bill and who use their entire Post-9/11 GI Bill benefit. Once they deplete their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits, they can request a refund for the amount of the MGIB they did not use. Refunds are prorated based on the amount of the MGIB they used.

Transferring Your GI Bill Benefits state bank of lincoln a Family Member

Did you know that if you are an active-duty service member, you have the ability to transfer benefits to family members? The Department of Defense is “authorized to allow individuals who, on or after Aug. 1, 2009, have served at least six years in the armed forces and who agree to serve at least another four years in the armed forces to transfer unused entitlement to their spouse,” according to the VA.

National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration and Public Health System personnel can also transfer their benefits to eligible dependents.

Members who are considering transferring their benefits to their spouse or children should do so ASAP. Congress is considering making changes to the transfer rules that may affect the Military Housing Allowance for spouses and dependents. Those who transfer benefits now will be grandfathered into the current plan, which offers dependents the same MHA benefits as veterans.

How Do You Apply for GI Bill Benefits?

If you meet the minimum service requirement for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, you are automatically eligible to receive benefits. All you have to do is use the Veterans Online Application (VONAPP) through the eBenefits portal to get the ball rolling toward using your benefits.

What Are You Waiting For?

If you meet the criteria for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, find a VA-approved program that you’re interested in and start using your benefits. You earned the opportunity to get free education and training, so take advantage of those benefits to improve your life without having to take on student loans.

Источник: https://themilitarywallet.com/post-9-11-gi-bill/

Your GI Bill benefits: Everything you need to know

What is the Post-9/11 GI Bill?

The Post-9/11 GI Bill is a generous education benefit for the latest generation of service members and veterans. It includes payment of tuition and fees, a monthly housing allowance and a stipend for textbooks and supplies for up to 36 months. The GI Bill traces its history back to World War II when the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act was enacted to provide education and training, home loan guarantee and other benefits for veterans. Revamped several times to aid veterans of war and peacetime, the GI Bill as we know it was signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2008 and went into effect the following year. Portions of the GI Bill were updated again in 2017 under the Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act, better known as the “Forever GI Bill.”

Who is eligible for the GI Bill?

If you have served on active duty for at least 90 days since Sept. 10, 2001, you are eligible for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits — whether you’re still in the military or have already separated with an honorable discharge. The amount of time you spent on active duty determines the percentage of total benefits you can receive.

Right now, the VA uses this scale to determine eligibility:

  • 100 percent: 36 months or more, or at least 30 continuous days and discharged due to service-connected disability
  • 90 percent: At least 30 months, less than 36 months
  • 80 trustco bank login in At least 24 months, less than 30 months
  • 70 percent: At least 18 months, less than 24 months
  • 60 percent: At least 12 months, less than 18 months
  • 50 percent: At least 6 months, less than 12 months
  • 40 percent: At least 90 days, less than 6 months
  • No benefit: Less than 90 days

Don’t worry about memorizing this, though, because it’s about to change in August 2020 when a portion of the Forever GI Bill goes into effect. At that point, the same 90-days-to-six-month window will equal to 50 percent of total benefits. Service members with at least six months and less than 18 months of service will be eligible for 60 percent of benefits.

Children or spouses of service members who died in the line of duty on or after 9/11 may also be eligible to use the GI Bill to further their education through the Marine Gunnery John David Fry Scholarship Program. These benefits are available at the 100-percent level to children between age 18 and 33 and spouses who have not remarried for 15 years after the service member’s death.

How to apply for your GI Bill

You can apply for GI Bill benefits online or in person at a VA regional office near you. You can also call 1-888-GI BILL-1 to ask the VA to mail an application directly to you.

The application process is simple, especially if you do it online. The form will ask you for information about your military background, education history and the school you want to attend. It also asks for your Social Security and bank account numbers, so make sure you have those handy, too. (While the tuition and fee payments go directly to the schools, the housing and textbook allowances go straight to you.)

If you’re feeling nervous about the process, you can also talk to the school certifying official at your college. This person typically works in the school’s registrar’s office or financial aid department and will be able to walk you through the application.

GI Bill certificate of eligibility

Once you apply for your benefits, the VA will send you a certificate of eligibility that spells out exactly what you are eligible to receive. This is the document you’ll present to your school when you enroll.

If your tuition payments are ever delayed, your certificate of eligibility acts as proof that payment is coming, meaning your school can’t charge you late fees or impose other restrictions when there’s an outstanding balance on your account through no fault of your own.

Keep in mind that it may take a while for the VA to issue your certificate of eligibility to you. In the meantime, you can log into your eBenefits account to keep track of things.

How much does the GI Bill pay for school?

The Post-9/11 GI Bill includes payment of tuition and fees, a monthly housing allowance and a stipend for textbooks and supplies.

For students attending public colleges and universities, the GI Bill covers all tuition and fees at the in-state rate, but it may not have the same reach at a private or for-profit school. The national maximum at such schools will be $24,476.79 for the 2019-2020 school year and generally increases slightly each year.

If the GI Bill doesn’t cover the 911 gi bill pay chart cost of your education, see if your school participates in the Yellow Ribbon program. This is an agreement schools make with the VA to split school costs not covered by the GI Bill, reducing or eliminating the amount students must pay themselves. Currently, only veterans and surviving dependents of service members are eligible for the program, though this will extend to active-duty troops in August 2022.

A lot of schools participate in this program, including prestigious Ivy League institutions. To see if your school is part of the Yellow Ribbon Program, check out the interactive map on VA’s website.

Should I use my GI Bill while on active duty?

You can, provided you meet the minimum service requirements. But should you?

If you use your GI Bill benefits to pay for school while on active duty, you will not receive a monthly housing stipend from the GI Bill in addition to the housing allowance you’re already receiving from the military. Depending on which school you attend, that housing stipend could be worth as much as the tuition coverage and possibly more. Therefore, your GI Bill benefits will end up amounting to much less than what you would receive after separating from the military.

Still, the choice is yours.

The GI Bill housing allowance.

Your monthly housing stipend depends on the percentage level of benefits you’re eligible for and how many courses you’re taking.

The VA uses the Department of Defense Basic Allowance for Housing, or BAH, rates to calculate how much you will receive. Right now, this is the cost of living wherever the main campus of your school is located — not where you live — at the amount that an E5 with dependents would receive in that area. (Your own rank has no bearing on the total amount you receive.)

Under the Forever GI Bill, however, housing allowances will be determined by the location of the campus where a student takes the most classes. So, that means if you take classes at a satellite campus miles — or even states — away from the school’s main headquarters, your monthly stipend will better reflect your cost of living. The VA is expected to roll this out in December 2019.

The VA has already done a lot of the math for you through their GI Bill Comparison Tool. Simply search by school name or type and 911 gi bill pay chart on the results to see how much you’d receive each month.

A few things to remember:

If you are pursuing a degree entirely online, you will only receive half of the national BAH average. For the 2019-2020 school year, that amounts to $894.50 per month. Some experts recommend taking at least one class in person if you can, so you can get the flexibility of attending school online with the cash benefits of attending on campus.

If you’re attending school half time or less or are a dependent using GI Bill benefits that have been transferred to you from a service member, you are not eligible for this part of the benefit.

How to change schools with the GI Bill

Changing schools once you’ve already started using the GI Bill is much like applying for the GI Bill in the first place. June 1st quotes need to provide basic information about your military service, education history and the school you want to go to, in addition to your Social Security and bank account numbers.

You can do this all online or in person at a VA regional office.

GI bill status and how to check it.

It’s important to maintain an active Ebenefits account so you can check on the status of your GI Bill benefits — how much you’ve used and how much you have left.

Transferring GI Bill to your dependents

If you’ve already finished your degree or just don’t see yourself ever going to school, you may want to consider transferring the GI Bill to your dependents.

To be eligible for transfer, you must have at least six years of service under your belt and must be able to serve four more after the transfer is approved by the DoD.

In early 2019, the DoD proposed a cap on the transfer option at 16 years of service. But congressional lawmakers in December inserted language in the annual defense authorization bill to kill the policy before it ever went into effect.

If you are an active-duty Purple Heart recipient, disregard all of the above; you can transfer your GI Bill benefits to family members whenever you want.

A dependent child must be 18 or younger when the GI Bill benefits are transferred to them — or under 23 in special cases for approved programs. To use the GI Bill, the dependent must be 18 or a high school graduate.

If you decide you want to transfer your benefits, log onto DMDC milConnect to get 911 gi bill pay chart. At the top of the page, you’ll see a section labeled, “I want to.” Click on the “Transfer my education benefits” option and go from there.

Cool/alternative/creative ways to use the GI Bill

You have a little flexibility with the Region mobile bank personal Bill in that it doesn’t have to just go toward a traditional education at a brick-and-mortar school. You can use it to take classes online or through correspondence.

You can get help starting your own business.

You can get a tutor to help you with your classes.

You seaside heights vacation rentals with pool also use your benefits toward a flight school or apprenticeship program. Even licensing programs, certification tests and admission tests, such as the SAT or LSAT, are covered.

If you are a veteran majoring in a STEM field — science, technology, engineering or math — you can apply for more GI Bill benefits, since many of these majors take more than the standard four years of college to complete. The Forever GI Bill set up the Edith Nourse Rogers STEM Scholarship fund that will give up to $30,000 to STEM students on a first-come, first-serve basis. Veterans and surviving dependents of deceased service members are eligible for this scholarship.

About Natalie Gross

Natalie Gross has been reporting for Military Times since 2017. She grew up in a military family and has a master's degree in journalism from Georgetown University.

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Источник: https://www.militarytimes.com/education-transition/2019/07/20/gi-bill-benefits-guide/

Things that Affect your BAH:

So you’ve done it. You’ve served your country honorably [or you have received benefits from your spouse or parent] and have decided to utilize your north carolina coastal islands map earned education benefits. Thankfully, in addition to the Post 9/11 GI Bill covering tuition and fees, it also provides a significant TAX FREE housing benefit. Depending where your school is located this housing benefit may be larger than the walmart canada printers payments themselves! The BAH rate is variable and is based in part on the Department of Defense’s E-5 with dependents Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) rate.

Unlike tuition, BAH is paid directly to the beneficiary [student veteran]. Which allows you to ultimately spend the money however you’d like. If you want to stay with family or bunk up with a bunch of people. You can freely pocket that excess money!

Location and Physical Attendance

Location, location, location. This something you may have heard over and over again regarding the price of real estate.  So it should be no surprise to learn that where your school is located is one of the biggest factors when it comes to how much BAH you will get. If you are planning on going to a school located in Middle America, you can expect your BAH to be on the lower end. Now, if you are going to a school in say San Diego or New York city. You can certainly expect a much larger BAH check!

That being said there are some contributing factors regarding location that you should be aware of:

  • Taking all classes online will result in your BAH rate being half of the national average BAH rate for an E-5 with dependents.
  • If you are attending school at a foreign school your BAH rate will be the national average BAH rate for an E-5 with dependents. Currently that breaks down to $1,789.00 (August 2019 – July 2020).
  • Taking classes at a school that has multiple 911 gi bill pay chart. You will be paid based on the BAH of the campus that you most often attend. No longer will you receive the BAH of the more expensive campus.
  • Schools in U.S. Territories. You will receive Overseas Housing Allowance (OHA) at the E-5 with dependents rate for the area the school is in.

NOTE: A student who is full time that takes just one class in person will allow them to get the FULL BAH amount.

Whether you started using your GI Bill Benefits before January 1, 2018

Due to the implementation of the Forever GI Bill. Students who started using their education benefits before January 1, 2018 will receive a slightly higher BAH rate. This equates to a rate difference of $100 or so depending on your location.

Eligibility

If you do not meet the requirements to earn the 100% benefit level for the GI Bill your BAH will be prorated accordingly.

Being a Part Time student

If you are a full time student. Then you are good to go. 911 gi bill pay chart get your full BAH amount. However, if you are not a full time student then your BAH will be pro-rated. That is… so long as you are over at least 51% of full-time. Taking 50% or less than the credits needed to be considered full time will result in you getting no BAH! Below are some tables that breakdown how much you should expect to get based upon how many credits you take.

16 Week Courses BAH Rates
Credit HoursPercentage
12100.00%
1190.00%
1080.00%
980.00%
870.00%
760.00%
6 or less0.00%

 

8 Week Courses BAH Rates
Credit HoursPercentage
6100.00%
580.00%
470.00%
3 or less0.00%

 

Active Duty Status

Unfortunately, you cannot receive the BAH from the Post 9/11 GI Bill while you are still Active Duty. This is something to keep in mind if you plan on starting school while you are Transition Leave.

Kicker Bonus (AKA College Fund)

You may be eligible for additional BAH money depending on your original or reenlistment contracts! In an effort to recruit and retain highly first national bank of hutchinson app Soldiers for critical or short Military Occupational Specialties (MOS) the Kicker Bonus was offered. Depending on how long that contact was for you may be entitled to an additional $100 to over $850 a month! Your service branch should automatically notify the VA that you are entitled to this bonus. However, if you do not receive the bonus and it is in your contract. Contact the VA and send them a copy of your contract so they can ensure you get all the benefits you have earned.

The VA has recently released a new BAH Calculator that will help you determine how much BAH you can expect to make based on the zip code of your school.

GI Bill BAH Calculator:https://www.va.gov/gi-bill-comparison-tool

Tags: BAH,Basic Allowance For Housing,Basic Housing Allowance,GI Bill,MHA,Monthly Housing Allowance,Post 9/11

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Источник: https://veteranseducationproject.org/2021/04/20/post-9-11-gi-bill-bah-info/
Garrett FitzGerald

BAH Calculator

Basic Allowance For Housing Calculator and GI Bill MHA Rates

BAH Calculator for US military personnel and their families who are relocating or planning to move.  Also can be used by veterans or those looking to use their GI Bill benefits as a Post 911 GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance rate calculator.

BAH Calculator (Basic Allowance For Housing)

** UPDATED for 2021**

Calculate your 2021 BAH rate entering your paygrade, location and dependent status.

BAH Rates (Basic Allowance for Housing) are an allowance for U.S. based housing.

Post 9/11 GI Bill BAH Rates (Monthly Housing Allowance)

Monthly Housing Allowance rates for 2020 / 2021 academic year.  These will be in effect as of Aug 1, 2020 and until Aug 1, 2021.

StateMHA NameE05
AKKetchikan$1,944
AKSitka$2,265
AKJuneau$2,454
AKKodiak Island$1,950
AKAnchorage$2,067
AKFairbanks$1,977
ALAnniston/Fort Mcclellan$858
ALFort Rucker$1,113
ALHuntsville$1,236
ALMobile$1,374
ALMontgomery$1,248
ALAuburn$1,182
ALBirmingham$1,530
ARLittle Rock$1,326
ARFort Chaffee/Fort Smith$840
ARFayetteville$1,047
AZPhoenix$1,698
AZFort Huachuca$1,011
AZDavis-Monthan AFB$1,425
AZYuma$1,008
CAOakland$3,243
CASan Francisco$4,614
CAChina Lake$984
CAFresno$1,539
CALemoore NAS$1,506
CACamp Pendleton$2,589
CAVentura$2,586
CAVandenberg AFB$2,094
CAMarin/Sonoma$3,234
CABarstow/Fort Irwin$1,359
CASan Bernardino$2,370
CATwenty Nine Palms MCB$1,038
CABeale AFB$2,115
CASacramento$2,289
CAStockton$1,917
CAVallejo/Travis AFB$2,736
CALos Angeles$3,114
CASan Diego$2,850
CAMonterey$2,508
CARiverside$2,268
CAHumboldt County$1,446
CASanta Clara County$4,122
CASan Luis Obispo$1,998
CABridgeport$1,218
CAEl Centro$1,254
CAEdwards AFB/Palmdale$1,911
CODenver$2,208
COColorado Springs$1,839
COFort Collins$1,740
COBoulder$2,010
CTNew London$1,608
CTHartford$1,956
CTNew Haven/Fairfield$2,901
DCWashington$2,352
DEDover AFB/Rehoboth$1,536
FLEglin AFB$1,536
FLGainesville$1,431
FLJacksonville$1,641
FLPatrick AFB$1,761
FLMiami/Fort Lauderdale$2,547
FLOrlando$1,902
FLPanama City$1,794
FLPensacola$1,467
FLTallahassee$1,326
FLTampa$2,097
FLWest Palm Beach$2,349
FLOcala$1,482
FLFlorida Keys$2,976
FLVolusia County$1,698
FLFort Pierce$1,710
FLFt Myers Bch$1,692
GAAtlanta$2,262
GAAlbany$960
GAFort Gordon$1,305
GAKings Bay/Brunswick$1,284
GAFort Benning$1,212
GARobins AFB$1,320
GASavannah$1,566
GADahlonega$1,332
GAFort Stewart$1,434
GAMoody AFB$1,068
HIMaui County$2,844
HIHonolulu County$2,913
HIHawaii County$2,346
HIKauai County$2,379
IADes Moines$1,398
IDBoise$1,236
IDMountain Home AFB$1,356
ILChampaign/Urbana$1,020
ILRock Island$1,617
ILPeoria$1,323
ILGreat Lakes Navtracen$1,722
ILScott AFB$1,173
ILChicago$2,142
ILSpringfield/Decatur$1,059
INIndianapolis$1,509
INFort Wayne$1,338
INTerre Haute$1,038
INBloomington$1,254
KSFort Riley$1,095
KSWichita/McConnell AFB$1,065
KSFort Leavenworth$1,461
KSTopeka$1,098
KYFort Campbell$1,386
KYLexington$1,308
KYLouisville$1,530
KYFort Knox$966
KYFrankfort$888
KYPaducah$912
LAAlexandria$900
LABaton Rouge$1,542
LAFort Polk$933
LANew Orleans$1,548
LAShreveport/Barksdale AFB$1,428
LALafayette$1,401
LASt Mary And Terrebonne$1,299
LALake Charles$1,503
LAMonroe$951
MANantucket$3,024
MABoston$3,024
MAWorcester$1,878
MAFitchburg$2,115
MACape Cod-Plymouth$2,295
MAEssex Co$2,556
MAHampden County$1,683
MAMartha's Vineyard$2,838
MAHanscom AFB$2,850
MDAberdeen Proving Grounds$1,785
MDAnnapolis$2,169
MDBaltimore$2,154
MDFort Detrick$1,863
MDFort G. G. Meade$2,280
MDIndian Head Navordsta$2,190
MDPatuxent River$1,827
MDOcean City$1,329
MDOxford$1,803
MEBrunswick$1,632
MEPortland$1,983
MECoastal Maine$1,605
MEBangor$1,332
MEKittery / Portsmouth, NH$2,304
MIDetroit$1,797
MIMarquette$1,146
MISault Ste Marie$1,119
MITraverse City$1,467
MIGrand Haven$1,506
MIBattle Creek/Kalamazoo$1,344
MILansing$1,320
MIGrand Rapids$1,662
MIAnn Arbor$2,034
MISaginaw$1,053
MNDuluth$1,536
MNMinneapolis/St Paul$1,728
MOKansas City$1,548
MOSt. Louis$1,641
MOWhiteman AFB$1,041
MOFort Leonard Wood$870
MOSpringfield$936
MOColumbia/Jefferson City$1,095
MOSaint Joseph$900
MSGulfport$1,209
MSColumbus AFB$975
MSJackson$1,407
MSMeridian$972
MSHattiesburg$1,203
MTMalmstrom AFB/Great M in hand lines Banks$1,668
NCMorehead/Cherry Pt MCAS$1,338
NCCamp Lejeune$1,251
NCCharlotte$1,626
NCDurham/Chapel Hill$1,494
NCElizabeth City$1,509
NCFort Bragg/Pope$1,233
NCSeymour Johnson AFB$1,068
NCGreensboro$1,260
NCRaleigh$1,590
NCWilmington$1,380
NCAsheville$1,602
NDBismarck$1,269
NDFargo$1,152
NDGrand Forks$1,335
NDMinot AFB$1,140
NEOmaha/Offutt AFB$1,422
NELincoln$1,140
NHPortsmouth / Kittery, ME$2,304
NHManchester/Concord$2,184
NJAtlantic City$1,644
NJCape May$1,524
NJFort Monmouth/Earle NWS$2,508
NJPerth Amboy$2,259
NJNorthern New Jersey$2,853
NJTrenton$2,448
NJJB Mcguire-Dix-Lakehurst$2,016
NJCamden / Philadelphia, PA$2,049
NMHolloman AFB/Alamogordo$1,059
NMAlbuquerque/Kirtland AFB$1,404
NMCannon AFB/Clovis$1,032
NMWhite Sands MR/Las Cruces$1,101
NMSanta Fe/Los Alamos$1,518
NVFallon NAS$1,260
NVNellis AFB/Las Vegas$1,632
NVReno/Carson City$1,929
NYBallston Spa/Albany$2,148
NYBuffalo$1,938
NYWest Point$2,247
NYLong Island$3,465
NYNew York City$3,234
NYRochester$1,578
NYRome/Griffiss AFB$1,509
NYSyracuse$1,491
NYFort Drum/Watertown$1,308
NYWestchester County$3,150
NYStaten Island$2,781
OHAkron$1,140
OHCincinnati$1,629
OHCleveland$1,461
OHColumbus$1,257
OHWright-Patterson AFB$1,206
OHToledo$1,527
OHYoungstown$1,068
OKAltus AFB$894
OKVance AFB/Enid$936
OKFort Sill/Lawton$888
OKOklahoma City$1,257
OKTulsa$1,056
ORAstoria$1,506
ORCoos Bay$1,260
ORPortland$2,361
ORSalem$1,524
ORCorvallis$1,653
OREugene$1,656
PACarlisle Barracks$1,539
PAPhiladelphia / Camden, NJ$2,049
PAWillow Grove$2,226
PAPittsburgh$1,830
PAState College$1,395
PAErie$1,158
PAWilkes-Barre/Scranton$1,512
PAAllentown/Bethlehem$1,842
PAJohnstown$897
RINewport$1,995
RIProvidence$2,076
SCBeaufort/Parris Island$1,677
SCCharleston$1,860
SCColumbia/Fort Jackson$1,476
SCGreenville$1,296
SCMyrtle Beach$1,362
SCSumter/Shaw Suntrust suntrust bank near me City/Ellsworth AFB$1,305
SDSioux Falls$1,119
TNChattanooga$1,317
TNKnoxville$1,305
TNMemphis$1,683
TNNAShville$1,953
TNJohnson City/Kingsport$1,011
TXAbilene/Dyess AFB$1,167
TXAustin$2,097
TXBeaumont$1,542
TXCollege Station$1,272
TXCorpus Christi$1,593
TXDallas$1,965
TXLaughlin AFB/Del Rio$1,092
TXEl Paso$1,206
TXBrownsville$1,197
TXHouston$1,692
TXLubbock$1,077
TXGoodfellow AFB$1,221
TXSan Antonio$1,656
TXFort Hood$1,152
TXWichita Fls/Sheppard AFB$1,122
TXFort Worth$1,821
TXWaco$1,209
UTOgden/Hill AFB$1,485
UTSalt Lake City$1,500
UTProvo$1,482
VACharlottesville$1,806
VAQuantico/Woodbridge$1,914
VAHampton/Newport News$1,542
VANorfolk/Portsmouth$1,641
VARichmond/Fort Lee$1,422
VAWarrenton$2,292
VALexington$1,038
VARoanoke$1,176
VADahlgren/Fort Ap Hill$1,689
VTBurlington$1,941
WABremerton$2,007
WAEverett$2,367
WAPort Angeles$1,485
WASeattle$2,748
WASpokane$1,482
WATacoma$1,974
WAWhidbey Island$1,413
WAYakima$1,410
WIMadison$1,656
WIMilwaukee$1,824
WISparta/Fort Mccoy$1,068
WIStevens Point$1,008
WVMorgantown$1,401
WVHuntington$1,293
WVCharleston$1,038
WVEastern Panhandle$1,356
WYCheyenne$1,194

 

RELATED: Cities and Colleges With The Highest BAH in the US

Online GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance

The online GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance is $916.50 for the 2020-2021 academic year. 

The online GI Bill BAH Rate calculation is determined by taking half of the national BAH Rate average.  This applies when attending online courses exclusively.

RELATED: Online Colleges for Military

Calculate Your Post 9/11 Monthly Housing Rate for 2020/2021 School Year

You can use the calculator to determine the Post 911 GI Bill BAH rate for the 2020/2021 school year by doing the following:

Use the E-5 paygrade with dependents BAH Rate for your military housing area.

BAH Rates State Charts

BAH Calculation Factors

BAH north carolina central university store Basic Allowance for Housing Rates are determined by:

  • Location
  • Pay grade
  • Dependency status – with or without 911 gi bill pay chart is affected by the cost of housing (ownership and rental) in local markets within the US.

     

    >> Interested in a zero down payment home loan with no mortgage insurance?  For a no-obligation, free consultation regarding your VA Loan eligibility, please go here.

     

    RELATED:

     

     

    Tagged: BAH Rates

Источник: https://collegerecon.com/bah-calculator/

Tax Exclusion for Veterans Education Benefits

If you serve or served in the military and are receiving Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) education benefits, the IRS excludes this income from taxation. Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education, the authoritative source for all education tax matters, covers this tax exclusion. You can learn more about “Veterans’ Benefits” in chapter 1. Read below for a summary of the policy.

Requirements

1. You must be serving or have served in the military.

2. You must be receiving VA education benefits.

Actions

There is no required action for you to receive the exclusion.

Provisions

Payments you receive for education, training, or subsistence under any law administered by the VA are tax free. Don't include these payments as income on your federal tax return.

If you qualify for one or more of the education tax benefits discussed in Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education, chapters 2 through 12, you may have to reduce the amount of education expenses qualifying for a specific tax benefit by part or all of your VA payments. This applies only to the part of your VA payments that is required to be used for education expenses.

Example: You have returned to college and are receiving two education benefits under the latest GI Bill: (1) a $1,534 monthly basic housing allowance (BHA) that is directly deposited to your checking account, and (2) $3,840 paid directly to your college for tuition. Neither of these benefits is taxable and you don't report them on your tax return. You also want to claim an American opportunity credit on your return. Your total tuition charges are $5,000. To figure the amount of credit, you must first subtract the $3,840 from your qualified education expenses because this payment under the GI Bill was required to be used for education expenses. You don't subtract any amount of the BHA because it was paid to you and its use wasn't restricted.

You may want to visit the VA website for specific information about the various VA benefits for education.

The Tax Information for Students webpage is an additional resource that provides links to a broader range of student-related tax topics.

Источник: https://www.irs.gov/individuals/tax-exclusion-for-veterans-education-benefits

The Post-9/11 GI Bill: Beneficiaries, Choices, and Cost

Beginning August 1, 2009, the Post-9/11 GI 911 gi bill pay chart extended educational benefits to service members who were on active duty in the military on or after September 11, 2001. This GI Bill (officially the Post- 9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2008), the latest version of a law that helps veterans pay for higher education, provides more extensive benefits than have ever been offered to current and former service members, enabling them to transfer its benefits to certain family members and to enroll in a wide bankwest debit card limit of educational and training programs. In March 2019, the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) reported that in 2018 it spent about $10.7 billion on 700,000 beneficiaries of the Post-9/11 GI Bill.

At the request of the House Budget Committee, the Congressional Budget Office analyzed data from VA to understand the law’s cost, the types of educational programs beneficiaries enrolled in, and the institutions they attended. CBO also reviewed research related to some of the law’s stated purposes, such as motivating people to join or stay in the military and using the educational benefits as part of readjusting to civilian life. This analysis primarily describes spending in 2016, with some information from 2017 and some historical data from 2009 onward.

What Benefits Does the Post-9/11 GI Bill Offer?

The Post-9/11 GI Bill is more generous than earlier GI bills. Beneficiaries are eligible for 36 months of postsecondary education, including full tuition and fees at public colleges and universities (or up to $23,672 for the 2018–2019 academic year toward tuition and fees at private schools), as well as cit bank locations near me housing allowance, books and supplies, and other related expenses. After 2009, the Congress further expanded the law, among 911 gi bill pay chart things allowing benefits to be used for nondegree and apprenticeship programs. The amount of benefits people receive depends on the length of their qualifying active-duty service (partial benefits are available with a minimum of 90 days’ service), enrollment status (full time or part time), and the type of school or program they enroll in.

The Post-9/11 GI Bill differs from its predecessors in several important ways: There is no specific dollar limit on tuition and fees for programs at public institutions; benefits may be transferred to spouses or children once members have served between 6 and 16 years in the military; and students generally may use the benefit at any point in time.

How Much Is Spent on the Law’s Benefits?

The Veterans Benefits Administration (VBA) spent $65 billion (in 2018 dollars) on about 1.6 million beneficiaries in the seven years from the law’s inception through 2016, CBO estimates (see figure below).

In 2016 (the most recent year for which beneficiary data were available), most spending on the Post-9/11 GI Bill (82 percent) was for veterans, and the remainder was for spouses and children (see figure below). Total annual benefits were, on average $17,400 per person. (Active-duty personnel, who are about 10 percent of Post-9/11 GI Bill recipients annually, were excluded from the analysis of beneficiaries.) Tuition, fees, and housing accounted for 95 percent of total spending in that year.

The housing allowance, the most expensive of the law’s benefits, is set at the amount of the Department of Defense’s monthly basic housing allowance. It accounted for about half of the spending for veterans, about 45 percent of the spending for children, and 30 percent of the spending for spouses, who often received housing through the service member. Most beneficiaries (90 percent) attended programs more than half time, which qualified them for part or all of the housing benefit.

Spending was less per capita for students who enrolled in programs that were primarily online than it was for beneficiaries who attended brick-and-mortar schools, CBO estimates. That is because tuition and fees for online programs tend to be lower compared with other programs and because the housing allowance for students in online programs is set at half of the monthly basic housing allowance.

What Types of Schools Do Beneficiaries Attend?

Veterans and spouses who used the law’s benefits chose different types of education than their children did. Veterans and spouses were less likely than their children to enroll in public institutions; they were more likely to pursue postsecondary programs at junior colleges, private nonprofit and for-profit institutions, and graduate schools. By contrast, most children, like many college-age students nationwide, attended undergraduate programs at public universities and colleges.

Veterans and spouses enrolled in online programs at about the same rate as all students nationwide (13 percent of veterans and 17 percent of spouses in 2016, compared with about 13 percent of all students). Children of veterans enrolled in such programs at much lower rates (about 2 percent). Overall, 8 percent (about $900 million) of total spending on the Post-9/11 GI Bill in 2016 was for beneficiaries in online programs.

The majority of beneficiaries in 2017 (the most recent year for which data on payments to institutions were available) attended public institutions; VBA paid those schools less per capita than it paid private nonprofit and for-profit institutions.

Since the law’s inception, 8 of the 10 institutions that received the largest amounts of tuition and fees have been private for-profit institutions. For-profit firms accounted for a very large share of the online programs used by beneficiaries.

Does the Law Meet Its Objectives?

The degree to which the Post-9/11 GI Bill achieves the purposes set out in the bill is difficult to measure. Because VBA collects little data on the number of beneficiaries who complete programs and no information on employment outcomes, the effectiveness of the benefits in helping service members readjust to civilian life is unclear. (Lawmakers enacted legislation in 2016 and 2017 to require VBA to provide more data on outcomes, but as of April 2019 VBA had not delivered its report.)

Recent research indicates that the newest GI Does chime have overdraft fees is comparable to prior veterans’ education benefits in that it makes retaining service members more difficult because in order to use the educational benefits themselves, service members usually must separate from the military. The option to transfer benefits to dependents, which was designed to encourage longer service, appears to have had little impact. Furthermore, because beneficiaries have broad latitude in choosing a program, VBA has limited ability to ensure that beneficiaries enroll at institutions whose graduates have strong employment prospects and relatively high earnings. About one-third of veterans using Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits in 2016 attended for-profit programs, and most research indicates that graduates of such institutions have worse labor market outcomes than similar students in public institutions.

Источник: https://www.cbo.gov/publication/55179

911 gi bill pay chart -

Are you a military veteran or active-duty service member of the U.S. armed forces who has served at least 30 days or more since Sept. 10, 2001? Then, under the Post-9/11 GI Bill, you’re eligible to receive education and training benefits to help you avoid student loan debt.

Understanding Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits doesn’t have to be confusing. When these benefits are broken down, it’s easy to know when, where and how you’ll be able to start receiving your GI Bill education and training benefits.

Post-9/11 GI Bill Basics

Any veteran who has served at least 90 days of active duty with the U.S. Armed Forces, starting after Sept. 10, 2001, and received an honorable discharge qualifies for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits. 

To qualify for the maximum amount of benefits payable, you have to have served for at least three years on active duty.

Tiered Eligibility Percentage Payment Structure

The Post-9/11 GI Bill program has many different payments which are structured around an eligibility tier. The length of your service determines your eligibility percentage.

Member ServesPercentage of maximum benefit payable
At least 36 months100%
At least 30 continuous days on active duty and
must be discharged due to service-connected disability or received a Purple Heart
100%
At least 30 months, but less than 36 months90%
At least 24 months, but less than 30 months80%
At least 18 months, but less than 24 months70%
At least 6 months, but less than 18 months60%
At least 90 days, but less than 6 months50%

It’s important to note that any service members who qualify for the active duty GI Bill, the reserve GI Bill, or the Reserve Educational Assistance Program (REAP) can choose which benefit best fits their education needs. However, the REAP program is being shut down soon because the Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits are generally much better than REAP.

What Are the Post-9/11 GI Bill Benefits?

Under the Post-9/11 GI Bill, veterans are eligible to receive:

Tuition and Fee Payments

Students using the Post-9/11 GI Bill are eligible to receive all tuition and fee payments for an in-state school at the level of the maximum cost of public-university education in that state. Students attending a private or foreign university can receive benefits up to $25,162.14 during the academic year. 

Under the Yellow Ribbon Program, if you are attending a public institution of higher learning (IHL) as a non-resident student or are at a private IHL that is more expensive than the annual cap, you may be eligible for extra payments. 

Also, you may qualify for in-state tuition rates if you live in the state where you’re going to school, regardless of your former state of residence.

GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance (MHA)

The GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance is generally the same as the military Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) for “E-5 with dependents.” Your rate is based on your school’s zip code, not your personal address, and it is paid at a percentage based on your actual training time.

Essentially, this means that full-time students will receive a higher MHA than part-time students. You can use the GI Bill Comparison Tool to research MHA for the school you’re looking to attend.

There are some rules regarding MHA availability:

  • MHA is not available to active-duty service members, spouses of active-duty members using transferred benefits and those taking courses at or below half-time.
  • MHA is available to veterans taking at least a half-time load, spouses of veterans using transferred benefits, and children using transferred benefits.
  • Housing rates are determined on a case-by-case basis if your training is exclusively online with no in-classroom hours or if you are a veteran attending a foreign school, your housing rates are listed as TBD.

Additional benefits:

  • A yearly books and supplies stipend of up to $1,000 is paid proportionately based on enrollment.
  • A one-time rural benefit payment of $500 may be payable to certain veterans who are relocating from highly rural areas.

What if I Don’t Want to Earn a College Degree?

The benefits available to veterans are the same for those who wish to attend a non-college-degree-granting institution as those in a traditional college setting. For example, all net costs for tuition and fees can’t exceed maximum in-state public-college tuition. And you may still be eligible to receive MHA, the books and supplies stipend and the one-time rural benefit.

The MHA rates differ for apprenticeship and on-the-job training, however. For example, apprenticeship and on-the-job training rates are as follows, according to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA):

  • For the first six months of training, you can receive 100% of your applicable MHA.
  • For the second six months of training, you can receive 80% of your applicable MHA.
  • For the third six months of training, you can receive 60% of your applicable MHA.
  • For the fourth six months of training, you can receive 40% of your applicable MHA.
  • For the remainder of your pursuit of training, you can receive 20% of your applicable MHA.

Alternative Training Rates

You can also use your GI Bill benefits to pursue alternative training such as the options below.

Correspondence School

The net costs of correspondence school cannot exceed $12,221.58 per academic year.

National Testing Programs or Licensing and Certification Tests

  • You can use your GI Bill to be reimbursed up to $2,000 per test. Your entitlement will be charged one month for every $2,099.24 paid to you, rounded down to the nearest non-zero month. This basically means that you can charge even low-cost tests to your GI Bill benefits, but you’ll be charged for an entire month of GI Bill benefits per test.

Vocational Flight School Training

According to multiple flight school websites, the net costs for your flight school training cannot exceed $14,378.35 per academic year. This cap applies to all classes and enrollments that begin during that academic year, regardless of the year the class or enrollment is completed.

What Does The Montgomery GI Bill Offer?

Many service members sign up for Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB) benefits when they join the military or are automatically eligible for the MGIB-Selected Reserve when they join the Guard or Reserves. The MGIB is different from the Post-9/11 GI Bill. In general, the Post-9/11 GI Bill is a more valuable benefit than the MGIB.

Comparing the Post-9/11 GI Bill and the Montgomery GI Bill (MGIB)

The following table provides an overview of the benefits under both GI Bill programs.

Benefits and CostsPost-9/11MGIB
Buy-in requirementNone$1,200
Minimum length of service
to qualify
90 days of active aggregate service (after Sept. 10, 2001) or 30 days continuous service if discharged due to a disabilityTwo years continuous enlistment (minimum duty varies by service date, branch, etc.)
Who receives payment?Educational institution receives tuitionVeteran receives payment
Books and supplies stipend$1,000 per year is paid to the student at the beginning of the termNone
Housing stipendBasic Allowance for Housing (BAH) rate at “E-5 with Dependents;” paid monthlyNone
Expanded educational benefitsYesNo
Are benefits transferable?Yes, under limited circumstancesNo
Time limit to useNo expiration for veterans discharged on or after Jan. 1, 2013

15-year expiration for veterans discharged on or prior to Dec. 31, 2012
10 years
Yellow Ribbon ProgramYesNo

Obtaining Montgomery GI Bill Refunds

Many service members want to know if they are eligible for a refund for the $1,200 they paid into the MGIB. Montgomery GI Bill refunds are only available to service members who are eligible for both the MGIB and the Post-9/11 GI Bill and who use their entire Post-9/11 GI Bill benefit. Once they deplete their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits, they can request a refund for the amount of the MGIB they did not use. Refunds are prorated based on the amount of the MGIB they used.

Transferring Your GI Bill Benefits to a Family Member

Did you know that if you are an active-duty service member, you have the ability to transfer benefits to family members? The Department of Defense is “authorized to allow individuals who, on or after Aug. 1, 2009, have served at least six years in the armed forces and who agree to serve at least another four years in the armed forces to transfer unused entitlement to their spouse,” according to the VA.

National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration and Public Health System personnel can also transfer their benefits to eligible dependents.

Members who are considering transferring their benefits to their spouse or children should do so ASAP. Congress is considering making changes to the transfer rules that may affect the Military Housing Allowance for spouses and dependents. Those who transfer benefits now will be grandfathered into the current plan, which offers dependents the same MHA benefits as veterans.

How Do You Apply for GI Bill Benefits?

If you meet the minimum service requirement for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, you are automatically eligible to receive benefits. All you have to do is use the Veterans Online Application (VONAPP) through the eBenefits portal to get the ball rolling toward using your benefits.

What Are You Waiting For?

If you meet the criteria for the Post-9/11 GI Bill, find a VA-approved program that you’re interested in and start using your benefits. You earned the opportunity to get free education and training, so take advantage of those benefits to improve your life without having to take on student loans.

Источник: https://themilitarywallet.com/post-9-11-gi-bill/

Your GI Bill benefits: Everything you need to know

What is the Post-9/11 GI Bill?

The Post-9/11 GI Bill is a generous education benefit for the latest generation of service members and veterans. It includes payment of tuition and fees, a monthly housing allowance and a stipend for textbooks and supplies for up to 36 months. The GI Bill traces its history back to World War II when the Servicemen’s Readjustment Act was enacted to provide education and training, home loan guarantee and other benefits for veterans. Revamped several times to aid veterans of war and peacetime, the GI Bill as we know it was signed into law by President George W. Bush in 2008 and went into effect the following year. Portions of the GI Bill were updated again in 2017 under the Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act, better known as the “Forever GI Bill.”

Who is eligible for the GI Bill?

If you have served on active duty for at least 90 days since Sept. 10, 2001, you are eligible for Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits — whether you’re still in the military or have already separated with an honorable discharge. The amount of time you spent on active duty determines the percentage of total benefits you can receive.

Right now, the VA uses this scale to determine eligibility:

  • 100 percent: 36 months or more, or at least 30 continuous days and discharged due to service-connected disability
  • 90 percent: At least 30 months, less than 36 months
  • 80 percent: At least 24 months, less than 30 months
  • 70 percent: At least 18 months, less than 24 months
  • 60 percent: At least 12 months, less than 18 months
  • 50 percent: At least 6 months, less than 12 months
  • 40 percent: At least 90 days, less than 6 months
  • No benefit: Less than 90 days

Don’t worry about memorizing this, though, because it’s about to change in August 2020 when a portion of the Forever GI Bill goes into effect. At that point, the same 90-days-to-six-month window will equal to 50 percent of total benefits. Service members with at least six months and less than 18 months of service will be eligible for 60 percent of benefits.

Children or spouses of service members who died in the line of duty on or after 9/11 may also be eligible to use the GI Bill to further their education through the Marine Gunnery John David Fry Scholarship Program. These benefits are available at the 100-percent level to children between age 18 and 33 and spouses who have not remarried for 15 years after the service member’s death.

How to apply for your GI Bill

You can apply for GI Bill benefits online or in person at a VA regional office near you. You can also call 1-888-GI BILL-1 to ask the VA to mail an application directly to you.

The application process is simple, especially if you do it online. The form will ask you for information about your military background, education history and the school you want to attend. It also asks for your Social Security and bank account numbers, so make sure you have those handy, too. (While the tuition and fee payments go directly to the schools, the housing and textbook allowances go straight to you.)

If you’re feeling nervous about the process, you can also talk to the school certifying official at your college. This person typically works in the school’s registrar’s office or financial aid department and will be able to walk you through the application.

GI Bill certificate of eligibility

Once you apply for your benefits, the VA will send you a certificate of eligibility that spells out exactly what you are eligible to receive. This is the document you’ll present to your school when you enroll.

If your tuition payments are ever delayed, your certificate of eligibility acts as proof that payment is coming, meaning your school can’t charge you late fees or impose other restrictions when there’s an outstanding balance on your account through no fault of your own.

Keep in mind that it may take a while for the VA to issue your certificate of eligibility to you. In the meantime, you can log into your eBenefits account to keep track of things.

How much does the GI Bill pay for school?

The Post-9/11 GI Bill includes payment of tuition and fees, a monthly housing allowance and a stipend for textbooks and supplies.

For students attending public colleges and universities, the GI Bill covers all tuition and fees at the in-state rate, but it may not have the same reach at a private or for-profit school. The national maximum at such schools will be $24,476.79 for the 2019-2020 school year and generally increases slightly each year.

If the GI Bill doesn’t cover the full cost of your education, see if your school participates in the Yellow Ribbon program. This is an agreement schools make with the VA to split school costs not covered by the GI Bill, reducing or eliminating the amount students must pay themselves. Currently, only veterans and surviving dependents of service members are eligible for the program, though this will extend to active-duty troops in August 2022.

A lot of schools participate in this program, including prestigious Ivy League institutions. To see if your school is part of the Yellow Ribbon Program, check out the interactive map on VA’s website.

Should I use my GI Bill while on active duty?

You can, provided you meet the minimum service requirements. But should you?

If you use your GI Bill benefits to pay for school while on active duty, you will not receive a monthly housing stipend from the GI Bill in addition to the housing allowance you’re already receiving from the military. Depending on which school you attend, that housing stipend could be worth as much as the tuition coverage and possibly more. Therefore, your GI Bill benefits will end up amounting to much less than what you would receive after separating from the military.

Still, the choice is yours.

The GI Bill housing allowance.

Your monthly housing stipend depends on the percentage level of benefits you’re eligible for and how many courses you’re taking.

The VA uses the Department of Defense Basic Allowance for Housing, or BAH, rates to calculate how much you will receive. Right now, this is the cost of living wherever the main campus of your school is located — not where you live — at the amount that an E5 with dependents would receive in that area. (Your own rank has no bearing on the total amount you receive.)

Under the Forever GI Bill, however, housing allowances will be determined by the location of the campus where a student takes the most classes. So, that means if you take classes at a satellite campus miles — or even states — away from the school’s main headquarters, your monthly stipend will better reflect your cost of living. The VA is expected to roll this out in December 2019.

The VA has already done a lot of the math for you through their GI Bill Comparison Tool. Simply search by school name or type and click on the results to see how much you’d receive each month.

A few things to remember:

If you are pursuing a degree entirely online, you will only receive half of the national BAH average. For the 2019-2020 school year, that amounts to $894.50 per month. Some experts recommend taking at least one class in person if you can, so you can get the flexibility of attending school online with the cash benefits of attending on campus.

If you’re attending school half time or less or are a dependent using GI Bill benefits that have been transferred to you from a service member, you are not eligible for this part of the benefit.

How to change schools with the GI Bill

Changing schools once you’ve already started using the GI Bill is much like applying for the GI Bill in the first place. You’ll need to provide basic information about your military service, education history and the school you want to go to, in addition to your Social Security and bank account numbers.

You can do this all online or in person at a VA regional office.

GI bill status and how to check it.

It’s important to maintain an active Ebenefits account so you can check on the status of your GI Bill benefits — how much you’ve used and how much you have left.

Transferring GI Bill to your dependents

If you’ve already finished your degree or just don’t see yourself ever going to school, you may want to consider transferring the GI Bill to your dependents.

To be eligible for transfer, you must have at least six years of service under your belt and must be able to serve four more after the transfer is approved by the DoD.

In early 2019, the DoD proposed a cap on the transfer option at 16 years of service. But congressional lawmakers in December inserted language in the annual defense authorization bill to kill the policy before it ever went into effect.

If you are an active-duty Purple Heart recipient, disregard all of the above; you can transfer your GI Bill benefits to family members whenever you want.

A dependent child must be 18 or younger when the GI Bill benefits are transferred to them — or under 23 in special cases for approved programs. To use the GI Bill, the dependent must be 18 or a high school graduate.

If you decide you want to transfer your benefits, log onto DMDC milConnect to get started. At the top of the page, you’ll see a section labeled, “I want to.” Click on the “Transfer my education benefits” option and go from there.

Cool/alternative/creative ways to use the GI Bill

You have a little flexibility with the GI Bill in that it doesn’t have to just go toward a traditional education at a brick-and-mortar school. You can use it to take classes online or through correspondence.

You can get help starting your own business.

You can get a tutor to help you with your classes.

You can also use your benefits toward a flight school or apprenticeship program. Even licensing programs, certification tests and admission tests, such as the SAT or LSAT, are covered.

If you are a veteran majoring in a STEM field — science, technology, engineering or math — you can apply for more GI Bill benefits, since many of these majors take more than the standard four years of college to complete. The Forever GI Bill set up the Edith Nourse Rogers STEM Scholarship fund that will give up to $30,000 to STEM students on a first-come, first-serve basis. Veterans and surviving dependents of deceased service members are eligible for this scholarship.

About Natalie Gross

Natalie Gross has been reporting for Military Times since 2017. She grew up in a military family and has a master's degree in journalism from Georgetown University.

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Источник: https://www.militarytimes.com/education-transition/2019/07/20/gi-bill-benefits-guide/

Tax Exclusion for Veterans Education Benefits

If you serve or served in the military and are receiving Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) education benefits, the IRS excludes this income from taxation. Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education, the authoritative source for all education tax matters, covers this tax exclusion. You can learn more about “Veterans’ Benefits” in chapter 1. Read below for a summary of the policy.

Requirements

1. You must be serving or have served in the military.

2. You must be receiving VA education benefits.

Actions

There is no required action for you to receive the exclusion.

Provisions

Payments you receive for education, training, or subsistence under any law administered by the VA are tax free. Don't include these payments as income on your federal tax return.

If you qualify for one or more of the education tax benefits discussed in Publication 970, Tax Benefits for Education, chapters 2 through 12, you may have to reduce the amount of education expenses qualifying for a specific tax benefit by part or all of your VA payments. This applies only to the part of your VA payments that is required to be used for education expenses.

Example: You have returned to college and are receiving two education benefits under the latest GI Bill: (1) a $1,534 monthly basic housing allowance (BHA) that is directly deposited to your checking account, and (2) $3,840 paid directly to your college for tuition. Neither of these benefits is taxable and you don't report them on your tax return. You also want to claim an American opportunity credit on your return. Your total tuition charges are $5,000. To figure the amount of credit, you must first subtract the $3,840 from your qualified education expenses because this payment under the GI Bill was required to be used for education expenses. You don't subtract any amount of the BHA because it was paid to you and its use wasn't restricted.

You may want to visit the VA website for specific information about the various VA benefits for education.

The Tax Information for Students webpage is an additional resource that provides links to a broader range of student-related tax topics.

Источник: https://www.irs.gov/individuals/tax-exclusion-for-veterans-education-benefits
Garrett FitzGerald

BAH Calculator

Basic Allowance For Housing Calculator and GI Bill MHA Rates

BAH Calculator for US military personnel and their families who are relocating or planning to move.  Also can be used by veterans or those looking to use their GI Bill benefits as a Post 911 GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance rate calculator.

BAH Calculator (Basic Allowance For Housing)

** UPDATED for 2021**

Calculate your 2021 BAH rate entering your paygrade, location and dependent status.

BAH Rates (Basic Allowance for Housing) are an allowance for U.S. based housing.

Post 9/11 GI Bill BAH Rates (Monthly Housing Allowance)

Monthly Housing Allowance rates for 2020 / 2021 academic year.  These will be in effect as of Aug 1, 2020 and until Aug 1, 2021.

StateMHA NameE05
AKKetchikan$1,944
AKSitka$2,265
AKJuneau$2,454
AKKodiak Island$1,950
AKAnchorage$2,067
AKFairbanks$1,977
ALAnniston/Fort Mcclellan$858
ALFort Rucker$1,113
ALHuntsville$1,236
ALMobile$1,374
ALMontgomery$1,248
ALAuburn$1,182
ALBirmingham$1,530
ARLittle Rock$1,326
ARFort Chaffee/Fort Smith$840
ARFayetteville$1,047
AZPhoenix$1,698
AZFort Huachuca$1,011
AZDavis-Monthan AFB$1,425
AZYuma$1,008
CAOakland$3,243
CASan Francisco$4,614
CAChina Lake$984
CAFresno$1,539
CALemoore NAS$1,506
CACamp Pendleton$2,589
CAVentura$2,586
CAVandenberg AFB$2,094
CAMarin/Sonoma$3,234
CABarstow/Fort Irwin$1,359
CASan Bernardino$2,370
CATwenty Nine Palms MCB$1,038
CABeale AFB$2,115
CASacramento$2,289
CAStockton$1,917
CAVallejo/Travis AFB$2,736
CALos Angeles$3,114
CASan Diego$2,850
CAMonterey$2,508
CARiverside$2,268
CAHumboldt County$1,446
CASanta Clara County$4,122
CASan Luis Obispo$1,998
CABridgeport$1,218
CAEl Centro$1,254
CAEdwards AFB/Palmdale$1,911
CODenver$2,208
COColorado Springs$1,839
COFort Collins$1,740
COBoulder$2,010
CTNew London$1,608
CTHartford$1,956
CTNew Haven/Fairfield$2,901
DCWashington$2,352
DEDover AFB/Rehoboth$1,536
FLEglin AFB$1,536
FLGainesville$1,431
FLJacksonville$1,641
FLPatrick AFB$1,761
FLMiami/Fort Lauderdale$2,547
FLOrlando$1,902
FLPanama City$1,794
FLPensacola$1,467
FLTallahassee$1,326
FLTampa$2,097
FLWest Palm Beach$2,349
FLOcala$1,482
FLFlorida Keys$2,976
FLVolusia County$1,698
FLFort Pierce$1,710
FLFt Myers Bch$1,692
GAAtlanta$2,262
GAAlbany$960
GAFort Gordon$1,305
GAKings Bay/Brunswick$1,284
GAFort Benning$1,212
GARobins AFB$1,320
GASavannah$1,566
GADahlonega$1,332
GAFort Stewart$1,434
GAMoody AFB$1,068
HIMaui County$2,844
HIHonolulu County$2,913
HIHawaii County$2,346
HIKauai County$2,379
IADes Moines$1,398
IDBoise$1,236
IDMountain Home AFB$1,356
ILChampaign/Urbana$1,020
ILRock Island$1,617
ILPeoria$1,323
ILGreat Lakes Navtracen$1,722
ILScott AFB$1,173
ILChicago$2,142
ILSpringfield/Decatur$1,059
INIndianapolis$1,509
INFort Wayne$1,338
INTerre Haute$1,038
INBloomington$1,254
KSFort Riley$1,095
KSWichita/McConnell AFB$1,065
KSFort Leavenworth$1,461
KSTopeka$1,098
KYFort Campbell$1,386
KYLexington$1,308
KYLouisville$1,530
KYFort Knox$966
KYFrankfort$888
KYPaducah$912
LAAlexandria$900
LABaton Rouge$1,542
LAFort Polk$933
LANew Orleans$1,548
LAShreveport/Barksdale AFB$1,428
LALafayette$1,401
LASt Mary And Terrebonne$1,299
LALake Charles$1,503
LAMonroe$951
MANantucket$3,024
MABoston$3,024
MAWorcester$1,878
MAFitchburg$2,115
MACape Cod-Plymouth$2,295
MAEssex Co$2,556
MAHampden County$1,683
MAMartha's Vineyard$2,838
MAHanscom AFB$2,850
MDAberdeen Proving Grounds$1,785
MDAnnapolis$2,169
MDBaltimore$2,154
MDFort Detrick$1,863
MDFort G. G. Meade$2,280
MDIndian Head Navordsta$2,190
MDPatuxent River$1,827
MDOcean City$1,329
MDOxford$1,803
MEBrunswick$1,632
MEPortland$1,983
MECoastal Maine$1,605
MEBangor$1,332
MEKittery / Portsmouth, NH$2,304
MIDetroit$1,797
MIMarquette$1,146
MISault Ste Marie$1,119
MITraverse City$1,467
MIGrand Haven$1,506
MIBattle Creek/Kalamazoo$1,344
MILansing$1,320
MIGrand Rapids$1,662
MIAnn Arbor$2,034
MISaginaw$1,053
MNDuluth$1,536
MNMinneapolis/St Paul$1,728
MOKansas City$1,548
MOSt. Louis$1,641
MOWhiteman AFB$1,041
MOFort Leonard Wood$870
MOSpringfield$936
MOColumbia/Jefferson City$1,095
MOSaint Joseph$900
MSGulfport$1,209
MSColumbus AFB$975
MSJackson$1,407
MSMeridian$972
MSHattiesburg$1,203
MTMalmstrom AFB/Great Fls$927
MTHelena$951
NCOuter Banks$1,668
NCMorehead/Cherry Pt MCAS$1,338
NCCamp Lejeune$1,251
NCCharlotte$1,626
NCDurham/Chapel Hill$1,494
NCElizabeth City$1,509
NCFort Bragg/Pope$1,233
NCSeymour Johnson AFB$1,068
NCGreensboro$1,260
NCRaleigh$1,590
NCWilmington$1,380
NCAsheville$1,602
NDBismarck$1,269
NDFargo$1,152
NDGrand Forks$1,335
NDMinot AFB$1,140
NEOmaha/Offutt AFB$1,422
NELincoln$1,140
NHPortsmouth / Kittery, ME$2,304
NHManchester/Concord$2,184
NJAtlantic City$1,644
NJCape May$1,524
NJFort Monmouth/Earle NWS$2,508
NJPerth Amboy$2,259
NJNorthern New Jersey$2,853
NJTrenton$2,448
NJJB Mcguire-Dix-Lakehurst$2,016
NJCamden / Philadelphia, PA$2,049
NMHolloman AFB/Alamogordo$1,059
NMAlbuquerque/Kirtland AFB$1,404
NMCannon AFB/Clovis$1,032
NMWhite Sands MR/Las Cruces$1,101
NMSanta Fe/Los Alamos$1,518
NVFallon NAS$1,260
NVNellis AFB/Las Vegas$1,632
NVReno/Carson City$1,929
NYBallston Spa/Albany$2,148
NYBuffalo$1,938
NYWest Point$2,247
NYLong Island$3,465
NYNew York City$3,234
NYRochester$1,578
NYRome/Griffiss AFB$1,509
NYSyracuse$1,491
NYFort Drum/Watertown$1,308
NYWestchester County$3,150
NYStaten Island$2,781
OHAkron$1,140
OHCincinnati$1,629
OHCleveland$1,461
OHColumbus$1,257
OHWright-Patterson AFB$1,206
OHToledo$1,527
OHYoungstown$1,068
OKAltus AFB$894
OKVance AFB/Enid$936
OKFort Sill/Lawton$888
OKOklahoma City$1,257
OKTulsa$1,056
ORAstoria$1,506
ORCoos Bay$1,260
ORPortland$2,361
ORSalem$1,524
ORCorvallis$1,653
OREugene$1,656
PACarlisle Barracks$1,539
PAPhiladelphia / Camden, NJ$2,049
PAWillow Grove$2,226
PAPittsburgh$1,830
PAState College$1,395
PAErie$1,158
PAWilkes-Barre/Scranton$1,512
PAAllentown/Bethlehem$1,842
PAJohnstown$897
RINewport$1,995
RIProvidence$2,076
SCBeaufort/Parris Island$1,677
SCCharleston$1,860
SCColumbia/Fort Jackson$1,476
SCGreenville$1,296
SCMyrtle Beach$1,362
SCSumter/Shaw AFB$1,095
SDRapid City/Ellsworth AFB$1,305
SDSioux Falls$1,119
TNChattanooga$1,317
TNKnoxville$1,305
TNMemphis$1,683
TNNAShville$1,953
TNJohnson City/Kingsport$1,011
TXAbilene/Dyess AFB$1,167
TXAustin$2,097
TXBeaumont$1,542
TXCollege Station$1,272
TXCorpus Christi$1,593
TXDallas$1,965
TXLaughlin AFB/Del Rio$1,092
TXEl Paso$1,206
TXBrownsville$1,197
TXHouston$1,692
TXLubbock$1,077
TXGoodfellow AFB$1,221
TXSan Antonio$1,656
TXFort Hood$1,152
TXWichita Fls/Sheppard AFB$1,122
TXFort Worth$1,821
TXWaco$1,209
UTOgden/Hill AFB$1,485
UTSalt Lake City$1,500
UTProvo$1,482
VACharlottesville$1,806
VAQuantico/Woodbridge$1,914
VAHampton/Newport News$1,542
VANorfolk/Portsmouth$1,641
VARichmond/Fort Lee$1,422
VAWarrenton$2,292
VALexington$1,038
VARoanoke$1,176
VADahlgren/Fort Ap Hill$1,689
VTBurlington$1,941
WABremerton$2,007
WAEverett$2,367
WAPort Angeles$1,485
WASeattle$2,748
WASpokane$1,482
WATacoma$1,974
WAWhidbey Island$1,413
WAYakima$1,410
WIMadison$1,656
WIMilwaukee$1,824
WISparta/Fort Mccoy$1,068
WIStevens Point$1,008
WVMorgantown$1,401
WVHuntington$1,293
WVCharleston$1,038
WVEastern Panhandle$1,356
WYCheyenne$1,194

 

RELATED: Cities and Colleges With The Highest BAH in the US

Online GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance

The online GI Bill Monthly Housing Allowance is $916.50 for the 2020-2021 academic year. 

The online GI Bill BAH Rate calculation is determined by taking half of the national BAH Rate average.  This applies when attending online courses exclusively.

RELATED: Online Colleges for Military

Calculate Your Post 9/11 Monthly Housing Rate for 2020/2021 School Year

You can use the calculator to determine the Post 911 GI Bill BAH rate for the 2020/2021 school year by doing the following:

Use the E-5 paygrade with dependents BAH Rate for your military housing area.

BAH Rates State Charts

BAH Calculation Factors

BAH or Basic Allowance for Housing Rates are determined by:

  • Location
  • Pay grade
  • Dependency status – with or without dependents

The compensation is affected by the cost of housing (ownership and rental) in local markets within the US.

 

>> Interested in a zero down payment home loan with no mortgage insurance?  For a no-obligation, free consultation regarding your VA Loan eligibility, please go here.

 

RELATED:

 

 

Tagged: BAH Rates

Источник: https://collegerecon.com/bah-calculator/
  1. Can I receive college credit for my military training?
  2. How do I get a copy of my DD214?
  3. What is the process for veterans applying for admission to FSU?
  4. Is there a discounted tuition rate for veterans?
  5. Veterans Affairs (VA) educational benefits are divided into different “chapters.” How do I know which chapter I qualify for?
  6. What documents do I need to submit to the FSU Student Veterans Center to receive my VA educational benefits?
  7. How many months of VA educational benefits (or entitlement) do I have left?
  8. Do I need to reapply for my VA educational benefits every semester?
  9. How can I determine what classes I should take?
  10. Will VA educational benefits cover the cost of remedial or deficiency courses?
  11. What happens if I change my schedule after I submit my FSU Request for Benefits form?
  12. What is the deadline for submitting my FSU Request for Benefits form?
  13. When do I start to receive my VA educational benefits?
  14. I qualify for Chapter 33 benefits. When can I expect to receive my textbook stipend and housing allowance?
  15. What is a deferment?
  16. How many credit hours do I need to take to be classified as a fulltime student?
  17. What level of VA educational benefits am I entitled to if I’m not classified as a fulltime student?
  18. How are VA educational benefits calculated during Summer semesters at FSU?
  19. Does not being classified as a fulltime student affect other VA educational benefits?
  20. Do I have to maintain a certain GPA to keep my VA educational benefits?
  21. If I fail a class, will I have to pay anything back to the VA?
  22. How do I drop or withdraw from a class, and will doing so affect my VA educational benefits?
  23. What types of “mitigating circumstances” are acceptable to the VA for dropping a class or withdrawing from FSU?
  24. What is a punitive grade and will getting one affect my VA educational benefits?
  25. What if I’m called to active duty?


1. Can I receive college credit for my military training?
Any military training you received that may qualify for college credit is evaluated by the FSU Student Veterans Center. While credits earned for military-related training do not factor into the admissions process, the academic dean for the program you major in may accept some or all of that credit and apply it toward your degree requirements. Provide the Admissions office with your official military transcripts, which may be ordered through this website, along with a copy of your DD214 (military discharge document).



2. How do I get a copy of my DD214? 
Request a copy through this website and note that the Member 4 copy, which shows the character of your discharge, is preferred for most educational purposes. After obtaining your DD214, be sure to keep this document in a safe place. Also note that it is not advisable to register for your DD214 through a county courthouse since doing so makes the process a public record, which could then lead to identity theft.



3. What is the process for veterans applying for admission to FSU?
The admission process is the same for veterans as it is for every other student and it’s best to review the admission requirements before applying. Admission applications for all types of FSU applicants (freshman, transfer, graduate, etc.) are here, and applications may be completed and submitted online.



4. Is there a discounted tuition rate for veterans?
Federal and state laws extend the in-state tuition rate to honorably discharged veterans, veteran dependents, and members of the National Guard and Reserve, regardless of their state of residency, provided they are living in Florida while they attend FSU (By state law, veteran dependents only qualify for in-state tuition during the time they are using VA educational benefits).  Also, veterans enrolled in FSU distance learning degree programs but not living in Florida may qualify for the federal Yellow Ribbon program, which reduces the tuition to the in-state rate. The Florida State University Student Veterans Center can assist these in securing the educational benefits they qualify for through the federal departments of Veterans Affairs and Defense.



5. Veterans Affairs (VA) educational benefits are divided into different “chapters.” How do I know which chapter I qualify for?
An outline of the different VA educational-benefit chapters may be found toward the bottom of this VA web page. Note, however, that the exact VA education benefit(s) you qualify for – and you may qualify for more than one, and will need to decide which one it would be best for you to accept – can only be determined by the VA. However, the FSU Student Veterans Center can provide assistance (contact information is at the bottom of this web page).



6. What documents do I need to submit to the FSU Student Veterans Center to receive my VA educational benefits?
Refer to the instructions for the educational benefits chapter you intend to use. Chapter 33 (Post 9/11 G.I. Bill) is the benefit most student-veterans qualify for and detailed Chapter 33 information is here. Contact the FSU Student Veterans Center with any questions.



7. How many months of VA educational benefits (or entitlement) do I have left?
You can access your remaining entitlements by going to the VA eBenefits page and working through these steps:

  1. Login to your existing account or register for an account (be sure to write down your username and password)
  2. When a security warning pops up while navigating through the site, follow these steps:
    1. Choose “I understand the risk”
    2. Choose “Add Exception”
    3. Confirm security exemption
  3. At the “Create your DS logon today” section, answer the questions, then begin “Basic Registration Lev. 1”
  4. Once your registration has been completed, upgrade your account and go through Remote Proofing
  5. When proofing has been completed, go to eBenefits and click Manage Benefits, then Education
  6. At that point, Chapter 33 Post 9/11 recipients should be able to view and print your Post 9/11 GI Bill Enrollment Info, which will serve as your Certificate of Eligibility (COE).
    Should you have trouble completing steps 5-6, try logging out and logging back in.



8. Do I need to reapply for my VA educational benefits every semester?
After your initial registration for educational benefits has been completed, you will only need to resubmit an FSU Request for Benefits form each semester. However, Chapter 33 (Post 9/11 G.I. Bill) recipients will also need to submit, each semester, an updated Certificate of Eligibility (COE) or a screenshot of the eBenefits webpage that shows remaining entitlements.



9. How can I determine what classes I should take?
The FSU Bulletin/Catalog outlines the Departments & Programs (majors) and their respective course requirements. Important things to know when selecting your courses:

  • The Bulletin/Catalog that corresponds to the academic year of your FSU enrollment lists the courses you must complete to fulfill the requirements of your major.
  • The courses you select must align directly with those outlined for your major in the Bulletin/Catalog.
  • VA educational benefits will only cover (pay for) courses required for your major; so, for example, if you major in accounting and take a music class, the VA will not pay for the music class since it is not required for graduation in the accounting program, unless there are general electives or other classifications (3000/4000 level coursework, for instance) that you need to satisfy the university’s graduation requirements.
  • Additional information on degree programs and their requirements is in the Academic Program Guide.
  • To resolve any questions or issues, refer to your academic advisor and/or the dean’s office for your academic program.



10. Will VA educational benefits cover the cost of remedial or deficiency courses?
Most VA educational benefit programs (or “chapters”) cover the cost of remedial or deficiency courses, but only if a placement test indicates that you need to take that type of course, or if the course is required as a prerequisite for another course in your major.



11. What happens if I change my schedule after I submit my FSU Request for Benefits form?
Notify the Student Veterans Center right away via email so your new schedule can be reviewed to (1) make sure the replacement course(s) are applicable to your major (VA educational benefits only cover courses that fulfill the degree requirements for your major), and (2) avoid any overpayment situations.



12. What is the deadline for submitting my FSU Request for Benefits form?
You have up to one year after the start of a semester to submit your form. However, if you wish to receive federal and state educational benefits, or have the VA pay for your tuition (the latter applies only to those who qualify for Chapter 33 and Chapter 31 educational benefits), the sooner you submit your form the better. Remember that veterans receive priority registration during FSU course-registration periods, so you should be able to arrange and finalize your schedule well in advance.



13. When do I start to receive my VA educational benefits?
The VA will process your benefits as quickly as possible but this can take several weeks from the first time you apply. Once you are in the VA system, though – and if you submit your FSU Request for Benefits form before the start of each semester – your benefits should be provided to you continuously (with any monthly stipends paid at the end of each month during a semester).



14. I qualify for Chapter 33 benefits. When can I expect to receive my textbook stipend and housing allowance?
The textbook stipend is paid as soon as your claim is processed so you should not wait for the stipend to arrive before ordering your textbooks. The Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH), meanwhile, and all other monthly stipends are paid at the end of each month during a semester. Keep in mind that partial months are paid at a prorated rate. For example, if a fall semester begins on August 26, your BAH payment will only be for the four days between August 26 and August 30 (provided your BAH certification was submitted in advance of August 26).



15. What is a deferment?
A deferment is a method of extending the tuition payment deadline. The deferment temporarily lifts the tuition liability, which means that for a short period of time, your FSU account will not have a “hold” placed on it for unpaid tuition. If you receive a deferment and for some reason the anticipated funds do not arrive, it is your responsibility to pay your account balances in full. Remember, all tuition that remains unpaid after the tuition payment deadline will incur a $100 late fee since a deferment is not a payment (in fact, it shows on your statement as a “billing”). Be sure to check your account statement often to avoid any unexpected pitfalls that may arise around deferments.



16. How many credit hours do I need to take to be classified as a fulltime student?
 FSU requires graduate and undergraduate students to take a minimum of 12 credit hours per semester to be classified as full-time. However, you should also check the credit-hour requirements to be classified as full-time by the VA educational benefits program through which you receive your benefits, as well as for any financial aid purposes. Graduate students should also note that their full-time status might vary based on any assistantships.


17. What level of VA educational benefits am I entitled to if I’m not classified as a fulltime student?
The VA calculates your benefit amount based on this “rate of pursuit” formula:

Chapter 33 (Post 9/11 G.I. Bill)All other VA educational benefits (or Chapters)
11 credit hours = 90% of all educational benefits12 credit hours or more = Fulltime
10 credit hours = 80%9 to 11 credit hours = Three-quarter time
9 credit hours = 80%6 to 8 credit hours = Half-time
8 credit hours = 70%4 and 5 credit hours = Less than half, more than one quarter
7 credit hours = 60%1 to 3 credit hours = Quarter-time



18. How are VA educational benefits calculated during Summer semesters at FSU? 
During the summer, Florida State offers split sessions (Summer sessions A, B, C, D, E, F), which are referred to as “accelerated sessions” by the federal Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). The VA will therefore accelerate the pay status in proportion to the length of a split session. Consequently, fulltime course loads will be different for students enrolled in the split sessions.

Semester Credit Equivalency Table

Credit HoursSummer Session by Number of Weeks (corresponding FSU term)
13
(A)
12*
(A)
111098
(D/F)
76
(B/C)
10
912.5
811.11213.1
79.710.511.512.6
68.399.810.812
56.97.58.291013.512.9
45.566.57.2811.210.312
34.24.54.95.4697.79
22.833.33.646.75.16
11.41.51.61.824.52.63

*Based on VA calculations, Summer Session A can be either 12 or 13 weeks.

Undergraduate students who want to maintain fulltime status during the Summer semester have the following options:

Option 1Option 2Option 3Option 4
Session A
9 credit hours for
13 weeks
OR
8 credit hours for
12 weeks
Session B
4 credit hours
PLUS
Session C
4 credit hours
Session A
3 credit hours for
13 weeks
PLUS
Session B
3 credit hours
PLUS
Session C
3 credit hours
Session A
2 credit hours for
12 weeks
PLUS
Session B
3 credit hours
PLUS
Session C
3 credit hours

The options above represent different ways to achieve fulltime status. Note that you will only receive your full allowance of VA benefits during the time you are classified as fulltime, which the VA calculates on a day-to-day basis. For example, if you take 3 credit hours during session A (12 weeks) and 3 credit hours during session B (6 weeks), you will be classified as fulltime for the 6 weeks that sessions A and B overlap, but then less than half-time status (reduced benefits) once session B ends.



19. Does not being classified as a fulltime student affect other VA educational benefits?
 If you are a recipient of Chapter 33(Post 9/11 G.I. Bill) educational benefits, you must be registered for course credits that constitute at least 51% of fulltime status (for undergraduates, this is a minimum of 6.12 credit hours) to receive the Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH). Credit-hour totals that are based on multiple or overlapping sessions (like during the Summer semester) must be approved by the FSU Student Veterans Center to ensure they meet Chapter 33 BAH requirements. Also, in order to avoid a drastic reduction in BAH, at least one credit hour each semester must physically take place on campus. Recipients of non-Chapter 33 educational benefits who take less than half the fulltime credit hours will have their tuition and fees only paid for by the VA (up to the monthly cap based on the rate of pursuit) either through a single payment for the semester or by providing a portion of the tuition and fees each month.



20. Do I have to maintain a certain GPA to keep my VA educational benefits?
All students utilizing VA educational benefits must maintain certain standards of progress as detailed in the FSU Bulletin/Catalog. Students who are placed on academic probation are provided with VA educational benefits for up to two consecutive semesters. However, if the student’s cumulative grade point average does not meet FSU’s published standards of progress after the second consecutive semester of academic probation, VA educational benefits will be terminated. Students who are reinstated to FSU after dismissal for unsatisfactory progress and plan to use VA educational benefits must meet with a Benefits Certifying Officer at the FSU Student Veterans Center after their reinstatement.



21. If I fail a class, will I have to pay anything back to the VA? 
No, you do not have to pay the VA back if you do not pass a course. You may repeat a course if it is required for your degree program and the VA will pay for it a second time. However, if you drop or withdraw from a class after the deadline for doing so, you will have to pay the VA back if you received money for that course.



22. How do I drop or withdraw from a class, and will doing so affect my VA educational benefits? 
If you need to drop or withdraw from a course, consult the FSU Registration Guide for step-by-step instructions, as well as the last date you are able to withdraw. Note that there are two types of grades you can get from dropping a course – punitive and non-punitive. If you drop a class, withdraw from all classes, or are dropped by the instructor before the deadline date, you are assigned a non-punitive grade, which will not affect your GPA and that the VA treats as having a neutral affect on your transcript. If dropping a class changes your attendance status (for example, if you are then classified as a non-fulltime student), the VA will require repayment of any money you received for attendance in that class unless you have mitigating circumstances. If you feel you have a valid reason for dropping the class or withdrawing from a class, you can write to the VA and ask that you be allowed to maintain your prevailing rate of pay, up to the last date of attendance in the course(s).



23. What types of “mitigating circumstances” are acceptable to the VA for dropping a class or withdrawing from FSU? 
Mitigating circumstances include (1) personal illness or injury, (2) the death, illness or serious injury of a family member, (3) relocation due to employment, (4) work-schedule conflict, or (5) hardships. If you claim a mitigating circumstance for dropping a class or withdrawing from FSU, the VA will require in-depth statements and supporting documents before approving payment. If you have other reasons for dropping or withdrawing, you may also provide those in writing to the VA.



24. What is a punitive grade and will getting one affect my VA educational benefits? 
If you drop a course, withdraw from all courses, or are dropped by an instructor after the last date to withdraw, you may be assigned a punitive grade. This grade will be figured into your grade point average as an “F” and the VA will only allow payment at the prevailing rate up to the last date of your attendance as reported by the instructor. After that date, the VA will begin a new rate of pay. With the implications that come from dropping a course, whether you receive a non-punitive grade or a punitive one (the latter affects your GPA), you should make every effort to avoid doing so.



25. What if I’m called to active duty?
Florida State recognizes and appreciates the important contributions made by active duty, Reserve, and National Guard members. In order to accommodate these students and their dependents, University Policy provides direction to faculty and staff on offering these students the following options to accommodate unexpected training/drill, deployment, or change-of-station orders:

  1. For any training/drill, deployment, or change-of-station orders: Students will attempt to make arrangements with instructors to maintain and/or make up classwork as needed and to assign grades as appropriate (including incompletes, to be made up later). Registration for those courses, in which instructors accommodate the absence will remain intact and tuition and mandatory fees will be assessed in full for those courses. Service members should provide instructors with maximum advance notice of absences, providing copies of training/drill, deployment, and/or change-of-station directives from the Military, Reserve, or National Guard.
  2. Instructors must accommodate absences of up to two weeks in duration (or equivalent in Summer) in accordance with paragraph one.
  3. When unable to make satisfactory arrangements with all instructors: Courses will be dropped and the tuition and mandatory fees for those courses will be rescinded.
  4. When unable to make arrangements with any instructors for unexpected orders requiring longer than a two-week absence: The student’s entire registration for that semester will be withdrawn or cancelled and 100% of the tuition and mandatory fees will be rescinded.

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Источник: https://veterans.fsu.edu/students/faqs