can someone hack my bank account with my phone number

As we use our phones to perform most of the tasks online, our privacy and data are at risk. Fraudsters can compromise your phone's security. A stolen Social Security number can affect your credit, finances and even Why would someone want to open a bank account in your name? It is possible for them to hack into your phone when you're using cellular data, too, but that is much harder to do. Always stick to cellular.

Can someone hack my bank account with my phone number -

Can Someone Hack Your Cash App with Just Your Username, Email, $Cashtag?

No, Your Cash App account cannot be hacked with just your username and $Cashtag. It will require having access to your Phone number, email, and Cash App Pin to hack your account. Keeping those items safe from prying eyes will safeguard you from having your Cash App account hacked.

However, your cash app can still be hacked in multiple ways. Let’s explore below;

Of all the various types of apps and accounts that can be hacked, few are more concerning compared to your banking and financial accounts.

As finance apps like Cash App continue to rise in popularity, it very much begs the question and rightly so: can someone hack your Cash App and how can you protect yourself?

Unfortunately, hackers and scammers are still and will be more so trying to take advantage of others and always circumvent. After gaining access to your Cash app account, hackers can easily transfer a user’s Cash App balance to their Cash App account, which they can easily transfer to and move around the funds.

can someone hack your cash app

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Can someone hack your Cash App?

Yes, Your Cash App Account can be hacked like all other accounts. Cash App account getting hacked isn’t uncommon. There are various websites that claim to offer services to hack Cash App accounts alongside phishing websites claiming to offer awesome features if you login with your Cash App.

Before we proceed…

There are two types of hack we are talking about here:

  • Hack on your personal account – Getting hold of your login email and password
  • Hack on the Cash Server

I assume you are asking the former.

As for the latter…

According to Cash App, they use cutting-edge encryption and fraud detection technology to make sure that your money and data are safe and secure from hackers and prying eyes.

Any information that you submit is encrypted and sent to their servers securely.

Refer here for a list of Unique cash App usernames.

Are cash app hacks real?

Yes, Cash App hacks are real and hackers can hold and get into your Cash App account by using several techniques such as phishing emails containing malicious software, or malware, either in embedded links or attachments.

Can someone hack your cash app with just your username?

No, It’s not possible for someone to hack into your Cash App account with just your username or $Cashtag itself.

However, someone can hack your account using your email address by using phishing websites, email spamming, etc in order to acquire your login email and password, and if the person has access to your email password, the hacker can have full access to your Cash App account.

That is something you need to be aware of and avoid putting sensitive information such as your Cash App email and password on suspicious websites, apps, and forms.

Can Someone hack your Bank Account through Cash App?

Unless they got hold of your Cash App account, there’s no way anyone can hack your bank account through Cash App from the outside.

>> Read: How To Disable Cash App Card?

If they are into your Cash account, they can get access to your bank and use it to transfer and fund money into the Cash wallet and then into the hacker’s account.

What can someone do with your Cash App Username?

Your Cash App username or $Cashtag is a unique identifier for individuals and businesses using Cash App and can only be used to either send or request money.

If you don’t feel like sharing your Cash App username and make you don’t feel comfortable, don’t share it on the social giveaway posts (eg. Cash App Friday Giveaway) where retweets and comments with your Cashtag are required.

Never share your Cash App phone number or email and we always recommend a Multi-factor authentication to safeguard your account.

Once someone has access to your Cash App email and password, they can change your password and transfer all your Cash wallet funds.

The problem with Cash App cards or for instance PayPal is they are connected to eBay or another site where you save your card which then leaves you vulnerable if they can breach one of your accounts.

And a hacker only needs your user’s eBay and Cash login credentials to access your account holding the money. If you previously authorize eBay or the website to immediately withdraw its fees from your Cash Card or set up for recurring payments, your Cash App account could be vulnerable.

Keep in mind that Cash app will never ask for your secret PIN code through email, text, or calls. Never enter your OTP code unless you are sending money through the app to someone.

How to keep your Cash App accounts from being hacked?

Keeping in mind that without direct access to your phone messages, email, and your PIN, there’s no way someone can easily hack into your account and get hold of it.

Here are some tips to keep your accounts safe from hackers:

Keep your email and password safe and your Passwords should be long and complex; experts suggest using a complex phrase.

We also recommend you to set passwords differently for both your email and Cash App account to avoid getting access even if one of your accounts gets hacked.

  1. Create a super-strong password and log out of the Cash app when you’re not using it.
  2. Secure your phone (in addition to your Cash App PIN).
  3. Add two-step authentication.
  4. Link your Cash App account to a credit card — not a debit card
  5. Double-check the contact you’re sending money to.
  6. Regularly check your Cash account activity for suspicious activities.

The reason why we recommend adding a credit card rather than a debit card is that if worse comes to worst and your Cash App is hacked, it’s better for the hackers to have access to your credit card rather than your debit card (if it has a decent amount in your debit card).

First off, your credit card almost always has zero liability for fraud.

Next, if someone wipes out your debit card linked to your bank account — the consequence is more immediate than a $2,000 charge on your credit card, that you can dispute: and you will owe no more than $50.

Pro tip: So, If you need to connect to your debit card account to transfer your Cash App balance, you can disconnect as soon as it’s done.

However, the chances of someone hacking your account is quite rare, if you follow the basic rules such as keeping your login email and password safe, avoid entering your cash app login in any suspicious files, websites and forms, add an extra layer of 2-step authentication and the few others mentioned above.

Final Thoughts:

Fraudsters and hackers are not always the typically sophisticated hackers. Sometimes, it can be someone you know of and who has access to your email and Phone number.

To hack your Cash App requires having access to your Phone number, email, and Cash Pin. So, if you keep those things safe from prying eyes, you should be good to go.

That put’s an end to the Can Someone Hack Your Cash App with Just Your Username?

For any queries, let us know in the comments below!

Источник: https://reallyneedcash.com/can-someone-hack-your-cash-app-with-just-your-username/

Ways to protect your banking and financial accounts from hackers, per the experts

Cybersecurity expert Paul Benda relays a story about the time that hackers tried to break into his bank account and steal his money. “They found out my login, but didn’t know my password,” says the senior vice president of risk and cybersecurity policy at American Bankers Association.

Fortunately, the cyber thieves were foiled. “I called up my bank and locked down my account,” Benda says.

Such incidents are likely to increase as hackers take advantage of Americans’ accelerated embrace of mobile banking due to the coronavirus crisis. The FBI recently reported a 50 percent rise in mobile banking since the start of 2020, and warned that the increase will likely result in consumers’ inadvertently downloading fake banking apps and app-based banking Trojans designed to take possession of their account information.

These are not new threats consumers face, but a new theme has emerged, Benda says. Hackers are going after stimulus checks and Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans that Americans and small businesses have received from the federal government to survive the pandemic’s economic downturn.

Tips to avoid getting hacked

Bankrate picked the brains of four cybersecurity experts to learn the best ways consumers can protect their banking and financial accounts. Here are their suggestions.

From Paul Benda, senior vice president of risk and cybersecurity policy of the American Bankers Association:

  • The number one way to protect yourself is to make sure you’re really on your bank or financial institution’s website or app when you’re transacting business — and not an imposter site set up by hackers. “Check on your statement or the back of your bank card for the right website, bookmark that, and use that,” Benda says.
  • Only download verified apps from reputable websites, such as the App Store or Google Play. “Trojans are really pernicious,” says Benda. “People need to be careful about what apps they install and where they install them from.” A high incidence of fraudulent activity can occur through so-called ‘sideload’ apps, or those downloaded from unofficial sources, he adds.
  • Pay attention to privacy policies. Apps often say they need to access your photos, your microphone, and your camera. “Banking apps will need access to those things,” says Benda. “People should make sure they’re comfortable with that.”

From Teresa Walsh, global intelligence officer at Financial Services Information Sharing and Analysis Center, or FS-ISAC, a consortium focused on reducing cyber-risk in the global financial system:

  • Stick to trusted app stores when downloading apps. “Users shouldn’t download applications found on open forums,” Walsh says. “For banking applications, many banks feature links to the app stores from their websites to ensure you pick the correct one.”
  • Beware of phishing emails from fraudsters trying to get your personal information. Phishing emails will often have wrong numbers or bad links. Don’t respond to those. “Phishing awareness still holds true for mobile threat mitigation as many people use their mobile for email and text messages from their banks,” Walsh says.
  • Not sure what kind of app experience to expect from your bank? Check with your bank to see what features it contains and how to access it safely. “If you are confused at all, you should talk to your bank,” Walsh says.

From Donald Korinchak of CyberExperts.com:

  • If you want to avoid getting ripped off, don’t make it easy for hackers to guess your PIN and password. “The biggest problem with passwords is that people tend to reuse passwords and choose weak passwords,” Korinchak says. “This is because weak passwords are easier to remember. Strong passwords are difficult to remember, especially if you have dozens of different strong passwords.” But you’ll be better able to thwart cyber criminals if you use longer passwords with a combination of upper and lower case letters, numbers and symbols.
  • Use two-factor or multi-factor authentication to reduce your risk of exposure. This security measure forces you to provide at least two different factors to verify your identity. The extra layer of security required to access your account will offer greater protection.  “There are three categories of authentication,”  Korinchak says. “One, something you know, like a password. Two, something you have, like your cell phone – this is validated when you receive the text code. And three, something you are – biometrics.” This last example, such as a fingerprint or iris scan, is not currently in widespread use. “Banks are beginning to use biometrics by implementing voice print technology during phone calls,” he says.
  • Set up alerts via email, text or the financial institution’s app to monitor fraudulent activity. “In the old days, customers often were unaware of fraud until they got their monthly bank statements,” he says. “Because of this delay, the fraudulent activity could continue for up to four weeks. With alerts, the customer is notified very quickly and can work with the bank to swiftly rectify the issue.”
  • Avoid sending financial or sensitive information via email since it’s not encrypted and can be intercepted by hackers and used to raid your account.
  • Use the security functions that are built into your device software to protect data. “Be sure to set up the ability to track your stolen device, disable it and wipe it remotely,” says Korinchak.
  • Using strong passwords is easier if you use a reputable password manager, or app that helps you generate, store and manage your personal passwords. Korinchak says password manager software is recommended by most cyber security experts.

From Eric Kraus, vice president of fraud, risk and compliance solutions at FIS, a provider of payment and financial technology solutions to merchants, banks and capital markets worldwide:

  • In addition to downloading only verified apps from the App Store or Google Play app store, double-check reviews about apps before downloading them. “If a couple of consumers downloaded an app and had a malicious experience, they write about it in the review,” Kraus says.
  • Scrutinize the email address of the app company. “Does it look legitimate? If there are weird spellings or the email address looks off or if something doesn’t look right, avoid it,” he says.
  • Just as Norton or McAfee antivirus and malware tracking software help to protect your desktop computer, there are versions of mobile security software designed to protect your device and help you identify before you get tripped up by a hacker.
  • A hint that something may be amiss is if you run through data more quickly than usual or your battery is draining. “That can indicate something is silently running in the background,” says Kraus. “Be actively involved in monitoring data and battery usage.”
  • Avoid clicking on adware popups. “That’s a popular way that fraudsters love to embed malware,” Kraus says. “Don’t be overly zealous clicking into less than scrupulous apps and ads that are being pushed to you and popping up.”
  • Refrain from sharing too much of your personal information on social media. “Everyone wants to tell everyone in the world about every little personal thing in their life,” he says. “Be cognizant of not oversharing.” The more pieces of personal data a hacker has of yours, the greater likelihood they can use that information to find their way into your account.
  • Consider using a reputable Virtual Private Network, or VPN, on your computer to shield you from password pickpockets. But avoid any that are “free” as they may not protect you at all. “VPNs can be very effective,” says Kraus. “They’re not expensive, and not hard to set up at your home.”

Bottom line

A study by the University of Maryland’s Clark School of Engineering found that hackers attempt to attack computers with internet access every 39 seconds on average. That puts the onus on you to be alert to sinister tactics used by cyber thieves, such as phishing and website spoofing designed to trick you into revealing confidential information.

“Hackers are constantly improving their game, and it is up to all of us to be vigilant,” says Korinchak of CyberExperts.com.

Featured image by 10’000 Hours of Getty Images.

Learn more:

Источник: https://www.bankrate.com/banking/protect-accounts-from-hackers/

There are lots of ways to protect your personal information and data from scammers. But what happens if your email or social media account gets hacked? Here are some quick steps to help you recover your email or social media account.

Signs That Your Email or Social Media Account Has Been Hacked

You might have been hacked if

  • your social media account has posts you didn’t make
  • you can’t log into your email or social media account
  • your Sent folder has messages you didn’t send, or has been emptied
  • friends and family are getting emails or messages you didn’t send, sometimes with random links or fake pleas for help or money

Steps To Get Back Into Your Account

1. Update your security software, run a scan, and delete any malware.

Start with this important step — especially if you’re not sure how someone hacked into your account. Use either the security software that comes with your computer, phone, or tablet or download software from a reputable, well-known security company. Then, run it to scan your device for malware. If the scan identifies suspicious software, delete it, and restart your device.

2. Change your passwords.

If you’re able to log into your email or social media account, change the password right away. If you use similar passwords for other accounts, change them, too. Make sure you create strong passwords that will be hard to guess.

If you can’t log in to change your password, check the advice your email provider or social network has available. Several popular email service providers (like Gmail and Yahoo) and social media websites (like Facebook and Twitter) give advice on how to restore and protect your account. If someone took over your account, you might need to fill out forms to prove it’s really you who’s trying to get back into your account.

3. Set up multi-factor authentication.

While you’re updating your password, check if your email or social media account lets you turn on multi-factor authentication. Multi-factor authentication requires a password plus something else — say, a code from an authenticator app — to prove it’s really you.

What To Do Once You’re Back in Your Account

1. Check your account settings.

After you log back in to your email account, check on a few things:

  • Look at your signature block and make sure it doesn’t have any unfamiliar links.
  • Check your settings to see if there are “rules” set up to forward emails automatically. Delete any rules you didn’t set up, so your messages aren’t forwarded to someone else’s address.
  • On your social media account, look for changes since you last logged in — like any new “friends.”

2. Take stock of what’s in your inbox.

Consider what kind of information the hacker might have seen. Hackers look for information that can help them find usernames and passwords to important sites, like online banking or retirement accounts. Consider changing the usernames and passwords for accounts that may be at risk.

3. Look for tracks.

In your email account, review the Sent, Trash, or Deleted folders. You might be able to uncover clues about what the hacker did. Search for emails that the hacker sent from your account, or that the hacker may have viewed and then deleted.

In your social media account, check for messages that the hacker might have sent from your account.

This information will help you figure out what information was exposed. If it was, visit IdentityTheft.gov to find out what you should do next.

4. Report misused information at IdentityTheft.gov.

If you the hacker misused your sensitive information, like your Social Security number, to access or open new accounts, to apply for government benefits, to file federal taxes, or any other misuse, report it. At IdentityTheft.gov, you can create an individualized recovery plan to help you recover from identity theft.

5. Tell your friends.

Send your friends a quick email or text, or post something to let them know that you were hacked. Tell them not to click on links in emails from you or respond to a hacker’s fake pleas for help or money. If you’re emailing a bunch of people, put their email addresses in the Bcc line to keep them confidential. You could send them this article, too.

How To Protect Your Accounts From Getting Hacked

  • Use strong passwords. That means at least 12 characters. Making a password longer is generally the easiest way to make it stronger. Consider using a passphrase of random words so that your password is more memorable, but avoid using common words or phrases. If the service you’re using doesn’t allow long passwords, you can make your password stronger by mixing uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols. And don’t reuse existing passwords from other accounts. If one of those accounts gets hacked, a hacker can try that same password to get into your email or social media account. For more tips, check out this Password Checklist.
  • Turn on multi-factor authentication. Multi-factor authentication requires a password plus something else — say, a code from an authenticator app — to prove it’s really you. This protects your account even if your password is stolen.
  • Protect your information. Think twice when someone asks you to put in your username and password. Never give them out in response to an email. If the email or text seems to be from your bank, for example, visit the bank website directly. Don’t click on any links or call any numbers in the message. Scammers impersonate well-known businesses to  trick people into giving out personal information.
  • Install and update security software, and use a firewall. Set your security software, internet browser, and operating system (like Windows or Mac OS X) to update automatically.
  • Get well-known software directly from the source. Sites that offer lots of different browsers, PDF readers, and other popular software for free are more likely to include malware.
  • Don’t treat public computers or a friend’s phone like it’s your own device. If it’s not your computer or phone, don’t let a web browser remember your passwords. Avoid going to personal accounts — like bank accounts or email — from anywhere besides your own personal devices. And make sure to log out of any accounts when you’re done. Limiting where you put your personal information reduces the chance that your information will get hacked. Also always avoid logging into your personal accounts when you’re on public Wi-Fi because it’s usually not secure.
Источник: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/how-recover-your-hacked-email-or-social-media-account

How you can protect yourself

This information might look different depending on the browser you’re using. When a third party has verified the site you're trying to access, you'll see a message on the site letting you know you're on a verified website.

Think you’ve shared your personal information?

Sign in to chase.com and check your account information. If you notice suspicious activity in your accounts, let us know right away using one of numbers on How to Report Fraud. If you think you've mistakenly given out personal information (such as your account number, password or PIN) in an email, text or website that might be fraudulent, call us right away. We’ll help secure your account.

And, if you’ve shared your username or password with a person or a service you don’t feel secure about, change them anytime in “Profile & settings.”

You can also forward a suspicious email message to us at [email protected] We'll send you an automated response to let you know we got the message.

Protect yourself

You can protect yourself and your accounts by recognizing and preparing for online banking threats. Here are a few ways to keep yourself and your information safe:

Be careful about giving out your username and passwords.

Giving anyone access to your accounts can put your financial information and your money at risk. This includes financial websites and apps that offer tools to help you manage your accounts, invest or prepare your taxes.

We work with some companies that allow you to enter your chase.com username and password directly into a secure chase.com window from their website or app. Once you’ve linked to these companies, you can see them under Linked Apps and Websites on chase.com, and remove access if you change your mind.

We continue to work with additional companies to provide that secure access. If you have given your Chase password to a company, but don’t see it under Linked Apps and Websites, you should:

  • Know and trust the company that’s asking for your credentials
  • Learn about their security practices
  • Know what they plan to do with your information
  • Change your chase.com password if you want to remove their access.

Be creative with your password

It's important to use a highly secure password for all your financial accounts. The most secure passwords combine letters, numbers and special characters. Never use your pet's name, your child's name or anything else that a fraudster could easily find out, like your address, phone number or birth date. For added security, remember to change your password regularly, and avoid using the same password for multiple sites or financial institutions.

We also recommend using an email provider that asks you to verify your identity in multiple steps.

For more information, sign in and go to the “Passwords & Other Sensitive Information” section of the Digital Services Agreement. To change your username or password anytime, sign in and go to “Profile & settings” on chase.com.

Be careful on social media

It’s better to be cautious about the information you share on social media. Don't use information from your social media account for your password.

Take control

We make our products and services secure, but there are things you can do to keep your accounts safe, too:

  • Don't give your account numbers or any personal or financial information on the phone unless you initiate the conversation and you know the person or organization.
  • Don't give personal information to any stranger, even someone claiming to be from Chase.
  • Don't print your driver's license, phone or Social Security number on your checks.
  • Report lost or stolen checks immediately, and we’ll stop payment on the check numbers you report. When you get new checks, look through them to make sure none of them were stolen in the mail.
  • Store your new and canceled checks in a safe place.
  • Tell us right away if you get any suspicious phone inquiries asking for your personal or account information, or if you see anything suspicious in your account activity or on your statement.
  • To help keep thieves from stealing your identity, destroy or store financial information securely (including bank statements, invoices, ATM and credit card receipts).
  • Guard your PINs and passwords (hint: Don’t store them on your phone or write them on your card).
  • Create secure PINs and passwords. Don't use birth dates, your Social Security or driver's license numbers, your address or any family names. Someone trying to steal your identity may have this information.
  • If you use chase.com or one of our apps in public or on a public or shared computer, make sure you sign out when you’re done, and delete all cookies.
  • Be careful when you use your device in public areas. Watch out for anyone looking to see what you’re doing.

Don't be fooled

Phishing is when an imposter tries to trick you into providing your personal information. They might impersonate us in an email, phone call or text, asking you to confirm your information or saying you’ve won something—and it might look legitimate. A few examples:

  • You get an email that appears to be from a reputable company you know or do business with, like us. The email asks you to reply or go to a website that looks like chase.com, where you’ll be asked to give your username, password, account number, personal identification number (PIN), Social Security number or other personal information.
  • You get a voice mail or text message telling you your bank account will be closed, frozen or terminated unless you call or go to a website, where you’ll be asked to give personal information.

Scams often try to create a feeling of urgency or alarm, by threatening to close off an account, or offering a security update—as soon as you provide your personal information. A few more common culprits are emails, phone calls or text messages that:

  • Require you to give personal or account information directly on the email or on a website; some fraudsters use pop-up windows to ask for confidential information.
  • Threaten to close or suspend your account if you don’t take immediate action.
  • Invite you to answer a survey that asks for personal or account information.
  • Say your account has been hacked, then asks for personal or account information.
  • Tell you there are unauthorized charges on your account, then asks for personal or account information.
  • Ask you to confirm, verify or update your account or billing information.
  • Ask you to provide account information because someone wants to send you money.
  • Claim you’re getting a refund.
  • Say you’ve won a contest.

If you think you've received a suspicious email but you haven't acted on it, please forward it to [email protected]

Learn how to spot suspicious emails

Think before you open

Don't open an email attachment, even if it appears to be from a friend or co-worker, unless you're expecting it or you’re absolutely sure you know what it contains.

Watch out for email subject lines or emails with a generic message like "check this out" or "thought you'd be interested in this." Make sure you know who sent the email before you open an attachment or click any links.

Set up free Account Alerts

We're always looking for ways to help you keep your accounts safe. Free Account Alerts are a great way to keep track of your finances to detect withdrawals you didn’t authorize or other suspicious account activity. You can sign up to get all types of alerts by text, phone or email. Set up Account Alerts

Get paperless statements

Paperless statements are an easy way to stay clutter-free and avoid losing statements in the mail. If you go paperless, you’ll get an email alerting you that a new statement is available on chase.com. You can see these statements anytime, from virtually anywhere. Go paperless now

Look over your credit reports

At least once a year, read through your credit reports carefully. You can request a free annual credit report from each of the 3 national credit reporting agencies, even if you don’t suspect any unauthorized activity on your account.

For your free annual report, go to AnnualCreditReport.com or call 1-877-FACTACT (1-877-322-8228). Or, request the reports directly from each agency:

  • Equifax: 1-800-525-6285
  • Experian: 1-888-397-3742
  • TransUnion: 1-800-680-7289

Look out for credit inquiries from unfamiliar companies, accounts you never opened and unexplained debts. This can be a warning sign of fraud or identity theft.

Protect your equipment

Install anti-virus and firewall software on your computer and keep it up to date.

Be cautious about offers for free anti-virus software; make sure you get your software from a reputable company. Look for anti-virus software that scans incoming communications and files for viruses, removes or quarantines viruses and updates automatically.

A firewall is software or hardware designed to block unauthorized access to your computer. It's especially important to run a firewall if you have a cable modem or DSL line or other broadband connection, because they’re targeted often. Many current operating systems come with a built-in firewall, which you have to turn on.

Safeguard your business

If you own a business, it's important to:

  • Maintain appropriate internal controls, including separation of duties. For example, be sure that the people who reconcile accounts are different than the people who make payments.
  • Periodically assess your risk and evaluate your internal controls, including reviewing your users and the permissions you give them. Your system administrator can establish user permissions and online transaction limits for each of your users.
  • Regularly check your transactions and statements for any unauthorized activity. We post your transaction details on Chase Commercial Online so you can monitor and control them—including transactions that originate online and through other channels, such as checks you've written or withdrawals you've made.
  • Take advantage of our online Positive Pay and Reverse Positive Pay Services to help you monitor and control checks clearing against your accounts.
  • Customize your Account Alerts so you’ll get notified when certain account activity takes place.
Источник: https://www.chase.com/digital/resources/privacy-security/security/how-you-can-protect

It began with dumplings.

When I got an email at midnight last March from Grubhub notifying me that my order from Dumpling Depot was on its way to an address 3,000 miles away from my location in New York City, I thought there must have been some mistake. And there was: mine.

Because I didn’t take a few basic internet security precautions, hackers robbed me of $13,103.91 worth of cash and prizes from three of my accounts over the next six months. And while this doesn’t make me, your Recode data privacy reporter, look very smart, I’m sharing my story with you in the hope that it will help you avoid a similar fate.

The person who hacked my Grubhub account last March ordered a black fungus salad with celery, a five-spice-marinated beef entree, and 12 pork dumplings (with chives) for a total of $26.84. At first, it was annoying but didn’t seem like that big of a deal: I notified Grubhub about the fraudulent charge and got a refund. Then I changed my password, sent an angry text to the phone number on the food order, and went about my life, foolishly thinking that this was an isolated incident. It was not.

Five months later, I logged into my bank account to find a substantially smaller number in my savings account than I expected. Sure enough, $9,000 had been wired away two days previously. During the subsequent, frantic call to my bank, I looked at my checking account and saw that $4,000 had been wired away from there, too — a discovery I declared with a variety of curse words. The woman on the other end of the line had a pleasant Southern drawl, which made her promises that I would get the money back seem extra reassuring.

She was right, although my access to all of my money was cut off for several days as the bank froze my old, violated accounts and created new ones. It took about two weeks before everything was fully up and running again and my $13,000 was restored. I don’t know if my bank got the $13,000 back or just fronted me the money and called it a loss. When I called them for an update and to demand justice, they told me they couldn’t tell me any details about the case because I was not the victim, the bank was. Obviously, things could have been a lot worse: I did get the money back.

But it wasn’t over. A month later, in September, I received an email from my credit card company informing me that it declined a $323.01 charge that Caviar tried to put on an expired card. Having a pretty good idea of where this was going, I checked my credit card and found that while the $323.01 charge was declined, two charges of $1.64 and $75.43 from Caviar had gone through. For some reason, my card transferred some (but not all) purchases made on the expired card that was attached to my account to my current one. And someone got away with $77.07 of rustic street food from one of Eater San Francisco’s top Oakland Vietnamese restaurant picks. Fortunately for me, the money was refunded to my credit card.

But just because I was lucky enough to get my money back in full, it doesn’t mean you will if hackers ever target you. And even losing that money temporarily was still a big, scary inconvenience: I had bills to pay and no way to pay them. I was terrified I would lose my health insurance coverage. I also had a few bill pay services linked to a closed account I didn’t switch over in time, and now I’m on some kind of scofflaw list at E-ZPass.

I don’t know if my bank, Grubhub, or Caviar were able to get any of the stolen money back. If not, they (and all the other businesses that cover hacked account expenditures) need to make it back somehow — and usually, customers end up having to cover those costs in some way. That means those thousands of dollars will come out of my pocket in one form or another. It will also come out of yours. Sorry about that.

I’m pretty sure I know how this happened, so I’m happy (and embarrassed) to share it with you so you’ll have better internet security hygiene than I did. Here are the three things I screwed up so you don’t have to:

1) Don’t reuse your passwords. And definitely don’t do it on dozens of different accounts.

Yes, I used the same password (or a variant of it) for most of my accounts, and I used it for almost a decade. I thought I had thwarted hackers by substituting certain letters and numbers for similar-looking special characters, but obviously they saw through this clever ruse.

This was probably my original sin. Somewhere, sometime, one of my online accounts got hacked, and my username, email address, password, and who knows what else was put on the internet for anyone to see and exploit. And once a hacker got my password, all they had to do was plug it (and its variants) into as many sites as possible until something clicked. The mini crime spree across multiple sites in the space of six months indicates that that’s exactly what they did.

Perhaps you, like me, re-use passwords — actually, half of you reading this do, according to this recent survey. If so, here’s what you should do: Check a site called Have I Been Pwned? to see if your information has been compromised. When I did, I saw that my email address is listed in no fewer than 15 different site breaches. I had assumed that every site where I’d created an account had taken adequate measures to keep my information secure and private, but my trust was sorely misplaced.

Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

What I should have done — and what I do now, and what you should do if you don’t already — is use different passwords for everything. This isn’t as complicated as you might think. I have a password manager app that keeps all of my usernames and passwords in one place (I use LastPass, but there are several such services — some free, some not — out there). Now, if my password for one site gets out there, the damage is limited to that site alone. They’re pretty easy to use, and many of them have password generators to help you come up with unique, difficult-to-crack passwords for every account.

Yes, there’s always a possibility — albeit remote — that the password manager itself could get hacked. Security consulting firm Independent Security Evaluators found vulnerabilities in several password manager apps but still said password managers were “a good thing.” LastPass claims that it has only had one “security incident” in its 10-year history, and that its users’ passwords were not exposed. 1Password says it has never been hacked.

When it comes to password managers, at least I know I’ve entrusted my information to a place that promises it’s taken all available security precautions. I don’t think I can say the same for Disqus, LinkedIn, MyHeritage, or Tumblr, all of which were listed on Have I Been Pwned? as having data breaches that could have exposed my password.

If downloading and setting up an entire app to manage your password seems a little beyond your capabilities (or the amount of work you want to put in), many browsers and devices will now do this for you, even if these options are less secure. Mac devices have a keychain app; Google has its own password manager you can use with its Chrome browser; and Firefox has a password manager too. You know when you set up an account for the first time on a website and a prompt comes up on your browser or the device itself asking if you want to save your password for the site? That’s it.

If even that seems too difficult or tech-y for you, you can always go analog and write your passwords down in a notebook. There are different schools of thought out there on this: Some say it’s the best defense against hackers you can get and others say you should never, ever write your password down. Considering that most Americans keep track of their passwords by memorizing them (which indicates they’re only using one or few passwords for multiple sites, given the limitations of the human memory) or writing them down, I do think you’re better served by having unique passwords for every site written in a book (presumably one that you’ve stored in a safe location to which there is limited outside access) than you are using the same password all over the internet. Just keep in mind the disastrous consequences if that book were to ever fall into the wrong hands.

Another good thing about having your passwords in a central place? It’ll help you keep track of all the accounts you have. After the bank hack, I changed my password on every account I could think of. But I forgot about Caviar, which I used one time in 2018 because it was the only delivery service for the good cheeseburger place near me. So it was still there for the taking when my hacker got a craving for green papaya salad and braised pork belly.

Finally, change your passwords every once in a while. Recommendations for how often you should do it vary, but if you are like me, it’s time to realize that changing passwords once a decade is not frequent enough. How about once a year? February 1 is the (unofficial) Change Your Password Day. That’s coming up soon.

2) Put two-factor authentication on everything

Two-factor authentication, or 2FA (also known as two-step verification), means you need two ways of verifying your identity before you can log into an account, which helps protect you from hacks. One factor is your password. The other can come from an authentication service or via a text message. This way, a hacker might know your password, but if they don’t have access to your phone or the authenticator app, they can’t get into your account.

My bank didn’t offer 2FA by text — the method I was the most familiar with — but only through an authenticator called Symantec VIP. That involved downloading and setting up an app on my phone, which I took one look at, got suspicious that someone was trying to sell me something and make me put yet another unwanted app on my phone, and decided not to bother with. In retrospect, I really should have bothered! So should you. Authentication services are an increasingly common option because they are the most secure 2FA method, even if they take a few extra steps to set up (basically, downloading and installing the app in the first place). I use Google Authenticator, but there are several others.

Another method is via text, where you just tell the website your phone number and it sends you a text with a PIN code when you log in. This is easier, but it’s also less secure: A really determined hacker can get access to your text messages by hacking your SIM card. To give yourself an added measure of security against that, you can put a custom PIN code on your SIM card with your cellphone provider.

My bank does offer 2FA by text now, and I have it set up. But a lot of people don’t use 2FA at all. A 2017 survey showed that only 28 percent of Americans use it, while more than half of them had never heard of it. And a Google engineer said in 2018 that more than 90 percent of active Google accounts don’t use 2FA. Meanwhile, Google’s research has shown that 2FA blocks the vast majority of hacking attempts. Remember, this isn’t just about locking down your bank account: You can lose access to your Facebook profile, or have your Twitter account taken over by porn bots. If 2FA is available on a site you use, take advantage of it.

If the reason why you haven’t set up 2FA yet is that you think it’s too complicated, I strongly urge you to at least give it a try. Most sites have detailed, easy-to-follow instructions on how to set it up (usually found in the settings “security” section — here’s Facebook’s, for example), it’s only a few steps, and then it’s just a matter of getting a text or opening an authenticator app on your phone to get into your account. And if you save your login for future use, you only have to do it once.

3) Don’t save your credit card info on your account

The reason why the hackers were able to buy food on my credit card was because I saved my credit card info on those food delivery accounts. Lots of vendors you have accounts with will give you that “save this card for later” option, and I suggest that you not do this.

This is not always possible — Uber, for example, requires you to have a credit card attached to your account at all times. But where you can avoid saving your card on your account, you absolutely should. Yes, you will have to enter your credit card info every time you place an order or make a purchase, but that’s less of a pain than sending a series of increasingly panicked emails to various delivery services and calling your credit card company in the middle of the night.

In the end, none of these methods are foolproof and this list is not exhaustive, but they are a great place to start. And trust me, it’s better than the alternative. Do as I say, not as I did, and the next time a hacker gets a hankering for pork dumplings (with chives), you won’t be the one footing the bill.

Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists.

Источник: https://www.vox.com/recode/2020/1/28/21080122/avoid-hack-hacker-theft

How Do Hackers Get Your Card Number?

By Milton Kazmeyer

Hackers use many different techniques to steal credit card information.

Opening up your credit card statement and seeing charges you did not make is never a pleasant experience. All too often, hackers target businesses with the ultimate goal of stealing financial information like credit card numbers, trophies they trade to other cyber criminals or simply use to run up bogus charges. Hackers steal credit card numbers in a variety of ways, and understanding these methods can help your company avoid becoming a victim.

Phishing

One of the simplest and most direct methods of card theft is phishing. The hacker simply calls your business, pretending to be from your bank, and tricks you into giving away your financial data. Often, phishing attempts begin with a warning of unauthorized activity to put you on your guard and make you eager to cooperate. If you ever receive a call claiming to be from your bank or card issuer, do not provide any account information and call your bank directly to report the contact.

Spoofing

Hackers can also use fake emails and websites to steal credit card information. Much like a phone phishing attack, a spoofed email will claim to be from your financial institution and report some kind of fraudulent access to your business account. The email will claim that all you need to do to correct the problem is log into their site with the link provided and enter your account information to verify your identity. Of course, the link goes to a fake site the hacker controls, designed to capture any data you enter. If you receive an email claiming to be from your card issuer, do not click any links, and call your provider for further information.

Hacking

In some cases, hackers steal credit card numbers by hacking businesses. Many web commerce systems allow you to store your credit card information for later use, making repeated purchases easy. Most businesses heavily encrypt this information, so that even if a hacker manages to steal the database, decoding the individual credit card numbers is impossible. Unfortunately, occasional security flaws allow criminals to bypass this security, allowing them to steal large numbers of cards at once. If your credit card supports the technology, single-use card numbers can prevent hackers from accessing your accounts even if they compromise card databases. At the very least, you should resist the urge to allow sites to store your credit card details between sessions.

Skimming

The Internet is not the only way a criminal can steal your credit card number. Skimmers are electronic devices, usually placed on ATMs or the card readers on gas pumps. When you place your card into the reader, it passes through the skimmer, allowing the device to capture your account information. Travelers are especially vulnerable to these devices, since they may be unfamiliar with the normal pump or ATM design. Always examine outdoor card readers carefully before using them, and look for anything that seems out of place or awkwardly attached.

References

Resources

Writer Bio

Milton Kazmeyer has worked in the insurance, financial and manufacturing fields and also served as a federal contractor. He began his writing career in 2007 and now works full-time as a writer and transcriptionist. His primary fields of expertise include computers, astronomy, alternative energy sources and the environment.

Источник: https://smallbusiness.chron.com/hackers-card-number-64333.html

Hackers stole millions of Social Security numbers from T-Mobile. What should you do?

Hackers have found their way again into T-Mobile’s systems, the fourth reported breach of the company’s data since early 2020. This time, the haul included sensitive personal information associated with about 48 million people, most of whom were former or prospective customers of the self-styled “un-carrier.”

Here is a breakdown of what happened, the risks you might face and how you can protect yourself against them.

What information was taken?

According to the company, the stolen data included names, birth dates, Social Security numbers and driver’s license information. In most cases, the company said, “no phone numbers, account numbers, [personal identification numbers], passwords, or financial information were compromised.” However, some 850,000 customers with prepaid accounts had their names, phone numbers and account PINs exposed, T-Mobile revealed.

Hackers started offering the data for sale last weekend, according to security researcher Brian Krebs, who predicted that it would all wind up online soon.

Although the potential number of people affected is huge, by T-Mobile’s count it represents less than half the company’s current 105 million customers. T-Mobile has said it will notify the customers whose data was exposed and provide two years of identity theft protection service for free from the security company McAfee.

What are the risks?

There have been so many data breaches at so many companies over the years, some security experts say that much of the information exposed by T-Mobile is probably already available on the dark web. But that doesn’t mean you should just shrug off what happened. Those whose data were exposed face greater risks of identity theft, phishing scams and other forms of fraud, Krebs warned.

Social Security numbers are widely used by the federal government, banks, investment companies, government benefit programs and insurers to verify identity. Your stolen SSN can be used to open fraudulent credit card accounts, divert or fraudulently collect benefits and commit workplace fraud, among other forms of deceit. Throw in your name, birth date and driver’s license number, and it’s exponentially easier for someone to pretend to be you.

Identity thieves could use that information to target both you and the banks, insurers and other companies you do business with. For example, they could use it to make phishing emails seem more realistic, helping to persuade you to give up additional sensitive information such as a password or PIN. Or they could use it to dupe your bank into letting them change the password on your account, giving them access to your money.

For those whose phone numbers were also exposed, there’s at least one more malign possibility: a SIM-swap attack. That’s where someone persuades your mobile phone company to transfer your number to a different device, which he or she then uses to try to break into the accounts that you’ve tied to your phone number. It’s increasingly common for people to use their mobile numbers as a way to verify their identity — for example, when they log into their online banking account, or when they want to reset their password. But that convenience can backfire if your number is hijacked, then used to impersonate you online.

How do you protect yourself?

The single best thing to do is to put a freeze on your credit files, which will prevent anyone from opening a new account. It’s free to place a freeze and to lift it for your own needs. But you have to contact each of the three major credit bureaus individually, which you can do online. Krebs also suggests freezing the credit files maintained by a handful of smaller, specialized agencies. You should also check your credit score regularly, which is a good way to detect fraud after it happens.

Credit- and identity-monitoring services, which typically carry a monthly fee, can also help reveal the work of identity thieves. They provide tools to prevent you from phishing and other forms of hacking combined with scanning services that look for your Social Security number or email address in places online where it doesn’t belong.

Meanwhile, T-Mobile has set up a website suggesting more steps people can take to guard against fraud. Anyone with a smartphone would be wise to take them:

  • Create a PIN for your mobile phone account to provide an extra layer of security against unauthorized changes in your account, such as a malicious SIM swap. If you’re a T-Mobile customer and you have a PIN, set a new one.
  • Activate T-Mobile’s “account takeover protection” feature, which provides an extra layer of protection on top of the PIN. Verizon goes further, automatically blocking SIM swaps by shutting down both the new device and the existing one until the account holder weighs in with the existing device.
  • Change the password you use to get into your mobile phone account online. Changing passwords periodically is a good practice for all your accounts. And if you have trouble remembering dozens of passwords, try a password manager app that can keep track of them for you.

On the plus side, two-factor authentication is becoming the standard online, and that’s improving security across the web. But too many sites encourage you make that second factor a text to your phone number, which encourages SIM swap fraud. Wherever possible, use an authentication app instead.

Источник: https://www.latimes.com/business/technology/story/2021-08-18/how-to-protect-yourself-in-t-mobile-hack

It began with dumplings.

When I got an email at midnight last March from Grubhub notifying me that my order from Dumpling Depot was on its way to an address 3,000 miles away from my location in New York City, I thought there must have been some mistake. And there was: mine.

Because I didn’t take a few basic internet security precautions, hackers robbed me of $13,103.91 worth of cash and prizes from three of my accounts over the next six months. And while this doesn’t make me, your Recode data privacy reporter, look very smart, I’m sharing my story with you in the hope that it will help you avoid a similar fate.

The person who hacked my Grubhub account last March ordered a black fungus salad with celery, a five-spice-marinated beef entree, and 12 pork dumplings (with chives) for a total of $26.84. At first, it was annoying but didn’t seem like that big of a deal: I notified Grubhub about the fraudulent charge and got a refund. Then I changed my password, sent an angry text to the phone number on the food order, and went about my life, foolishly thinking that this was an isolated incident. It was not.

Five months later, I logged into my bank account to find a substantially smaller number in my savings account than I expected. Sure enough, $9,000 had been wired away two days previously. During the subsequent, frantic call to my bank, I looked at my checking account and saw that $4,000 had been wired away from there, too — a discovery I declared with a variety of curse words. The woman on the other end of the line had a pleasant Southern drawl, which made her promises that I would get the money back seem extra reassuring.

She was right, although my access to all of my money was cut off for several days as the bank froze my old, violated accounts and created new ones. It took about two weeks before everything was fully up and running again and my $13,000 was restored. I don’t know if my bank got the $13,000 back or just fronted me the money and called it a loss. When I called them for an update and to demand justice, they told me they couldn’t tell me any details about the case because I was not the victim, the bank was. Obviously, things could have been a lot worse: I did get the money back.

But it wasn’t over. A month later, in September, I received an email from my credit card company informing me that it declined a $323.01 charge that Caviar tried to put on an expired card. Having a pretty good idea of where this was going, I checked my credit card and found that while the $323.01 charge was declined, two charges of $1.64 and $75.43 from Caviar had gone through. For some reason, my card transferred some (but not all) purchases made on the expired card that was attached to my account to my current one. And someone got away with $77.07 of rustic street food from one of Eater San Francisco’s top Oakland Vietnamese restaurant picks. Fortunately for me, the money was refunded to my credit card.

But just because I was lucky enough to get my money back in full, it doesn’t mean you will if hackers ever target you. And even losing that money temporarily was still a big, scary inconvenience: I had bills to pay and no way to pay them. I was terrified I would lose my health insurance coverage. I also had a few bill pay services linked to a closed account I didn’t switch over in time, and now I’m on some kind of scofflaw list at E-ZPass.

I don’t know if my bank, Grubhub, or Caviar were able to get any of the stolen money back. If not, they (and all the other businesses that cover hacked account expenditures) need to make it back somehow — and usually, customers end up having to cover those costs in some ameri ichinose blowjob. That means those thousands of dollars will come out of my pocket in one form or another. It will also come out of yours. Sorry about that.

I’m pretty sure I know how this happened, so I’m happy (and embarrassed) to share it with you so you’ll have better internet security hygiene than I did. Here are the three things I screwed up so you don’t have to:

1) Don’t reuse your passwords. And definitely don’t do it on dozens of different accounts.

Yes, I used the same password (or a variant of it) for most of my accounts, and I used it for almost a decade. I thought I had thwarted hackers by substituting certain letters and numbers for similar-looking special characters, but obviously they saw through this clever ruse.

This was probably my original sin. Somewhere, sometime, one of my online accounts got hacked, and my username, email address, password, and who knows what else was put on the internet for anyone to see and exploit. And once a hacker got my password, all they had to do was plug it (and its variants) into as many sites as possible until something clicked. The mini crime spree across multiple sites in the space of six months indicates that that’s exactly what they did.

Perhaps you, like me, re-use passwords — actually, half of you reading this do, according to this recent survey. If so, here’s what you should do: Check a site called Have I Been Pwned? to see if your information has been compromised. When I did, I saw that my email address is listed in no fewer than 15 different site breaches. I had assumed that every site where I’d created an account had taken adequate measures to keep my information secure and private, but my trust was sorely misplaced.

Johannes Eisele/AFP via Getty Images

What I should have done — and what I do now, and what you should do if you don’t already — is use different passwords for everything. This isn’t as complicated as you might think. I have a password manager app that keeps all of my usernames and passwords in one place (I use LastPass, but there are several such services — some free, some not — out there). Now, if my password for one site gets out there, the damage is limited to that site alone. They’re pretty easy to use, and many of them have password generators to help you come up with unique, difficult-to-crack passwords for every account.

Yes, there’s always a possibility — albeit remote — that the password manager itself could get hacked. Security consulting firm Independent Security Evaluators found vulnerabilities in several password manager apps but still said password managers were “a good thing.” LastPass claims that it has only had one “security incident” in its 10-year windows 360 login, and that its users’ passwords were not exposed. 1Password says it has never been hacked.

When it comes to password managers, at least I know I’ve entrusted my information to a place that promises it’s taken all available security precautions. I don’t think I can say the same for Disqus, LinkedIn, MyHeritage, or Tumblr, all of which were listed on Have I Been Pwned? as having data breaches that could have exposed my password.

If downloading and setting up an entire app to manage your password seems a little beyond your capabilities (or the amount of work you want to put in), many browsers and devices will now do this for you, even if these options are less secure. Mac devices have a keychain app; Google has its own password manager you can use with its Chrome browser; and Firefox has a password manager too. You know when you set up an account for the first time on a website and a prompt comes up on your can someone hack my bank account with my phone number or the device itself asking if you want to save your password for the site? That’s it.

If even that seems too difficult or tech-y for you, you can always go analog and write your passwords down in a notebook. There are different schools of thought out there on this: Some say it’s the best defense against hackers you can get and others say you should never, ever write your password down. Considering that most Americans keep track of their passwords by memorizing them (which indicates they’re only using one or few passwords for multiple sites, given the limitations of the human memory) or writing them down, I do think you’re better served by having unique can someone hack my bank account with my phone number for every site written in a book (presumably one that you’ve stored in a safe location to which there is limited outside access) than you are using the same password all over the internet. Just keep in mind the disastrous consequences if that book were to ever fall into the wrong hands.

Another good thing about having your passwords in a central place? It’ll help you keep track of all the accounts you have. After the bank hack, I changed my password on every account I could think of. But I forgot about Caviar, which I used one time in 2018 because it was the only delivery service for the good cheeseburger place near me. So it was still there for the taking when my hacker got a craving for green papaya salad and braised pork belly.

Finally, change your passwords every once in a while. Recommendations for how often you should do it vary, but if you are like me, it’s time to realize that changing passwords once a decade is not frequent enough. How about once a year? February 1 is the (unofficial) Change Your Password Day. That’s coming up soon.

2) Put two-factor authentication on everything

Two-factor authentication, or 2FA (also known as two-step verification), means you need two ways of first national bank personal loan your identity before you can log into an account, which helps protect you from hacks. One factor is your password. The other can come united first credit union customer service an authentication service or via a text message. This way, a hacker might know your password, but if they don’t have access to your phone or the authenticator app, they can’t get into your account.

My bank didn’t offer 2FA obie trice download songs text — the method I was the most familiar with — but only through an authenticator called Symantec VIP. That involved downloading and setting up an app on my phone, which I took one look at, got suspicious that someone was trying to sell me something and make me put yet another unwanted app on my phone, and decided not to bother with. In retrospect, I really should have bothered! So should you. Authentication services are an increasingly can someone hack my bank account with my phone number option because they are the most secure 2FA method, even if they take a few extra steps to set up (basically, downloading and installing the app in the first place). I use Google Authenticator, but there are several others.

Another method is via text, where you just tell the website your phone number and it sends you a text with a PIN code when you log in. This is easier, but it’s also less secure: A really determined hacker can get access to your text messages by hacking your SIM card. To give yourself an added measure of security against that, you can put a custom PIN code on your SIM card with your cellphone provider.

My bank does offer 2FA by text now, and I have it set up. But a lot of people don’t use 2FA at all. A 2017 survey showed that only 28 percent of Americans use it, while more than half of them had never heard of it. And a Google engineer said in 2018 that more than 90 percent of active Google accounts don’t use 2FA. Meanwhile, Google’s research has shown that 2FA blocks the vast majority of hacking attempts. Remember, this isn’t just about locking down your bank account: You can lose access to your Facebook profile, or have your Twitter account taken over by porn bots. If 2FA is available on a site you use, take advantage of it.

If the reason why you haven’t set up 2FA yet is that you think it’s too complicated, I strongly urge you to at least give it a try. Most sites have detailed, easy-to-follow instructions on how to set it up (usually found in the settings “security” section — here’s Facebook’s, for example), it’s only a few steps, and then it’s just a matter of getting a text or opening an authenticator app on your phone to get into your account. And if you save your login for future use, you only have to do it once.

3) Don’t save your credit card info on your account

The reason why the hackers were able to buy food on my credit card was because I saved my credit card info on those food delivery accounts. Lots of vendors you have accounts with will give you that “save this card for later” option, and I suggest that you not do this.

This is not always possible — Uber, for example, requires you to have a credit card attached to your account ways to pay american express bill all times. But where you can avoid saving your card on your account, you absolutely should. Yes, you will have to enter your credit card info every can someone hack my bank account with my phone number you place an order or make a purchase, but that’s less of a pain than sending a series of increasingly panicked emails to various delivery services and calling your credit card company in the middle of the night.

In the end, none of these methods are foolproof and this list is not exhaustive, but they are a great place to start. And trust me, it’s better than the alternative. Do as I say, not as I did, and the next time a hacker gets a hankering for pork dumplings (with chives), you won’t be the one footing the bill.

Open Sourced is made possible by Omidyar Network. All Open Sourced content is editorially independent and produced by our journalists.

Источник: https://www.vox.com/recode/2020/1/28/21080122/avoid-hack-hacker-theft

How Do Hackers Get Your Card Number?

By Milton Kazmeyer

Hackers use many different techniques to steal credit card information.

Opening up your credit card statement and seeing charges you did not make is never a pleasant experience. All too often, hackers target businesses with the ultimate goal of stealing financial information like credit card numbers, trophies they trade to other cyber criminals or simply use to run up bogus charges. Hackers steal credit card numbers in a variety of ways, and understanding these can someone hack my bank account with my phone number can help your company avoid becoming a victim.

Phishing

One of the simplest and most direct methods of card theft is phishing. The hacker simply calls your business, pretending to be from your bank, and tricks you into giving away your financial data. Often, phishing attempts begin with a warning of unauthorized activity to put you on your guard and make you eager to cooperate. If you ever receive a call claiming to be from your bank or card issuer, do not provide any account information and call your bank directly to report the contact.

Spoofing

Hackers can also use fake emails and websites to steal credit card information. Much like a phone phishing attack, a spoofed email will claim to be from your financial institution and report some kind of fraudulent access to your business account. The email will claim that all you need to do to correct the problem is log into their site with the link provided and enter your account information to verify your identity. Of course, the link goes to a fake site the hacker controls, designed to capture any data you enter. If you receive an email claiming to be from your card issuer, do not click any links, and call your provider for further information.

Hacking

In some cases, hackers steal credit card numbers by hacking businesses. Many web commerce systems allow you to store your credit card information for later use, making repeated purchases easy. Most businesses heavily encrypt this information, so that even if a hacker manages to steal the database, decoding the individual credit card numbers is impossible. Unfortunately, occasional security flaws allow criminals to bypass this security, allowing them to americas best eyeglasses frames large numbers of cards at once. If your credit card supports the technology, single-use card numbers can prevent hackers from accessing your accounts even if they compromise card databases. At the very least, you should resist the urge to allow sites to store your credit card details between sessions.

Skimming

The Internet is not the only way a criminal can steal your credit card number. Skimmers are electronic devices, usually placed on ATMs or the card readers on gas pumps. When you place your card into the reader, it passes through the skimmer, allowing the device to capture your account information. Travelers are especially vulnerable to these devices, since they may be unfamiliar with the normal pump or ATM design. Always examine outdoor card readers carefully before using them, and look for anything that seems out of place or awkwardly attached.

References

Resources

Writer Bio

Milton Kazmeyer has worked in the insurance, financial and manufacturing fields and also served as a federal contractor. He began his writing career in 2007 and now works full-time as a writer and transcriptionist. His primary fields of expertise include computers, astronomy, alternative energy sources and the environment.

Источник: https://smallbusiness.chron.com/hackers-card-number-64333.html

Hackers stole millions of Social Security numbers from T-Mobile. What should you do?

Hackers have found their way again into T-Mobile’s systems, the fourth reported breach of the company’s data since early 2020. This time, the haul included sensitive personal information associated with about 48 million people, most of whom were former or prospective customers of the self-styled “un-carrier.”

Here is a breakdown of what happened, the risks you might face and how you can protect yourself against them.

What information was taken?

According to the company, the stolen data included names, birth dates, Social Security numbers and driver’s license information. In most cases, the company said, “no phone numbers, account numbers, [personal identification numbers], passwords, or financial information were compromised.” However, some 850,000 customers with prepaid accounts had their names, phone numbers and account PINs exposed, T-Mobile revealed.

Hackers started offering the data for sale last weekend, according to security researcher Brian Krebs, who predicted that it would all wind up online soon.

Although the potential number of people affected is huge, by T-Mobile’s count it represents less than half the company’s current 105 million customers. T-Mobile has said it will notify the customers whose data was exposed and provide two years of identity theft protection service for free from the security company McAfee.

What are the risks?

There have been so many data breaches at so many companies over the years, some security experts say that much of the information exposed by T-Mobile is probably already available on the dark web. But that doesn’t mean you should just shrug off what happened. Those whose data were exposed face greater risks of identity theft, phishing scams and other forms of fraud, Krebs warned.

Social Security numbers are widely used by the federal government, banks, investment companies, government benefit programs and insurers to verify identity. Your stolen SSN can be used to open fraudulent credit card accounts, divert or fraudulently collect benefits and commit workplace fraud, among other forms of deceit. Throw in your name, birth date and driver’s license number, and it’s exponentially easier for someone to pretend to be you.

Identity thieves could use that information to target both you and the banks, insurers and other companies you do business with. For example, they could use it to make phishing emails seem more realistic, helping to persuade you to give up additional sensitive information such as a password or PIN. Or they could use it to dupe your bank into letting them change the password on your account, giving them access to your money.

For those whose phone numbers were also exposed, there’s at least one more malign possibility: a SIM-swap attack. That’s where someone persuades your mobile phone company to transfer your number to a different device, which he or she then uses to try to break into the accounts that you’ve tied to your phone number. It’s increasingly common for people to use their mobile numbers as a way to verify their identity — for example, when they log into their online banking account, or when they want to reset their password. But that convenience can backfire if your number is hijacked, then used to impersonate you online.

How do you protect yourself?

The single best thing to do is to put a freeze on your credit files, which will prevent anyone from opening a new account. It’s free to place a freeze and to lift it for your own needs. But you have to contact each of the three major credit bureaus individually, which you can do online. Krebs also suggests freezing the credit files maintained by a handful of smaller, specialized agencies. You should also check your credit score regularly, which is a good way to detect fraud after it happens.

Credit- and identity-monitoring services, which typically carry a monthly fee, can also help reveal the work of identity thieves. They provide tools to prevent you from phishing and other forms of hacking combined with scanning services that look for your Social Security number or email address in places online where it doesn’t belong.

Meanwhile, T-Mobile has set up a website suggesting more steps people can take to guard against fraud. Anyone with a smartphone would be wise to take them:

  • Create a PIN for your mobile phone account to provide an extra layer of security against unauthorized changes in your account, such as a malicious SIM swap. If you’re a T-Mobile customer and you have a PIN, set a new one.
  • Activate T-Mobile’s “account takeover protection” feature, which provides an extra layer of protection on top of the PIN. Verizon goes further, automatically blocking SIM swaps by shutting down both the new device and the existing one until the account holder weighs in with the existing device.
  • Change the password you use to get into your mobile phone account online. Changing passwords periodically is a good practice for all your accounts. And if you have trouble remembering dozens of passwords, try a password manager app that can keep track of them for you.

On the plus side, two-factor authentication is becoming the standard online, and that’s improving security across the web. But too many sites encourage you make that second factor a text to your phone number, which encourages SIM swap fraud. Wherever possible, use an authentication app what restaurants are open today in chicago https://www.latimes.com/business/technology/story/2021-08-18/how-to-protect-yourself-in-t-mobile-hack

There are lots of ways to protect your personal information and data from scammers. But what happens if your email or social media account gets hacked? Here are some quick steps to help you recover your email or social media account.

Signs That Your Email or Social Media Account Has Been Hacked

You might have been hacked if

  • your social media account has posts you didn’t make
  • you can’t log into your email or social media account
  • your Sent folder has messages you didn’t send, or has been emptied
  • friends and family aba 026013673 getting emails or messages you didn’t send, sometimes with random links or fake pleas for help or money

Steps To Get Back Into Your Account

1. Update your security software, run a scan, and delete any malware.

Start with this important step — especially if you’re not sure how someone hacked into your account. Use either the security software that comes with your computer, phone, or tablet or download software from a reputable, well-known security company. Then, run it to scan your device for malware. If the scan identifies suspicious software, delete it, and restart your device.

2. Change your passwords.

If you’re able to log into your email or social media account, change the password right away. If you use similar passwords for other accounts, change them, too. Make sure you create strong passwords that will be hard to guess.

If you can’t log in to change your password, check the advice your email provider or social network has available. Several popular email service providers (like Gmail and Yahoo) and social media websites (like Facebook and Twitter) give advice on how to restore and protect your account. If someone took over your account, you might need to fill out forms to prove it’s really you who’s trying to get back into your account.

3. Set up multi-factor authentication.

While you’re updating your password, check if your email or social media account lets you turn on multi-factor authentication. Multi-factor authentication requires a password plus something else — say, a code from an authenticator app — to prove it’s really you.

What To Do Once You’re Back in Your Account

1. Check your account settings.

After you log back in to your email can someone hack my bank account with my phone number, check on a few things:

  • Look at your signature block and make sure it doesn’t have any unfamiliar links.
  • Check your settings to see if there are “rules” set up to forward emails automatically. Delete any rules you didn’t set up, so your messages aren’t forwarded to someone else’s address.
  • On your social media account, look for changes since you last logged in — like any new “friends.”

2. Take stock of what’s in your inbox.

Consider what kind of information the hacker might have seen. Hackers look for information that can help them find usernames and passwords to important sites, like online banking or retirement accounts. Consider changing the usernames and passwords for accounts that may be at risk.

3. Look for tracks.

In your email account, review the Sent, Trash, or Deleted folders. You might be able to uncover clues about what the hacker did. Search for emails that the hacker sent from your account, or that the hacker may have viewed and then deleted.

In your social media account, check for messages that the hacker might have sent from your account.

This information will help you figure out what information was exposed. If it was, visit IdentityTheft.gov to find out what you should do next.

4. Report misused information at IdentityTheft.gov.

If you the hacker misused your sensitive information, like your Social Security number, to access or open new accounts, to apply for government benefits, to file federal taxes, or any other misuse, report it. At IdentityTheft.gov, you can create an individualized recovery plan to help you recover from identity theft.

5. Tell your friends.

Send your friends a quick email or text, or post something to let them know that you were hacked. Tell them not to click on links in emails from you or respond to a hacker’s fake pleas for help or money. If you’re emailing a bunch of people, put their email addresses in the Bcc line to keep them confidential. You could send them this article, too.

How To Protect Your Accounts From Getting Hacked

  • Use strong passwords. That means at least 12 characters. Making a password longer is generally the easiest way to make it stronger. Consider using a passphrase of random words so that your password is more memorable, but avoid using common words or phrases. If the service you’re using doesn’t allow long passwords, you can make your password stronger by mixing uppercase and lowercase letters, numbers, and symbols. And don’t reuse existing passwords from other accounts. If one of those accounts gets hacked, a hacker can try that same password to get into your email or social media account. For more tips, check out this Password Checklist.
  • Turn on multi-factor authentication. Multi-factor authentication requires a password plus something else — say, a code from an authenticator app — to prove it’s really you. This protects your account even if your password is stolen.
  • Protect your information. Think twice when someone asks you to put in your username and password. Never give them out in response to an email. If the email or text seems to be from your bank, for example, visit the bank website directly. Don’t click on any links or call any numbers in the message. Scammers impersonate well-known businesses to  trick people into giving out personal information.
  • Install and update security software, and use a firewall. Set your security software, internet browser, and operating system (like Windows or Mac OS X) to update automatically.
  • Get well-known software directly from the source. Sites that offer lots of different browsers, PDF readers, and other popular software for free are more likely to include malware.
  • Don’t treat public computers or a friend’s phone like it’s your own device. If it’s not your computer or phone, don’t let a web browser remember your passwords. Avoid going to personal accounts — like bank accounts or email — from anywhere besides your own personal devices. And make sure to log out of any accounts when you’re done. Limiting where you put your personal information reduces the chance that your information will get hacked. Also always avoid logging into your personal accounts when you’re can someone hack my bank account with my phone number public Wi-Fi because it’s usually not secure.
Источник: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/how-recover-your-hacked-email-or-social-media-account

Why Do Hackers Want Your Email Address?

These days, most of us have two find a sperm bank near me addresses that we use frequently online: one for home, and one for work.Our professional email addresses will change every few years as we move from job to job – but you’re likely to use the same personal email address for years – maybe even a decade or more!

Both personal and work email addresses are our “home base” when we connect online. Your email address is a primary way to receive messages from ally drops savings rate and businesses. An email address is also the one piece of contact information you most frequently share with services as you shop and bank. In fact, most of our online activity requires signing up for accounts and logging in, so your email address inevitably gets shared far and wide on the web.

What can hackers do with your email address?

Although your email address may seem rather ordinary,it’sactually a valuable piece of information. So why exactly do hackers want it?

First, your email is your primary identifier in the login process. If a hacker wanted to try breaking into one of your online accounts, knowing your email address is a solid first step. Obviously, they can’t log in without your password, but by knowing your email address, they could target you with phishing emails –  malicious attachments that install malware on your machine. Alternatively, they could attempt to steal passwords on phony login pages, or even ask you directly in an email to disclose personal or financial information by impersonating someone reputable – including friends and family.

Second, any password reset requests will be sent to your inbox. If a hacker knows your email address and uses one of the above methods to log in to your email account, they could attempt to log in to other sites with the password reset option. Once they reset the password, they’ll have access to your accounts, and you won’t. They’ll likely reset the password to your email account, too, why did america ferrera leaving superstore that they can continue solano county fire district map take advantage of you while you’re locked out.

Furthermore, given how often we use our email for online activity, your inbox is a treasure trove of personal information. In most cases, it even contains a list of all of your contacts. So, anyone who gained access to your email address would be able to tell a lot about the websites you use (including your financial accounts). It may give them information they need to steal money or uncover other personal information that can can someone hack my bank account with my phone number be sold on the web. They can also mine your contacts list to send out phishing emails and/or malware to compromise even more accounts or defraud the people you know! Read about other signs that your email may have been hacked.

How to protect your email address

Good cybersecurity habits will go a long way towards protecting your email address from hackers. Here are some important tips to keep in mind:

Use a unique password. Never use the password for your email address on another website. Unique passwords ensure a data breach of another website is less likely to cause account takeovers.

Use a generated password.Make sure your password has uppercase, lowercase, numbers, and symbols. The more random and long it is, the less likely it is to be guessed or cracked by a hacker. A password manager can help you generate – and then store – a strong password.

Turn on MFA. Most email providers support multifactor authentication (MFA). MFA requires a second piece of information after you submit your password to log in. The second piece of information (or factor) may include a generated code, a swipe of your fingerprint, or a face scan. MFA makes it much harder for hackers to break in because they won’t have access to that second piece of information.

Turn on dark web monitoring.Data breaches are common occurrences, but we don’t always know when they happen or if we’ve been affected. Cybercriminals are regularly collecting and selling data on the dark web, but most of us don’t have the time or skill to see if our data is out there. Turning on dark web monitoring with a service like LastPass alerts you if your stolen credentials are on the dark web. Dark web alerts will help you understand where a breach occurred, what information was stolen, and what you should do next.

Create separate email addresses. You might consider a separate, “throwaway” email address that you use for online shopping. Not only will it keep your primary email address free of promotional clutter, it will reduce the impact of any data breaches. If your finances and other sensitive accounts are tied to your primary email address, it will be harder for hackers to figure out those other accounts with your throwaway email address.

Источник: https://blog.lastpass.com/2020/11/why-do-hackers-want-your-email-address/

Recover from a hacked online bank account

Cyber criminals are typically financially motivated and getting access to an online bank account is the crown jewels for many. If you have noticed suspicious transactions or activity on your online bank account you need to act quickly to limit the damage the perpetrator can do.

We want to better understand the impact of you experiencing this issue, can you share your experience by filling in this online form? This will help us better protect future victims.

Hacked online bank account - Do this first!

  1. Contact your can someone hack my bank account with my phone number immediately - call your bank as soon as you spot the suspicious activity - the number will be on your bank statement, card or the bank’s website. If money has been taken they will protect your account and make sure no more money can be taken. Even if no money has been taken your bank will take action by changing your security details and cancelling your cards.

  2. Change your login details - if you are still able to login to your account then follow the normal procedure to reset your password and other security information. This should lock the criminal out of the account.

  3. Contact the police - report the crime to Action Fraud or Police Scotland. They will log the crime and give you a crime reference number.

Am I going to get my money back?

Your bank should refund any money stolen from you as a result of fraud and identity theft. They should do this as soon as possible - ideally by the end of the next working day after you report the problem.

If the bank thinks you might have acted fraudulently or were negligent, they can delay the refund while they investigate - this shouldn't take more than a few days.

If you were tricked by a criminal into transferring the money into another account then the bank is unlikely to refund your money.

If the bank won't refund your money, you'll only be able to get it back by taking the person who stole it to court.

Approaches to dealing with a hacked online bank account

Once you have spoken to your bank, reported the crime to the police and changed your login details consider these additional steps:

  1. Check your transactions, payees and direct debits - have a good look through your account and look for any changes that have been made. Take a close look at your statement, any new payees created and review your direct debits.

  2. Review security settings and information - many online bank accounts provide a list of latest activity on the account as well as a list of recent logins and connected devices. Review can someone hack my bank account with my phone number and make sure this is nothing suspicious since you have taken back control of the account.

  3. Scan your devices for malware - there are a number of ways the perpetrator may have got your login details - from a past breach (you can check known breaches here), guessed it, seen you type it in, tricked you into sharing it online or you may have told them in the past. However, they could also have malicious software on one of your devices that gives them access to what you type into websites. Scan all of the devices you use to access your account with an anti-virus solution and remove any malware.

  4. Monitor - keep a close eye on your account for any suspicious activity and it is worth checking your personal credit report as the criminal may have stolen your identity to take out other financial products. You can check your personal credit report with one if the three credit reference agencies: TransUnion, Equifax and Experian.

How do I avoid my bank account being hacked in future?

There are a number of ways you can reduce the risk of bank fraud:

  • Keep your cards and financial details safe - try and keep your card in sight when making a transaction. Sign new cards as soon as they arrive and destroy old cards by cutting through the magnetic strip and chip. Keep your financial documents safe and use a shredder to destroy them when you don’t need them anymore.

  • Secure your PIN - memorise your PIN and destroy the letter sent to tell you your PIN. Make sure you are the only person who knows your PIN and make sure nobody can see you enter it at ATMs. Set your pin to something random and avoid things like your date of birth.

  • Only visit your online bank account by typing in the address into your web browser - never follow a link in a text or email.

  • Get good at passwords - use strong password, use different passwords on each site, never share them and change them regularly. Use a password manager app to help you do this. See some good guidance here.

  • Commit to two-factor authentication - two-factor is a way to improve your security drastically in one east step. Use it on every site that offers it. You can get more information here.

  • Review account security settings - all social media accounts offer a range of security features such as log in notification, secure browsing and two-factor authentication. Review these settings and turn all security options on.

  • Be careful clicking or downloading - tricking you to share your password by sending you trick emails or texts is a really common way to have your passwords stolen. As is downloading attachments in email that contain malicious software. Be extremely careful when clicking online links or opening/downloading online attachments.

  • Get secure - take time to improve your general online security. Use sites like Get Safe Online and Cyber Aware to understand what good security looks like and make changes.

Donate

To help people like you we rely 100% on donations from people like you.

Without donations we cannot keep our service free and provide help to the most vulnerable victims of cyber crime when they need it most. As a not-for-profit organisation, 100% of your donation goes towards keeping The Cyber Helpline up and running - so 100% goes towards helping people like you. Donate now and help us support victims of cyber crime. 

Источник: https://www.thecyberhelpline.com/guides/hacked-online-bank-account

Can Someone Hack Your Cash App with Just Your Username, Email, $Cashtag?

No, Your Cash App account cannot be hacked with just your username and $Cashtag. It will require having access to your Phone number, email, and Cash App Pin to hack your account. Keeping those items safe from prying eyes will safeguard you from having your Cash App account hacked.

However, your cash app can still be hacked in multiple ways. Let’s explore below;

Of all the various types of apps and accounts that can be hacked, few are more concerning compared to your banking and financial accounts.

As finance apps like Cash App continue to rise in popularity, it very much begs the question and rightly so: can someone hack your Cash App and how can you protect yourself?

Unfortunately, hackers and scammers are still and will be more so trying to take advantage of others and always circumvent. After gaining access to your Cash app account, hackers can easily transfer a user’s Cash App balance to their Cash App account, which they can easily transfer to and move around the funds.

can someone hack your cash app

Contents

Can someone hack your Cash App?

Yes, Your Cash App Account capital one car loan status be hacked like all other accounts. Cash App account getting hacked isn’t uncommon. There are various websites that claim to offer services to hack Cash App accounts alongside phishing websites claiming to offer awesome features if you login with your Cash App.

Before we proceed…

There are two types of hack we are talking about here:

  • Hack on your personal account – Getting hold of your login email and password
  • Hack on the Cash Server

I assume you are asking the former.

As for the latter…

According to Cash App, they use cutting-edge encryption and fraud detection technology to make sure that your money and data are safe and secure from hackers and prying eyes.

Any information that you submit is encrypted and sent to their servers securely.

Refer here for a list of Unique cash App usernames.

Are cash app hacks real?

Yes, Cash App hacks are real and hackers can hold and get into your Cash App account by using several techniques such as phishing emails containing malicious software, or malware, either in embedded links or attachments.

Can someone hack your cash app with just your username?

No, It’s not possible for someone to hack into your Cash App account with just your username or $Cashtag itself.

However, someone can hack your account using your email address by using phishing websites, email spamming, etc in order to acquire your login email and password, and if the person has access to your email password, the hacker can have full access to your Cash App account.

That is something you need to can someone hack my bank account with my phone number aware of and avoid putting sensitive information such as your Cash App email and password on suspicious websites, apps, and forms.

Can Someone hack your Bank Account through Cash App?

Unless they got hold of your Cash App account, there’s no way anyone can hack your bank account through Cash App from the outside.

>> Read: How To Disable Cash App Card?

If they are into your Cash account, they can get access to your bank and use it to transfer and fund money into the Cash wallet and then into the hacker’s account.

What can someone do with your Cash App Username?

Your Cash App username or $Cashtag is a unique identifier for individuals and businesses using Cash App and can only be used to either send or request money.

If you don’t feel like sharing your Cash App username and make you don’t feel comfortable, don’t share it on the social giveaway posts (eg. Cash App Friday Giveaway) where retweets and comments with your Cashtag are required.

Never share your Cash App phone number or email and we always recommend a Multi-factor authentication to safeguard your account.

Once someone has access to your Cash App email and password, they can change your password and transfer all your Cash wallet funds.

The problem with Cash App cards or for instance PayPal is they are connected to eBay or another site where you save your card which then leaves you vulnerable if they can breach one of your accounts.

And a hacker only needs your user’s eBay and Cash login credentials to access your account holding the money. If you previously authorize eBay or the website to immediately withdraw its fees from your Cash Card or set up for recurring payments, your Cash App account could be vulnerable.

Keep in mind that Cash app will never ask for your secret PIN code through email, text, or calls. Never enter your OTP code unless you are sending money through the app to someone.

How to keep your Cash App accounts from being hacked?

Keeping in mind that without direct access to your phone messages, email, and your PIN, there’s no way someone can easily hack into your account and get hold of it.

Here are some tips to keep your accounts safe from hackers:

Keep your email and password safe and your Passwords should be long and complex; experts suggest using a complex phrase.

We also recommend you to set passwords differently for both your email and Cash App account to avoid getting access even if one of your accounts gets hacked.

  1. Create a super-strong password and log out of the Cash app when you’re not using it.
  2. Secure your phone (in addition to your Cash App PIN).
  3. Add two-step authentication.
  4. Link your Cash App account to a credit card — not a debit card
  5. Double-check the contact you’re sending money to.
  6. Regularly check your Cash account activity for suspicious activities.

The reason why we recommend adding a credit card rather than a debit card is that if worse comes to worst and your Cash App is hacked, it’s better for the hackers to have access to your credit card rather than your debit card (if it has a decent amount in your debit card).

First off, your credit card almost always has zero liability for fraud.

Next, if someone wipes out your debit card linked to your bank account — the consequence is more immediate than a $2,000 charge on your credit card, that you can dispute: and you will owe no more than $50.

Pro tip: So, If you need to connect to your debit card account to transfer your Cash App balance, you can disconnect as soon as it’s done.

However, the chances of someone hacking your account is quite rare, if you follow the basic rules such as keeping your login email and password safe, avoid entering your cash app login in any suspicious files, websites and forms, add an extra layer of 2-step authentication and the few others mentioned above.

Final Thoughts:

Fraudsters and hackers are not always the typically sophisticated hackers. Sometimes, it can be someone you know of and who has access to your email and Phone number.

To hack your Cash App requires having access to your Phone number, email, and Cash Pin. So, if you keep those things safe from prying eyes, you should be good to go.

That put’s an end to the Can Someone Hack Your Cash App with Just Your Username?

For any queries, let us know in the comments below!

Источник: https://reallyneedcash.com/can-someone-hack-your-cash-app-with-just-your-username/

: Can someone hack my bank account with my phone number

Can someone hack my bank account with my phone number
Can someone hack my bank account with my phone number
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Can someone hack my bank account with my phone number
can someone hack my bank account with my phone number

4 Replies to “Can someone hack my bank account with my phone number”

  1. that means i want to transfer 4000 to my bank account from credit card through payz aap. that means i have to pay credit card bill of 4000+100 extra . am i right ?

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