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Scammers can use the internet to make calls from all over the world. They don’t care if you’re on the National Do Not Call Registry. That’s why your best defense against unwanted calls is call blocking and call labeling. Which type of call-blocking or call-labeling technology you use will depend on the phone — whether it’s a cell phone, a home phone that makes calls over the internet (VoIP), or a traditional landline.

What Are Call Blocking and Call Labeling?

When we talk about call blocking, it means technologies or devices that can stop a lot of the unwanted calls you get — like scam calls and illegal robocalls — before they reach you. Cell phones, home phones that make calls over the internet (VoIP), and landlines each have their own call-blocking options. Just know that call-blocking services could block some legitimate calls.

Some companies also offer call labeling. Call-labeling services show categories like “spam” or “scam likely” on your phone’s screen for incoming calls. Then you can decide whether to answer the call.

Block Calls on a Cell Phone

Watch this video on how to stop calls on your cell phone

Download a call-blocking app

One of the best ways to block unwanted calls on a cell phone is to download a call-blocking app. A call-blocking app acts like a filter. The company behind the app uses call data or reports from users, the FTC, and other sources to predict which calls are illegal or likely scams. The app then intercepts those calls before they reach you. Some apps are free, but others you have to pay for.

To get a call-blocking app

  • Go to the online app store for your phone’s operating system (iOS (Apple), Android, etc.) and look at ratings for different apps.
  • Look online for expert reviews on call-blocking apps.
  • Check out apps listed at ctia.org, a website for the U.S. wireless communications industry. The site lists apps specific to Android, BlackBerry, iOS (Apple), or Windows

Apps typically let you choose how to respond to calls flagged as scams. Calls might

  • be stopped
  • ring silently
  • go straight to voicemail

Apps also can let you do things like

  • block calls based on the geographic location or area code of the incoming call
  • let you create lists of numbers to block, or lists of numbers to let through
  • send a prewritten text message to the caller
  • report it to the FTC, which you can do at DoNotCall.gov, or, if you lost money to the scammer, at ReportFraud.ftc.gov

Some apps access your contacts list, so know whether that’s important to you. The app’s privacy policy should explain how it gets and uses your information.

Check the built-in features of your phone

Many cell phones come with settings that let you block calls from specific numbers, though there might be a limit to how many numbers you can block. Cell phones also typically have features like Do Not Disturb, where you can set hours during which calls will go straight to voicemail.

See what services your phone provider offers

Check your phone provider’s website or call customer service to find out what call-blocking or call-labeling services it offers or recommends. Some services are free, but others might charge you a fee.

For links to company-specific information about blocking calls, go to the FCC’s Call Blocking Resources.

Block Calls on a Home Phone That Uses the Internet (VoIP)

First find out if your phone uses the internet (VoIP)

It’s possible you have VoIP service on your home phone and don’t know it. VoIP stands for Voice over Internet Protocol, and it simply means that your phone makes calls over the internet, not over phone lines. If you’re not sure what you have, check with your phone provider. But if you get your phone service through a cable company, or use a phone/internet/cable bundle, you probably have VoIP service. If you find out you don’t have internet-based phone service, skip down to the advice on blocking calls on a traditional landline.

Read expert reviews on internet-based call-blocking services

Internet-based call-blocking services can block unwanted calls on phones that use the internet. Your phone provider might be able to recommend a specific service. But you also can search online for expert reviews. Some services are free and some charge you each month.

Some internet-based services and phone apps require all calls to be routed through their service, where they are instantly analyzed. You may have choices about how unwanted calls are handled. For example, unwanted calls might

  • be stopped
  • ring silently
  • go straight to a separate voicemail
  • go to a spam folder

See what your phone provider offers

Check your phone provider’s website or call customer service to find out what your options are or if there’s a service it recommends. Some phone providers offer these services for free, but some charge a fee.

For links to company-specific information about blocking calls, go to the FCC’s Call Blocking Resources.

Block Calls on a Traditional Landline

Watch this video on how to stop calls on your home phone

Install a call blocking-device

If your home phone is a traditional landline that doesn’t use the internet (VoIP), you can buy and install a call-blocking device. Call-blocking devices are typically small boxes you attach to your phone.

Some devices use databases of known scam numbers but let you add numbers you want blocked. Other devices rely on you to create and update your own list of numbers to block.

Some use lists to

  • stop unwanted calls
  • divert calls to voicemail
  • show a blinking light when an unwanted call comes in
  • connect callers to a recording with options so a real caller can still get through

Some devices also use lists of approved numbers. That helps you limit which calls get through, or lets you set up “do not disturb” hours during which calls go straight to voicemail. Other devices try to weed out robocalls by playing a prerecorded message prompting callers to press a number to continue the call.

See what services your phone provider offers

Some services are free, but some charge a fee.

For links to company-specific information about blocking calls, go to the FCC’s Call Blocking Resources.

What About the National Do Not Call Registry?

The National Do Not Call Registry is designed to stop sales calls from real companies that follow the law. The Registry is a list that tells telemarketers what numbers not to call. The FTC does not and cannot block calls. Scammers don’t care if you’re on the Registry.

Even though the Registry can’t stop all of the unwanted calls you’re getting, being on the Registry could reduce the number of calls you get and make it easier for you to spot illegal calls. If a caller is ignoring the Registry, there’s a good chance it’s a scam. Even if it’s not a scam, you don’t want to do business with or give your information to someone calling you illegally.

What About Robocalls?

If you answer the phone and hear a recorded message instead of a live person, it's a robocall. Robocalls trying to sell you something are illegal unless the company trying to sell you something got your written permission, directly from you, to call you that way. If someone is already breaking the law by robocalling you without permission, there’s a good chance it’s a scam. At the very least, it’s a company you don’t want to do business with.

Call blocking can help stop robocalls from scammers. But some robocalls might still get through. If you get an illegal robocall, hang up. Don’t press a number, which could lead to more robocalls. Then report it to the FTC. Some robocalls are legal and don’t require your permission, like purely informational messages, political calls, or calls from charities. But if they try to also sell you something on the call, it becomes an illegal robocall.

Learn more at ftc.gov/robocalls.

Calls From Fake Numbers — or “Spoofing”

Call blocking technology can sometimes stop calls from scammers who can make fake names or numbers show up on your caller ID. Scammers often use these “spoofed” names and numbers in government impersonator scams to make you think it’s the IRS or law enforcement calling. Then they try to convince you to wire money or pay them with gift cards. Learn more about common phone scams.

In something known as neighbor spoofing, scammers display a number with your area code. They often match the first six digits of your phone number, thinking that you’ll be more likely to answer the call. Often the faked name and number belong to a real person who has no idea their information is being misused.

Report Unwanted Calls

If you didn’t lose money and just want to report a call, you can use the streamlined reporting form at DoNotCall.gov.

If you’ve lost money to a phone scam or have information about the company or scammer who called you, report it at ReportFraud.ftc.gov.

Report the number that received the call, the number that appears on your caller ID — even if you think it might be fake — and any number you’re told to call back. Also report the exact date and time of the call, if you’re able to. The FTC analyzes complaint data and trends to identify illegal callers based on calling patterns. We also use additional information you report, like any names or numbers you’re told to call back, to track down scammers.

We take the illegal callers’ phone numbers you report and release them to the public each business day. This helps phone companies and other partners that are working on call-blocking and call-labeling solutions. Your reports also help law enforcement identify the people behind illegal calls.

Источник: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/how-block-unwanted-calls

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Unwanted calls – including illegal and spoofed robocalls - are the FCC's top consumer complaint and our top consumer protection priority. These include complaints from consumers whose numbers are being spoofed or whose calls are being mistakenly blocked or labeled as a possible scam call by a robocall blocking app or service. The FCC is committed to doing what we can to protect you from these unwelcome situations and is cracking down on illegal calls in a variety of ways:

Check out the consumer guide on Call Blocking Tools and Resources, which includes information on many of the call blocking and labeling tools currently available to consumers.

File a complaint with the FCC if you believe you have received an illegal call or text, or if you think you're the victim of a spoofing scam. Click the tabs below for tips, FAQs and resources.

Consumer Tips to Stop Unwanted Robocalls and Avoid Phone Scams

  • Don't answer calls from unknown numbers. If you answer such a call, hang up immediately.
  • You may not be able to tell right away if an incoming call is spoofed. Be aware: Caller ID showing a "local" number does not necessarily mean it is a local caller.
  • If you answer the phone and the caller - or a recording - asks you to hit a button to stop getting the calls, you should just hang up. Scammers often use this trick to identify potential targets.
  • Do not respond to any questions, especially those that can be answered with "Yes."
  • Never give out personal information such as account numbers, Social Security numbers, mother's maiden names, passwords or other identifying information in response to unexpected calls or if you are at all suspicious.
  • If you get an inquiry from someone who says they represent a company or a government agency, hang up and call the phone number on your account statement, in the phone book, or on the company's or government agency's website to verify the authenticity of the request. You will usually get a written statement in the mail before you get a phone call from a legitimate source, particularly if the caller is asking for a payment.
  • Use caution if you are being pressured for information immediately.
  • If you have a voice mail account with your phone service, be sure to set a password for it. Some voicemail services are preset to allow access if you call in from your own phone number. A hacker could spoof your home phone number and gain access to your voice mail if you do not set a password.
  • Talk to your phone company about call blocking tools they may have and check into apps that you can download to your mobile device to block unwanted calls.
  • If you use robocall-blocking technology already, it often helps to let that company know which numbers are producing unwanted calls so they can help block those calls for you and others.
  • To block telemarketing calls, register your number on the Do Not Call List. Legitimate telemarketers consult the list to avoid calling both landline and wireless phone numbers on the list.

FAQs About Robocalls

Robocalls are calls made with an autodialer or that contain a message made with a prerecorded or artificial voice.

Advances in technology have unfortunately allowed illegal and spoofed robocalls to be made from anywhere in the world and more cheaply and easily than ever before. That's why it's become more of a problem for consumers, and a more difficult problem to solve.

Keep in mind that many robocalls are legal. While we have taken several actions, and continue to work on reducing illegal robocalls, it is a difficult problem that requires complex solutions. The most complex part is identifying the illegal calls in real time to be able to block them without blocking lawful calls.

  • What are the rules for robocalls?  expand and contract

    FCC rules require a caller to obtain your written consent – on paper or through electronic means, including website forms, a telephone keypress – before it may make a prerecorded telemarketing call to your home or wireless phone number.  FCC rules also require a caller to obtain your consent, oral or written, before it may make an autodialed or prerecorded call or text to your wireless number.  There are exceptions to these rules, such as for emergencies involving danger to life or safety.

  • What are the rules for telemarketers calling a wireline home phone?  expand and contract

    Callers must have your prior express written consent before making telemarketing calls using a prerecorded or artificial voice. Telephone solicitation calls to your home are prohibited before 8 am or after 9 pm.

    Telemarketers are no longer able to make telemarketing robocalls to your wireline home telephone based solely on an "established business relationship" that you may have established when purchasing something from a business or contacting the business to ask questions.

  • Are robocalls to wireless phones prohibited?  expand and contract

    A consumer's written or oral consent is required for autodialed, prerecorded, or artificial voice calls or texts made to your wireless number, with a few exceptions such as emergency calls regarding danger to life or safety.  Consent must be in writing for telemarketing robocalls.  Telemarketers have never been permitted to make robocalls to your wireless phone based solely on an "established business relationship" with you.

  • What types of autodialed calls are permitted under the FCC rules?  expand and contract

    Not all robocalls are illegal.  There are several factors to consider: the technology used to make the call, whether the call is to a landline or a mobile number, whether the content of the call is telemarketing, and whether the called number is on the National Do Not Call Registry.

    Market research or polling calls to home wireline numbers are not restricted by FCC rules, nor are calls on behalf of tax-exempt non-profit groups. Informational messages such as school closings or flight information to your home phone are permissible without prior consent. The rules do require all prerecorded calls, including market research or polling calls, to identify the caller at the beginning of the message and include a contact phone number. Autodialed or prerecorded calls to wireless phones are prohibited without prior express consent, regardless of the call's content, with a few exceptions such as emergency calls regarding danger to life or safety.

  • What are the rules about robocalls releasing telephone lines?  expand and contract

    Autodialers that deliver a prerecorded message must release the called party's telephone line within five seconds of the time that the calling system receives notification that the called party's line has hung up. In some areas, you could experience a delay before you can get a dial tone again. Your local telephone company can tell you if there is a delay in your area.

  • Are any organizations or individuals exempt from the Do Not Call rules?  expand and contract

    Yes. The Do Not Call rules only apply to telemarketing calls. So, the following types of calls are ones that don't have to comply with do-not-call requests: tax-exempt, non-profit organizations; political organizations; pollsters and survey takers, not making sales calls; religious organizations; and telemarketers to whom you have given prior written consent to call you.

  • Can I opt out of autodialed calls?  expand and contract

    FCC rules require telemarketers to allow you to opt out of receiving additional telemarketing robocalls immediately during a prerecorded telemarketing call through an automated menu. The opt-out mechanism must be announced at the outset of the message and must be available throughout the duration of the call.

  • Where should I file my unwanted call complaint?  expand and contract

    Consumers can file complaints with the FCC by going to fcc.gov/complaints.  You should choose the phone form and the unwanted calls issue for all complaints involving unwanted calls, including if your number is being spoofed, blocked, or labeled.

    If you have a complaint about telephone fraud or telemarketers who have disregarded the Do Not Call list, we also encourage you to file a complaint with the FTC at www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov.

    If the unwanted call is an IRS scam, we also encourage you to file your complaint with the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at www.tigta.gov or call 1-800-366-4484.

  • What does the FCC do with consumer complaints?  expand and contract

    We do not resolve individual unwanted call complaints but such complaints provide valuable information that the FCC uses to inform policy decisions and as the basis of potential enforcement actions against callers violating our rules under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (for most robocalls) or Truth in Caller ID Act. We may share your complaint with other agencies, such as the FTC, if we have shared jurisdiction over the alleged violation.

  • How can schools get more information about compliance?  expand and contract

    For schools who have questions about compliance with the Commission's robocalls rules, please contact [email protected]

Download the FCC Report on Robocalls (PDF).

Robotexts

FCC rules ban text messages sent to a mobile phone using an autodialer unless you previously gave consent to receive the message or the message is sent for emergency purposes.

  • For commercial texts, your consent must be in writing.
  • For non-commercial, informational texts (such as those sent by or on behalf of tax-exempt non-profit organizations, those for political purposes, and other noncommercial purposes, such as school closings), your consent may be oral.

The ban applies even if you have not placed your mobile phone number on the national Do-Not-Call list.

Tips for avoiding unwanted texts

  • Do not respond to unwanted texts from questionable sources. Several mobile service providers allow you to block the sender by forwarding unwanted texts to 7726 (or "SPAM"). Check with your provider about options.
  • Be careful about giving out your mobile phone number or any other personal information.
  • Read through commercial web forms and check for a privacy policy when submitting your mobile phone number to any customer website. You should be able to opt out of receiving texts – but you may have to check or uncheck a preselected box to do so.
  • Find out if any company you do business with has a policy that allows it to sell or share your information.

Take action

File a complaint with the FCC if you receive:

  • An unwanted commercial text message sent to your mobile phone.
  • An autodialed text message sent to your mobile phone if you didn't consent to the message previously (or it doesn't involve an emergency).
  • Any autodialed text message from a telecommunications company or advertising a telecommunications company's products or services, if sent without your prior consent.

Spoofing and Caller ID

Caller ID spoofing is when a caller deliberately falsifies the information transmitted to your caller ID display to disguise their identity. Spoofing is often used as part of an attempt to trick someone into giving away valuable personal information so it can be used in fraudulent activity or sold illegally, but also can be used legitimately, for example, to display the toll-free number for a business.

  • What is neighbor spoofing?  expand and contract

    Robocallers use neighbor spoofing, which displays a phone number similar to your own on your caller ID, to increase the likelihood that you will answer the call. To help combat neighbor spoofing, the FCC is requiring the phone industry to adopt a robust caller ID authentication system.

  • When is spoofing illegal?  expand and contract

    Under the Truth in Caller ID Act, FCC rules prohibit anyone from transmitting misleading or inaccurate caller ID information with the intent to defraud, cause harm or wrongly obtain anything of value. Anyone who is illegally spoofing can face penalties of up to $10,000 for each violation. However, spoofing is not always illegal. There are legitimate, legal uses for spoofing, like when a doctor calls a patient from her personal mobile phone and displays the office number rather than the personal phone number or a business displays its toll-free call-back number.

  • What can you do if your number is being spoofed?  expand and contract

    If you get calls from people saying your number is showing up on their caller ID, it's likely that your number has been spoofed. We suggest first that you do not answer any calls from unknown numbers, but if you do, explain that your telephone number is being spoofed and that you did not actually make any calls. You can also place a message on your voicemail letting callers know that your number is being spoofed. Usually scammers switch numbers frequently. It is likely that within hours they will no longer be using your number.

  • What is blocking or labeling?  expand and contract

    If a telephone number is blocked or labeled as a "potential scam" on your caller ID, it is possible the number has been spoofed. Several phone companies and app developers offer call-blocking and labeling services that detect whether a call is likely to be fraudulent based on call patterns, consumer complaints or other means.

    FCC rules do not prohibit call blocking or labeling technologies, however the FCC is very concerned about ensuring that lawful calls are completed and has encouraged providers who block calls to establish a means for a caller whose number is blocked to contact the provider and remedy the problem.

    You can legally block the transmission of your phone number when you make calls, so your number will appear as "unknown." Doing so is not spoofing.

  • What are the caller ID rules for telemarketers?  expand and contract

    FCC rules specifically require that a telemarketer:

    • Transmit or display its telephone number or the telephone number on whose behalf the call is being made, and, if possible, its name or the name of the company for which it is selling products or services.
    • Display a telephone number you can call during regular business hours to ask to no longer be called. This rule applies even to companies that already have an established business relationship with you.

Political Campaign Robocalls & Robotexts

During election seasons, consumers will likely experience an increase in calls and texts from political campaigns. While campaign calls and texts are exempt from the Do Not Call List requirements, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act contains specific rules they must follow.

In general, robocalls and robotexts to mobile phones require prior consent and calls to landlines are allowed without prior consent. But there are exceptions detailed below.

Political Robocall Restrictions

Political campaign-related autodialed or prerecorded voice calls, including autodialed live calls, autodialed texts, and prerecorded voice messages, are prohibited to cell phones, pagers or other mobile devices without the called party's prior express consent. The same restrictions apply to protected phone lines such as emergency or toll-free lines, or lines serving hospitals or similar facilities.

Political campaign-related autodialed or prerecorded voice calls are permitted when made to landline telephones, even without prior express consent.

All prerecorded voice message calls, campaign-related and otherwise, must include certain identification information:

  • The identity of the business, individual, or other entity initiating the call must be clearly stated at the beginning of the prerecorded message.
  • If the calling party is a business or corporate entity, the entity's official business name must be stated clearly at the beginning of the message.
  • The telephone number of the calling party must be provided, either during or after the message.

Political Robotexts

Robotexts – text messages generated through autodialing – are also considered a type of call and fall under all robocall rules.

As text messages generally go to mobile phones, robotexts require the called party's prior express consent. However, political text messages can be sent without the intended recipient’s prior consent if the message’s sender does not use autodialing technology to send such texts and instead manually dials them.

Report Unwanted Calls and Texts

If you think you've received a political robocall or text that does not comply with the FCC’s rules, you can file an informal complaint with the FCC at fcc.gov/complaints. If you are receiving texts that you didn’t ask for, report the sender by forwarding the texts to 7726 (or "SPAM"). Campaigns should also honor opt-out requests if you reply "STOP."

Web Resources for Blocking Robocalls

Call blocking is a tool used by phone companies to stop illegal and unwanted calls from reaching your phone. A recent FCC report found that by partnering with third-party analytics companies, providers are able to block billions of unwanted calls to American consumers each year.

Phone companies sometimes block calls connected to suspicious calling patterns proactively for their customers.  Many phone companies also enable their customers to block additional unwanted calls by enrolling in a service or installing an app.  Consumers can also adjust certain settings on their phone, sign up with a third-party service, or download a third-party app to block suspected unwanted calls.

Depending on your service provider, a blocked call may go straight to your voicemail, you may hear a single ring and get caller ID information from the blocked call, or you may get no notice at all.

Many phone companies are taking advantage of FCC rules that allow consumers to be enrolled automatically in call blocking services, but you can opt-out if you are concerned about missing wanted calls.  A number of companies also offer call labeling to help consumers determine which calls they want to answer.  Labeling services display categories for potentially unwanted or illegal calls such as "spam" or "scam likely" on the caller ID display.

Contact your phone company to learn more about the blocking and labeling solutions that may be available to protect you from unwanted and illegal calls.  There may also be apps you can download for your mobile device – at little or no cost – to block or label potential spam calls.  In addition to call-blocking and labeling services, you should also check with your wireless device manufacturer about built-in features you can use to block unwanted calls from specific numbers using your cell phone’s settings.  

The resources listed below* provide information on many of the call blocking and labeling tools currently available to consumers.

Wireless/Mobile

  • AT&T: Mobile security and call protection services.
  • Google Project Fi: Call blocking options for Project Fi wireless service.
  • Sprint: Call blocking options using My Sprint.
  • T-Mobile: Call-protection options to identify or block potential scammers.
  • U.S. Cellular:  Automatic network call identification, labeling, and blocking app options.
  • Verizon:  Call Filter FAQS for screening and blocking unwanted calls.

Landline/Wireline/VoIP

  • AT&T:  Information on Digital Phone Call Protect service, call blocking, and other features.
  • CenturyLink: Customer tips and tools to block unwanted calls.
  • Comcast:  Call blocking options for XFINITY Voice subscribers.
  • Frontier Communications:  Consumer options for call blocking tools and services.
  • Spectrum:  Guide for using Nomorobo service to block robocallers.
  • Verizon:  Customer options for stopping unwanted calls to residential lines.

Third-Party Analytics Resources

  • First Orion:  Tools and services for mobile customers and businesses.
  • Hiya:  Tools and services for mobile phones; Hiya Connect for businesses.
  • Nomorobo:  Tools and services for VoIP landlines and mobile phones.
  • TNS Call Guardian:  Call analytics solutions for businesses.
  • YouMail:   Tools and services for individuals and businesses.

Wireless Device Solutions

  • Apple iPhones have an opt-in “Silence Unknown Callers” call-screening and blocking feature.
  • Google Pixel phones have a “Call Screen” call-screening and blocking feature;  Google offers several free, opt-in, call-blocking tool apps for Android phones;  and  Google Voice users can use a call management tool to block unwanted calls.  
  • Samsung partners with Hiya to offer a call-blocking solution called Smart Call to label potentially unwanted calls.

Trade Association Consumer Resources and Information

  • CTIA: Consumer resources for stopping robocalls.
  • US Telecom:  Consumer information on illegal robocalls.

*The resources listed are provided for informational purposes. The FCC does not endorse any products or services listed, and is not responsible for the content, accuracy, completeness, or timeliness of non-FCC websites.

The National Do Not Call List

The national Do Not Call list protects landline and wireless phone numbers. You can register your numbers on the national Do Not Call list at no cost by calling 1-888-382-1222 (voice) or 1-866-290-4236 (TTY). You must call from the phone number you wish to register. You can also register at donotcall.gov.

Telemarketers must remove your numbers from their call lists and stop calling you within 31 days from the date you register. Your numbers will remain on the list until you remove them or discontinue service – there is no need to re-register numbers.

Under FCC rules, telemarketers calling your home must provide their name along with the name, telephone number, and address where their employer or contractor can be contacted. Telemarketing calls to your home are prohibited before 8 am or after 9 pm, and telemarketers are required to comply immediately with any do-not-call request you make during a call.

Whether you are on the National Do Not Call Registry or not, tell unwanted callers that you do not consent to the call and to put you on their internal do not call list. Make a record of the caller's number and when you made your request not to be called, and file a complaint with the FCC if the caller does not comply with your request.


FAQs

What is a telephone solicitation?

A telephone solicitation is a telephone call that acts as an advertisement. However, some phone solicitations are permissible under FCC rules, including: calls or messages placed with your express prior permission, by or on behalf of a tax-exempt non-profit organization, or from a person or organization. However, having an established business relationship no longer meets the rules for permissible unsolicited calls to your landline phone. Companies and telemarketers must have your express permission to call.

Are there any other lists I can register my number with?

Yes. Additionally, many states now have statewide do-not-call lists for residents. Contact your state's public service commission or consumer protection office to see if your state has such a list, and to find out how to register your number or numbers. For contact information for your state public service commission, check the government listings or blue pages of your local phone directory.

If I continue to receive such calls, what can I do?

If you receive a telephone solicitation that you think violates any of the FCC rules, you can file a complaint with the FCC. The FCC can issue warning citations and impose fines against companies violating or suspected of violating the do-not-call rules, but does not award individual damages.

Printable Version

Stop Unwanted Robocalls and Texts (pdf)

Источник: https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/stop-unwanted-robocalls-and-texts

How To Use a Fake Number to Call Someone (Spoof a Phone Number)

How To Use a Fake Number to Call Someone (Spoof a Phone Number)

Call spoofing has enabled people to fake the return number that is shown by Caller IDs for many years now, and the ability to “spoof” a phone number has become widespread.

Spoofing, in simple terms, just means that the number shown on someone’s caller ID is not the actual number that is placing the call. As opposed to a fake number, spoofing a number lets callers appear to be a number more familiar with the recipient.

Common Reasons to Call Someone using a Fake Number

Quick Links

People spoof caller ID numbers for a wide variety of reasons.

  • They perform a classic prank call to their neighbor or friend.
  • They protect their privacy and phone information from being captured and sold to third parties.
  • They want a secondary number captured by recipients.
  • They want to reserve their actual phone number for their close family and friends while using a secondary number for “social media” friends and other parties.
  • They call a debt collector with a spoofed number to avoid repeated calls in the future.
  • They investigate a number they are curious about.
  • They attempt to confirm or investigate a “potential” scam call.
  • They use it to actually scam others by faking the number so the recipient thinks it is someone local, or a person or business they know.

With more and more people starting to ignore calls from unfamiliar numbers and sending them to voicemail automatically, it has made pulling off a classic prank call trickier. However, spoofing a number that the victim recognizes, has become a popular scenario for scam artists and pranksters alike.

In 2020, it’s more important than ever to practice safety when it comes to your personal identification. While it may be difficult to change your phone number on all services or registrations to a spoofed number, you can still protect your identity by making sure that your new number spreads to as many services as possible. This way, you will receive return calls on a number that can be easily disposed of if anything were ever to go wrong with the intended caller.

Is Spoofing Your Phone Number Legal?

Yes. At its core, there’s nothing illegal about the act of spoofing caller ID with a false number in the United States. It is your intentions that generally determine the legality of your actions.

  • If you hide your real number to contact a business to protect your personal information, it’s legal.
  • If you fake your phone number to investigate a potentially risky call, it is legal.
  • If you get a second phone number for specific contacts, it is legal.
  • If you hide your real number to prank a caller, it is often legal, but your actions may be considered illegal depending on location and circumstances. It can be an act of falsifying information in an attempt to harass or abuse, etc.
  • If you spoof your phone number to scam the recipient, it is questionably legal, but your intentions and actions are definitely illegal!
  • If you call from a disposable number to threaten the recipient, it is possibly illegal due to your intentions and the falsification of caller identity (trickery). However, the action of threatening the recipient is definitely illegal.

For legitimate, non-criminal motivations, you are in the clear. So using a spoofed number to trick your friend into thinking that the President is calling him on his birthday may be more or less funny depending on your sense of humor, but it is legal.

If you spoof your number to trick him into thinking he’s talking to his credit card company, and you attempt to get his card details, it is a crime.

How Can I Call Someone with a Fake Number?

There are basically three different ways to spoof a number or call.

  • You can register for a permanent number through a call forwarding website or app.
  • You can get a temporary number from sites more oriented towards “burner” numbers.
  • You can use various apps to enter a false phone number that displays on the recipient’s caller ID, while actually just using your own number to make the call.

How Do I Actually Spoof a Call with a Fake Number?

You can’t personally stop the identity leaks from happening, but by using a spoofed number, you can make the fallout a little less catastrophic. Spoofed numbers can come in two different varieties, depending on what you’re looking for. Permanent numbers don’t change or recycle and can be held by you for as long as you’ll need them.

In fact, they’re a real number, just connected to a phone you don’t answer if they’re connected to a phone at all.

Disposable numbers, on the other hand, are designed to be cycled through, used for a certain duration before being tossed in the trash. Whether or not that’s something you’re looking to use is up to you, and really, the type of number you’ll be using really depends on the scenario you find yourself in. Still, we’ll cover both options below, with some great suggestions for both free and paid spoof numbers.

Permanent Fake Numbers

While you still have to dedicate some time to managing your fake number, as you would your real number, you’re secure if your false number ever leaks online. These permanent services usually offer some amount of call blocking and restricting features. Being able to ensure your number is always in your grasp means that you can place your false number on more important documents, giving it out to your dentist or doctor for appointments, or placing it on job applications to protect your standard account service.

Permanent number services are also typically cheaper than their temporary counterparts, as you’ll discover in the next segment.

Google Voice

The first service you should take a look at for a secondary spoof number is, unsurprisingly, Google Voice. Voice is for someone looking for a secondary, web-based number that doesn’t cost anything. Google offers a desktop and mobile web client, along with dedicated clients for both iOS and Android that are sleek and regularly updated.

Google Voice allows you to use your assigned secondary number to forward calls to your primary number, all while making free phone calls throughout the United States. Your assigned number is able to be customized as well, so you can select a specific area code throughout the US, or type the last-four digits to make it easy to remember.

Talkatone

Like Google Voice, Talkatone is built around providing alternate numbers to call and text US-based users for free (and to call and text numbers outside the United States for small charges).

Talkatone even lets you change this number when you need to. This makes the service bit less permanent while simultaneously giving you more flexibility should your number get leaked online. The downside to Talkatone is ads within the app.

Textfree

Textfree has been around for nearly a decade, and you can still grab a free number through their service by signing up through the website or mobile application. You can choose your area code and memorable number patterns when signing up for a number. You can keep the number as long as you want, though you’ll need to use it once every 30 days to place a call.

There are also paid, premium options available, including Flyp, Hushed, TextNow, and Sideline.

Disposable Fake Numbers

Sometimes, you just need a number for one-time use or for a certain period. Disposable numbers are great. You can call a business or an individual, hang up the phone following your conversation, and toss the number away, leaving the person without a way to contact you again. Unfortunately, disposable numbers rarely come without a fee attached.

Burner

Burner is an app that automatically gives you a new number whenever you need one. Your number is real and can be used to call and text from within the app, and the caller ID displays your Burner info instead of your actual phone number. The app is smooth and responsive, and you get a free number for seven days upon installation. Depending on how many numbers you need and how much you’ll be using the app, Burner can get really expensive, really fast.

Flyp

Flyp offers support for multiple secondary numbers, making it easier to cycle through plans. Of course, paying the monthly fees can get expensive rather quickly. If you plan on holding multiple numbers at once, this spook call service might get costly. Still, the ability to mirror local area codes while placing a call is ideal for someone looking to spoof numbers with only one account, and with great audio quality.

Hushed

Hushed offers both permanent and disposable numbers. The app provides the ability to dispose of numbers at any time, so long as you’re paying for the service.

Hushed stands out with its end-to-end encryption when talking to other users. This makes the service the most secure phone number app on the list, and that may be important if you’re trying to hide your identity. All numbers are disposable. There’s no credit card needed to sign up for an account, and calls can be sent and received from anywhere. Hushed is also one of the more affordable paid plans.

Online Spoofing Services

There are a number of services online that provide spoofed calling numbers on a one-shot basis. That is, after you’ve registered at the site and paid the subscription fee, you can enter the number you want to call and the number that you want to appear on Caller ID.

The call will go through on your smartphone or landline, or via your web browser. You can use as many different numbers as you wish and can assign a new number for every call you make if you want.

Spoof Card

SpoofCard is reputable, and they are one of the oldest spoofing providers in the industry. SpoofCard offers a number of features, including the ability to artificially disguise your voice and even change its gender presentation. The service also provides the ability to record calls for later playback (priceless if you’re planning on pranking your friends), the addition of background noises like traffic, a nightclub, or police activity for added realism, and the ability to send calls directly to voicemail.

You can also dial multiple recipients at once, or add more people on your end of the call to listen in. SpoofCard also allows you to send spoofed SMS text messages. The service is definitely optimized for pranksters.

SpoofCard offers a 60-second free trial, offers a web version, as well as an Android app and an iOS app. Charges are based on bulk minute packages, paid as a one-off purchase, or as a monthly subscription. SpoofCard supports calls to non-US destinations but uses more credits per minute.

SpoofTel

SpoofTel is another service providing instant spoofing service on-demand. SpoofTel offers a desktop app for Windows and an iOS app. The iOS version requires a jailbroken phone.

SpoofTel has the ability to change your voice pitch and add soundboard audio to the background. SpoofTel offers SMS text message spoofing as well. Costs are based on a per-minute basis, in addition to added features like voice changing and recording.

Spoof Call

Spoof Call does not offer app versions; all calls occur via the service’s website. The service has some unique features, including call recording, voice changing software, limited background noises, group calls, and a text-to-speech converter with multiple language choices. Spoof Call is based in Europe, but the credits they sell are valid for US calls (among other locations).

What is FCC Stir Shaken?

Since 2015, a group of telecom engineers from major carriers started developing a way to stop call spoofing in its tracks. In recent years, spoofing has gone mainstream. The widespread nature of call spoofing has begun to undermine public trust in the integrity of the phone system. The engineering teams are relying on two new systems to stop it: STIR (Secure Telephone Identity Revisited) and SHAKEN (Signature-based Handling of Asserted information using tokens).

The idea behind STIR and SHAKEN is to give every phone a certificate of authenticity, a digital signature, that becomes the sole source of caller ID information. Caller ID would become trustworthy once more. The basic idea is ridiculously complicated, but here is a simplified explanation. A person places a call. That call’s data stream would contain the certificate (in digital form) that verified that the call was coming from the number it claims to be coming from.

As the phone call passes through the circuitry, the carrier would check the validity of the certificate using a public/private key system. A call whose certificate failed to pass validity would either get blocked or display a warning message in the caller ID field.

FCC mandates that all voice carriers effectively implement STIR/SHAKEN authentication by June 30, 2021.

There are other resources available at TechJunkie to help you combat call spoofing efforts.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is there a way to tell if a spoofed number is calling?

It’s highly improbable that you’ll know a number is spoofed until you answer the phone call. If someone is spoofing a number that you’re familiar with, you probably won’t know that’s what’s happening until you pick up the call.

If the number calling is unfamiliar to you but spoofed using the same area code as your phone number, you can do a reverse lookup on the phone number. If the number is spoofed, the search results will turn up no information. Also, calling a spoofed number back will likely result in a busy signal rather than actually getting to talk to someone.

How do I avoid being scammed?

Spoofed numbers can be incredibly tricky, it gives any scammers the upper-hand. If you receive a phone call from a company asking for any personal information, it’s best to hang up and call the company from a phone number that you’re familiar with.

AT&T for example had an issue with their customer service number being spoofed. The scammers would offer bill credits but they’d need the account Passcode to access the account. Most reputable companies will never ask you for any information if they call you.

The FCC warns that scams resulting from spoofed numbers usually happen after a natural disaster, or to gain access to your credit information.

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Источник: https://www.techjunkie.com/fake-number-call-someone-spoof/

I groggily answered the ringing phone at 6am, and was alarmed to hear an official-sounding robotic voice. “This is the alert system with Visa (or Mastercard) account services!” It went on to tell me that there were two suspicious charges to my Visa card. It went on to describe the charges, which were in the hundreds of dollars. Press 1 to accept these charges, press 2 to reject them and be connected to a customer service representative. Find out what to do instead, so you don’t fall prey to this new credit card scam.

This post may contain affiliate links, which means I make a small commission if you decide to purchase something through that link. This has no cost to you, and in some cases may give you a discount off the regular price. If you do make a purchase, thank you for supporting my blog! I only recommend products and services that I truly believe in, and all opinions expressed are my own. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Please read my disclaimers for more information.

Key Takeaways:

  • Be suspicious if you get an automated call from Visa about charges, especially if it is outside of regular bank business hours.
  • Do NOT press 1 or 2 or anything else – hang up instead.
  • Do NOT call the phone number they give you to verify the legitimacy.
  • If you are unsure whether the call is legitimate, phone the Visa or Mastercard number on the back of your credit card.

Keep reading for more details about this Visa scam phone call. Prevent falling for this and other common fraud calls. And the essential steps you must take if you think you might be a victim of fraud.

How this Visa Scam Call Works

  1. They time their calls for the early hours of the morning. My call was about 6am. Others report having calls anywhere between 5am and 7:30. The hope of the scammers is that because you are groggy and half asleep, your guard will be down. That can make you more vulnerable to fall for their scam.
  2. The automated call from Visa about charges sounds official – “this is an important message regarding your credit card account”. It sounds exactly like when you call the bank and get their robotic system before connecting to a human. This was high quality!
  3. The call states that unauthorized charges have already been made to your credit card account. (This is a lie! No charges have been made to your credit card.) The automated voice describes the charges, including the amount, which is in the hundreds of dollars. The fraudulent charges are high enough to be alarming.
  4. The call then gives you the choice to accept the charges by pressing 1, or preventing the charges, by pressing 2. Naturally they expect people will press 2, because these charges don’t exist!
  5. At that point, you are connected to a person, who will “help” you. This is where they start phishing for information. In my case, I hung up because I was exhausted, and I’d already declared the charges were not valid. I did not yet realize I was being scammed, but I decided to phone back later in the day.
  6. Reports describe how the fake credit card representative will then ask you which bank your credit card is for. They then ask you if the card starts with the following 4 numbers. Yes it does! That’s because all credit cards from that bank start with those four digits!
  7. Now that you’re comfortable that the bank is “legit”, they ask you for the remaining digits in your credit card, to confirm with their system. THIS IS YOU GIVING THE SCAMMERS YOUR CREDIT CARD NUMBER! Presumably they then ask you to give them the expiry date and possibly the PIN on the back of the card.
  8. The credit card scammers now have all the information they need to place fraudulent charges on your credit card.

How this Scam can get Worse!

There are a few different ways this credit card scam can get worse, according to a recent article from Greedyrates.

Call-Back Request: The scammers may ask you to hang up and call the bank’s 1-800 number on the back of your credit card to prove the call is legitimate. However, they don’t hang up the phone, and instead play a dial tone sound. So you think you’re calling the bank, but you get the same scammer when they “answer”. At this point, they may ask you to transfer your funds to a “safe” account while they investigate. Now they have your bank account funds AND your credit card number!

Transaction Review Request: The “investigator” asks you to give remote access of your computer to them so they can “review suspicious transactions”. Now they have access to anything on your computer, including your online banking, AND your credit card number!

Bank Investigator: The scammer asks you to “help” them catch the criminal, sometimes described as a dishonest employee, by accepting a deposit and then transferring it back to them. The deposit, however, is fake, so you end up transferring your own funds to them. Now they have your bank account funds AND your credit card number!

Components of a Credit Card Number

This section is just for those who are interested in diving into the rabbit hole of learning about credit card numbers. If you’re not that interested, feel free to skip ahead to the next section!

The first digit of your credit card number is the Major Industry Identifier (MII). For example, an MII of 4 indicates a Visa card. AMEX starts with 3, Mastercard starts with 5, Discover Card starts with 6.

Digits 1-6 are called the Issuer Identification Number (IIN) or Bank Identification Number (BIN). It indicates the bank that issues the card, whether it’s a business or personal card, what region or country it was issued in, etc. For example, 4520-34 indicate this is a TD Canada Trust Visa card, issued in Canada. For banks with more than one IIN, cards of the same type and same region will generally have the same IIN. (See more at Credit Card Validator and Credit Card Review.)

Digits 7-15 are your Primary Account Number (PAN), and are unique to your account.

BMO Air Miles Mastercard

Digit 16 is the last number on most credit cards. This is the check digit, that allows for easy verification of the number. It helps to detect typos, or transposing digits. That is, entering “1324” instead of “1234” for part of your credit card number. If you want to go down an even deeper rabbit hole, you can read more about the Luhn Algorithm for credit card validation.

The credit card scam people know the IINs for all the banks. They say they’re calling about a Visa card, and then you confirm that you do have a TD Canada Trust Visa. So when they say, “I’m confirming that your card starts with 4520”, you will confirm that it is, in fact, your card.

How Long has this Credit Card Scam been Around?

A July 2020 article from Greedyrates reports “RCMP Warns of New Credit Card Scam”

However, I found a report from the CBC in January 2015 in an article called “New credit card phishing scam hits Canada”. In the article, a call-taker from the anti-fraud department states that this phishing scam has been “quite successful”.

While it may have been around for a few years, this is the first I have heard of it. It certainly seems less common than the Canada Revenue Agency scam, which I get weekly. Or people wanting to clean my air ducts – we don’t even have air ducts, as our old house has hot water radiator heating.

Is Fraud a Big Problem in Canada?

The best source of information on this is the Government of Canada’s Anti-Fraud Centre.

In the first 8 months of 2021, over 50,000 Canadians reported fraud attempts. There were more than 36,000 victims of fraud, who lost more than $140 million! That works out to an average loss of almost $4,000 per victim.

And the situation is worsening. In 2019, nearly 20,000 Canadians lost over $102 million. In 2020, over 42,000 Canadians were victims of fraud, and lost a total of $106 million. At only 8 months into 2021, Canadians have lost over $140 million to fraud!

Clearly fraud is a profitable business for the crooks. And victims are losing substantial amounts of money, which can be life changing.

How does Visa Notify you of Suspicious Activity?

This is the tricky part of this phone call scam. Because Visa will legitimately call you if they detect suspicious charges on your account.

However, remember that the real Visa already has your account information. They know your name, credit card number, expiry date, and the 3-digit code on the back. They will never ask you to tell them this information.

How to Prevent Becoming a Victim of Credit Card Scams or Other Fraud

There are many things you can do to prevent becoming a victim of fraud:

  • Don’t be afraid to say “NO”, or to hang up on a call
  • Do your research, verify the organisation is legitimate
  • Be wary of plays on your emotion – “Gran, it’s me! I’ve been in an accident and I need money quickly!”
  • Don’t give out personal information, especially on unsolicited calls
  • Don’t carry unnecessary ID or credit cards in your purse or wallet – this minimizes how much a thief can steal
  • Never leave your purse or wallet unattended in a public place (including work, shopping carts, parties, restaurants, and church); never leave your purse or wallet in view in your car, even if it’s locked
  • Use a shredder to destroy mail with personal information such as your credit card statements, including pre-approved credit card offers that you do not want
  • Be wary of upfront fees – there are NO prize fees or taxes in Canada
  • Protect your computer: watch out for spoofed emails; be careful when clicking on attachments or links; never click on urgent-looking messages that pop up while you’re browsing online; never give strangers remote access to your computer
  • Be careful who you share images with; disconnect or cover your webcam when you are not using it (hackers can get remote access and record you)
  • Know who you’re dealing with
  • Watch for anomalies in your finances or credit score and report immediately
  • For businesses, limit your employees’ authority by only allowing a small number of staff to approve purchases and pay bills

If you don’t already track your credit score, you can do that for free with Borrowell! Your credit report can alert you to any fraud or identity theft if someone takes out a loan or a credit card in your name.

Borrowell Credit Score and Report Banners

Sources: TransUnion, The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre

What to do if you Think you are a Victim of Fraud

Please know that you are not alone. Remember that there were over 42,000 victims of fraud in Canada in 2020, and it looks like we’re on track for even more in 2021.

Fraud can go unreported because victims are embarrassed. By reporting the fraud you are helping the authorities to catch the perpetrators. And you can prevent someone else from becoming a victim.

The most important first step is to remain calm. Of course it’s natural to be upset! But a clear head right now is important.

Start with gathering any evidence: documents, receipts, bank statements, copies of emails or text messages if applicable.

Next, contact your financial institutions. The phone numbers are on the back of your credit and debit cards, and your bank statements. Ask them to place flags on all of your accounts. Then change all your banking passwords.

Report the fraud to both credit bureaus, Equifax and TransUnion.

Contact your local police. Remember that 911 is for emergencies only, but there will be a local phone number you can call. Also report the fraud to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre toll free at 1-888-495-8501 or through the Fraud Reporting System.

If your government issued ID has been stolen, contact the appropriate level of government in your province or territory:

  • National government issued ID includes: passport, immigration documents, social insurance number
  • Provincial government issued ID includes: driver’s licence, health card, birth certificate

Protect yourself from future fraud. Once you have been a victim, you may be targeted again. Sign up for free with Borrowell to track your credit report, which can alert you if someone tries to take out credit in your name.

Borrowell Credit Score and Report Banners

Did I Become a Victim to this 6am Credit Card Scam?

The phone call woke me up at 6am. The professional-sounding automated voice said two charges had been made to my Visa. It described them, then asked me to press 1 to approve the charges or 2 to decline them. Of course I pressed 2. It then said it was transferring me to a Visa representative who would help me.

At this point, I was so tired I didn’t think I could speak to someone, and I had already indicated they should decline the charges. So I hung up.

At no point did I think this call was fraudulent!

Later in the day, I phoned the number on the back of my Visa cards. (I have business Visas at two different banks for companies I work for. We use Mastercard and Amex for our personal cards.)

The first bank rep recited the most recent purchases, which were legitimate, and did not include the items listed when I got a call from Visa this morning.

So I called the second Visa number. This rep said, “We’re getting a lot of calls about early morning credit card scams!” There were no suspicious charges on this card either.

Thankfully, I unwittingly did the right thing! I hung up on the scam call, and phoned my bank using the number on the back of the card.

I did NOT become the next victim of a credit card scam.

2021 update: I have received the same scam phone call several more times. These calls from the Visa Mastercard alert system seem to be more prevalent than ever.

Источник: https://moneyinyourtea.com/credit-card-scam/

Robocalls and scam calls persist during pandemic, so Americans have stopped answering the phone


Is it safe to answer the phone? Short answer: No. It’s probably a robocall spammer.

Sometimes, they claim Social Security Administration or the Internal Revenue Service is on the line. (They aren't; neither service will ever threaten you or demand immediate payment on the phone.) Or they call saying your car's warranty is expiring and that your credit card interest rate could be lowered.

Three out of 4 Americans said they were targeted by phone scammers over the past year, finds a survey done for Hiya, which provides cloud-based phone call performance management services for companies including AT&T and Samsung.

The bombardment of robocalls, many of which come from scammers seeking to bilk you out of money, has led many to simply not answer their phone when the caller is unknown.

And for good reason. On average, those who fall for scam calls lose $182, with some losing more than $500, according to the survey of more than 2,000 consumers and 300 business professionals conducted Dec. 23-29, 2020, for Hiya by market research firm Censuswide.

Apple Maps: App includes accident, speed trap reporting in iOS 14.5 update

True or false: You should reboot your computer every day

The robocall and scam call deluge has led many to just avoid answering their phone – about 94% of those surveyed said they let unidentified incoming calls go unanswered. That comes at a time – during the coronavirus pandemic – when consumer and business use of voice calls nearly tripled, increasing 184%, says Hiya's "State of the Call 2021" report.

"Businesses are using the voice call more than ever to reach customers and the public are picking up the phone to connect with friends, family and colleagues," said Hiya CEO Alex Algard in the report, out Friday. "At the same time, this crucial communication tool is being hijacked by hackers and scammers, exploiting our need to feel connected and informed."

Robocalls keep on coming

The robocall bonanza shows no signs of slowing. More than 4 billion robocalls targeted phones across the U.S. in January, a 3.7% increase over the month of December, according to YouMail, a company that provides anti-robocall services.

During January, robocalls averaged 129.5 million calls daily, according to YouMail's Robocall Index, or about 1,500 calls each second.

Robocalls did decline in 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the closing of some call centers, YouMail says in its report. The estimated 45.9 billion robocalls to consumers in 2020, however, was 50% more than in 2017, the company says.

But the robocall volumes "appear to be resuming their slow journey back toward their pre-pandemic levels," said YouMail CEO Alex Quilici in the report. YouMail offers a free robocall blocking app for mobile phones. 

During the coronavirus pandemic, new types of phone scams have arisen including those promising tests and cures, expedited stimulus payments and texts about COVID-19 support and pandemic tracing.

But many of the traditional scams remain tops and have more targets since many Americans are at home and using their smartphones as their main communications device for work and personal calls. 

"The reality of it is the fraudsters are always changing tactics," said Hiya president Kush Parikh. "They are always trying to figure how to pounce on whatever the latest trend is and obviously right now there’s fraud happening around vaccinations. There’s this cat-and-mouse game always happening."

The harms of not answering

The amount of consumers not answering unidentified calls (94%) is significantly higher than a year ago (72%), Hiya found. It may seem counterintuitive, but that increased rate of unanswered calls can lead to more calls being initiated.

Businesses have expensive call centers, too, and when calls aren't answered, "whether that’s customer service or sales … if people end up not answering those calls what do they end up doing? They call more," Parikh said. "So legitimate businesses not just fraudsters are actually calling more because people are answering less." 

Public health can be impacted, too, as COVID-19 vaccine scams have more than doubled since September, Hiya's data finds. Scammers can take advantage of interest in getting vaccinated – and confusion about the vaccination process – to lure victims.

Hiya estimates it saved its corporate and consumer customers about $2.3 billion in 2020. But that doesn't take into account the lost time that scam victims spend extricating themselves from scams. Add that in and the lost funds and productivity to scam calls likely surpassed $10 billion last year, Parikh said.

Regulators, wireless providers and security companies have focused on blocking robocalls. 

The Federal Communications Commission and Federal Trade Commission have fined phone companies allowing coronavirus-related robocall scams. The FTC has worked with the Justice Department to block illegal robocalls and the FCC is requiring phone companies to adopt new caller ID features by June 30, 2021. Those actions would combat "spoofing," where a false caller ID makes a call appear to be coming from a nearby location.

How to rebuff robocalls

  • Hang up. If you answer the phone and hear a recorded message, you can hang up. It's likely a scammer.
  • Use call blocking technology. Wireless providers including AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon have also adopted technology to block calls from getting to consumers, so check with your provider about possible call blocking features. 
  • Check the number. Remember, a scammer can make their call look like its coming from a local number.
  • Read up on robocalls. For more information about robocalls, scam calls and call blocking go to the FCC website and FTC website.

Follow Mike Snider on Twitter: @MikeSnider.

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Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2021/02/12/robocalls-scammers-fraud-phone-calls-increase-fcc-ftc-efforts/6706727002/

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Entreprenuers Have More Than One Hustle

Robocalls and scam calls persist during pandemic, so Americans have stopped answering the phone


Is it safe to answer the phone? Short answer: No. It’s probably a robocall spammer.

Sometimes, they claim Social Security Administration or the Internal Revenue Service is on the line. (They aren't; neither service will ever threaten you or demand immediate payment on the phone.) Or they call saying your car's warranty is expiring and that your credit card interest rate could be lowered.

Three out of 4 Americans said they were targeted by phone scammers over the past year, finds a survey done for Hiya, which provides cloud-based phone call performance management services for companies including AT&T and Samsung.

The bombardment of robocalls, many of which come from scammers seeking to bilk you out of money, has led many to simply not answer their phone when the caller is unknown.

And for good reason. On average, those who fall for scam calls lose $182, with some losing more than $500, according to the survey of more than 2,000 consumers and 300 business professionals conducted Dec. 23-29, 2020, for Hiya by market research firm Censuswide.

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The robocall and scam call deluge has led many to just avoid answering their phone – about 94% of those phone call account services said they let unidentified incoming calls go unanswered. That comes at a time – during the coronavirus pandemic – when consumer and business use of voice calls nearly tripled, increasing 184%, says Hiya's "State of the Call 2021" report.

"Businesses are using the voice call more than ever to reach customers and the public are picking up the phone to connect with friends, family and colleagues," said Hiya CEO Alex Algard in the report, out Friday. "At the same time, this crucial communication fifththird com login is being hijacked by hackers and scammers, exploiting our need to feel connected and informed."

Robocalls keep on coming

The robocall bonanza shows no signs of slowing. More than 4 billion robocalls targeted phones across the U.S. in January, a 3.7% increase over the month of December, according to YouMail, a company that provides anti-robocall services.

During January, robocalls averaged 129.5 million calls guaranty rv sales junction city or, according to YouMail's Robocall Index, or about 1,500 calls each second.

Robocalls did decline in 2020 as the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in the closing of some call centers, YouMail says in its report. The walmart one wire com 45.9 billion robocalls to consumers in 2020, however, was 50% more than in 2017, the company says.

But the robocall volumes "appear to be resuming their slow journey back toward their pre-pandemic levels," said YouMail CEO Alex Quilici in the report. YouMail offers a free robocall blocking app for mobile phones. 

During the coronavirus pandemic, new types of phone scams have arisen including those promising tests and cures, expedited stimulus payments and texts about COVID-19 support and pandemic tracing.

But many of the traditional scams remain tops and have more targets since many Americans are at home and using their smartphones as their main communications device for work and personal calls. 

"The reality of it is the fraudsters are always changing tactics," said Hiya president Kush Parikh. "They are always trying to figure how to pounce on whatever the latest trend is and obviously right now there’s fraud happening around vaccinations. There’s this cat-and-mouse game always happening."

The harms of not answering

The amount of consumers not answering unidentified calls (94%) is significantly higher than a year ago (72%), Hiya found. It may seem counterintuitive, but that increased rate of unanswered calls can lead to more calls being initiated.

Businesses have expensive call centers, too, and when phone call account services aren't answered, "whether that’s customer service or sales … if people end up not answering those calls what do they end up doing? They call more," Parikh said. "So legitimate businesses not just fraudsters are actually calling more because people are answering less." 

Public health can be impacted, too, as COVID-19 vaccine scams have more than doubled since September, Hiya's data finds. Scammers can take advantage of interest in getting vaccinated – and confusion about the vaccination process – to lure victims.

Hiya estimates it saved its corporate and consumer customers about $2.3 billion in 2020. But that doesn't take into account the lost time that scam victims spend extricating themselves from scams. Add that in and the lost funds and productivity to scam calls likely surpassed $10 billion last year, Parikh said.

Regulators, wireless providers and security companies have focused on blocking robocalls. 

The Federal Communications Commission and Federal Trade Commission have fined phone companies allowing coronavirus-related robocall scams. The FTC has worked with the Justice Department to block illegal robocalls and the FCC is requiring phone companies to adopt new caller ID features by June 30, 2021. Those actions would combat "spoofing," where a false caller ID makes a call appear to be coming from a nearby location.

How to rebuff robocalls

  • Hang up. If you answer the phone and hear a recorded message, you can hang up. It's likely a scammer.
  • Use call blocking technology. Wireless providers including AT&T, T-Mobile and Verizon have also adopted technology to block calls from getting to consumers, so check with your provider about possible call blocking features. 
  • Check the number. Remember, a scammer can make their call look like its coming from a local number.
  • Read up on robocalls. For more information about robocalls, scam calls and call blocking go to the FCC website and FTC website.

Follow Mike Snider on Twitter: @MikeSnider.

SMSFacebookTwitterEmail

Источник: https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2021/02/12/robocalls-scammers-fraud-phone-calls-increase-fcc-ftc-efforts/6706727002/

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The inmate must complete and sign an Offender Telephone List – Inmate Phone Policy “Indiana Code – 11-8-2-5(a)(8), identifying no more than 20 names and the telephone numbers of who could be called.

The 20 names are for 20 individuals, regardless of whether they have the same telephone number.

There are several ways to receive calls from inmates, including collect, prepaid collect, and inmate debit calls. Inmates have the option of placing collect calls to telephone numbers approved by the correctional facility. Collect calls are billed to the called party every month through their phone carrier company.

If you receive a high number of collect calls, you may have reached the billing limit allowed by your local phone company. Once you reach a maximum phone bill amount, you may be at a risk of being blocked from receiving future collect calls from an inmate. In such instances, you can call GTL at 800-483-8314 to sign up for a prepaid calling account and begin receiving calls again.

You can sign up for a prepaid calling account today if you experience any of the following:

• You have a collect call restriction by your local phone provider
• You have exceeded the collect call limit
• You are unable to receive inmate calls on your cell phone, office phone call account services, hospital phone or other commercial phone numbers
• Your local telephone company does not bill for inmate collect calls
• Your phone number is blocked from receiving inmate collect calls
• You have a high collect call bill and want to manage your calling budget

Please note in order to receive calls to cell phones, inmates must call either prepaid collect or use their inmate debit calling account.

Источник: https://www.gtl.net/in-telephone-service/

Scammers can use the internet to make calls from all over the world. They don’t care if you’re on the National Do Not Call Registry. That’s why your best defense against unwanted calls is call blocking and call labeling. Which type of call-blocking or call-labeling technology you use will depend on the phone — whether it’s a cell phone, a home phone that makes calls over the internet (VoIP), or a traditional landline.

What Are Call Blocking and Call Labeling?

When we talk about call blocking, it means technologies or devices that can stop a lot of the unwanted calls you get — like scam calls and illegal robocalls — before they reach you. Cell phones, home phones that make calls over the internet (VoIP), and landlines each have their own call-blocking options. Just know that call-blocking services could block some legitimate calls.

Some companies also offer call labeling. Call-labeling services show categories like “spam” or “scam likely” on your phone’s screen for incoming calls. Then you can decide whether to answer the call.

Block Calls on a Cell Phone

Watch this video on how to stop calls on your cell phone

Download a call-blocking app

One of the best ways to block unwanted calls on a cell phone is to download a call-blocking app. A call-blocking app acts like a filter. The company behind the app uses call data or reports from users, the FTC, and other sources to predict which calls are illegal or likely scams. The app then intercepts those calls before they reach you. Some apps are free, but others you have to pay for.

To get a call-blocking app

  • Go to the online app store for your phone’s operating system (iOS (Apple), Android, etc.) and look at ratings for different apps.
  • Look online for expert reviews on call-blocking apps.
  • Check out apps listed at ctia.org, a website for the U.S. wireless communications industry. The site lists apps specific to Android, BlackBerry, iOS (Apple), or Windows

Apps typically let you choose how to respond to calls flagged as scams. Calls might

  • be stopped
  • ring silently
  • go straight to voicemail

Apps also can let you do things like

  • block calls based on the geographic location or area code of the incoming call
  • let you create lists of numbers to block, or phone call account services of numbers to let through
  • send a prewritten text message to the caller
  • report it to the FTC, phone call account services you can do at DoNotCall.gov, or, if you lost money to the scammer, at ReportFraud.ftc.gov

Some apps access your contacts list, so know whether that’s important to you. The app’s privacy policy should explain how it gets and uses your information.

Check the built-in features of your phone

Many cell phones come with settings that let you block calls from specific numbers, though there might be a limit to how many numbers you can block. Cell phones also typically have features like Do Not Disturb, where you can set hours during which calls will go straight to voicemail.

See what services your phone provider offers

Check your phone provider’s website or call customer service to find out what call-blocking or call-labeling services it offers or recommends. Some services are free, but others might charge you a fee.

For links to company-specific information about blocking calls, go to the FCC’s Call Blocking Resources.

Block Calls on a Home Phone That Uses the Internet (VoIP)

First find out if your phone uses the internet (VoIP)

It’s possible you have VoIP service on your home phone and don’t know it. VoIP stands for Voice over Internet Protocol, and it simply means that your phone makes calls over the internet, not over phone lines. If you’re not sure what you have, check with your phone provider. But if you get your phone service through a cable company, or use a phone/internet/cable bundle, you probably have VoIP service. If you find out you don’t have internet-based phone service, skip down to the advice on blocking calls on a traditional landline.

Read expert reviews on internet-based call-blocking services

Internet-based call-blocking services can block unwanted calls on phones that use the internet. Your phone provider might be able to recommend a specific service. But you also can search online for expert reviews. Some services are free and some charge you each month.

Some internet-based services and phone apps require all calls to be routed through their service, where they are instantly analyzed. You may have choices about how unwanted calls are handled. For example, unwanted calls might

  • be stopped
  • ring silently
  • go straight to a separate voicemail
  • go to a spam folder

See what your phone provider offers

Check your phone provider’s website or call customer service to find out what your options are or if there’s a service it recommends. Some phone providers offer these services for free, but some charge a fee.

For links to company-specific information about blocking calls, go to the FCC’s Call Blocking Resources.

Block Calls on a Traditional Landline

Watch this video on how to stop calls on your home phone

Install a call blocking-device

If your home phone is a traditional landline that doesn’t use the internet (VoIP), you can buy and install a call-blocking device. Call-blocking devices are typically small boxes you attach to your phone.

Some devices use databases of known scam numbers but let you add numbers you want blocked. Other devices rely on you to create and update your own list of numbers to block.

Some use lists to

  • stop unwanted calls
  • divert calls to voicemail
  • show a blinking light when an unwanted call comes in
  • connect callers to a recording with options so a real caller can still get through

Some devices also use lists of approved numbers. That helps you limit which calls get through, or lets you set up “do not disturb” hours during which calls go straight to voicemail. Other devices try to weed out robocalls by playing a prerecorded message prompting callers to press a number to continue the call.

See what services your phone provider offers

Some services are free, but some charge a fee.

For links to company-specific information about blocking calls, go to the FCC’s Call Blocking Resources.

What About the National Do Not Call Registry?

The National Do Not Call Registry is designed to stop sales calls from real companies that follow the law. The Registry is a list that tells telemarketers what numbers not to call. The FTC does not and cannot block calls. Scammers don’t care if you’re on the Registry.

Even though the Registry can’t stop all of the unwanted calls you’re getting, being on the Registry could breakfast restaurants in kill devil hills nc the number of calls you get and make it easier for you to spot illegal calls. If a caller is ignoring the Registry, there’s a good chance it’s a scam. Even if it’s not a scam, you don’t want to do business with or give your information to someone calling you illegally.

What About Robocalls?

If you answer the phone and hear a recorded message instead of a live person, it's a robocall. Robocalls trying to sell you something are illegal unless the company trying to sell you something got your written permission, directly from you, to call you that way. If someone is already breaking the law by robocalling you without permission, there’s a good chance it’s a scam. At the very least, it’s a company you don’t want to do business with.

Call blocking can help stop robocalls from scammers. But some robocalls might still get through. If you get an illegal robocall, hang up. Don’t press a number, which could lead to more robocalls. Then report it to the FTC. Some robocalls are legal and don’t require your permission, like purely informational messages, political calls, or calls from charities. But if they try to also sell you something on the call, it becomes an illegal robocall.

Learn more at ftc.gov/robocalls.

Calls From Fake Numbers — or “Spoofing”

Call blocking technology can sometimes stop calls from scammers who can make fake names or numbers show up on your caller ID. Scammers often use these “spoofed” names and numbers in government impersonator scams to make you think it’s the IRS or law enforcement calling. Then they try to convince you to wire money or pay them with gift cards. Learn more about common phone scams.

In something known as neighbor spoofing, scammers display a number with your area code. They often match the first six digits of your phone number, thinking that you’ll be more likely to answer the call. Often the faked name and number belong to a real person who has no idea their information is being misused.

Report Unwanted Calls

If you didn’t lose money and just want to report a call, you can use the streamlined reporting form at DoNotCall.gov.

If you’ve lost money to a phone scam or have information about the company or scammer who called you, report it at ReportFraud.ftc.gov.

Report the number that received the call, the number that appears on your caller ID — even if you think it might be fake — and any number you’re told to call back. Also report the exact date and time of the call, if you’re able to. The FTC analyzes complaint data and trends to identify illegal callers based on calling patterns. We also use additional information you report, like any names or numbers you’re told to call back, to track down scammers.

We take the illegal callers’ phone numbers you report and release them to the public each business day. This helps phone companies and other partners that are working on call-blocking and call-labeling solutions. Your reports also help law enforcement identify the people behind illegal calls.

Источник: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/articles/how-block-unwanted-calls

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The calling tool enables you to connect over the phone with your contacts in the CRM. You can register a phone number to make calls using HubSpot's calling tool while still retaining use of that number with your existing carrier. You can also integrate with a third-party calling partner. Set up call recording for your account so your team's calls are recorded and accessible in the calls index page for review. If you're a user in a Sales Hub or Service Hub Enterprise account, turn on Conversation Intelligence (CI) to automatically record, transcribe, and review calls made in HubSpot.

Register & manage phone numbers

The process for registering a phone number is user-specific; while multiple users can use the same number in your account, each user must register the phone number individually. You can register a phone number to make calls using HubSpot's calling tool while still retaining use of that number with your existing carrier. Before you food banks in camden nj a phone number, make sure your country issupported for calling.

Register phone number with HubSpot

  • In your HubSpot account, click the settingssettings icon in the main navigation bar.
  • In the left sidebar menu, navigate to General.
  • Click the Calling tab.
  • If calling hasn't been turned on in your account, click Connect calling.

turn-on-calling

  • To register your phone number, click Add phone number.
  • In the dialog box, enter yourphone numberand an extension (if applicable).
  • You can choose how the verification code is delivered to you. Select the SMS message or Phone call radio button.
  • Click Text me or Call me.

You'llreceive an SMS message or phone callto verify that you have access to the phone number. When prompted, enter the verification code that appears on your screen.

verify-your-phone-number

Your phone number will then be listed in your calling settings and you can use itmake calls in HubSpot. To add additional phone numbers, click Add phone numbers. The first number that you add will automatically become the default, but to change the default number, click the star next to the desired phone number. Or, click Delete next to the number to remove it as an option for calling.

Use a third-party calling provider

If you have an assignedSales HuborService HubProfessionalorEnterpriseseat, you can set up a Twilio Connect account to make calls in HubSpot, purchase additional calling minutes, and make calls to countries that are not included on the supported country list.

Or, you can connect a third-party calling provider to HubSpot to make calls. You can integrate with a provider listed on the App Marketplace that supports third-party calling and related functionality, or work with a developer to connect your own calling app using the Calling Extension SDK.

Reconnect HubSpot calling

If you enabled calling a month ago and have not registered any new numbers or made any calls inthe past seven days, the calling tool will be disabled in your account. Before your calling tool is disabled, you'll be notified by email and will have seven days from when you were first notified to opt out of having your calling tool disabled.

reconnect-to-hubspot-calling

To keep your calling tool active, click Keep my calling account activated in the notification email. You will then be redirected to your account's calling settings and will see a notification banner indicating if your calling account is still active.

Turn on call recording

Turn on call recording to capture the call's audio. The ability to record calls is an account-wide setting, affecting all users who are making calls in the account. It can be turned on or off by auser with Account access permissions. Before turning on call recording, learn more about call recording laws.

  • In your HubSpot account, click the settingssettings icon in the main navigation bar.
  • In the left sidebar menu, navigate toObjects>Activities.
  • On theCalltab, select theAllow call recordingcheckbox.If this setting is turned off, the Record button will not appear when making a call. If you are not seeing the option to record, check with the other admins in your account to see if they have turned this setting off.

allow-call-recording

Turn on Conversation Intelligence (Sales Hub or Service Hub Enterprise only)

If you're a Super admin in a Sales Hub orService Hub Enterprise account, you can also turn on Conversation Intelligence (CI) to automatically transcribe and analyze calls. This includes calls made through the calling tool, using HubSpot's can i exchange my gamestop gift card for cash with Zoom, or using a connected third-party calling provider that supports CI. Using CI in HubSpot, you can:

  • Review recorded calls using call speaker tracks, sharing options, transcripts, and search capabilities.
  • Access a full list of your team's calls in your calls home. These calls are filterable by call properties such as user, team, call outcome, and duration.
  • Search across all recorded calls for key terms within global search.
  • Preview call details on associated records for added context.

Please note:only calls made by users with an assigned Sales Hub or Service HubEnterprise paid seat will be automatically transcribed. Any user in a Sales Hub or Service HubEnterprise account can access the call recording and transcript for coaching.

To turn on CI in HubSpot:

  • In your HubSpot account, click the settingssettings icon in the main navigation bar.
  • In the left sidebar menu, navigate to Objects > Activities.
  • In the Transcription and analysis section, click Turn on transcription and analysis.
turn-on-transcription-and-analysis-1
  • When turning on CI, you can also opt-in to use your account's data to improve the quality of your call transcripts. In the dialog box, select the Help improve your transcriptions checkbox. If you don't turn this on when setting up CI, you can navigate back to your calling settings at any time to turn it on later. Learn more about how HubSpot uses data to improve the quality of your transcripts.

transcript-and-analysis-with-improve-transcripts-setting

  • Click Turn on transcription and analysis.

If you're using HubSpot's integration with Zoom to make calls, make sure cloud recording is turned on in your Zoom account.

 

Turn off calling for all users

Super admins can turn off calling for all users in the account. This is useful if your team switches to a different calling tool and you want to make sure every user stops using the built-in calling tool. 

  • In your HubSpot account, click the settingssettings icon in the main navigation bar.
  • In the left sidebar menu, navigate to Objects Activities
  • Click Turn off calling for all users

turn-off-calling-for-users

  • In the dialog box, type turn off in the text field, then click Turn off

Users will no longer have access to HubSpot's calling tool and all registered numbers will be disconnected. Any existing call engagements will still be available on your records' timelines. You will still be able to use Twilio Connect or another third-party integration to make calls. 

Источник: https://knowledge.hubspot.com/calling/manage-phone-numbers-registered-for-calling

I groggily answered the ringing phone at 6am, and was alarmed to hear an official-sounding robotic voice. “This is the alert system with Visa (or Mastercard) account services!” It went on to tell me that there were two suspicious charges to my Visa card. It went on to describe the charges, which were in the hundreds of dollars. Press 1 to accept these charges, press 2 to reject them and be connected to a customer service representative. Find out what to do instead, so you don’t fall prey to this new credit card scam.

This post may contain affiliate links, which means I make a small commission if you decide to purchase something through that link. This has no cost to you, and in some cases may give you a discount off the regular price. If you do make a purchase, thank you for supporting my blog! I only recommend products and services that I truly believe in, and all opinions expressed are my own. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Please read my disclaimers for more information.

Key Takeaways:

  • Be suspicious if you get an automated call from Visa about charges, especially if it is outside of regular jobs amazon near me business hours.
  • Do NOT press 1 or 2 or anything else – hang up instead.
  • Do NOT call the phone number they give you to verify the legitimacy.
  • If you are unsure whether the call is legitimate, phone the Visa or Mastercard number on the back of your credit card.

Keep reading for more details about this Visa scam phone call. Prevent falling for this and other common fraud calls. And the essential steps you must take if you think you might be a victim of fraud.

How this Visa Scam Call Works

  1. They time their calls for the early hours of the morning. My call was about 6am. Others report having calls anywhere between 5am and 7:30. The hope of the scammers is that because you are groggy and half asleep, your guard will be down. That can make you more vulnerable to fall for their scam.
  2. The automated call from Visa about charges sounds official – “this is an important message regarding your credit card account”. It sounds exactly like when you call the bank and get their robotic system before connecting to a human. This was high quality!
  3. The call states that unauthorized charges have already been made to your credit card account. (This is a lie! No charges have been made to your credit card.) The automated voice describes the charges, including the amount, which is in the hundreds of dollars. The fraudulent charges are high enough to be alarming.
  4. The call then gives you the choice to accept the charges by pressing 1, or preventing the charges, by pressing 2. Naturally they expect people will press 2, because these charges don’t phone call account services that point, you are connected to a person, who will “help” you. This is where they start phishing for information. In my case, I hung up because I was exhausted, and I’d already declared the charges were not valid. I did not yet realize I was being scammed, but I decided to phone back later in the day.
  5. Reports describe how the fake credit card representative will then ask you which bank your credit card is for. They then ask you if the card starts with the following 4 numbers. Yes it does! That’s because all credit cards from that bank start with those four digits!
  6. Now that you’re comfortable that the bank is “legit”, they ask you for the remaining digits in your credit card, to confirm with their system. THIS IS YOU GIVING THE SCAMMERS YOUR CREDIT CARD NUMBER! Presumably they then ask you to give them the expiry date and possibly the PIN on the back of the card.
  7. The credit card scammers now have all the information they need to place fraudulent charges on your credit card.

How this Scam can get Worse!

There are a few different ways this credit card scam can get worse, according to a recent article from Greedyrates.

Call-Back Request: The scammers may ask you to hang up and call the bank’s 1-800 number on the back of your credit card to prove the call is legitimate. However, they don’t hang up the phone, and instead play a dial tone sound. So you think you’re calling the bank, but you get the same scammer when they “answer”. At this point, they may ask you to transfer your funds to a “safe” account while they investigate. Now they have your bank account funds AND your credit card number!

Transaction Review Request: The “investigator” asks you to give remote access of your computer to them so phone call account services can “review suspicious fidelity center locations. Now they have access to anything on your computer, including your online banking, AND your credit card number!

Bank Investigator: The scammer asks you to “help” them catch the criminal, sometimes described as a dishonest employee, by accepting a deposit and then transferring it back to them. The deposit, however, is fake, so you end up transferring your own funds to them. Now they have your bank account funds AND your credit card number!

Components of a Credit Card Number

This section is just for those who are interested in diving into the rabbit hole of learning about credit card numbers. If you’re not that interested, feel free to skip ahead to the next section!

The first digit of your credit card number is the Major Industry Identifier (MII). For example, an MII of 4 indicates a Visa card. AMEX starts with 3, Mastercard starts with 5, Discover Card starts with phone call account services 1-6 are called the Issuer Identification Number (IIN) or Bank Identification Number (BIN). It indicates the bank that issues the card, whether it’s a business or personal card, what region or country it was issued in, etc. For example, 4520-34 indicate this is a TD Canada Trust Visa card, issued in Canada. For banks with more than one IIN, cards of the same type and same region will generally have the same IIN. (See more at Credit Card Validator and Telephone number for autozone Card Review.)

Digits 7-15 are your Primary Account Number (PAN), and are unique to your account.

BMO Air Miles Mastercard

Digit 16 is the last number on most credit cards. This is the check digit, that allows for easy verification of the number. It helps to detect typos, or transposing digits. That is, entering “1324” instead of “1234” for part of your credit card number. If you want to go down an even deeper rabbit hole, you can read more about the Luhn Algorithm for credit card validation.

The credit card scam people know the IINs for all the banks. They say they’re calling about a Visa card, and then you confirm that you do have a TD Canada Trust Visa. So when they say, “I’m confirming that your card starts with 4520”, you will confirm that it is, in fact, your card.

How Carroll bank and trust routing number has this Credit Card Scam been Around?

A July 2020 article from Greedyrates reports “RCMP Warns of New Credit Card Scam”

However, I found a report from the CBC in January 2015 in an article called “New credit card phishing scam hits Canada”. In the article, a call-taker from the anti-fraud department states that this phishing scam has been “quite successful”.

While it may have been around for a few years, this is the first I have heard of it. It certainly seems less common than the Canada Revenue Agency scam, which I get weekly. Or people wanting to clean my air ducts – we don’t even have air ducts, as our old house has hot pnc financial services corporate headquarters address radiator heating.

Is Fraud a Big Problem in Canada?

The best source of information on this is the Government of Canada’s Anti-Fraud Centre.

In the first 8 months of 2021, over 50,000 Canadians reported fraud attempts. There were more than 36,000 victims of fraud, who lost more than $140 million! That works out to an average loss of almost $4,000 per victim.

And the situation is worsening. In 2019, nearly 20,000 Canadians lost over $102 million. In 2020, over 42,000 Canadians were victims of fraud, and lost a total of $106 million. At only 8 months into 2021, Canadians have lost over $140 million to fraud!

Clearly fraud is a profitable business for the crooks. And victims are losing substantial amounts of money, which can be life changing.

How does Visa Notify you of Suspicious Activity?

This is the tricky part of this phone call scam. Because Visa will legitimately call you if they detect suspicious charges on your account.

However, remember that the real Visa already has your account information. They know your name, credit card number, expiry date, and the 3-digit code on the back. They will never ask you to tell them this information.

How to Prevent Becoming a Victim of Credit Card Scams or Other Fraud

There are many things you can do to prevent becoming a victim of fraud:

  • Don’t be afraid to say “NO”, or to hang up on a call
  • Do your research, verify the organisation is legitimate
  • Be wary of plays on your emotion – “Gran, it’s me! I’ve been in an accident and I need money quickly!”
  • Don’t give out personal information, especially on unsolicited calls
  • Don’t carry unnecessary ID or credit cards in your purse or wallet – this minimizes how much a thief can steal
  • Never leave your purse or wallet unattended in a public place (including work, shopping carts, parties, restaurants, and church); never leave your purse or wallet in view in your car, even if it’s locked
  • Use a shredder phone call account services destroy mail with personal information such as your credit card statements, including pre-approved credit card offers that you phone call account services not want
  • Be wary of upfront fees – there are NO prize fees or taxes in Canada
  • Protect your computer: watch out for spoofed emails; be careful when clicking on attachments or links; never click on urgent-looking messages that pop up while you’re browsing online; never give strangers remote access to your computer
  • Be careful who you share images with; disconnect or cover your webcam when you are not using it (hackers can get remote access and record you)
  • Know who you’re dealing with
  • Watch for anomalies in your finances or credit score and report immediately
  • For businesses, limit your employees’ authority by only allowing a small number of staff to approve purchases and pay bills

If you don’t already track your credit score, you can do that for free with Borrowell! Your credit report can alert you to any fraud or identity theft if someone takes out a loan or a credit card in your name.

Borrowell Credit Score and Report Banners

Sources: phone call account services TransUnion, The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre

What to do if you Think you are a Victim of Fraud

Please know that you are not alone. Remember that there were over 42,000 victims of fraud in Canada in 2020, and it looks like we’re on track for even more in 2021.

Fraud can go unreported because victims are embarrassed. By reporting the fraud you are helping the authorities to catch the perpetrators. And you can prevent someone else from becoming a victim.

The most important first step is to remain calm. Of course it’s phone call account services to be upset! But a clear head right now is important.

Start with gathering any evidence: documents, receipts, bank statements, copies of emails or text messages if applicable.

Next, contact your financial institutions. The phone numbers are on the back of your credit and debit cards, and your bank statements. Ask them to place flags on all of your accounts. Then change all your banking passwords.

Report the fraud to both credit bureaus, Equifax and TransUnion.

Contact your local police. Remember that 911 is for emergencies only, but there will be a local phone number you can call. Also report the fraud to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre toll free at 1-888-495-8501 or through the Fraud Reporting System.

If your government issued ID has been stolen, contact the appropriate level of government in your province or territory:

  • National government issued ID includes: passport, immigration documents, social insurance number
  • Provincial government issued ID includes: driver’s licence, health card, birth certificate

Protect yourself from future fraud. Once you have been a victim, you may be targeted again. Sign up for free with Borrowell to track your credit report, which can alert you if someone tries to take out credit in your name.

Borrowell Credit Score and Report Banners

Did I Become a Victim to this 6am Credit Card Scam?

The phone call woke me up at 6am. The professional-sounding automated voice said two charges had been made to my Visa. It described them, then asked me to press 1 to approve the charges or 2 to decline them. Of course I pressed 2. It then said it was transferring me to a Visa representative who would help me.

At this point, I was so tired I didn’t think I could speak to someone, and I had already indicated they should decline the charges. So I hung up.

At no point did I think this call was fraudulent!

Later in the day, I phoned the number on the back of my Visa cards. (I have business Visas at two different banks for companies I work for. We use Mastercard and Amex for our personal cards.)

The first bank rep recited the most recent purchases, which were legitimate, and did not include the items listed when I got a call from Visa this morning.

So I called the second Visa number. This rep said, “We’re getting a lot of calls about early morning credit card scams!” There were no suspicious charges on this card either.

Thankfully, I unwittingly did the right thing! I hung up on the scam call, and phoned my bank using the number on the back of the card.

I did NOT become the next victim of a credit card scam.

2021 update: I have received the same scam phone call several more times. These calls from the Visa Mastercard alert system seem to be more prevalent than ever.

Источник: https://moneyinyourtea.com/credit-card-scam/

Phone call account services -

The calling tool enables you to connect over the phone with your contacts in the CRM. You can register a phone number to make calls using HubSpot's calling tool while still retaining use of that number with your existing carrier. You can also integrate with a third-party calling partner. Set up call recording for your account so your team's calls are recorded and accessible in the calls index page for review. If you're a user in a Sales Hub or Service Hub Enterprise account, turn on Conversation Intelligence (CI) to automatically record, transcribe, and review calls made in HubSpot.

Register & manage phone numbers

The process for registering a phone number is user-specific; while multiple users can use the same number in your account, each user must register the phone number individually. You can register a phone number to make calls using HubSpot's calling tool while still retaining use of that number with your existing carrier. Before you register a phone number, make sure your country issupported for calling.

Register phone number with HubSpot

  • In your HubSpot account, click the settingssettings icon in the main navigation bar.
  • In the left sidebar menu, navigate to General.
  • Click the Calling tab.
  • If calling hasn't been turned on in your account, click Connect calling.

turn-on-calling

  • To register your phone number, click Add phone number.
  • In the dialog box, enter yourphone numberand an extension (if applicable).
  • You can choose how the verification code is delivered to you. Select the SMS message or Phone call radio button.
  • Click Text me or Call me.

You'llreceive an SMS message or phone callto verify that you have access to the phone number. When prompted, enter the verification code that appears on your screen.

verify-your-phone-number

Your phone number will then be listed in your calling settings and you can use itmake calls in HubSpot. To add additional phone numbers, click Add phone numbers. The first number that you add will automatically become the default, but to change the default number, click the star next to the desired phone number. Or, click Delete next to the number to remove it as an option for calling.

Use a third-party calling provider

If you have an assignedSales HuborService HubProfessionalorEnterpriseseat, you can set up a Twilio Connect account to make calls in HubSpot, purchase additional calling minutes, and make calls to countries that are not included on the supported country list.

Or, you can connect a third-party calling provider to HubSpot to make calls. You can integrate with a provider listed on the App Marketplace that supports third-party calling and related functionality, or work with a developer to connect your own calling app using the Calling Extension SDK.

Reconnect HubSpot calling

If you enabled calling a month ago and have not registered any new numbers or made any calls inthe past seven days, the calling tool will be disabled in your account. Before your calling tool is disabled, you'll be notified by email and will have seven days from when you were first notified to opt out of having your calling tool disabled.

reconnect-to-hubspot-calling

To keep your calling tool active, click Keep my calling account activated in the notification email. You will then be redirected to your account's calling settings and will see a notification banner indicating if your calling account is still active.

Turn on call recording

Turn on call recording to capture the call's audio. The ability to record calls is an account-wide setting, affecting all users who are making calls in the account. It can be turned on or off by auser with Account access permissions. Before turning on call recording, learn more about call recording laws.

  • In your HubSpot account, click the settingssettings icon in the main navigation bar.
  • In the left sidebar menu, navigate toObjects>Activities.
  • On theCalltab, select theAllow call recordingcheckbox.If this setting is turned off, the Record button will not appear when making a call. If you are not seeing the option to record, check with the other admins in your account to see if they have turned this setting off.

allow-call-recording

Turn on Conversation Intelligence (Sales Hub or Service Hub Enterprise only)

If you're a Super admin in a Sales Hub orService Hub Enterprise account, you can also turn on Conversation Intelligence (CI) to automatically transcribe and analyze calls. This includes calls made through the calling tool, using HubSpot's integration with Zoom, or using a connected third-party calling provider that supports CI. Using CI in HubSpot, you can:

  • Review recorded calls using call speaker tracks, sharing options, transcripts, and search capabilities.
  • Access a full list of your team's calls in your calls home. These calls are filterable by call properties such as user, team, call outcome, and duration.
  • Search across all recorded calls for key terms within global search.
  • Preview call details on associated records for added context.

Please note:only calls made by users with an assigned Sales Hub or Service HubEnterprise paid seat will be automatically transcribed. Any user in a Sales Hub or Service HubEnterprise account can access the call recording and transcript for coaching.

To turn on CI in HubSpot:

  • In your HubSpot account, click the settingssettings icon in the main navigation bar.
  • In the left sidebar menu, navigate to Objects > Activities.
  • In the Transcription and analysis section, click Turn on transcription and analysis.
turn-on-transcription-and-analysis-1
  • When turning on CI, you can also opt-in to use your account's data to improve the quality of your call transcripts. In the dialog box, select the Help improve your transcriptions checkbox. If you don't turn this on when setting up CI, you can navigate back to your calling settings at any time to turn it on later. Learn more about how HubSpot uses data to improve the quality of your transcripts.

transcript-and-analysis-with-improve-transcripts-setting

  • Click Turn on transcription and analysis.

If you're using HubSpot's integration with Zoom to make calls, make sure cloud recording is turned on in your Zoom account.

 

Turn off calling for all users

Super admins can turn off calling for all users in the account. This is useful if your team switches to a different calling tool and you want to make sure every user stops using the built-in calling tool. 

  • In your HubSpot account, click the settingssettings icon in the main navigation bar.
  • In the left sidebar menu, navigate to Objects Activities
  • Click Turn off calling for all users

turn-off-calling-for-users

  • In the dialog box, type turn off in the text field, then click Turn off

Users will no longer have access to HubSpot's calling tool and all registered numbers will be disconnected. Any existing call engagements will still be available on your records' timelines. You will still be able to use Twilio Connect or another third-party integration to make calls. 

Источник: https://knowledge.hubspot.com/calling/manage-phone-numbers-registered-for-calling

I groggily answered the ringing phone at 6am, and was alarmed to hear an official-sounding robotic voice. “This is the alert system with Visa (or Mastercard) account services!” It went on to tell me that there were two suspicious charges to my Visa card. It went on to describe the charges, which were in the hundreds of dollars. Press 1 to accept these charges, press 2 to reject them and be connected to a customer service representative. Find out what to do instead, so you don’t fall prey to this new credit card scam.

This post may contain affiliate links, which means I make a small commission if you decide to purchase something through that link. This has no cost to you, and in some cases may give you a discount off the regular price. If you do make a purchase, thank you for supporting my blog! I only recommend products and services that I truly believe in, and all opinions expressed are my own. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases. Please read my disclaimers for more information.

Key Takeaways:

  • Be suspicious if you get an automated call from Visa about charges, especially if it is outside of regular bank business hours.
  • Do NOT press 1 or 2 or anything else – hang up instead.
  • Do NOT call the phone number they give you to verify the legitimacy.
  • If you are unsure whether the call is legitimate, phone the Visa or Mastercard number on the back of your credit card.

Keep reading for more details about this Visa scam phone call. Prevent falling for this and other common fraud calls. And the essential steps you must take if you think you might be a victim of fraud.

How this Visa Scam Call Works

  1. They time their calls for the early hours of the morning. My call was about 6am. Others report having calls anywhere between 5am and 7:30. The hope of the scammers is that because you are groggy and half asleep, your guard will be down. That can make you more vulnerable to fall for their scam.
  2. The automated call from Visa about charges sounds official – “this is an important message regarding your credit card account”. It sounds exactly like when you call the bank and get their robotic system before connecting to a human. This was high quality!
  3. The call states that unauthorized charges have already been made to your credit card account. (This is a lie! No charges have been made to your credit card.) The automated voice describes the charges, including the amount, which is in the hundreds of dollars. The fraudulent charges are high enough to be alarming.
  4. The call then gives you the choice to accept the charges by pressing 1, or preventing the charges, by pressing 2. Naturally they expect people will press 2, because these charges don’t exist!
  5. At that point, you are connected to a person, who will “help” you. This is where they start phishing for information. In my case, I hung up because I was exhausted, and I’d already declared the charges were not valid. I did not yet realize I was being scammed, but I decided to phone back later in the day.
  6. Reports describe how the fake credit card representative will then ask you which bank your credit card is for. They then ask you if the card starts with the following 4 numbers. Yes it does! That’s because all credit cards from that bank start with those four digits!
  7. Now that you’re comfortable that the bank is “legit”, they ask you for the remaining digits in your credit card, to confirm with their system. THIS IS YOU GIVING THE SCAMMERS YOUR CREDIT CARD NUMBER! Presumably they then ask you to give them the expiry date and possibly the PIN on the back of the card.
  8. The credit card scammers now have all the information they need to place fraudulent charges on your credit card.

How this Scam can get Worse!

There are a few different ways this credit card scam can get worse, according to a recent article from Greedyrates.

Call-Back Request: The scammers may ask you to hang up and call the bank’s 1-800 number on the back of your credit card to prove the call is legitimate. However, they don’t hang up the phone, and instead play a dial tone sound. So you think you’re calling the bank, but you get the same scammer when they “answer”. At this point, they may ask you to transfer your funds to a “safe” account while they investigate. Now they have your bank account funds AND your credit card number!

Transaction Review Request: The “investigator” asks you to give remote access of your computer to them so they can “review suspicious transactions”. Now they have access to anything on your computer, including your online banking, AND your credit card number!

Bank Investigator: The scammer asks you to “help” them catch the criminal, sometimes described as a dishonest employee, by accepting a deposit and then transferring it back to them. The deposit, however, is fake, so you end up transferring your own funds to them. Now they have your bank account funds AND your credit card number!

Components of a Credit Card Number

This section is just for those who are interested in diving into the rabbit hole of learning about credit card numbers. If you’re not that interested, feel free to skip ahead to the next section!

The first digit of your credit card number is the Major Industry Identifier (MII). For example, an MII of 4 indicates a Visa card. AMEX starts with 3, Mastercard starts with 5, Discover Card starts with 6.

Digits 1-6 are called the Issuer Identification Number (IIN) or Bank Identification Number (BIN). It indicates the bank that issues the card, whether it’s a business or personal card, what region or country it was issued in, etc. For example, 4520-34 indicate this is a TD Canada Trust Visa card, issued in Canada. For banks with more than one IIN, cards of the same type and same region will generally have the same IIN. (See more at Credit Card Validator and Credit Card Review.)

Digits 7-15 are your Primary Account Number (PAN), and are unique to your account.

BMO Air Miles Mastercard

Digit 16 is the last number on most credit cards. This is the check digit, that allows for easy verification of the number. It helps to detect typos, or transposing digits. That is, entering “1324” instead of “1234” for part of your credit card number. If you want to go down an even deeper rabbit hole, you can read more about the Luhn Algorithm for credit card validation.

The credit card scam people know the IINs for all the banks. They say they’re calling about a Visa card, and then you confirm that you do have a TD Canada Trust Visa. So when they say, “I’m confirming that your card starts with 4520”, you will confirm that it is, in fact, your card.

How Long has this Credit Card Scam been Around?

A July 2020 article from Greedyrates reports “RCMP Warns of New Credit Card Scam”

However, I found a report from the CBC in January 2015 in an article called “New credit card phishing scam hits Canada”. In the article, a call-taker from the anti-fraud department states that this phishing scam has been “quite successful”.

While it may have been around for a few years, this is the first I have heard of it. It certainly seems less common than the Canada Revenue Agency scam, which I get weekly. Or people wanting to clean my air ducts – we don’t even have air ducts, as our old house has hot water radiator heating.

Is Fraud a Big Problem in Canada?

The best source of information on this is the Government of Canada’s Anti-Fraud Centre.

In the first 8 months of 2021, over 50,000 Canadians reported fraud attempts. There were more than 36,000 victims of fraud, who lost more than $140 million! That works out to an average loss of almost $4,000 per victim.

And the situation is worsening. In 2019, nearly 20,000 Canadians lost over $102 million. In 2020, over 42,000 Canadians were victims of fraud, and lost a total of $106 million. At only 8 months into 2021, Canadians have lost over $140 million to fraud!

Clearly fraud is a profitable business for the crooks. And victims are losing substantial amounts of money, which can be life changing.

How does Visa Notify you of Suspicious Activity?

This is the tricky part of this phone call scam. Because Visa will legitimately call you if they detect suspicious charges on your account.

However, remember that the real Visa already has your account information. They know your name, credit card number, expiry date, and the 3-digit code on the back. They will never ask you to tell them this information.

How to Prevent Becoming a Victim of Credit Card Scams or Other Fraud

There are many things you can do to prevent becoming a victim of fraud:

  • Don’t be afraid to say “NO”, or to hang up on a call
  • Do your research, verify the organisation is legitimate
  • Be wary of plays on your emotion – “Gran, it’s me! I’ve been in an accident and I need money quickly!”
  • Don’t give out personal information, especially on unsolicited calls
  • Don’t carry unnecessary ID or credit cards in your purse or wallet – this minimizes how much a thief can steal
  • Never leave your purse or wallet unattended in a public place (including work, shopping carts, parties, restaurants, and church); never leave your purse or wallet in view in your car, even if it’s locked
  • Use a shredder to destroy mail with personal information such as your credit card statements, including pre-approved credit card offers that you do not want
  • Be wary of upfront fees – there are NO prize fees or taxes in Canada
  • Protect your computer: watch out for spoofed emails; be careful when clicking on attachments or links; never click on urgent-looking messages that pop up while you’re browsing online; never give strangers remote access to your computer
  • Be careful who you share images with; disconnect or cover your webcam when you are not using it (hackers can get remote access and record you)
  • Know who you’re dealing with
  • Watch for anomalies in your finances or credit score and report immediately
  • For businesses, limit your employees’ authority by only allowing a small number of staff to approve purchases and pay bills

If you don’t already track your credit score, you can do that for free with Borrowell! Your credit report can alert you to any fraud or identity theft if someone takes out a loan or a credit card in your name.

Borrowell Credit Score and Report Banners

Sources: TransUnion, The Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre

What to do if you Think you are a Victim of Fraud

Please know that you are not alone. Remember that there were over 42,000 victims of fraud in Canada in 2020, and it looks like we’re on track for even more in 2021.

Fraud can go unreported because victims are embarrassed. By reporting the fraud you are helping the authorities to catch the perpetrators. And you can prevent someone else from becoming a victim.

The most important first step is to remain calm. Of course it’s natural to be upset! But a clear head right now is important.

Start with gathering any evidence: documents, receipts, bank statements, copies of emails or text messages if applicable.

Next, contact your financial institutions. The phone numbers are on the back of your credit and debit cards, and your bank statements. Ask them to place flags on all of your accounts. Then change all your banking passwords.

Report the fraud to both credit bureaus, Equifax and TransUnion.

Contact your local police. Remember that 911 is for emergencies only, but there will be a local phone number you can call. Also report the fraud to the Canadian Anti-Fraud Centre toll free at 1-888-495-8501 or through the Fraud Reporting System.

If your government issued ID has been stolen, contact the appropriate level of government in your province or territory:

  • National government issued ID includes: passport, immigration documents, social insurance number
  • Provincial government issued ID includes: driver’s licence, health card, birth certificate

Protect yourself from future fraud. Once you have been a victim, you may be targeted again. Sign up for free with Borrowell to track your credit report, which can alert you if someone tries to take out credit in your name.

Borrowell Credit Score and Report Banners

Did I Become a Victim to this 6am Credit Card Scam?

The phone call woke me up at 6am. The professional-sounding automated voice said two charges had been made to my Visa. It described them, then asked me to press 1 to approve the charges or 2 to decline them. Of course I pressed 2. It then said it was transferring me to a Visa representative who would help me.

At this point, I was so tired I didn’t think I could speak to someone, and I had already indicated they should decline the charges. So I hung up.

At no point did I think this call was fraudulent!

Later in the day, I phoned the number on the back of my Visa cards. (I have business Visas at two different banks for companies I work for. We use Mastercard and Amex for our personal cards.)

The first bank rep recited the most recent purchases, which were legitimate, and did not include the items listed when I got a call from Visa this morning.

So I called the second Visa number. This rep said, “We’re getting a lot of calls about early morning credit card scams!” There were no suspicious charges on this card either.

Thankfully, I unwittingly did the right thing! I hung up on the scam call, and phoned my bank using the number on the back of the card.

I did NOT become the next victim of a credit card scam.

2021 update: I have received the same scam phone call several more times. These calls from the Visa Mastercard alert system seem to be more prevalent than ever.

Источник: https://moneyinyourtea.com/credit-card-scam/

Unwanted calls – including illegal and spoofed robocalls - are the FCC's top consumer complaint and our top consumer protection priority. These include complaints from consumers whose numbers are being spoofed or whose calls are being mistakenly blocked or labeled as a possible scam call by a robocall blocking app or service. The FCC is committed to doing what we can to protect you from these unwelcome situations and is cracking down on illegal calls in a variety of ways:

Check out the consumer guide on Call Blocking Tools and Resources, which includes information on many of the call blocking and labeling tools currently available to consumers.

File a complaint with the FCC if you believe you have received an illegal call or text, or if you think you're the victim of a spoofing scam. Click the tabs below for tips, FAQs and resources.

Consumer Tips to Stop Unwanted Robocalls and Avoid Phone Scams

  • Don't answer calls from unknown numbers. If you answer such a call, hang up immediately.
  • You may not be able to tell right away if an incoming call is spoofed. Be aware: Caller ID showing a "local" number does not necessarily mean it is a local caller.
  • If you answer the phone and the caller - or a recording - asks you to hit a button to stop getting the calls, you should just hang up. Scammers often use this trick to identify potential targets.
  • Do not respond to any questions, especially those that can be answered with "Yes."
  • Never give out personal information such as account numbers, Social Security numbers, mother's maiden names, passwords or other identifying information in response to unexpected calls or if you are at all suspicious.
  • If you get an inquiry from someone who says they represent a company or a government agency, hang up and call the phone number on your account statement, in the phone book, or on the company's or government agency's website to verify the authenticity of the request. You will usually get a written statement in the mail before you get a phone call from a legitimate source, particularly if the caller is asking for a payment.
  • Use caution if you are being pressured for information immediately.
  • If you have a voice mail account with your phone service, be sure to set a password for it. Some voicemail services are preset to allow access if you call in from your own phone number. A hacker could spoof your home phone number and gain access to your voice mail if you do not set a password.
  • Talk to your phone company about call blocking tools they may have and check into apps that you can download to your mobile device to block unwanted calls.
  • If you use robocall-blocking technology already, it often helps to let that company know which numbers are producing unwanted calls so they can help block those calls for you and others.
  • To block telemarketing calls, register your number on the Do Not Call List. Legitimate telemarketers consult the list to avoid calling both landline and wireless phone numbers on the list.

FAQs About Robocalls

Robocalls are calls made with an autodialer or that contain a message made with a prerecorded or artificial voice.

Advances in technology have unfortunately allowed illegal and spoofed robocalls to be made from anywhere in the world and more cheaply and easily than ever before. That's why it's become more of a problem for consumers, and a more difficult problem to solve.

Keep in mind that many robocalls are legal. While we have taken several actions, and continue to work on reducing illegal robocalls, it is a difficult problem that requires complex solutions. The most complex part is identifying the illegal calls in real time to be able to block them without blocking lawful calls.

  • What are the rules for robocalls?  expand and contract

    FCC rules require a caller to obtain your written consent – on paper or through electronic means, including website forms, a telephone keypress – before it may make a prerecorded telemarketing call to your home or wireless phone number.  FCC rules also require a caller to obtain your consent, oral or written, before it may make an autodialed or prerecorded call or text to your wireless number.  There are exceptions to these rules, such as for emergencies involving danger to life or safety.

  • What are the rules for telemarketers calling a wireline home phone?  expand and contract

    Callers must have your prior express written consent before making telemarketing calls using a prerecorded or artificial voice. Telephone solicitation calls to your home are prohibited before 8 am or after 9 pm.

    Telemarketers are no longer able to make telemarketing robocalls to your wireline home telephone based solely on an "established business relationship" that you may have established when purchasing something from a business or contacting the business to ask questions.

  • Are robocalls to wireless phones prohibited?  expand and contract

    A consumer's written or oral consent is required for autodialed, prerecorded, or artificial voice calls or texts made to your wireless number, with a few exceptions such as emergency calls regarding danger to life or safety.  Consent must be in writing for telemarketing robocalls.  Telemarketers have never been permitted to make robocalls to your wireless phone based solely on an "established business relationship" with you.

  • What types of autodialed calls are permitted under the FCC rules?  expand and contract

    Not all robocalls are illegal.  There are several factors to consider: the technology used to make the call, whether the call is to a landline or a mobile number, whether the content of the call is telemarketing, and whether the called number is on the National Do Not Call Registry.

    Market research or polling calls to home wireline numbers are not restricted by FCC rules, nor are calls on behalf of tax-exempt non-profit groups. Informational messages such as school closings or flight information to your home phone are permissible without prior consent. The rules do require all prerecorded calls, including market research or polling calls, to identify the caller at the beginning of the message and include a contact phone number. Autodialed or prerecorded calls to wireless phones are prohibited without prior express consent, regardless of the call's content, with a few exceptions such as emergency calls regarding danger to life or safety.

  • What are the rules about robocalls releasing telephone lines?  expand and contract

    Autodialers that deliver a prerecorded message must release the called party's telephone line within five seconds of the time that the calling system receives notification that the called party's line has hung up. In some areas, you could experience a delay before you can get a dial tone again. Your local telephone company can tell you if there is a delay in your area.

  • Are any organizations or individuals exempt from the Do Not Call rules?  expand and contract

    Yes. The Do Not Call rules only apply to telemarketing calls. So, the following types of calls are ones that don't have to comply with do-not-call requests: tax-exempt, non-profit organizations; political organizations; pollsters and survey takers, not making sales calls; religious organizations; and telemarketers to whom you have given prior written consent to call you.

  • Can I opt out of autodialed calls?  expand and contract

    FCC rules require telemarketers to allow you to opt out of receiving additional telemarketing robocalls immediately during a prerecorded telemarketing call through an automated menu. The opt-out mechanism must be announced at the outset of the message and must be available throughout the duration of the call.

  • Where should I file my unwanted call complaint?  expand and contract

    Consumers can file complaints with the FCC by going to fcc.gov/complaints.  You should choose the phone form and the unwanted calls issue for all complaints involving unwanted calls, including if your number is being spoofed, blocked, or labeled.

    If you have a complaint about telephone fraud or telemarketers who have disregarded the Do Not Call list, we also encourage you to file a complaint with the FTC at www.ftccomplaintassistant.gov.

    If the unwanted call is an IRS scam, we also encourage you to file your complaint with the Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration (TIGTA) at www.tigta.gov or call 1-800-366-4484.

  • What does the FCC do with consumer complaints?  expand and contract

    We do not resolve individual unwanted call complaints but such complaints provide valuable information that the FCC uses to inform policy decisions and as the basis of potential enforcement actions against callers violating our rules under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act (for most robocalls) or Truth in Caller ID Act. We may share your complaint with other agencies, such as the FTC, if we have shared jurisdiction over the alleged violation.

  • How can schools get more information about compliance?  expand and contract

    For schools who have questions about compliance with the Commission's robocalls rules, please contact [email protected]

Download the FCC Report on Robocalls (PDF).

Robotexts

FCC rules ban text messages sent to a mobile phone using an autodialer unless you previously gave consent to receive the message or the message is sent for emergency purposes.

  • For commercial texts, your consent must be in writing.
  • For non-commercial, informational texts (such as those sent by or on behalf of tax-exempt non-profit organizations, those for political purposes, and other noncommercial purposes, such as school closings), your consent may be oral.

The ban applies even if you have not placed your mobile phone number on the national Do-Not-Call list.

Tips for avoiding unwanted texts

  • Do not respond to unwanted texts from questionable sources. Several mobile service providers allow you to block the sender by forwarding unwanted texts to 7726 (or "SPAM"). Check with your provider about options.
  • Be careful about giving out your mobile phone number or any other personal information.
  • Read through commercial web forms and check for a privacy policy when submitting your mobile phone number to any customer website. You should be able to opt out of receiving texts – but you may have to check or uncheck a preselected box to do so.
  • Find out if any company you do business with has a policy that allows it to sell or share your information.

Take action

File a complaint with the FCC if you receive:

  • An unwanted commercial text message sent to your mobile phone.
  • An autodialed text message sent to your mobile phone if you didn't consent to the message previously (or it doesn't involve an emergency).
  • Any autodialed text message from a telecommunications company or advertising a telecommunications company's products or services, if sent without your prior consent.

Spoofing and Caller ID

Caller ID spoofing is when a caller deliberately falsifies the information transmitted to your caller ID display to disguise their identity. Spoofing is often used as part of an attempt to trick someone into giving away valuable personal information so it can be used in fraudulent activity or sold illegally, but also can be used legitimately, for example, to display the toll-free number for a business.

  • What is neighbor spoofing?  expand and contract

    Robocallers use neighbor spoofing, which displays a phone number similar to your own on your caller ID, to increase the likelihood that you will answer the call. To help combat neighbor spoofing, the FCC is requiring the phone industry to adopt a robust caller ID authentication system.

  • When is spoofing illegal?  expand and contract

    Under the Truth in Caller ID Act, FCC rules prohibit anyone from transmitting misleading or inaccurate caller ID information with the intent to defraud, cause harm or wrongly obtain anything of value. Anyone who is illegally spoofing can face penalties of up to $10,000 for each violation. However, spoofing is not always illegal. There are legitimate, legal uses for spoofing, like when a doctor calls a patient from her personal mobile phone and displays the office number rather than the personal phone number or a business displays its toll-free call-back number.

  • What can you do if your number is being spoofed?  expand and contract

    If you get calls from people saying your number is showing up on their caller ID, it's likely that your number has been spoofed. We suggest first that you do not answer any calls from unknown numbers, but if you do, explain that your telephone number is being spoofed and that you did not actually make any calls. You can also place a message on your voicemail letting callers know that your number is being spoofed. Usually scammers switch numbers frequently. It is likely that within hours they will no longer be using your number.

  • What is blocking or labeling?  expand and contract

    If a telephone number is blocked or labeled as a "potential scam" on your caller ID, it is possible the number has been spoofed. Several phone companies and app developers offer call-blocking and labeling services that detect whether a call is likely to be fraudulent based on call patterns, consumer complaints or other means.

    FCC rules do not prohibit call blocking or labeling technologies, however the FCC is very concerned about ensuring that lawful calls are completed and has encouraged providers who block calls to establish a means for a caller whose number is blocked to contact the provider and remedy the problem.

    You can legally block the transmission of your phone number when you make calls, so your number will appear as "unknown." Doing so is not spoofing.

  • What are the caller ID rules for telemarketers?  expand and contract

    FCC rules specifically require that a telemarketer:

    • Transmit or display its telephone number or the telephone number on whose behalf the call is being made, and, if possible, its name or the name of the company for which it is selling products or services.
    • Display a telephone number you can call during regular business hours to ask to no longer be called. This rule applies even to companies that already have an established business relationship with you.

Political Campaign Robocalls & Robotexts

During election seasons, consumers will likely experience an increase in calls and texts from political campaigns. While campaign calls and texts are exempt from the Do Not Call List requirements, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act contains specific rules they must follow.

In general, robocalls and robotexts to mobile phones require prior consent and calls to landlines are allowed without prior consent. But there are exceptions detailed below.

Political Robocall Restrictions

Political campaign-related autodialed or prerecorded voice calls, including autodialed live calls, autodialed texts, and prerecorded voice messages, are prohibited to cell phones, pagers or other mobile devices without the called party's prior express consent. The same restrictions apply to protected phone lines such as emergency or toll-free lines, or lines serving hospitals or similar facilities.

Political campaign-related autodialed or prerecorded voice calls are permitted when made to landline telephones, even without prior express consent.

All prerecorded voice message calls, campaign-related and otherwise, must include certain identification information:

  • The identity of the business, individual, or other entity initiating the call must be clearly stated at the beginning of the prerecorded message.
  • If the calling party is a business or corporate entity, the entity's official business name must be stated clearly at the beginning of the message.
  • The telephone number of the calling party must be provided, either during or after the message.

Political Robotexts

Robotexts – text messages generated through autodialing – are also considered a type of call and fall under all robocall rules.

As text messages generally go to mobile phones, robotexts require the called party's prior express consent. However, political text messages can be sent without the intended recipient’s prior consent if the message’s sender does not use autodialing technology to send such texts and instead manually dials them.

Report Unwanted Calls and Texts

If you think you've received a political robocall or text that does not comply with the FCC’s rules, you can file an informal complaint with the FCC at fcc.gov/complaints. If you are receiving texts that you didn’t ask for, report the sender by forwarding the texts to 7726 (or "SPAM"). Campaigns should also honor opt-out requests if you reply "STOP."

Web Resources for Blocking Robocalls

Call blocking is a tool used by phone companies to stop illegal and unwanted calls from reaching your phone. A recent FCC report found that by partnering with third-party analytics companies, providers are able to block billions of unwanted calls to American consumers each year.

Phone companies sometimes block calls connected to suspicious calling patterns proactively for their customers.  Many phone companies also enable their customers to block additional unwanted calls by enrolling in a service or installing an app.  Consumers can also adjust certain settings on their phone, sign up with a third-party service, or download a third-party app to block suspected unwanted calls.

Depending on your service provider, a blocked call may go straight to your voicemail, you may hear a single ring and get caller ID information from the blocked call, or you may get no notice at all.

Many phone companies are taking advantage of FCC rules that allow consumers to be enrolled automatically in call blocking services, but you can opt-out if you are concerned about missing wanted calls.  A number of companies also offer call labeling to help consumers determine which calls they want to answer.  Labeling services display categories for potentially unwanted or illegal calls such as "spam" or "scam likely" on the caller ID display.

Contact your phone company to learn more about the blocking and labeling solutions that may be available to protect you from unwanted and illegal calls.  There may also be apps you can download for your mobile device – at little or no cost – to block or label potential spam calls.  In addition to call-blocking and labeling services, you should also check with your wireless device manufacturer about built-in features you can use to block unwanted calls from specific numbers using your cell phone’s settings.  

The resources listed below* provide information on many of the call blocking and labeling tools currently available to consumers.

Wireless/Mobile

  • AT&T: Mobile security and call protection services.
  • Google Project Fi: Call blocking options for Project Fi wireless service.
  • Sprint: Call blocking options using My Sprint.
  • T-Mobile: Call-protection options to identify or block potential scammers.
  • U.S. Cellular:  Automatic network call identification, labeling, and blocking app options.
  • Verizon:  Call Filter FAQS for screening and blocking unwanted calls.

Landline/Wireline/VoIP

  • AT&T:  Information on Digital Phone Call Protect service, call blocking, and other features.
  • CenturyLink: Customer tips and tools to block unwanted calls.
  • Comcast:  Call blocking options for XFINITY Voice subscribers.
  • Frontier Communications:  Consumer options for call blocking tools and services.
  • Spectrum:  Guide for using Nomorobo service to block robocallers.
  • Verizon:  Customer options for stopping unwanted calls to residential lines.

Third-Party Analytics Resources

  • First Orion:  Tools and services for mobile customers and businesses.
  • Hiya:  Tools and services for mobile phones; Hiya Connect for businesses.
  • Nomorobo:  Tools and services for VoIP landlines and mobile phones.
  • TNS Call Guardian:  Call analytics solutions for businesses.
  • YouMail:   Tools and services for individuals and businesses.

Wireless Device Solutions

  • Apple iPhones have an opt-in “Silence Unknown Callers” call-screening and blocking feature.
  • Google Pixel phones have a “Call Screen” call-screening and blocking feature;  Google offers several free, opt-in, call-blocking tool apps for Android phones;  and  Google Voice users can use a call management tool to block unwanted calls.  
  • Samsung partners with Hiya to offer a call-blocking solution called Smart Call to label potentially unwanted calls.

Trade Association Consumer Resources and Information

  • CTIA: Consumer resources for stopping robocalls.
  • US Telecom:  Consumer information on illegal robocalls.

*The resources listed are provided for informational purposes. The FCC does not endorse any products or services listed, and is not responsible for the content, accuracy, completeness, or timeliness of non-FCC websites.

The National Do Not Call List

The national Do Not Call list protects landline and wireless phone numbers. You can register your numbers on the national Do Not Call list at no cost by calling 1-888-382-1222 (voice) or 1-866-290-4236 (TTY). You must call from the phone number you wish to register. You can also register at donotcall.gov.

Telemarketers must remove your numbers from their call lists and stop calling you within 31 days from the date you register. Your numbers will remain on the list until you remove them or discontinue service – there is no need to re-register numbers.

Under FCC rules, telemarketers calling your home must provide their name along with the name, telephone number, and address where their employer or contractor can be contacted. Telemarketing calls to your home are prohibited before 8 am or after 9 pm, and telemarketers are required to comply immediately with any do-not-call request you make during a call.

Whether you are on the National Do Not Call Registry or not, tell unwanted callers that you do not consent to the call and to put you on their internal do not call list. Make a record of the caller's number and when you made your request not to be called, and file a complaint with the FCC if the caller does not comply with your request.


FAQs

What is a telephone solicitation?

A telephone solicitation is a telephone call that acts as an advertisement. However, some phone solicitations are permissible under FCC rules, including: calls or messages placed with your express prior permission, by or on behalf of a tax-exempt non-profit organization, or from a person or organization. However, having an established business relationship no longer meets the rules for permissible unsolicited calls to your landline phone. Companies and telemarketers must have your express permission to call.

Are there any other lists I can register my number with?

Yes. Additionally, many states now have statewide do-not-call lists for residents. Contact your state's public service commission or consumer protection office to see if your state has such a list, and to find out how to register your number or numbers. For contact information for your state public service commission, check the government listings or blue pages of your local phone directory.

If I continue to receive such calls, what can I do?

If you receive a telephone solicitation that you think violates any of the FCC rules, you can file a complaint with the FCC. The FCC can issue warning citations and impose fines against companies violating or suspected of violating the do-not-call rules, but does not award individual damages.

Printable Version

Stop Unwanted Robocalls and Texts (pdf)

Источник: https://www.fcc.gov/consumers/guides/stop-unwanted-robocalls-and-texts

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How To Use a Fake Number to Call Someone (Spoof a Phone Number)

How To Use a Fake Number to Call Someone (Spoof a Phone Number)

Call spoofing has enabled people to fake the return number that is shown by Caller IDs for many years now, and the ability to “spoof” a phone number has become widespread.

Spoofing, in simple terms, just means that the number shown on someone’s caller ID is not the actual number that is placing the call. As opposed to a fake number, spoofing a number lets callers appear to be a number more familiar with the recipient.

Common Reasons to Call Someone using a Fake Number

Quick Links

People spoof caller ID numbers for a wide variety of reasons.

  • They perform a classic prank call to their neighbor or friend.
  • They protect their privacy and phone information from being captured and sold to third parties.
  • They want a secondary number captured by recipients.
  • They want to reserve their actual phone number for their close family and friends while using a secondary number for “social media” friends and other parties.
  • They call a debt collector with a spoofed number to avoid repeated calls in the future.
  • They investigate a number they are curious about.
  • They attempt to confirm or investigate a “potential” scam call.
  • They use it to actually scam others by faking the number so the recipient thinks it is someone local, or a person or business they know.

With more and more people starting to ignore calls from unfamiliar numbers and sending them to voicemail automatically, it has made pulling off a classic prank call trickier. However, spoofing a number that the victim recognizes, has become a popular scenario for scam artists and pranksters alike.

In 2020, it’s more important than ever to practice safety when it comes to your personal identification. While it may be difficult to change your phone number on all services or registrations to a spoofed number, you can still protect your identity by making sure that your new number spreads to as many services as possible. This way, you will receive return calls on a number that can be easily disposed of if anything were ever to go wrong with the intended caller.

Is Spoofing Your Phone Number Legal?

Yes. At its core, there’s nothing illegal about the act of spoofing caller ID with a false number in the United States. It is your intentions that generally determine the legality of your actions.

  • If you hide your real number to contact a business to protect your personal information, it’s legal.
  • If you fake your phone number to investigate a potentially risky call, it is legal.
  • If you get a second phone number for specific contacts, it is legal.
  • If you hide your real number to prank a caller, it is often legal, but your actions may be considered illegal depending on location and circumstances. It can be an act of falsifying information in an attempt to harass or abuse, etc.
  • If you spoof your phone number to scam the recipient, it is questionably legal, but your intentions and actions are definitely illegal!
  • If you call from a disposable number to threaten the recipient, it is possibly illegal due to your intentions and the falsification of caller identity (trickery). However, the action of threatening the recipient is definitely illegal.

For legitimate, non-criminal motivations, you are in the clear. So using a spoofed number to trick your friend into thinking that the President is calling him on his birthday may be more or less funny depending on your sense of humor, but it is legal.

If you spoof your number to trick him into thinking he’s talking to his credit card company, and you attempt to get his card details, it is a crime.

How Can I Call Someone with a Fake Number?

There are basically three different ways to spoof a number or call.

  • You can register for a permanent number through a call forwarding website or app.
  • You can get a temporary number from sites more oriented towards “burner” numbers.
  • You can use various apps to enter a false phone number that displays on the recipient’s caller ID, while actually just using your own number to make the call.

How Do I Actually Spoof a Call with a Fake Number?

You can’t personally stop the identity leaks from happening, but by using a spoofed number, you can make the fallout a little less catastrophic. Spoofed numbers can come in two different varieties, depending on what you’re looking for. Permanent numbers don’t change or recycle and can be held by you for as long as you’ll need them.

In fact, they’re a real number, just connected to a phone you don’t answer if they’re connected to a phone at all.

Disposable numbers, on the other hand, are designed to be cycled through, used for a certain duration before being tossed in the trash. Whether or not that’s something you’re looking to use is up to you, and really, the type of number you’ll be using really depends on the scenario you find yourself in. Still, we’ll cover both options below, with some great suggestions for both free and paid spoof numbers.

Permanent Fake Numbers

While you still have to dedicate some time to managing your fake number, as you would your real number, you’re secure if your false number ever leaks online. These permanent services usually offer some amount of call blocking and restricting features. Being able to ensure your number is always in your grasp means that you can place your false number on more important documents, giving it out to your dentist or doctor for appointments, or placing it on job applications to protect your standard account service.

Permanent number services are also typically cheaper than their temporary counterparts, as you’ll discover in the next segment.

Google Voice

The first service you should take a look at for a secondary spoof number is, unsurprisingly, Google Voice. Voice is for someone looking for a secondary, web-based number that doesn’t cost anything. Google offers a desktop and mobile web client, along with dedicated clients for both iOS and Android that are sleek and regularly updated.

Google Voice allows you to use your assigned secondary number to forward calls to your primary number, all while making free phone calls throughout the United States. Your assigned number is able to be customized as well, so you can select a specific area code throughout the US, or type the last-four digits to make it easy to remember.

Talkatone

Like Google Voice, Talkatone is built around providing alternate numbers to call and text US-based users for free (and to call and text numbers outside the United States for small charges).

Talkatone even lets you change this number when you need to. This makes the service bit less permanent while simultaneously giving you more flexibility should your number get leaked online. The downside to Talkatone is ads within the app.

Textfree

Textfree has been around for nearly a decade, and you can still grab a free number through their service by signing up through the website or mobile application. You can choose your area code and memorable number patterns when signing up for a number. You can keep the number as long as you want, though you’ll need to use it once every 30 days to place a call.

There are also paid, premium options available, including Flyp, Hushed, TextNow, and Sideline.

Disposable Fake Numbers

Sometimes, you just need a number for one-time use or for a certain period. Disposable numbers are great. You can call a business or an individual, hang up the phone following your conversation, and toss the number away, leaving the person without a way to contact you again. Unfortunately, disposable numbers rarely come without a fee attached.

Burner

Burner is an app that automatically gives you a new number whenever you need one. Your number is real and can be used to call and text from within the app, and the caller ID displays your Burner info instead of your actual phone number. The app is smooth and responsive, and you get a free number for seven days upon installation. Depending on how many numbers you need and how much you’ll be using the app, Burner can get really expensive, really fast.

Flyp

Flyp offers support for multiple secondary numbers, making it easier to cycle through plans. Of course, paying the monthly fees can get expensive rather quickly. If you plan on holding multiple numbers at once, this spook call service might get costly. Still, the ability to mirror local area codes while placing a call is ideal for someone looking to spoof numbers with only one account, and with great audio quality.

Hushed

Hushed offers both permanent and disposable numbers. The app provides the ability to dispose of numbers at any time, so long as you’re paying for the service.

Hushed stands out with its end-to-end encryption when talking to other users. This makes the service the most secure phone number app on the list, and that may be important if you’re trying to hide your identity. All numbers are disposable. There’s no credit card needed to sign up for an account, and calls can be sent and received from anywhere. Hushed is also one of the more affordable paid plans.

Online Spoofing Services

There are a number of services online that provide spoofed calling numbers on a one-shot basis. That is, after you’ve registered at the site and paid the subscription fee, you can enter the number you want to call and the number that you want to appear on Caller ID.

The call will go through on your smartphone or landline, or via your web browser. You can use as many different numbers as you wish and can assign a new number for every call you make if you want.

Spoof Card

SpoofCard is reputable, and they are one of the oldest spoofing providers in the industry. SpoofCard offers a number of features, including the ability to artificially disguise your voice and even change its gender presentation. The service also provides the ability to record calls for later playback (priceless if you’re planning on pranking your friends), the addition of background noises like traffic, a nightclub, or police activity for added realism, and the ability to send calls directly to voicemail.

You can also dial multiple recipients at once, or add more people on your end of the call to listen in. SpoofCard also allows you to send spoofed SMS text messages. The service is definitely optimized for pranksters.

SpoofCard offers a 60-second free trial, offers a web version, as well as an Android app and an iOS app. Charges are based on bulk minute packages, paid as a one-off purchase, or as a monthly subscription. SpoofCard supports calls to non-US destinations but uses more credits per minute.

SpoofTel

SpoofTel is another service providing instant spoofing service on-demand. SpoofTel offers a desktop app for Windows and an iOS app. The iOS version requires a jailbroken phone.

SpoofTel has the ability to change your voice pitch and add soundboard audio to the background. SpoofTel offers SMS text message spoofing as well. Costs are based on a per-minute basis, in addition to added features like voice changing and recording.

Spoof Call

Spoof Call does not offer app versions; all calls occur via the service’s website. The service has some unique features, including call recording, voice changing software, limited background noises, group calls, and a text-to-speech converter with multiple language choices. Spoof Call is based in Europe, but the credits they sell are valid for US calls (among other locations).

What is FCC Stir Shaken?

Since 2015, a group of telecom engineers from major carriers started developing a way to stop call spoofing in its tracks. In recent years, spoofing has gone mainstream. The widespread nature of call spoofing has begun to undermine public trust in the integrity of the phone system. The engineering teams are relying on two new systems to stop it: STIR (Secure Telephone Identity Revisited) and SHAKEN (Signature-based Handling of Asserted information using tokens).

The idea behind STIR and SHAKEN is to give every phone a certificate of authenticity, a digital signature, that becomes the sole source of caller ID information. Caller ID would become trustworthy once more. The basic idea is ridiculously complicated, but here is a simplified explanation. A person places a call. That call’s data stream would contain the certificate (in digital form) that verified that the call was coming from the number it claims to be coming from.

As the phone call passes through the circuitry, the carrier would check the validity of the certificate using a public/private key system. A call whose certificate failed to pass validity would either get blocked or display a warning message in the caller ID field.

FCC mandates that all voice carriers effectively implement STIR/SHAKEN authentication by June 30, 2021.

There are other resources available at TechJunkie to help you combat call spoofing efforts.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is there a way to tell if a spoofed number is calling?

It’s highly improbable that you’ll know a number is spoofed until you answer the phone call. If someone is spoofing a number that you’re familiar with, you probably won’t know that’s what’s happening until you pick up the call.

If the number calling is unfamiliar to you but spoofed using the same area code as your phone number, you can do a reverse lookup on the phone number. If the number is spoofed, the search results will turn up no information. Also, calling a spoofed number back will likely result in a busy signal rather than actually getting to talk to someone.

How do I avoid being scammed?

Spoofed numbers can be incredibly tricky, it gives any scammers the upper-hand. If you receive a phone call from a company asking for any personal information, it’s best to hang up and call the company from a phone number that you’re familiar with.

AT&T for example had an issue with their customer service number being spoofed. The scammers would offer bill credits but they’d need the account Passcode to access the account. Most reputable companies will never ask you for any information if they call you.

The FCC warns that scams resulting from spoofed numbers usually happen after a natural disaster, or to gain access to your credit information.

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Источник: https://www.techjunkie.com/fake-number-call-someone-spoof/
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  1. @ProudMoney - Credit Cards & Personal Finance I thought as much. I just watched the rest of it. Thanks. Great video.

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