kobe bryant off the court

Nearly everyone got out of their seat and showed their support for the Los Angeles Lakers' shooting guard, with one girl even shouting, “I love you, Kobe! Why. After all was said and done, with his body breaking down from years of abuse on the basketball court, Kobe left the game on his own terms and. This is how Kobe Bean Bryant felt about the sport he loved so much: basketball. Tributes have been showing up around the world since Kobe's.

Kobe bryant off the court -

Kobe Bryant will go down in history as one of the greatest basketball players of the 21st century.

His 20-year career at the Los Angeles Lakers saw five NBA championships; the 2008 MVP award; a two-time NBA finals MVP; and Bryant was the fourth-leading scorer in NBA history.

Off the court, Bryant, who was killed Jan. 26 in a helicopter crash along with his daughter Gianna and seven others, was equally exceptional. From mentoring young boys and girls to donating money to help support high school basketball teams, Bryant made a difference in the lives of thousands of people globally.

Here are nine times the “Black Mamba” made a difference outside the court.

National Ambassador For After-School All-Stars

Bryant was big on helping young people achieve their goals and become leaders.

In 2007, he became a national ambassador for After-School All-stars, a nonprofit organization that partners with schools to offer after-school programming for students from low-income families.

Through the organization, Bryant gave motivational speeches to young students throughout the U.S. He also raised money for the organization’s Los Angeles chapter, which serves 14,000 students from 38 schools.

See Also: 'Inspire The Next Generation': A Look At Kobe Bryant's Career As A Venture Capitalist

Raising Awareness, Money For Darfur

In 2008, Bryant was voted NBA’s most valuable player. The same year, he signed on as the spokesperson for Aid Still Required.

He used his status as MVP to create a PSA where he raised awareness on the atrocities of the Darfur conflict. Bryant made an emotional appeal asking people to come together and take a stand against the war.

Advocate For Children Fighting Terminal Illness

Throughout his 20-year career, Bryant brought countless smiles to kids suffering from life-threatening illnesses.

Through Make-a-wish-America, a nonprofit organization that creates life-changing wishes for youth with critical sickness, Bryant visited over 200 kids battling life-threatening illnesses.

He would also invite some of the kids to his games to provide a form of escape and inspire them.

The Kobe And Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation

Together with his wife Vanessa, the basketball legend established the Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation in 2011

The same year, the foundation partnered with homeless youth drop-in center My Friends Place to increase awareness about the homeless problem and help homeless youth build self-sufficient lives.

The KVBFF also operates the Mamba FC, which is a youth soccer club in Orange County that uses sports to provide training for young athletes to become independent thinkers and leaders.

Bryant also used the KVBFF to help increase awareness of black history. He was among the milestone founders of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Raising Money for Cancer Awareness

Throughout his career, Bryant worked with different organizations to raise money for cancer research and treatment.

In 2012, he was part of the Stand Up to Cancer telecast, which raised over $81 million for cancer research. Bryant also sent motivational messages to patients battling cancer.

Cultural Ambassador To China

After the 2008 Olympics, China fell in love with Bryant. In 2009, he was named the cultural ambassador to China and later contributed 5 million yuan to promote sports in China.

He also partnered with retail giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd - ADR (NYSE: BABA) to help promote basketball in China. Through the Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation, he provided hundred of America youths a chance to learn Mandarin and the Chinese culture and traditions.

Helping Others Succeed

After his retirement from the NBA, Bryant became a venture capitalist and helped several companies get off the ground.

Through his VC firm Bryant Stibel, Kobe invested in over a dozen tech, data and media startups.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Bryant said he enjoyed helping others succeed. “The most important thing I enjoy now is helping others be successful. I enjoy doing that much more; that's something that lasts forever."

A Literacy Advocate

Bryant was an advocate for academic achievement. He made several donations to literacy programs with his most recent being in June 2019, where he donated copies of his book "The Wizenard Series" to LeBron James’ I Promise School.

He often asked his fans to donate books to help promote reading among low-income children.

Supporting Women In Sports

Bryant was a big supporter of women in sports. In December 2019, Bryant and his wife Vanessa donated ,000 to help support the Roseville Basketball team.

This was after a student requested him to help them get prepared for the season.

Bryant had earlier partnered with Nike and the LA Boys and Girls club to create a youth basketball league called The Mamba League.

He later formed the Mamba Academy to provide kids with access to sports. He used the academy to offer athletic and lifestyle training to young athletes. The academy was also used as the training ground for his daughter’s basketball team.

He was headed to the Mamba Academy when his helicopter crashed.

Bryant was also an avid supporter of the U.S. national women's soccer team.

Public domain photo via Wikimedia.

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Источник: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/9-ways-kobe-bryant-made-232901564.html

Arike Ogunbowale Honors Idol Kobe Bryant On and Off the Court

On March 30, 2018, Arike Ogunbowale put up a shot that shocked the college basketball world. With a buzzer beater, she sent home a favoured UConn team that featured Kia Nurse and Napheesa Collier. In the stands were Kobe Bryant and his family. Moments after celebrating on the court, she received a tweet from the Black Mamba himself. The video of her reaction spread rapidly on social media:

Like for many of us, Ogunbowale’s favourite player was Kobe Bryant. The mentality he displayed on the court challenged us to be better. His legacy spreads beyond basketball. From winning an Oscar Award for his short film Dear Basketball to his business ventures, Bryant was unstoppable.

Nike’s Mamba Week coincided with August 24th to commemorate the two iconic numbers Bryant wore during his career (8 and 24). Fans all across the globe celebrated Byant and his daughter Gigi’s lives. Each day highlighted a value, such as passion, focus, honesty, fearless, or optimism. Athletes, including Devin Booker, Sabrina Ionescu, Naomi Osaka, and many others shared their perspective on the Mamba Mentality through videos. Ogunbowale was one of the athletes who honored Bryant that week. 

Before facing the Sparks on what would’ve been Bryant’s 42nd birthday, she sported the Black Mamba Jersey, which features a snakeskin-like texture, and both of Bryant’s numbers. In hand were her favourite kicks from the Undefeated x Nike Kobe 5 Protro "What If?" Pack: the Unlucky 13. These products were all a part of Nike’s release for the week.

Ogunbowale now wears the number 24 for the Dallas Wings—but she actually had the number before Bryant. When she joined her first AAU team, two numbers were left: 24 and 25.

“I just say it was fate, it was meant to happen,” Ogunbowale said.

While shooting an episode of Bryant’s show, Detailed, he invited Ogunbowale to chat with him. The first impression of her role model has stuck with her. When she arrived at the filming location, she texted Bryant, expecting to be called in. Instead, Bryant climbed down three flights of stairs and walked up with Ogunbowale. 

“He was such a good guy," Ogunbowale recalls. "It doesn’t matter, if he’s a legend, Hall of Famer, or an idol. He was a regular person and that’s how he treated people."

Now she emulates Bryant on and off the court: She recently started a successful clothing line. Items range from tees and sweatshirts to prints, and fans have been obsessing over it.

Bryant was known for sporting an orange WNBA hoodie and advocating for women’s basketball. He was always seen with Gigi courtside at games, teaching her plays and techniques. During Mamba Week and beyond, Ogunbowale’s goal is to continue his mission and use her platform to encourage young athletes. 

Despite a lack of team success, Ogunbowale had a memorable year for the Wings, as she led the league in points with 22.8 per game. The former Fighting Irish star was also named All-WNBA by the Associated Press.

She demonstrates the Mamba Mentality wherever she goes. Another topic Bryant was passionate about was racial justice. The WNBA players have shown their full support by protesting and speaking about their experiences. Ogunbowale wants to continue the conversation in the offseason.

“Stuff dies down and you don’t see a lot of posts about certain things anymore,” Ogunbowale said. “Whenever I can tweet something so that it stays fresh in people’s minds—because you don’t want all this work and all this talk about it to go to waste,” 

She’s a force to be reckoned with on and off the court, just like one of the world’s greatest, Kobe Bryant. 

Photo Credit: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/Imagn Content Services, LLC

Источник: https://www.sikids.com

Kobe Bryant: Behind the scenes stories from his former Lakers coaches and teammates

Sacre’s first story: “We’re going on a road trip, so they gave us our per diem. I think our per diem was like $1200 for a long road trip. I was like, ‘Yo, Kobe, let me get your per diem. You don’t need it.’ He goes, ‘What are you gonna do with it?’ I had my own little joke with him. We both laughed about it. He’s like, ‘You’re not getting it, though.’ I’m like, ‘Come on, man. Well, how much cash do you have on you right now?’ He whipped out $40,000 in cash and put it on the floor. I was like, ‘Damn! That’s what you’re rolling with?’ I’ve never seen that much cash like that. It was in his backpack.”

Sacre’s second story: “I always had a six-pack in my backpack. On the bus, he’d always ask me for a beer. I had to do Coors Light most times. If I could get the Bud heavy, I’d be on it. He’d be like, ‘Hey Sac, I know you got one.’ I’d throw him a beer once and a while.”

His foot was up in a cast, and he was on a scooter. It was funny to see him in a different light. At that point, I’d only seen him in basketball mode. With his family, he was like a big teddy bear

Hunt: “I have a picture, it’s me and Kobe, walking off the court. I’m in Dallas, and I’m palming the back of his head. We’re just giggling like two schoolgirls walking off the court. He hadn’t announced that he was going to retire, but he was basically telling me right there. His whole perspective was different. He was telling me then and then after the game when we met up again on the loading dock, and he is talking cryptically. My man is talking to me, and he used an analogy, something like, ‘If you’re a fat kid, how can a fat kid complain about being hungry?’ There was some other stuff wrapped around it, but he was basically alluding to the point of I’ve had a great career. I’ve had an incredible career. I’ve had a great time. I’ve done all the things I wanted to do. I’m good. Then, a couple of weeks later, is when he made the announcement publicly that he was retiring.”

Powell’s first story: “No matter how many stories are shared and information is swapped, it comes back to him being a competitor and being obsessed with the game he loves. I played checkers with him from time to time. We would compete on the planes or wherever. Those games would be so competitive that literally it could turn into 30 or 40 minutes just playing checkers. It’s not like we were playing chess, you know? He just hated losing that much. That’s just the type of guy he was.”

Powell’s second story: “He came to Riverdale. I had donated a technology center. In my school. I wrote a personal check for $20,000, and they built out a room. We had between 12 and 14 computers. It was set up to basically help the students and get on track notes, test prep, things like that, because at that time, the county had lost its accreditation. So, just trying to give them the resources that they need. He and Derek Fisher both came to my high school to help me present the checks as well as the room. People still talk about that moment to this day. The fact that he came out there to show love was amazing, especially good for the southside of Atlanta. For everybody who was in attendance that day, just a really amazing thing to be a part of, and I was beyond grateful for his support.”

Meeks’ first story: “I would always come back to the gym late at night and get some work in, and no one else would be in there at the time. I like to work at like 10:00 or 11:00 when nobody’s there. I was there for like an hour or two. I thought no one was there because all the lights were off in the weight room. I’m done and about to get dressed and go home, and Kobe walks in. He kind of scared me because my back was to the door. I’m like, ‘You were here?’ He was like, ‘Yeah, I was here the whole time in the weight room watching you. I really respect how you go about your craft.’ I’m like, this dude is maniacal about his teammates and who he’s playing with. I feel like when he knew that one of his teammates worked as hard or worked hard like him, he knew that he could trust you in times of need, and he can go to war with you.”

Meeks’ second story: “Right after he tore his Achilles, me and Dwight Howard went to his house. He was devastated, but we were trying to cheer him up. We went and spent a couple of hours with him and his family. His wife was there and his two daughters at the time. Gigi was young. We just spent some time hanging out. His foot was up in a cast, and he was on a scooter. It was funny to see him in a different light. At that point, I’d only seen him in basketball mode. With his family, he was like a big teddy bear.”

Meeks’ third story: “We were on the plane. I had just started to get into the rotation. I was asleep. This was one of those long plane rides after a game. He woke me up. It’s like 2:00 in the morning. We watched film for that whole plane ride. It was probably like a two and a half hour plane ride. I slept probably 30 minutes. He was like, ‘This is where I want you on the court.’ My spot in Mike D’Antoni’s offense was in the corner and I’d shake it up to the wing in transition or in halfcourt sets. That next week, and the rest of the season, I’d get three or four shots a game just off that film session.”

Bazemore: “I asked him about a couple of books he’d been reading because I also heard he was a philosopher, a really deep thinker. He gave me a book called Zen in the Art of Archery. He gave me that book. He said, ‘When you figure out the meaning, shoot me a text, and we can chat about it.’ I read through it and sent him a text. He said, ‘That’s not it. Think deeper.’ I had no idea how to even process what the book was telling me. Now, fast forward, six, seven, eight years, and I kind of grasp that a bit. He was just on such a different wavelength. He had his purpose. He had his ideals on the way the world worked and how he could make it better. You hear guys across the league how he was sharing his wisdom. Some people give you knowledge, but he was sharing wisdom. He had all the talks of all the greats, Bill Russell, MJ, Magic. He had some of the most intricate conversations with some of the best players of all time and meshed it into his game. I was just excited for once he retired and kind of see him starting to talk about these things and be out in public and show the world how great he was.”

Ham’s first story: “One thing that always stuck with me we were sitting in OKC one time. What did you learn about your time coming into the league? You and Shaq were a dynamic duo to the point where Shaq isn’t around, and now you’ve got to carry that load. He said, ‘The one thing I learned is I had to learn how to put my arms around my teammates and allow them to walk with me and not drag them behind me. Before I thought I had to go out there and set the tone through my work ethic and going hard at everybody on my team thinking that if I’m going hard at them. That’s going to make them work harder and step their game up and try to be on my level, but never communicated with them.’ People thought he was an oddball, a loner, a weirdo, whatever. He said, ‘But going through those lean years when I was the best player on a losing team taught me something.’ It taught him, and words out of his own mouth, how Shaq was a guy that was so f*cking dominant, but always took time to engage with his teammates in a positive and productive manner, even off the court.”

Ham’s second story: “I was having a beer with Craig Sager, and Kobe was coming back from having a workout with I think Tim Grover. He goes up, changes his clothes, comes back down, and we’re sitting there. Miami was playing somebody in the second round, and it’s the Dwyane Wade, LeBron, Chris Bosh team. We’re talking about the game, and he asked what I was drinking. I had a little Jack Daniels. He told the server, ‘Get my man some Jack Daniels, and I’m going to take some patron.’ Mind you, we’ve got an elimination game the next night. I’m like, ‘You drink? No way in hell.’ We both busted out laughing, and he said, ‘Hell yeah, if you deal with some of the sh*t that I have to deal with, yes indeed.’ I almost fell out of my chair.”

Источник: https://hoopshype.com/lists/kobe-bryant-stories-lakers-coaches-teammates/

NBA legend Kobe Bryant, 41, died in a helicopter crash on Sunday morning in Calabasas, Calif., along with his 13-year-old daughter Gianna, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Office confirmed. Seven other people were on board Bryant’s helicopter and were all killed in the tragic accident.

Bryant’s impact on basketball is obvious: five-time NBA champion; two-time NBA Finals MVP; league MVP in 2008; 18-time NBA All-Star; fourth-leading scorer in NBA history. He played for only one team in his career, the Lakers, and wore two numbers in his career, and both No. 8 and No. 24 have been retired by the team.

Few other professional athletes are more closely associated with and representative of one city than Bryant and Los Angeles; Derek Jeter and New York City might be a fair comparison. In a statement on Sunday, L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti said that Bryant “will live forever in the heart of Los Angeles.” He was also one of the league’s earliest global stars, pivotal in making the NBA huge in China.

But Bryant also leaves a stunning legacy off the court, completely outside of basketball, and thus a lasting impact on what pro athletes can achieve in business after retirement. (His legacy is also complicated: in 2003, he was accused of rape by a Colorado hotel employee and charged with felony sexual assault; prosecutors dropped the charges after his accuser refused to testify, and Bryant later settled with her out of court and publicly apologized.)

Bryant earned more than $323 million in NBA salary (plus more than that in additional endorsement money from Nike and others), and after retiring in 2016, he quickly put that fortune to work.

90th Academy Awards - Oscars Backstage - Hollywood, California, U.S., 04/03/2018 - Kobe Bryant with Best Animated Short Film Award for "Dear Basketball". REUTERS/Mike Blake     TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

That year, Bryant launched a $100 million tech investing fund, Bryant Stibel, with venture capitalist Jeff Stibel. It was a formalization of the investing the two had already been doing since 2013, a reminder that Bryant began planning for his second act well before he retired.

The firm’s portfolio has huge household names like Alibaba and Dell, plus stakes in more than 20 early-stage companies including: Derek Jeter’s athlete blog The Players’ Tribune (where Bryant published the original “Dear Basketball” post that would inspire his eventual Oscar-winning animated short); legal services startup LegalZoom; Cholula hot sauce; wedding site Minted; “Fortnite” game developer Epic Games; skincare company Art of Sport; Jessica Alba’s The Honest Co; and location tracker Tile.

Bryant’s $6 million early stake in sports drink BodyArmor in 2014 turned into $200 million after Coca-Cola bought a huge stake in the Gatorade competitor in 2018.

Of course, Bryant was hardly the only NBA star to catch the tech investing bug. LeBron James, Andre Iguodala, and Steph Curry, among many others, have all become known for the same. All of them watched Bryant do it first. In an interview with Yahoo Finance last year, former L.A. Laker Lamar Odom named Bryant as the athlete he has most taken cues from in business: “I learned the most from him... on and off the court.”

Even beside investing, Bryant’s breadth of achievements in media and youth sports are remarkable.

In 2018, he won an Academy Award for Best Animated Short for “Dear Basketball,” the movie he created, wrote, and produced based on his own poem. That year, he launched Granity Studios, a multimedia company focused on inspiring content for young people across television, film, and book publishing. Granity’s projects have included the podcast “The Punies,” the ESPN+ analysis show “Detail,” and Bryant’s book “Mama Mentality: How I Play the Game,” published last year. And it has a large slate of projects coming this and next year, including more books in the young adult “Wizenard Series.”

Bryant said in 2018 that he launched Granity “as a platform to create and share original stories to inspire today’s young athletes. There’s surprisingly little content that combines the passion of sports and the traditions of original storytelling.” He had made it one of his core business missions to inspire young people. Atlanta Hawks rookie Trae Young said on Sunday that in one of their last conversations, Bryant reiterated “how he wants me to continue being a role model for kids growing up, and for Gigi and all the kids looking up to me.”

On “Detail,” Bryant analyzed in great depth the styles of fellow basketball stars; in 2018, he recruited NFL legend Peyton Manning to narrate a season of analyzing quarterbacks. “Detail” was one of the earliest exclusive shows on the ESPN+ streaming app, and likely contributed to the service amassing 3.5 million paying subscribers in its first 18 months.

Bryant in 2018 also opened the Mamba Sports Academy in L.A., where he worked out NBA players, WNBA players, and hosted his daughter Gianna’s AAU club basketball team. Gianna Bryant was a promising young star herself and was headed for her own playing career. In recent years, Bryant often took her to Lakers games, L.A. Sparks WNBA games, and USC Trojans women’s basketball games. (NBA Commissioner Adam Silver’s statement on Bryant’s death took care to note that Bryant took “special delight in passing down his love of the game to Gianna.”) He was also a huge supporter of women’s sports outside of basketball, like the U.S. women’s national soccer team.

In media interviews over the last few years about his business endeavors, Bryant repeatedly said he had zeroed in on his post-NBA passion: “storytelling.”

Daniel Roberts is an editor-at-large at Yahoo Finance and closely covers sports business. Follow him on Twitter at @readDanwrite.

Read more:

Kobe Bryant, Derek Jeter, and the new playbook for athlete investing

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Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flipboard, LinkedIn,YouTube, and reddit.

Источник: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/kobe-bryant-left-huge-impact-on-business-off-the-court-131807858.html

It was Jan. 24, 2004, and 8-year-old Jeffrey Mckenzie hid behind his mother Linda and grabbed her legs. His wish to meet Kobe Bryant was about to be granted.

“I couldn’t believe he was actually walking toward me,” said Mckenzie, recounting the story in April 2016.

“I was in the fifth grade,” he said, and he had sickle cell anemia. His mother had taken a job at the Make-A-Wish Foundation, and the organization offered her son the opportunity to become a recipient.

When Bryant appeared, the young Jeffrey ran to the 6-foot-6-inch Los Angeles Lakers star and gave him a big hug. Then he wouldn’t let go.

“I just remember as a mom how much it touched me to see Kobe reach back down and embrace Jeffrey, because he had gone through so much,” Linda Mckenzie recalled.

Bryant had experience granting the wishes of children with life-threatening illnesses. He had appeared for Make-A-Wish more than 100 times over 20 years. And that was just one example of Bryant’s philanthropic work, some of it through the Lakers and the NBA, and other times on his own.

Bryant died on Jan. 26 in a helicopter crash that claimed the lives of nine people, including Bryant and his 13-year-old daughter, Gianna. He was 41.

The basketball phenom’s career spanned two decades with the Lakers, with whom he won five NBA championships and became an 18-time All-Star.

Basketball was also part of his charity work. He volunteered for the Boys & Girls Club of America, often hosting basketball camps. He participated in the league’s NBA Cares initiatives, where he helped build homes and basketball courts, stocked food pantries and supported reading initiatives.

Bryant was the official spokesman for After-School All-Stars, a national children’s charity that provides after-school programs to 72,000 kids. In 2008, he was named a spokesperson for Aid Still Required, which helps people left behind after natural disasters and other crises.

Remembering Kobe

Besides his work with sick kids through Make-A-Wish, Bryant also supported cancer initiatives. For instance, he participated in a fundraising effort for Stand Up To Cancer in 2012 that raised more than $80 million for cancer research.

Bryant and his wife Vanessa launched the Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation, originally named VIVO, in 2007. From 2012 to 2017, the organization reported revenue of more than $2.5 million, with $1,035,472 reported in 2012, according to IRS tax filings. They sponsored international enrichment experiences for minority college students and provided domestic and international youth scholarships for the Kobe Bryant Basketball Academy.

Combating youth homelessness was another cause that Bryant felt strongly about and the family foundation partnered with Los Angeles organizations Step Up on Second and My Friend’s Place to combat homelessness in the area. For three years, Bryant also served as the honorary chair of United Way of Greater Los Angeles’ Annual HomeWalk, a 5K run/walk that raises awareness about homelessness.

The foundation also supported Mamba FC, a fee-based youth soccer club in Orange County that teaches young athletes “how to become leaders and independent thinkers, while working together as a group to achieve a common goal through health and fitness.”

Bryant had global appeal and in June 2009, he established the Kobe Bryant China Fund to raise money for education, sports and culture programs for children from both China and the U.S. More than $6.15 million has been raised for those efforts. The Bryants are also founding donors to the National Museum of African American History and Culture with a $1 million pledge in 2017.

Besides making donations, Bryant used his presence to highlight causes. On April 4, 2016, the Lakers’ community relations department did a 10-day campaign on its Instagram account titled #KobeintheCommunity that highlighted such moments over his 20-year career.

The events included celebrating schools with 100% completion rate in a Lakers Reading Challenge, hosting holiday parties for kids from Boys & Girls Clubs around Los Angeles and joining President Barack Obama in assembling care packages for wounded warriors in Washington.

There were also less formal, less heralded moments. On a foggy day in December, Bryant stopped his car at a Newport Beach, California, intersection. He stepped over the wreckage from a motor vehicle accident to help direct traffic and talk with the victims until police arrived. A bystander captured the moment on video:

Kelley Evans is a general editor at The Undefeated. She is a food passionista, helicopter mom and an unapologetic southerner who spends every night with the cast of The Young and the Restless by way of her couch.

Источник: https://theundefeated.com/features/kobe-bryants-charitable-work-included-20-years-with-the-make-a-wish-foundation/

Kobe Bryant will go down in history as one of the greatest basketball players of the 21st century.

His 20-year career at the Los Angeles Lakers saw five NBA championships; the 2008 MVP award; a two-time NBA finals MVP; and Bryant was the fourth-leading scorer in NBA history.

Off the court, Bryant, who was killed Jan. 26 in a helicopter crash along with his daughter Gianna and seven others, was equally exceptional. From mentoring young boys and girls to donating money to help support high school basketball teams, Bryant made a difference in the lives of thousands of people globally.

Here are nine times the “Black Mamba” made a difference outside the court.

National Ambassador For After-School All-Stars

Bryant was big on helping young people achieve their goals and become leaders.

In 2007, he became a national ambassador for After-School All-stars, a nonprofit organization that partners with schools to offer after-school programming for students from kobe bryant off the court families.

Through the organization, Bryant gave motivational speeches to young students throughout the U.S. He also raised money for the organization’s Los Angeles chapter, which serves 14,000 students from 38 schools.

See Also: 'Inspire The Next Generation': A Look At Kobe Bryant's Career As A Venture Capitalist

Raising Awareness, Money For Darfur

In 2008, Bryant was voted NBA’s most valuable player. The same year, he signed on as the spokesperson for Aid Still Required.

He used his status as MVP to create a PSA where he raised awareness on the atrocities of the Darfur conflict. Bryant made an emotional appeal asking people to come together and take a stand against the war.

Advocate For Children Fighting Terminal Illness

Throughout his 20-year career, Bryant brought countless smiles to kids suffering from life-threatening illnesses.

Through Make-a-wish-America, a nonprofit organization that creates life-changing wishes for youth with critical sickness, Bryant visited over 200 kids battling life-threatening illnesses.

He would also invite some of the kids to his games to provide a form of escape and inspire them.

The Kobe And Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation

Together with his wife Vanessa, the basketball axis bank mutual fund online login established the Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation in 2011

The same year, the foundation partnered with homeless youth drop-in center My Friends Place to increase awareness about the homeless problem and help homeless youth build self-sufficient lives.

The KVBFF also operates the Mamba FC, which is a youth soccer club in Orange County that uses sports to provide training for young athletes to become independent thinkers and leaders.

Bryant also used the KVBFF to help increase awareness of black history. He was among the milestone founders of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

Raising Money for Cancer Awareness

Throughout his career, Bryant worked with different organizations to raise money for cancer research and treatment.

In 2012, he was part of the Stand Up to Cancer telecast, which raised over $81 million for cancer research. Bryant also sent motivational messages to patients battling cancer.

Cultural Ambassador To China

After the 2008 Olympics, China fell in love with Bryant. In 2009, he was named the cultural ambassador to China and later contributed 5 million yuan to promote sports in China.

He also partnered with retail giant Alibaba Group Holding Ltd - ADR (NYSE: BABA) to help promote basketball in China. Through the Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation, he provided hundred of America youths a chance to learn Mandarin and the Chinese culture and traditions.

Helping Others Succeed

After his retirement from the NBA, Bryant became a venture capitalist and helped several companies get off the ground.

Through his VC firm Bryant Stibel, Kobe invested in over a dozen tech, data and media startups.

In an interview with the Wall Street Journal, Bryant said he enjoyed helping others succeed. “The most important thing I enjoy now is helping others be successful. I enjoy doing that much more; that's something that lasts forever."

A Literacy Advocate

Bryant was an advocate for academic achievement. He made several donations to literacy programs with his most recent being in June 2019, where he donated copies of his book "The Wizenard Series" to LeBron James’ I Promise School.

He often asked his fans to donate books to help promote reading among low-income children.

Supporting Women In Sports

Bryant was a big supporter of women in sports. In December 2019, Bryant and his wife Vanessa donated ,000 to help support the Roseville Basketball team.

This was after a student requested him to help them get prepared for the season.

Bryant had earlier partnered with Nike and the LA Boys and Girls club to create a youth basketball league called The Mamba League.

He later formed the Mamba Academy to provide kids with access to sports. He used the academy to offer athletic and lifestyle training to young athletes. The academy was also used as the training ground for his daughter’s basketball team.

He was headed to the Mamba Academy when his helicopter crashed.

Bryant was also an avid supporter of the U.S. national women's soccer team.

Public domain photo via Wikimedia.

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Источник: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/9-ways-kobe-bryant-made-232901564.html

Arike Ogunbowale Honors Idol Kobe Bryant On and Off the Adt com pay my bill March 30, 2018, Arike Ogunbowale put up a shot that shocked the college basketball world. With a buzzer beater, she sent home a favoured UConn team that featured Kia Nurse and Napheesa Collier. In the stands were Kobe Bryant and his family. Moments after celebrating on the court, she received a tweet from the Black Mamba himself. The video of her reaction spread rapidly on social media:

Like for many of us, Ogunbowale’s favourite player was Kobe Bryant. The mentality he displayed on the court challenged us to be better. His legacy spreads beyond basketball. From winning an Oscar Award for his short film Dear Basketball to his business ventures, Bryant was unstoppable.

Nike’s Mamba Week coincided with August 24th to commemorate the two iconic numbers Bryant wore during his career (8 and 24). Fans all across the globe celebrated Byant and his daughter Gigi’s lives. Each day highlighted a value, such as passion, focus, honesty, fearless, or optimism. Athletes, including Devin Booker, Sabrina Ionescu, Naomi Osaka, and many others shared their perspective on the Mamba Mentality through videos. Ogunbowale was one of the athletes who honored Bryant that week. 

Before facing the Sparks on what would’ve been Bryant’s 42nd birthday, she sported the Black Mamba Jersey, which features a snakeskin-like texture, and both of Bryant’s numbers. In hand were her favourite kicks from the Undefeated x Nike Kobe 5 Protro "What If?" Pack: the Unlucky 13. These products were all a part of Nike’s release for the week.

Ogunbowale now wears the number 24 for the Dallas Wings—but she actually had the number before Bryant. When she joined her first AAU team, two numbers were left: 24 and 25.

“I just say it was fate, it was meant to happen,” Ogunbowale said.

While shooting an episode of Bryant’s show, Detailed, he invited Ogunbowale to chat with him. The first impression of her role model has stuck with her. When she arrived at the filming location, she texted Bryant, expecting to be called in. Instead, Bryant climbed down three flights of stairs and walked up with Ogunbowale. 

“He was such a good guy," Ogunbowale recalls. "It doesn’t matter, if he’s a legend, Hall of Famer, or an idol. He was a regular person and that’s how he treated people."

Now she emulates Bryant on and off the court: She recently started a successful clothing line. Items range from tees and sweatshirts to prints, and fans have been obsessing over it.

Bryant was known for sporting an orange WNBA hoodie and advocating for women’s basketball. He was always seen with Gigi courtside at games, teaching her plays and techniques. During Mamba Week and beyond, Ogunbowale’s goal is to continue his mission and use her platform to encourage young athletes. 

Despite a lack of team success, Ogunbowale had a memorable year for the Wings, as she led the league in points with 22.8 per game. The former Fighting Irish star was also named All-WNBA by the Associated Press.

She demonstrates the Mamba Mentality wherever she goes. Another topic Bryant was passionate about was racial justice. The WNBA players have shown their full support by protesting and speaking about their experiences. Ogunbowale wants to continue the conversation in the offseason.

“Stuff dies down and you don’t see a lot of posts about certain things anymore,” Ogunbowale said. “Whenever I can tweet something so that it stays fresh in people’s minds—because you don’t want all this work and all this talk about it to go to waste,” 

She’s a force to be reckoned with on and off the court, just like one of the world’s greatest, Kobe Bryant. 

Photo Credit: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel/Imagn Content Services, LLC

Источник: https://www.sikids.com

5 Ways Kobe Bryant impacted lives off the court

The Basketball Hall of Fame will soon welcome LA Lakers legend Kobe Bryant into its hallowed halls on Saturday. He will be inducted and subsequently immortalized along with other luminaries of the hardwood including Tim Duncan, Kevin Garnett and WNBA star Tamika Catchings.

Bryant has made a huge impact contra costa county covid cases the basketball court as evidenced by the multitude of records he has set or broken and the number of players who have idolized him growing up.

But the late Kobe Bryant impacted the lives of people off the court as well, and that arguably has had a wider reach than what he had done on the court. From individuals to organizations, the 18-time All-Star had shown that he lived out Spider-Man’s very famous moral code—with great power comes great kobe bryant off the court his life.

Gianna Bryant, Vanessa Bryant, former NBA player Kobe Bryant and Natalia Bryant attend the Nickelodeon Kids' Choice Sports Awards 2016 at UCLA's Pauley Pavilion.

A sampling of Kobe Bryant’s work off the court

Prior to Kobe Bryant’s retirement, he had already prepared for life after basketball. While his NBA career was his primary passion, he would spend many hours investing in the lives of others when he wasn’t dribbling a basketball on the court. It would carry over into his retirement as he continued and began efforts that would leave lasting legacies.

1) Supporting cancer research

Kobe Bryant understood how much he could do to aid in eradicating cancer. In 2012, the LA Lakers superstar took part in a special Stand Up To Cancer telecast to raise funds to battle the dreaded disease. The fundraising efforts raised more than $80 million that would go to cancer research.

Moreover, Kobe Bryant sought to impact patients who were already suffering from cancer by sending inspirational messages to them.

2) Making dreams come true

His dreams of playing in the NBA already realized, Kobe Bryant wanted to make the dreams of other children come true as well. For over 20 years, the five-time champion would make more than a hundred appearances for the Make-A-Wish Foundation. For those counting at home, that’s an average of five visits every year dating back to before he hung up his jersey permanently in 2016.

In doing so, Kobe Bryant granted kobe bryant off the court wishes of more than 200 children who were diagnosed with life-threatening illnesses. Some of them were invited to watch him play at LA Lakers games, giving them and their families a day filled with wonderful memories.

3) Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation

Kobe Bryant partnered with his wife Vanessa to launch the Kobe and Vanessa Bryant Family Foundation in 2006. According to its Facebook page, “KVBFF is dedicated to improving the lives of children and families in need.”

Kobe and Vanessa Bryant attend Tribeca Shorts: Animated Shorts curated by Whoopi Goldberg during the 2017 Tribeca Film Festival.

Originally called VIVO, the foundation was created to provide kids with cultural enrichment experiences and educational opportunities. Through this initiative, the Bryants touched the lives of countless minority college students and gave out scholarships for the Kobe Bryant Basketball Academy.

The foundation also took care of homeless children in the Los Angeles area. The Bryants helped support other foundations and non-profits such as My Friends Place and Step Up on Second that sought to help these underprivileged youth.

4) Supporting students from low-income families

By now you can tell that the youth were foremost in Kobe Bryant’s mind whenever he thought of reaching out to provide a helping hand. This was already evident even during the early part of his career.

Back kobe bryant off the court 2007, the former scoring champ was named a national ambassador for After-School All-Stars. The non-profit organization works with schools across the country to provide after-school activities to underprivileged students.

On their website is an entire page dedicated to Kobe Bryant and his impact on the students.

“Kobe was as much a superstar off the court as he was on it,” said Ben Paul, President and CEO of After-School All-Stars. “For over 12 years, he donated his time, wisdom and resources to the 90,000 All-Star students across the country. What I will remember most about Kobe’s involvement with us as a National Ambassador is how authentically he connected with students when he spent time with them,” reads the statement.

5) Inspiring the youth through TV, films and books

By now, practically everyone knows that Kobe Bryant won an Oscar in 2018 for Best Animated Short for “Dear Basketball,” his own story that was told through film. Because of this, he launched Granity Studios that was dedicated to inspiring the youth to create content for television, film and book writing/publishing.

“I built Granity Studios as a platform to create and share original stories to inspire today’s young athletes,” Bryant said at the time of its unveiling. “There’s surprisingly little content that combines the passion of sports and the traditions of original storytelling. Granity Studios will fill that void.”

The multimedia company released young adult books in its “Wizenard Series” which Kobe Bryant had planned to adapt through theater, animation and live-action content.

After its release, "The Wizenard Series: Training Camp," became No. 1 on The New York Times bestseller list.

The creativity he showed on the court continued to manifest itself in his vision to improve the lives of the youth. Whether it was sick children, underprivileged kids or those who needed to be inspired by him, Kobe Bryant spent time and his own resources to better the lives of those around him.


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Also Read: NBA Playoffs 2020-21: Analyzing LA Lakers' postseason scenarios


Источник: https://www.sportskeeda.com/basketball/5-ways-kobe-bryant-impacted-lives-court

Kobe Bryant had an illustrious NBA career, but his off-court legacy is complicated

The NBA icon Kobe Bryant, who died in a helicopter crash in California kobe bryant off the court Sunday, had an illustrious basketball career, and his influence can still be felt in the league today — but he had a complicated legacy off the court.

Bryant, who had a 20-year career with the Los Angeles Lakers until his retirement in 2016, was accused of sexual assault as a young player, experienced criticism over an Academy Award win in the wake of the #MeToo era in Hollywood, and faced other minor controversies throughout his life.

In 2003, Bryant was charged with sexual assault and false imprisonment after being accused of rape by a hotel employee in Colorado.

The then-19-year-old accuser told police at the time that she was asked by Bryant to come to his hotel room and give him a tour of the hotel. Following the tour, she and Bryant returned to his hotel room where the accuser alleged she was held there against her will and forced to have sex with him. 

There were more than 350 pages of transcripts and records related to the case, including us bank internet banking phone number and hair samples, reported the Daily Beast. According to records, the accuser had gone to the Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners at the Valley View Hospital in Greenwood Springs, Colorado, to be examined the day after the alleged assault. Nurses there found several lacerations on her body that were "consistent with penetrating genital trauma."

The accuser also said in an interview with police that Bryant had repeatedly choked her. 

In preliminary hearings, Bryant's defense team argued that the woman was looking for a large monetary payout (despite the fact that the woman came from a wealthy family), and attempted to use the woman's past sexual history against her. 

After a year of investigation, Bryant's accuser decided that she did not want to testify in the trial, and the criminal case was dropped. 

Had he been convicted, Bryant would have faced life in prison, but the charges were later dropped, and Bryant settled a separate civil case over the allegations.

Bryant did not admit guilt in the incident, but he did issue a statement through his attorney in which he apologized to the woman.

"Although I truly believe this encounter between us was consensual, I recognize now that she did not and does not view this incident the same way I did," the apology said. "After months of reviewing discovery, listening to her attorney, and even her testimony in person, I now understand how she feels that she did not consent to this encounter. I issue this statement today fully aware that while one part of this case ends today, another remains."

Bryant continued to play in the NBA for more than a decade after the allegations first surfaced, but he did lose endorsement deals with McDonald's and Nutella, and was suspended as a spokesperson by Nike. 

The accusations were brought up again in 2018, when Bryant won an Oscar for his short animated film, "Dear Basketball."

In the wake of the #MeToo movement in Hollywood, which saw multiple high-profile men accused of sexual misconduct, including the producer Harvey Weinstein and the actor Kevin Spacey, some people were surprised that Bryant was being celebrated over the animated short.

The Los Angeles Times' Robin Abcarian said in an essay at the time that there was a "moral confusion" in the academy.

"Why are the sexual misdeeds of some men forgivable, while others are not?" Abcarian wrote, while also mentioning Roman Polanski and Ryan Seacrest.

Elsewhere off the court, Bryant faced criticism among Armenian Americans after he signed a two-year endorsement deal with Turkish Airlines in 2010; Armenians had long campaigned against the Turkish government for its refusal to describe the early-20th-century mass killings of Armenians in the Ottoman Empire as genocide.

In 2011, Bryant was fined $100,000 for directing an antigay slur at a referee during a game.

"My actions were out of frustration during the heat of the game, period," he said at the time, according to ESPN. "The words expressed do NOT reflect my feelings towards the gay and lesbian communities and were NOT meant to offend anyone."

Despite the controversies, Bryant's legacy is still felt across the NBA and elsewhere. A moment of silence was held at the first NBA game after news of Bryant's death broke Sunday. Athletes, politicians, and celebrities alike have spoken out about his death, issuing condolences and telling positive stories of his life.

Источник: https://www.businessinsider.com/kobe-bryant-nba-career-controversies-off-the-court-2020-1

NBA legend Kobe Bryant, 41, died in amazon seller customer service helicopter crash on Sunday morning in Calabasas, Calif., along with his 13-year-old daughter Gianna, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Office confirmed. Seven other people were on board Bryant’s helicopter and were all killed in the tragic accident.

Bryant’s impact on basketball is obvious: five-time NBA champion; two-time NBA Finals MVP; league MVP in 2008; 18-time NBA All-Star; fourth-leading scorer in NBA history. He played for only one team in his career, the Lakers, and wore two numbers in his career, and both No. 8 and No. 24 have been retired by the team.

Few other professional athletes are more closely associated with and representative of one city than Bryant and Los Angeles; Derek Jeter and New York City might be a fair comparison. In a statement on Sunday, L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti said that Bryant “will live forever in the heart of Los Angeles.” He was also one of the league’s earliest global stars, pivotal in making the NBA huge in China.

But Bryant also leaves a stunning legacy off the court, completely outside of basketball, and thus a lasting impact on what pro athletes can achieve in business after retirement. (His legacy is also complicated: in 2003, he was accused of rape by a Colorado hotel employee and charged kobe bryant off the court felony sexual assault; prosecutors dropped the charges after his accuser refused to testify, and Bryant later settled with her out of court and publicly apologized.)

Bryant earned more than $323 million in NBA salary (plus more than that in additional endorsement money from Nike first national bank of hutchinson app others), and after retiring in 2016, he quickly put that fortune to work.

90th Academy Awards - Oscars Backstage - Hollywood, California, U.S., 04/03/2018 - Kobe Bryant with Best Animated Short Film Award for "Dear Basketball&quot. REUTERS/Mike Blake TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY

That year, Bryant launched a $100 million tech investing fund, Bryant Stibel, with venture capitalist Jeff Stibel. It was a formalization of the investing the two had already been doing since 2013, a reminder that Bryant began planning for his kobe bryant off the court act well before he retired.

The firm’s portfolio has huge household names like Alibaba and Dell, plus stakes in more than 20 early-stage companies including: Derek Jeter’s athlete blog The Players’ Tribune (where Bryant published the original “Dear Basketball” post that would inspire his eventual Oscar-winning animated short); legal services startup LegalZoom; Cholula hot sauce; wedding site Minted; “Fortnite” game developer Epic Games; skincare company Art of Sport; Jessica Alba’s The Honest Co; and location tracker Tile.

Bryant’s $6 million early stake in sports drink BodyArmor in 2014 turned into $200 million after Coca-Cola bought a huge stake in the Gatorade competitor in 2018.

Of course, Bryant first citizens bank credit card trinidad hardly the only NBA star to catch the tech investing bug. LeBron James, Andre Iguodala, and Steph Curry, among many others, have all become known for the same. All of them watched Bryant do it first. In an interview with Yahoo Finance last year, former L.A. Laker Lamar Odom named Bryant as the athlete he has most taken cues from in business: “I learned the most from him. on and off the court.”

Even beside investing, Bryant’s breadth of achievements in media and youth sports are remarkable.

In 2018, he won an Academy Award for Best Animated Short for “Dear Basketball,” the movie he created, wrote, and produced based on his own poem. That year, he launched Granity Studios, a multimedia company focused on inspiring content for mm 4 to m people across television, film, and book publishing. Granity’s projects have included the podcast “The Punies,” the ESPN+ analysis show “Detail,” and Bryant’s book “Mama Mentality: How I Play the Game,” published last year. And it has a large slate of projects coming this and next year, including more books in the young adult “Wizenard Series.”

Bryant said in 2018 that he launched Granity “as a platform to create and share original stories to inspire today’s young athletes. There’s surprisingly little content that combines the passion of sports and the traditions of original storytelling.” He had made it one of his core business missions to inspire young people. Atlanta Hawks rookie Trae Young said on Sunday that in one of their last conversations, Bryant reiterated “how he wants me to continue being a role model for kids growing up, and for Gigi and all the kids looking up to me.”

On “Detail,” Bryant analyzed in great depth the styles of fellow basketball stars; in kobe bryant off the court, he recruited NFL legend Peyton Manning to narrate a season of analyzing quarterbacks. “Detail” was one of the earliest exclusive shows on the ESPN+ streaming app, and likely contributed to the service amassing 3.5 million paying subscribers in its first 18 months.

Bryant in 2018 also opened the Mamba Sports Academy in L.A., where he worked out NBA players, WNBA players, and hosted his daughter Gianna’s AAU club basketball team. Gianna Bryant was a promising young star herself and was headed for her own playing career. In recent years, Bryant often took her to Lakers games, L.A. Sparks WNBA games, and USC Trojans women’s basketball games. (NBA Commissioner Adam Silver’s statement on Bryant’s death took care to note that Bryant took “special delight in passing down his love of the game to Gianna.”) He was also a huge supporter of women’s sports outside bb racing game download basketball, like the U.S. women’s national soccer team.

In media interviews over the last few years about his business endeavors, Bryant repeatedly said he had zeroed in on his post-NBA passion: “storytelling.”

Daniel Roberts is an editor-at-large kobe bryant off the court Yahoo Finance and closely covers sports business. Follow him on Twitter at @readDanwrite.

Read more:

Kobe Bryant, Derek Jeter, and the new playbook for athlete investing

NBA is blaming its ratings dip on injuries—but that's not the whole story

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Follow Yahoo Finance on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Flipboard, LinkedIn,YouTube, and reddit.

Источник: https://finance.yahoo.com/news/kobe-bryant-left-huge-impact-on-business-off-the-court-131807858.html

Kobe Bryant: Behind the scenes stories from his former Lakers coaches and teammates

Sacre’s first story: “We’re going on a road trip, so they gave us our per diem. I think our per diem was like $1200 for a long road trip. I was like, ‘Yo, Kobe, let me get your per diem. You don’t need it.’ He goes, ‘What are you gonna do with it?’ I had my own little joke with him. Bad times at the el royale review rotten tomatoes both laughed about it. He’s like, ‘You’re not getting it, though.’ I’m like, ‘Come on, man. Well, how much cash do you have on you right now?’ He whipped out $40,000 in cash and put it on the floor. I was like, ‘Damn! That’s what you’re rolling with?’ I’ve never seen that much cash like that. It was in his backpack.”

Sacre’s second story: “I always had a six-pack in my backpack. On the bus, he’d always ask me for a beer. I had to do Coors Light most times. If I could get the Bud heavy, I’d be on it. He’d be like, ‘Hey Sac, I know you got one.’ I’d throw him a beer once and a while.”

His foot was up in a cast, and he was on a scooter. It was funny to see him in a different light. At that point, I’d only seen him in basketball mode. With his family, he was like a big teddy bear

Hunt: “I have a picture, it’s me and Kobe, walking off the court. I’m in Dallas, and I’m palming the back of his head. We’re just giggling like two schoolgirls walking off the court. He hadn’t announced that he was going to retire, but he chime card not supported on cash app basically telling me right there. His whole perspective was different. He was telling me then and then after the game when we met up again on the loading dock, and he is talking cryptically. My man is talking to me, and he used an analogy, something like, ‘If you’re a fat kid, how can a fat kid complain about being hungry?’ There was some other stuff wrapped around it, but he was basically alluding to the point of I’ve had a great career. I’ve had an incredible career. I’ve had a great time. I’ve done all the things I wanted to do. I’m good. Then, a couple of weeks later, is when he made the announcement publicly that he was retiring.”

Powell’s first story: “No matter how many stories are shared and information is swapped, it comes back to him being a competitor and being obsessed with the game he loves. I played checkers with him from time to time. We would compete on the planes or wherever. Those games would be so competitive that literally it could turn into 30 or 40 minutes just playing checkers. It’s not like we were playing chess, you know? He just hated losing that much. That’s just the type of guy he was.”

Powell’s second story: “He came to Riverdale. I had donated a technology center. In my school. I wrote a personal check for $20,000, and they built out a room. We had between 12 and 14 computers. It was set up to basically help the students and get on track notes, test prep, things like that, because at that time, the county had lost its accreditation. So, just trying to give them the resources that they need. He and Derek Fisher both came to my high school to help me present the checks as well as the room. People still talk about that moment to this day. The fact that he came out there to show love enterprise bank and trust clayton mo amazing, especially good for the southside of Atlanta. For everybody who was in attendance that day, just a really amazing thing to be a part of, and I was beyond grateful for his support.”

Meeks’ first story: “I would always come back to the gym late at night and get some work in, and no one else would be in there at the time. I like to work at like 10:00 or 11:00 when nobody’s there. I rehoboth beach rentals airbnb there for like an hour or two. I thought no one was there because all the lights were off in the weight room. I’m done and about to get dressed and go home, and Kobe walks in. He kind of scared me because my back was to the door. I’m like, ‘You were here?’ He was like, ‘Yeah, I was here the whole time in the weight room watching you. I really respect how you go about your craft.’ I’m like, this dude is maniacal about his teammates and who he’s playing with. I feel like when he knew that one of his teammates worked as hard or worked hard like him, he knew that he could trust you in times of need, and he can go to war with you.”

Meeks’ second story: “Right after he tore his Achilles, me and Dwight Howard went to his house. He was devastated, but we were trying to cheer him up. We went and spent a couple of hours with fifth third bank brunswick ohio hours and his family. His wife was there and his two daughters at the time. Gigi was young. We just spent some time hanging out. His foot was up in a cast, and he was on a scooter. It was funny to see him in a different light. At that point, I’d only seen him in basketball mode. With his family, he was like a big teddy bear.”

Meeks’ third story: “We were on the plane. I had just started to get into the rotation. I was asleep. This was one of those long plane rides after a game. He woke me up. It’s like 2:00 in the morning. We watched film for that whole plane ride. It was probably like a two and a half hour plane ride. I slept probably 30 minutes. He was like, ‘This is where I want you on the court.’ My spot in Mike D’Antoni’s offense was in the corner and I’d shake it up to the wing in transition or in halfcourt sets. That next week, and the rest of the season, I’d get three or four shots a game just off that film session.”

Bazemore: “I asked him about a couple of books he’d been reading because I also heard he was a philosopher, a really deep thinker. He gave me a book called Zen in the Art of Archery. He gave me that book. He said, ‘When you figure out the meaning, shoot me a text, and we can chat about it.’ I read through it and sent him a text. He said, ‘That’s not it. Think deeper.’ I had no idea how to even process what the book was telling me. Now, fast forward, six, seven, eight years, and I kind of grasp that a bit. He was just on such a different wavelength. He had his purpose. He had his ideals on the way the world worked and how he could make it better. You hear guys across the league how he was sharing his wisdom. Some people give you knowledge, but he was sharing wisdom. He had all the talks of all the greats, Bill Russell, MJ, Magic. He had some of the most intricate conversations with some of the best players of all time and meshed it into his game. I was just excited for once he retired and kind of see him starting to talk about these things and be out in public and show the world how guaranty rv sales junction city or he was.”

Ham’s first story: “One thing that always stuck with me we were sitting in OKC one time. What did you learn about your time coming into the league? You and Shaq were a dynamic duo to the point where Shaq isn’t mortgage 1 down payment, and now you’ve got to carry that load. He said, ‘The one thing I learned is I had to learn how to put my arms around my teammates and allow them to walk with me and not drag them behind me. Before I thought I had to go out there and set the tone through my work ethic and going hard at everybody on my team thinking that if I’m going hard at kobe bryant off the court. That’s going to make them work harder and step their game up and try to be on my level, but never communicated with them.’ People thought he was an oddball, a loner, a weirdo, whatever. He said, ‘But going through those lean years when I was the best player on a losing team taught me something.’ It taught him, and words out of his own mouth, how Shaq was a guy that was so f*cking dominant, but always took time to engage with his teammates in a positive and productive manner, even off the court.”

Ham’s second story: “I was having a beer with Craig Sager, and Kobe was coming back from having a workout with I think Tim Grover. He goes up, changes his clothes, comes back down, and we’re sitting there. Miami was playing somebody in the second round, and it’s the Dwyane Wade, LeBron, Chris Bosh team. We’re talking about the game, and he asked what I was drinking. I had a little Jack Daniels. He told the server, ‘Get my man some Jack Daniels, and I’m going to take some patron.’ Mind you, we’ve got an elimination game the next night. I’m like, ‘You drink? No way in hell.’ We both busted out laughing, and he said, ‘Hell yeah, if you deal with some of the sh*t that I have to deal with, yes indeed.’ I almost fell out of my chair.”

Источник: https://hoopshype.com/lists/kobe-bryant-stories-lakers-coaches-teammates/
kobe bryant off the court

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