most notorious outlaws of the old west

It wouldn't have been the Wild West without them. which include a timeline of some of the most notorious crimes of the century. Jesse James was an American outlaw, gang leader, bank robber, train robber, and murderer from the state of Missouri and the most famous member of the James-. Old West gunfighter outlaw Harry Tracy Jesse James Billy the Kid Butch With that, the greatest manhunt in Pacific Northwest history was.

Most notorious outlaws of the old west -

Photos of the Old Wild West That Look Like They’re Straight Out of a Storybook

Goldie Griffith

Put ’em up, cowgirl! Ms. Griffith was a part of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, but she wasn’t there to look pretty! Goldie Griffith was known for her mean abilities as a boxer and wrestler, she also rode broncos and performed various other acts.

Wild West

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Griffith became a star in her own right, even getting married at Madison Square Garden! She famously rode her horse up the steps of Ulysses S. Grant’s tomb in New York City and was known as “the gol darndest gal who ever sat leather.” On a bet, she rode her horse over 3,000 miles from San Francisco to New York.

We all want to be as tough as Goldie! Keep reading to see more fascinating figures from the Old West.

Texas Jack Vermillion

John Wilson Vermillion, also known as Texas Jack, is one of the legendary gunfighters of the Old West who was known for working with the Earps in their vendetta rides searching for outlawed cowboys. He was also known by the name “Shoot-Your-Eye-Out Vermillion” because it was rumored that he once shot a man in the eye.

Ranker

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Texas Jack is called as such because that’s how they listed him on all of his wanted posters, which he was on for shooting a man during an argument at cards. Yikes! Someone once asked him why he was called Texas Jack and replied, “because I’m from Virginia.” Well, that explains a lot!

Jesse James

Jesse James is a notorious American outlaw, but his talents didn’t end there! He was also a guerrilla fighter, a gang leader, bank and train robber and, of course, a murderer. James was born in Missouri and, together with his brother, the two formed the James-Younger Gang. That’s one strong sibling bond!

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They were Confederate bushwhackers during the Civil War and were ultimately accused of committing multiple monstrosities against Union soldiers during the war, including their many infamous robberies.

Olive Oatman

Olive Oatman was only 14 years-old when her family was attacked and killed by a group of Native Americans. The Oatmans were traveling through present-day Arizona at the time. Olive and her sister were kidnapped and sold to the Mohave people. Her sister died of starvation while in captivity.

Wild West

Benjamin F. Powelson/Wikimedia Commons

Olive is best recognized by her blue face tattoo which she believed was a sign of slavery in the Mohave tribe where she was kept, but that is inconsistent with tribal traditions. According to the Mohave tradition, all members of the tribe receive face tattoos. Her story was widely publicized but few details are known about her time with the Mohave.

Santiago ‘Jimmy’ McKinn

Santiago ‘Jimmy’ McKinn was a boy by the age of 11 or 12, who lived with his family in the lower Mimbres Valley, New Mexico. One day, while out with his older brother Martin, a group of Chiricahua Apache led by Geronimo approached the two. The Apache then killed Martin and abducted young Santiago.

Old Wild West

Jimmy McKinn/Wikimedia Commons

As the story goes, Santiago was eventually rescued by General George Crook, but the boy did not want to go back to his family and preferred to stay with the Apache. The above photo depicts young Santiago McKinn along with his captors, with whom he lived for six months, taking up their language and lifestyle.

Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley is probably one of the most well known faces of the Wild West. Born Phoebe Ann Mosey, Oakley rose to fame at the early age of 15 due to her outstanding sharpshooting skills. She began trapping, shooting and hunting by the age eight, to support her poor family after the death of her father.

Old Wild West

Annie Oakley/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

After making a name for herself as a trained shooter, young Annie married fellow marksman and former rival Frank E. Butler. The two later joined Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show, turning Oakley into an international star.

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show

Buffalo Bill has a “wild” reputation throughout the Old West, and has been one of the most influential showmen ever! Bill was a scout and a bison hunter, but when he wasn’t out in the wild, he was working his show! Don’t you want a ticket?

Old Wild West

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The Wild West Shows were a series of traveling shows that romanticized life in the American Frontier. They performed variety acts, including reenacting the incident of Warbonnet Creek, a parade, and many other circus-like acts. There was something for everyone!

Rose Dunn

This next Wild West woman is something of a western legend. Rose Dunn, also known as Rose of the Cimarron, was romantically involved with outlaw George “Bittercreek” Newcomb around the age of 14 or 15. Newcomb’s gang adored Dunn for her good looks and cool demeanor. After a shoot-out with US Marshals, the gang went into hiding.

Rose Dunn Old Wild West

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Newcomb and another gang member eventually returned to visit Rose and her brothers shot them on site. The Dunn’s collected a $5,000 bounty for Newcomb. He was wanted “Dead or Alive.” Legend says that Dunn set him up, but we may never know the true story.

Discretion is Advised

Brothels and outlaws usually go well together, and Fannie Porter’s brothel was no exception. Ex-prostitute porter was respected among criminals for her warm and sincere attitude, as well as her discretion. She was known for refusing to turn in her costumers, and was popular among members of the Wild Bunch gang for this reason.

Old Wild West

United States Library of Congress’s Prints/Wikimedia Commons

Among the San Antonio brothel’s frequent clients were Butch Cassidy and Kid Curry, the Sundance Kid and other members of the gang. What’s more, a number of Porter’s “girls” became involved with the gang members. Wild Bunch member, Laura Bullion (pictured above), is even said to have worked at the brothel for a time.

Members of Buffalo Bill’s troupe

These charming men gathered around a log cabin are several members of Buffalo Bill’s troupe. These are some of the people that would likely travel all over the world performing for people who wanted to get a glimpse of the Wild West! Lucky for us, we can catch a glimpse of it on here.

Old Wild West Buffalo Bill

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In this photograph, we have a John Nelson, John Burke, a Sioux Native American, and several other stern cowboys.

Charley Nebo and a Friend

Charley Nebo, pictured left, was born in 1842 to an English father and Canadian mother. He was a well known cowboy that lived in New Mexico, Texas and Nebraska. Nebo served in the Union Army during the civil war, and suffered a painful injury that left him handicapped. He ended up being honorably discharged, and eventually became a stockman.

Wild West

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In 1878, Nebo started working for John Chisum’s cattle empire. He was also friends with renowned robber, Billie the Kid, and was known to be a skilled cowboy, that left a lasting impression on the old Wild West.

Having a Drink

Being a cowboy wasn’t always hard work on horseback at the ranch. In the photo below, a group of cowboys is seen enjoying a drink and a quick chat with the bartender at a saloon in Old Tasacosa, Northern Texas ca. 1907.

Old Wild West Photos

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The saloon was a place to rest, have a drink, play some poker and even negotiate cattle. Some saloons were open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and were popular not only among cowboys, but also gold diggers, soldiers, travelers and even lawyers.

Bob Leavitt’s Saloon

Bob’s Saloon was a popular establishment in Jordan, Montana, in the early 1900s. In this 1904 photo by L.A. Huffman, a group of cowboys is seen relaxing in front of the saloon. The owner, Robert Leavitt, was a cowboy himself, and was also one of the early settlers in Jordan.

Old Wild West Photos

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The old Western saloons offered their clientele various types of entertainment, including dancing girls, card games, dice games and even bowling. Some saloons even had piano players and theatrical skits for their costumers to enjoy.

The Cowboy Look

In the wild west, cowboys were so much more than mere animal herders. The term originated from the Spanish Vaquero, a livestock herder riding on horseback, and required skill and plenty of physical ability, developed from an early age.

Wild West Old Photos

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American cowboys were mostly white men, though quite a few African American freedmen, as well as Mexicans and American Indians, also worked as cowboys by the late 1860s. The cowboy look, that has since become iconic, famously included a bandanna, leather gloves, chaps, boots, a sturdy pair of jeans and most importantly, a wide brimmed cowboy hat.

Gould and Curry miner

Mining was a huge part of the Wild West – there were plenty of jobs in the field and lots of towns revolved solely around mining! This mine here is a silver mine in Virginia City, Nevada. The city had two major mines: Savage and the Gould and Curry.

Wild West Old Photos

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The miner here is 900 feet underground, and yet all he has for light is a burning magnesium wire. Can you believe that? Virginia City became a boomtown after the discovery of the silver deposits. At its peak, the city boasted of 25,000 residents. When the mine’s output declined, so did its residents. As of 2010, only around 850 people live in Virginia City. People in the West really were fearless!

Two Barmen in an Old West Saloon

We’ve all heard of saloons, right? Back in the old West, saloons were a specific kind of bar that served a wide assortment of folks, including cowboys, fur trappers, soldiers, miners, and many more. The very first saloon ever was established in Wyoming in 1822, but they quickly popped up all around the American Frontier!

Wild West Old Photos

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By 1880, these were one of the more popular establishments available to people in the West. Bartenders prided themselves on the appearance of their saloons, as well as their drink pouring abilities. Many of these saloons were used for gambling, prostitution and opium dens. Cheers!

Charging Thunder

Charging Thunder was one of the several Native Americans who participated in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. This Lakota chief joined the crew when he was only 26 years old. Eventually, he married one of the American horse trainers in the crew… ah, stage romance!

Wild West Old Photos

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After Buffalo Bill’s show, Charging Thunder became a British citizen and ended up working in Manchester’s Belle Vue Circus as an elephant trainer. He later changed his name to George Edward Williams and found a factory job after the circus.

A Mojave Native American

This Mojave Native American’s name was Maiman, and he worked as a guide and interpreter in 19th century Colorado, especially during the 1870s. Maiman would often guide photographer Timothy O’Sullivan around and help him find the best locations for his photographs.

Wild West Old Photos

Timothy H OSullivan/Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

O’Sullivan, unlike many other photographers at the time, didn’t like to photograph Native Americans in a studio, which lent his works a very realistic quality which we can see here! He also famously photographed many Civil War battlefields.

Billy the Kid, c. 1879

Here’s everyone’s favorite outlaw… Billy the Kid, who was actually born as Henry McCarty, is one of the most well-known outlaws of the Old West. Kid was one of the most notorious gunfighters of the time, and is known for having killed at least 8 men at a very young age.

Old Wild West Photos

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Billy the Kid was born in New York City and later resided mostly in New Mexico, he even fought in their Lincoln County War! Kid was eventually arrested and jailed, then died by gunshot of Sheriff Pat Garrett in an attempt to escape his jail cell. He was only 21! But his legacy didn’t end there. It was rumored that the outlaw didn’t die in the gunfight and over the next few decades numerous people committed crimes while claiming to be Billy the Kid.

General Custer Crossing the Dakota Territory

This photograph is of the Dakota Territory, which encompassed what is now North and South Dakota, and features General Custer’s men crossing the plains. General Custer – as you may remember from your history books – was an officer in the United States Army during the American Civil War and the Indian Wars.

Wild West Old Photos

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This photograph is by W.H. Illingworth, another famous photographer on this list, but unlike the rest of them, he’s English! Illingworth once accompanied an expedition to the Montana Territory in the 1860s and 1870s, through the Black Hills of the Dakotas.

The Soiled Doves

Plenty of notorious madams and prostitutes were considered fixtures of old Western towns, some were so popular and successful they became millionaires. These women came from all over the world, despite the harsh conditions they had to endure.

Wild West Old Photos

Hulton Archive/Getty Images

These scarlet women had different, surprisingly poetic nicknames, depending on the region. In California, they were labeled “soiled doves” by the cowboys, and “ladies of the line” or “sporting women” by the California ’49er. Other nicknames were “fallen frails,” “doves of the roost,” “nymphs du prairie” and “fallen angles.”

Wheeler Survey Group

This incredibly happy looking group of men were the Wheeler Survey group. The Wheeler Survey was a giant expedition to survey the Western United States, led by Captain George Montague Wheeler. The expedition took place from 1869 to 1879 and led to the creation of topographic maps of the Southwest!

Wild West Old Photos

Timothy H OSullivan/Library of Congress/Corbis/VCG via Getty Images

Three areas of the survey were named after Captain Wheeler: Wheeler Peak in Nevada, Wheeler Peak in New Mexico, and Wheeler Geologic Area in Colorado! That’s not a bad deal!

Wyatt Earp, c. 1887

Wyatt Earp was a good friend of Doc Holliday and had some very similar interests. He was also a proficient gambler in the Wild West, but had a working job as a deputy sheriff in Arizona! It seems like everyone at the time had the same job…

Old Wild West Photos

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He gained his notorious reputation during a gunfight at the O.K. Corral in which he killed three cowboys. From then on he was known as a regarded shooter, especially in Tombstone, Arizona! He continuously clashed with cowboys until his death in 1929.

Louisa Earp, Morgan Earp’s Wife

We’ve heard plenty about the Earp men so far, but nothing about the woman! They say that behind every great man, there’s a great woman, and that’s certainly true of Morgan Earp. Morgan Earp was married to Louisa Earp, though nobody knows how they met or got married.

Old Wild West Photos

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The two lived in Montana for some time, then moved to California. When Morgan moved to Arizona, he left Louisa behind, expecting it to be a short trip, but the two would never meet again.

Navajo Indians Near Fort Defiance

This photograph by Timothy O’Sullivan, entitled “Aboriginal Life Among the Navajo Indians Near Old Fort Defiance, New Mexico” was printed in 1873! The print depicts the Navajoes at their home, an abandoned military post, back in the Old Wild West.

Life in the Old Wild West

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The Navajoes themselves are known for being very intelligent and fierce, and are one of the most wealthy aboriginal tribes of the United States. In this photo, you can see the ears of corn that they cultivate and the looms for making blankets.

Doc Holliday, all-around man

Doc Holliday is another incredibly well known and dangerous gunfighter of the Wild West. He was a good friend of Wyatt Earp and is well known for being a gambler, a gunfighter, and… a dentist! Say what?

Life in Old Wild West

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Holliday became a dentist when he was 20 years old, then when he was diagnosed with tuberculosis, he became a gambler in Arizona. Why not, right? He couldn’t stay away from the gun, though, and soon earned a reputation for being a deadly gunman.

Old Mission Church, New Mexico

Old Mission Church in New Mexico is one of the earliest examples of a Spanish Colonial era mission, as it was established way back in 1630! The mission itself is relatively small, but complex. It’s a long-standing piece of adobe history, and you can still visit it today!

Wild West Old Photos

Tom Kelley/Getty Images

The Mission played a big role during the Pueblo Revolt and was inhabited by Franciscans for some time until Mexico gained independence from Spain. Now, it marks a tourist attraction for Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico!

Sioux Indian Teepees

The Sioux Nation of Native Americans is one of the largest tribes to have lived on the Great Plains. The Sioux Nation is actually 3 different tribes under the same nation: Eastern Dakota, Western Dakota, and the Lakota tribes. All of these were nomadic tribes that hunted bison, and as a part of their lives on the great plains, they built the teepees that you see here!

Life in Old Wild West

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It’s not known exactly where this photograph was taken, but it’s safe to guess that it’s probably the Dakota Territory. Wherever it was, it’s pretty amazing!

Sterling, Goldie Griffith’s son

On May 9, 1913, the tough and rough girl Goldie Griffith got married at Madison Square Garden to fellow Buffalo Bill performer Harry Griffith. The two didn’t always have the best marriage or the best life, but they did give birth to an adorable baby boy, Sterling.

Buffalo Bill Museum & Grave

Buffalo Bill Museum & Grave

After her time in the Wild West shows, Goldie Griffith took her son to Nederland, Colorado where she raised him alone in a happy tight-knit family. During their time in Colorado, the family opened a number of restaurants and trained dogs.

Timothy O’Sullivan photograph

Timothy O’Sullivan was born on Staten Island, New York, and would go on to become one of the most influential photographers of the Civil War era, though he also garnered a solid reputation for his photography of the American Western landscape. One of his best-known photographs is this one, of Native Americans.

Old Wild West Photos

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O’Sullivan joined a geological survey team in 1871 which allowed him to travel around the United States and take picturesque photographs everywhere that he went, especially in the pueblos of the Canyon de Chelly. There was nobody as talented as him!

This photograph is exactly what you’d expect from the Old West! Keep reading to see even more incredible photographs.

Morgan Earp, deputy

Morgan Earp was also friends with Doc Holliday and was Wyatt Earp’s brother! Just like his brother, Morgan Earp often spent his time in Tombstone, Arizona confronting outlaw cowboys. The Earps interfered so much that they all had targets on their heads!

Old Wild West Photos

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Those targets eventually got to Morgan Earp, who was killed by ambush. After his death, Wyatt Earp took matters into his own hands and avenged his brother’s death outside of the law. It’s like a real-life Western movie!

Personal hygiene in the Wild West

Don’t you just want to take a dip in these waters too? So refreshing! These waters are a part of the Pagosa Hot Springs in Colorado, which are still around today. It’s amazing to think that people are still doing the same things that those in the 19th century were doing.

Old Wild West Photos

Timonthy O’Sullivan/Wikimedia Commons

The Pagosa Hot Springs are renowned for their mineral waters, which supposedly could cure any ailments and rejuvenate any person – including this man!

Buffalo Soldier, 1890

Nobody is sure who this specific buffalo soldier is, but his face will forever be remembered in history! Buffalo soldiers were the name given to the 10th Cavalry of the United States Army between 1866 and 1951.

Old Wild West Photos

Wikimedia Commons

The nickname, Buffalo soldier, was given to black soldiers by the Native Americans when the soldiers fought during the Indian Wars. The name has stuck ever since!

This photograph is an amazing piece of history – click on for even more!

The Deadwood Coach

John C.H. Grabill is another well-known photographer from the 19th century! He mostly worked out of the Dakota Territory, though he had a studio in Chicago as well. This photograph of his is of the infamous Deadwood Coach. The Deadwood Coach is perhaps the most historic and well-known stagecoach in existence!

Wild West Old Time Photos

John C H Grabill Collection/Wikimedia Commons

This is the stagecoach that was carried by Buffalo Bill in all of his Wild West shows throughout America and Europe. Can you imagine how many wonderful adventures this coach has seen?

Ox Teams at Sturgis

This photograph, which is currently located in the Library of Congress, is from the largest surviving collection of John C.H. Grabill’s works. This particular photograph is an image of frontier life in Sturgis, South Dakota. Can you imagine living in a town like this?

Wild West Photos

John C H Grabill Collection/Wikimedia Commons

All of the Dakota Territory was full of prospectors, hunters, and cowboys, many of which used these teams of oxen. Who needs cars when you’ve got a wagon?

SHARE this article if you loved seeing all of these historic photos of the wild west!

Source: Ranker

Источник: https://www.directexpose.com/photos-old-wild-west-believe-exist/

A History of the Old Outlaws of California : Bad Guys Are a Good Draw at Exhibit

SACRAMENTO — 

Californians hate crime, but they love outlaws.

Old outlaws. Dead outlaws.

About 200,000 visitors have come since last March to ooh and aah and muse and chuckle over California badmen, notorious and obscure, whose deeds are on display in the State Museum in the Capitol building.

There’s Black Bart, the poetic stage coach robber. There’s the legendary Joaquin Murrieta, the Mexican Robin Hood. There’s Willian Miner, the Grey Fox, also called the Gentleman Bandit and the subject of a recent movie. And there’s long-forgotten Walter Hitchcock, wanted for murder and described on a poster as shifty-eyed with a prominent, pointed nose “very red, apparently from excessive drinking.”

Popular Exhibit

The exhibit, “The Outlaws of California, 1853-1925,” has been rivaled in popularity at the museum only by a former display portraying the calamitous San Francisco earthquake of 1906, according to exhibits technician Paula S. Jow. After the outlaws exhibit closes next Tuesday, the display material will be available for public viewing at the California State Archives, a block from the Capitol.

For the last seven months, ordinary, law-abiding folks from all walks of life have come to the State Museum to gaze at the modest exhibit, their fingers streaking the glass of the five display cases as they ponder prison ledgers, mug shots, letters and photographs, appeals for parole denied and granted.

“It’s fascinating,” said Vivian Gulley a retirement home worker from Hemet.

“What did they do?” she asked as she peered at a page from the San Quentin prison ledger dated 1883. “The crimes are just the basic crimes, murder, robbery. . . . There’s no drugs on here. . . . They’re not like the real terrible crimes we have today. There’s no hurting children.”

‘Black Bart the Po 8'

At the top of the ledger that Gulley was examining was the name C. E. Bolton, with the notation “Alias Black Bart the Po 8.”

That was the way Bolton signed the verses he sometimes left at the scenes of his 27 successful stagecoach holdups. A photograph of the gray-haired, distinguished-looking bandit is displayed next to the prison ledger which notes that Bolton served five years of a six-year sentence.

“He was a pretty good robber,” said Charles Aney, a construction worker from Sacramento who visited the museum.

Beneath the notorious Black Bart on the prison ledger are the names of other convicts, none of them ever well known and now all forgotten.

On the same day Black Bart entered San Quentin on Nov. 21, 1893, a Chinese cook with the melancholy name Ah Sam was imprisoned to begin a year’s sentence for grand larceny.

What Became of Him?

Ah Sam, what did he steal? What became of him?

And on the same page, on Nov. 29, it is noted that Ella Amador, a brown-eyed, 24-year-old seamstress from Los Angeles began a five-year sentence for a “felony.”

What did Ella Amador do, mused Gulley. What felony cost her five years at San Quentin?

At an adjacent exhibit case, John Salinas, an automobile detailer from Fresno, pondered a display dealing with Joaquin Murrieta, who, as legend has it, began robbing the rich and helping the poor in the 1850s after suffering discrimination and violent mistreatment by whites in the California gold fields.

“He was sort of a folk hero to the Mexican race,” said Salinas. “The struggle that a man went through back then . . . might be like what a Mexican-American goes through today--prejudice, our legal rights.”

1853 Petition

The Murrieta display case contains an 1853 petition from Mariposa County residents to then-Gov. John Bigler, complaining that “our county is now being ravaged by a bunch of robbers under the command of the daring bandit Joaquin or some equally desperate outlaw.”

The leader of a band of California Rangers subsequently claimed to have killed Murrieta and collected a reward. A human head--alleged that of the bandit--was put on public display.

Bette Rudick, retired realtor from Los Angeles, looked at a display case showing that writer Jack London had helped a prisoner named Joe King gain parole in 1915 by offering him a job at his ranch in the Valley of the Moon.

“I think that’s great,” said Rudick, “if they’ve done their time and they can come back into society. (But) today, I don’t know. It’s completely different. Crime is a little different.

“We don’t live as they did then,” she added. “We live with bolted, locked doors, security systems, guards. I hate it.”

Источник: https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1986-10-20-me-6557-story.html

Legends of the Old West

Famous Cowboys, Lawmen, Outlaws and Pioneers

with images and information

(Also see Famous Cowboy Characters, and Famous Cowboys Actors

 

 

Legends of the Old West sorted by Popular Name

 

 

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Annie Oakley; Legend of the Old West

  Annie Oakley 
Birth Name: Phoebe Ann Oakley Moses
• Sharpshooter and exhibition shooter; starred in Buffalo Bill's Wild West show
Born: 1860, August 13  → Died: 1926, November 3
Age: 66y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 3d → Cause of death: pernicious anemia

Arkansas Tom Jones; Legend of the Old West

  Arkansas Tom Jones 
Birth Name: Roy Daugherty
• Outlaw and a member of the Wild Bunch gang
Born: 1870, ? ?  → Died: 1924, August 16
Age: 54y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot during a gunfight

Bass Reeves; Legend of the Old West

  Bass Reeves 
Birth Name: Bass Reeves
• The first black deputy U.S. marshal west of the Mississippi River
Born: 1828, July ?  → Died: 1910, January 12
Age: 71y ⋅ 6m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: Bright's disease

Bat Masterson; Legend of the Old West

  Bat Masterson 
Birth Name: William Barclay Masterson
• Gunfighter, gambler, Wyatt Earp's deputy, newspaper columnist
Born: 1853, November 27  → Died: 1921, October 25
Age: 67y ⋅ 10m ⋅ 28d → Cause of death: heart attack

Bee Ho Gray; Legend of the Old West

  Bee Ho Gray 
Birth Name: Emberry Cannon Gray
• Performer who spent fifty years in Wild West shows, vaudeville, circus, and silent films doing rope trick, knife throwing, bullwhips, and trick riding, often combined in comedy.
Born: 1885, April 7  → Died: 1951, August 3
Age: 76y ⋅ 3m ⋅ 23d → Cause of death: unknown

Belle Starr; Legend of the Old West

  Belle Starr 
Birth Name: Myra Belle Shirley Reed Starr (The Bandit Queen)
• Rustling, horse stealing, bootlegging whiskey
Born: 1848, February 5  → Died: 1889, February 3
Age: 40y ⋅ 11m ⋅ 29d → Cause of death: shot in an ambush

Ben Thompson; Legend of the Old West

  Ben Thompson 
Birth Name: Ben Thompson
• Gunman, gambler, lawman, saloon operator, friend of Bat Masterson.
Born: 1843, November 2  → Died: 1884, March 11
Age: 40y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 9d → Cause of death: shot in a gunfight

Big Jim Courtright; Legend of the Old West

  Big Jim Courtright 
Birth Name: Timothy Isaiah Courtright (Tim Isaiah)
• Lawman, outlaw and gunfighter
Born: 1848, ? ?  → Died: 1887, February 8
Age: 39y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot in a gunfight

Bill Doolin; Legend of the Old West

  Bill Doolin 
Birth Name: William Doolin
• Bandit, founder of the Wild Bunch gang
Born: 1858, ? ?  → Died: 1896, August 24
Age: 38y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot by US Marshall Heck Thomas


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Bill Miner; Legend of the Old West

  Bill Miner 
Birth Name: Ezra Allen Miner (aka "Gentleman Bandit")
• Stagecoach robber, known for his politeness
Born: 1847, ? ?  → Died: 1913, September 2
Age: 66y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: gastritis

Bill Pickett; Legend of the Old West

  Bill Pickett 
Birth Name: William Pickett (The Bull Dogger)
• Rodeo cowboy; introduced bulldogging
Born: 1870, December 5  → Died: 1932, April 2
Age: 61y ⋅ 3m ⋅ 28d → Cause of death: accident, kicked in the head by a horse

Bill Tilghman; Legend of the Old West

  Bill Tilghman 
Birth Name: William Matthew "Bill" Tilghman, Jr.
• Deputy sheriff, gunfighter, saloon owner
Born: 1854, July 4  → Died: 1924, November 1
Age: 70y ⋅ 3m ⋅ 28d → Cause of death: shot by a corrupt prohibition agent

Bill Walters, "Bronco Bill"; Legend of the Old West

  Bill Walters, "Bronco Bill" 
Birth Name: William E. Walters
• Outlaw during the closing days of the Old West, best known for the legend of his "lost treasure"
Born: 1869, ? ?  → Died: 1921, June 16
Age: 52y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: accidental fall

Billy Brooks; Legend of the Old West

  Billy Brooks 
Birth Name: William L. "Buffalo Bill" Brooks
• Buffalo hunter, gunfighter, stage driver, marshal.
Born: 1832, ? ?  → Died: 1874, July 29
Age: 42y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: hanged

Billy Clanton; Legend of the Old West

  Billy Clanton 
Birth Name: William Harrison Clanton
• Member of an outlaw gang who was involved in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral
Born: 1862, ? ?  → Died: 1881, October 26
Age: 19y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: gunshot wounds

Billy McGinty; Legend of the Old West

  Billy McGinty 
Birth Name: William M. "Billy" McGinty
• Leader of the McGinty's Oklahoma Cowboy Band, a Rough Rider, and inducted into the Hall of Great Westerners
Born: 1871, January 1  → Died: 1961, May 21
Age: 90y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 20d → Cause of death: old age

Billy the Kid ; Legend of the Old West

  Billy the Kid  
Birth Name: William Henry McCarty (Aka: Henry Antrim, William H. Bonney)
• Outlaw, gunfighter, member of the Regulators gang
Born: 1859, November 23  → Died: 1881, July 14
Age: 21y ⋅ 7m ⋅ 21d → Cause of death: shot by Pat Garrett

Black Bart; Legend of the Old West

  Black Bart 
Birth Name: Charles E. Boles
• (Also Bolles) Good-mannered stage coach robber
Born: 1829, ? ?  → Died: 1888, February 28
Age: 59y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: unknown, last seen February 28, 188)

Black Jack Christian; Legend of the Old West

  Black Jack Christian 
Birth Name: William Christian
• Robber, killer, member of the "High Fives Gang"
Born: 1871, ? ?  → Died: 1897, April 28
Age: 26y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot in gun fight with a posse

Black Jack Ketchum; Legend of the Old West

  Black Jack Ketchum 
Birth Name: Thomas Edward Ketchum
• Cowboy turned robber, member of Hole in the Wall gang
Born: 1863, October 31  → Died: 1901, April 26
Age: 37y ⋅ 5m ⋅ 26d → Cause of death: hanged

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Blue Duck; Legend of the Old West

  Blue Duck 
Birth Name: Sha-con-gah (Cherokee)
• Outlaw and boyfriend of Belle Starr
Born: 1859, June 17  → Died: 1895, May 7
Age: 35y ⋅ 10m ⋅ 20d → Cause of death: tuberculosis

Bob Dalton; Legend of the Old West

  Bob Dalton 
Birth Name: Robert Rennick Dalton
• Train and bank robber (1)
Born: 1869, May 13  → Died: 1892, October 5
Age: 23y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 22d → Cause of death: shot during a bank robbery

Bob Ford; Legend of the Old West

  Bob Ford 
Birth Name: Robert Newton "Bob" Ford
• Outlaw; the man who shot Jesse James
Born: 1862, January 31  → Died: 1892, June 8
Age: 30y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 8d → Cause of death: shot in the chest

Bob Younger; Legend of the Old West

  Bob Younger 
Birth Name: Robert Ewing Younger
• Train and bank robber (2)
Born: 1853, October 29  → Died: 1889, September 16
Age: 35y ⋅ 10m ⋅ 18d → Cause of death: tuberculosis while in prison

Bose Ikard; Legend of the Old West

  Bose Ikard 
Birth Name: Bose Ikard
• Cowboy, helped in opening up the Goodnight-Loving Trail
Born: 1843, ? ?  → Died: 1929, January 4
Age: 86y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: influenza

Buckskin Frank Leslie; Legend of the Old West

  Buckskin Frank Leslie 
Birth Name: Buckskin Frank Leslie
•  U.S. Army scout, gambler, bartender, rancher, miner, and gunfighter and con-man
Born: 1842, March 18  → Died: 1927, October ?
Age: 85y ⋅ 4m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: unknown

Buffalo Bill; Legend of the Old West

  Buffalo Bill 
Birth Name: William Frederick Cody
• Organized Buffalo Bill's Wild West, an outdoor extravaganza
Born: 1846, February 26  → Died: 1917, January 10
Age: 70y ⋅ 10m ⋅ 15d → Cause of death: kidney failure

Burton Mossman; Legend of the Old West

  Burton Mossman 
Birth Name: Burton W. Mossman
•  American lawman and cattleman in the final years of the Old West
Born: 1867, April 30  → Died: 1956, September 5
Age: 89y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 6d → Cause of death: old age

Butch Cassidy; Legend of the Old West

  Butch Cassidy 
Birth Name: Robert LeRoy Parker
• Robber; member of the Wild Bunch gang
Born: 1866, April 13  → Died: 1909, November 6
Age: 43y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 24d → Cause of death: suicide while trapped

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Calamity Jane; Legend of the Old West

  Calamity Jane 
Birth Name: Martha Jane Cannary
• Sharpshooter, prospector, rowdy prostitute, gambler, heavy drinker
Born: 1852, May 1  → Died: 1903, August 1
Age: 51y ⋅ 3m ⋅ 0d → Cause of death: alcoholism

Captain Bill McDonald; Legend of the Old West

  Captain Bill McDonald 
Birth Name: William Jesse McDonald
• A Texas Ranger who served briefly as a bodyguard for both U.S. Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and Woodrow Wilson
Born: 1852, September 28  → Died: 1918, January 15
Age: 65y ⋅ 3m ⋅ 18d → Cause of death: pneumonia

Casey Tibbs; Legend of the Old West

  Casey Tibbs 
Birth Name: Casey Duane Tibbs
• Cowboy, rodeo performer, and actor.
Born: 1929, March 5  → Died: 1990, January 28
Age: 60y ⋅ 10m ⋅ 23d → Cause of death: cancer, lung

Charles Colcord; Legend of the Old West

  Charles Colcord 
Birth Name: Charles Francis Colcord
• Successful cattle-rancher, U.S. Marshal, Chief of Police, businessman, and pioneer of the Old West
Born: 1859, August 18  → Died: 1934, December 10
Age: 75y ⋅ 3m ⋅ 22d → Cause of death: old age

Charles Goodnight; Legend of the Old West

  Charles Goodnight 
Birth Name: Charles Goodnight
• Cattle-driver; founded the Goodnight-Loving Trail; invented the chuck wagon
Born: 1836, March 5  → Died: 1929, December 12
Age: 93y ⋅ 9m ⋅ 7d → Cause of death: old age

Charley Parkhurst; Legend of the Old West

  Charley Parkhurst 
Birth Name: Charlotte Darkey Parkhurst (One-Eyed Charley)
• American woman stagecoach driver, farmer and rancher, thought by all to be a man
Born: 1812, ? ?  → Died: 1879, December 18
Age: 67y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: cancer, tongue

Charlie Bassett; Legend of the Old West

  Charlie Bassett 
Birth Name: Charlie E. Bassett
• Lawman and saloon owner of the Long Branch Saloon in Dodge City.
Born: 1847, October 30  → Died: 1896, January 5
Age: 48y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 5d → Cause of death: inflammatory rheumatism

Charlie Siringo; Legend of the Old West

  Charlie Siringo 
Birth Name: Charles Angelo Siringo
• Lawman, detective, and agent for the Pinkerton National Detective Agency
Born: 1855, February 7  → Died: 1928, October 18
Age: 73y ⋅ 8m ⋅ 11d → Cause of death: bronchitis

Chris Madsen ; Legend of the Old West

  Chris Madsen  
Birth Name: Christian "Chris" Madsen
• Danish born gunfighter; U.S. Deputy Marshal in Oklahoma; member of the Three Guardsmen crime fighers
Born: 1851, December 25  → Died: 1944, January 9
Age: 92y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 15d → Cause of death: old age

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Chuck Roberson; Legend of the Old West

  Chuck Roberson 
Birth Name: Charles Hugh Roberson
• Cowboy, actor, and stuntman
Born: 1919, May 10  → Died: 1988, June 8
Age: 69y ⋅ 1m ⋅ 29d → Cause of death: cancer

Clay Allison; Legend of the Old West

  Clay Allison 
Birth Name: Robert Clay Allison
• Ruthless killer, gunfighter
Born: 1841, September 2  → Died: 1887, July 3
Age: 46y ⋅ 10m ⋅ 1d → Cause of death: accident, broken neck

Cole Younger; Legend of the Old West

  Cole Younger 
Birth Name: Thomas Coleman Younger
• Train and bank robber; lectured and toured with Frank James in a wild west show  (2)
Born: 1844, January 15  → Died: 1916, March 21
Age: 72y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 6d → Cause of death: old age

Connie Douglas Reeves; Legend of the Old West

  Connie Douglas Reeves 
Birth Name: Connie Douglas
• Cowgirl who taught thousands of girls how to ride horses at Texas's Camp Waldemar
Born: 1901, September 26  → Died: 2003, August 17
Age: 101y ⋅ 10m ⋅ 22d → Cause of death: accident, thrown from a horse

Conrad Kohrs; Legend of the Old West

  Conrad Kohrs 
Birth Name: Carsten Conrad Kohrs
•  Montana cattle rancher (cattle baron) and politician
Born: 1835, August 5  → Died: 1920, July 23
Age: 84y ⋅ 11m ⋅ 18d → Cause of death: old age

Curly Bill Brocius; Legend of the Old West

  Curly Bill Brocius 
Birth Name: William "Curly Bill" Brocius
• Gunman, rustler and outlaw cowboy
Born: 1845, ? ?  → Died: 1882, March 24
Age: 37y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot by Wyatt Earp

Dallas Stoudenmire; Legend of the Old West

  Dallas Stoudenmire 
Birth Name: Dallas Stoudenmire
• Gunfighter and marshal; involved in a famous gunfight dubbed the "Four Dead in Five Seconds Gunfight"
Born: 1845, December 11  → Died: 1882, September 18
Age: 36y ⋅ 9m ⋅ 7d → Cause of death: shot in a gun fight

Deadwood Dick; Legend of the Old West

  Deadwood Dick 
Birth Name: Nat Love
• (pronounced "Nate") Well travelled cowboy; won every competition and $200 prize at July 4, 1876 Deadwood cowboy contest
Born: 1854, June 14  → Died: 1921, ? ?
Age: 66y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: unknown

Doc Holliday; Legend of the Old West

  Doc Holliday 
Birth Name: John Henry Holliday
• Dentist, gambler, and gunfighter; at the O.K. Corral gunfight
Born: 1851, August 14  → Died: 1887, November 8
Age: 36y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 25d → Cause of death: tuberculosis

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Doc Scurlock; Legend of the Old West

  Doc Scurlock 
Birth Name: Josiah Gordon Scurlock
• Old West figure, cowboy and gunfighter
Born: 1849, January 11  → Died: 1929, July 25
Age: 80y ⋅ 9m ⋅ 25d → Cause of death: heart attack

Dutch Henry; Legend of the Old West

  Dutch Henry 
Birth Name: Henry Borne
• Horse thief
Born: 1849, July 2  → Died: 1921, January 10
Age: 80y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 14d → Cause of death: pneumonia

Earl Bascom; Legend of the Old West

  Earl Bascom 
Birth Name: Earl Wesley Bascom
• American painter, printmaker, rodeo performer and sculptor
Born: 1906, June 19  → Died: 1995, August 28
Age: 89y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 9d → Cause of death: old age

Elfego Baca; Legend of the Old West

  Elfego Baca 
Birth Name: Elfego Baca
• Lawman, lawyer, and politician; "Frisco Shootout" incident where Elfego faced 80 men firing 4,000 shots at the home where he was cornered
Born: 1865, February 10  → Died: 1945, August 27
Age: 80y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 17d → Cause of death: old age

Ella Watson; Legend of the Old West

  Ella Watson 
Birth Name: Ellen Liddy Watson ("Cattle Kate")
• Pioneer of Wyoming, accused of cattle rustling by powerful cattlemen
Born: 1861, July 2  → Died: 1889, July 20
Age: 28y ⋅ 0m ⋅ 18d → Cause of death: hanged

Emmett Dalton; Legend of the Old West

  Emmett Dalton 
Birth Name: Emmett Dalton
• Train and bank robber, real estate agent, author and actor  (1)
Born: 1871, May 3  → Died: 1937, July 13
Age: 66y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 10d → Cause of death: unknown

Florence "Flores" LaDue ; Legend of the Old West

  Florence "Flores" LaDue  
Birth Name: Florence "Flores" LaDue
• Champion trick roper and vaudeville performer
Born: 1883, ? ?  → Died: 1951, ? ?
Age: 68y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: heart failure

Frank Canton ; Legend of the Old West

  Frank Canton  
Birth Name: Josiah Horner
• Lawman, gunslinger, cowboy and at one point in his life, an outlaw
Born: 1849, September 15  → Died: 1927, September 27
Age: 78y ⋅ 0m ⋅ 12d → Cause of death: old age

Frank Eaton; Legend of the Old West

  Frank Eaton 
Birth Name: Frank Boardman "Pistol Pete" Eaton
• Author, cowboy, scout, Indian fighter, and Deputy U. S. Marshal
Born: 1860, October 26  → Died: 1958, April 8
Age: 97y ⋅ 5m ⋅ 13d → Cause of death: old age

Frank H. Maynard; Legend of the Old West

  Frank H. Maynard 
Birth Name: Frank Henry Maynard
• Cowboy and author of the revised version of the well-known ballad "The Streets of Laredo"
Born: 1853, December 16  → Died: 1926, March 28
Age: 72y ⋅ 3m ⋅ 12d → Cause of death: heart disease

Frank James; Legend of the Old West

  Frank James 
Birth Name: Alexander Frank James
• Bank robber; rode with William Quantrill's raiders; later shoe salesman
Born: 1843, January 10  → Died: 1915, February 18
Age: 72y ⋅ 1m ⋅ 8d → Cause of death: heart failure

Frank Wolcott; Legend of the Old West

  Frank Wolcott 
Birth Name: Frank Wolcott
• Army major in the Civil War; rancher in Wyoming, involved in the Johnson County War; later became a Justice of the Peace.
Born: 1840, December 13  → Died: 1910, March 30
Age: 69y ⋅ 3m ⋅ 17d → Cause of death: unknown

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George McJunkin; Legend of the Old West

  George McJunkin 
Birth Name: George McJunkin
• Cowboy, amateur archaeologist and historian
Born: 1851, ? ?  → Died: 1922, January 21
Age: 71y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: old age

George Scarborough; Legend of the Old West

  George Scarborough 
Birth Name: George Scarborough
• Cowboy and lawman and partner of Jeff Milton
Born: 1859, October 2  → Died: 1900, April 5
Age: 40y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 3d → Cause of death: shot, died of wound

George Washington Littlefield; Legend of the Old West

  George Washington Littlefield 
Birth Name: George Washington Littlefield
•  Confederate Army officer, cattleman, banker, and regent of the University of Texas
Born: 1842, June 27  → Died: 1920, November 10
Age: 78y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 14d → Cause of death: old age

Grat Dalton; Legend of the Old West

  Grat Dalton 
Birth Name: Gratton Hanley Dalton
• Train, bank robber  (1)
Born: 1861, March 30  → Died: 1892, October 5
Age: 31y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 5d → Cause of death: shot during a bank robbery

Heck Thomas; Legend of the Old West

  Heck Thomas 
Birth Name: Henry A. Thomas
• Peace officer, tracked down and killed outlaw Bill Doolin
Born: 1850, January 3  → Died: 1912, August 15
Age: 62y ⋅ 7m ⋅ 12d → Cause of death: Bright's disease

Helen Gibson; Legend of the Old West

  Helen Gibson 
Birth Name: Helen Gibson
• Actress, vaudeville performer, trick rider and rodeo performer, and is the first professional stunt woman for film
Born: 1892, August 27  → Died: 1977, October 10
Age: 85y ⋅ 1m ⋅ 13d → Cause of death: heart failure

Ike Clanton; Legend of the Old West

  Ike Clanton 
Birth Name: Joseph Isaac Clanton
• Cattle rustler; involved in the Gunfight at the OK Corral
Born: 1847, ? ?  → Died: 1887, June 1
Age: 40y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot dead resisting arrest

Jedediah Smith ; Legend of the Old West

  Jedediah Smith  
Birth Name: Jedediah Strong Smith
• Hunter, trapper, fur trader and explorer of the American West Coast
Born: 1799, January 6  → Died: 1831, May 27
Age: 31y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 21d → Cause of death: shot by Comanche Indians

Jeff Milton; Legend of the Old West

  Jeff Milton 
Birth Name: Jeff Milton
• Texas Ranger, Deputy US Marshal, Chief of Police in El Paso, Texas
Born: 1861, November 7  → Died: 1947, May 7
Age: 85y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 0d → Cause of death: old age

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Jesse Chisholm; Legend of the Old West

  Jesse Chisholm 
Birth Name: Jesse Chisholm
• Indian trader, guide, and interpreter; namesake to the ChisholmTrail
Born: 1806, ? ?  → Died: 1868, March 4
Age: 62y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: food poisoning

Jesse James; Legend of the Old West

  Jesse James 
Birth Name: Jesse Woodson James
• Bank and train robber, killer; member of outlaw Clement gang
Born: 1847, September 5  → Died: 1882, April 3
Age: 34y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 29d → Cause of death: shot by Robert Ford

Jim Bridger; Legend of the Old West

  Jim Bridger 
Birth Name: James Felix Bridger
• Mountain man, trappers, scouts and guides who explored and trapped the western U.S.
Born: 1804, March 17  → Died: 1881, July 17
Age: 77y ⋅ 4m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: old age

Jim Levy; Legend of the Old West

  Jim Levy 
Birth Name: James H. Levy
• One of the most notorious gunmen in the Old West known for challenging other gunmen to a duel.
Born: 1842, ? ?  → Died: 1882, June 5
Age: 40y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot in an ambush

Jim Miller; Legend of the Old West

  Jim Miller 
Birth Name: James Brown Miller (Deacon Jim)
• Outlaw and professional killer, said to have killed 12 people during gunfights
Born: 1861, October 25  → Died: 1909, April 19
Age: 47y ⋅ 5m ⋅ 25d → Cause of death: hanged

Jim Younger; Legend of the Old West

  Jim Younger 
Birth Name: James Hardin Younger
• Rancher, train and bank robber  (2)
Born: 1848, January 15  → Died: 1902, October 19
Age: 54y ⋅ 9m ⋅ 4d → Cause of death: suicide

John Bozeman; Legend of the Old West

  John Bozeman 
Birth Name: John Merin Bozeman
• Pathfinder of the Bozeman Trail and founder of Bozeman, MT
Born: 1837, ? ?  → Died: 1867, April 20
Age: 30y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot by his partner

John Chisum; Legend of the Old West

  John Chisum 
Birth Name: John Simpson Chisum
• Cattle baron
Born: 1824, August 15  → Died: 1884, December 23
Age: 60y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 8d → Cause of death: cancer, throat

John Jackson "Jack" Helm; Legend of the Old West

  John Jackson "Jack" Helm 
Birth Name: John Jackson Helm
• Lawman, cowboy, gunfighter, and inventor in the American Old West
Born: 1839, ? ?  → Died: 1873, May 17
Age: 34y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot in an ambushed

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John Selman; Legend of the Old West

  John Selman 
Birth Name: John Selman
• outlaw and sometimes lawman; known as the man who shot John Hardin
Born: 1839, November 16  → Died: 1896, April 6
Age: 42y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 24d → Cause of death: shot in a shootout

John Ware; Legend of the Old West

  John Ware 
Birth Name: John Ware
• Remembered for his ability to ride and train horses
Born: 1845, ? ?  → Died: 1905, September 12
Age: 60y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: accident, when his horse tripped

John Wesley Hardin ; Legend of the Old West

  John Wesley Hardin  
Birth Name: John Wesley Hardin
• Gunfighter, killer; claimed to have killed 44 men
Born: 1853, May 26  → Died: 1895, August 19
Age: 42y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 24d → Cause of death: shot by lawman John Selman

John Younger; Legend of the Old West

  John Younger 
Birth Name: John Harrison Younger
• Train and bank robber, killer  (2)
Born: 1851, ? ?  → Died: 1874, March 17
Age: 23y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot in the neck

Johnny Ringo ; Legend of the Old West

  Johnny Ringo  
Birth Name: John Peters Ringo
• Robber, killer; member of Clanton gang
Born: 1850, May 3  → Died: 1882, July 13
Age: 32y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 10d → Cause of death: suicide by gun

Kid Curry ; Legend of the Old West

  Kid Curry  
Birth Name: Harvey Logan
• Outlaw, gunman, "wildest of the Wild Bunch"
Born: 1867, ? ?  → Died: 1904, June 17
Age: 37y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: suicide during a gun battle

King Fisher; Legend of the Old West

  King Fisher 
Birth Name: John King Fisher
• Gunfighter, gang leader, rancher
Born: 1854, ? ?  → Died: 1884, March 11
Age: 30y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot as he leapt from a theater balcony

Kit Carson ; Legend of the Old West

  Kit Carson  
Birth Name: Christopher Houston Carson
• Scout, trapper; much involved with Indian affairs
Born: 1809, December 24  → Died: 1868, May 23
Age: 58y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 29d → Cause of death: heart attack

Kitty Canutt ; Legend of the Old West

  Kitty Canutt  
Birth Name: Katherine Derre
• Bronco rider, known as "Diamond Kitty"
Born: 1899, July 15  → Died: 1988, June 3
Age: 88y ⋅ 10m ⋅ 19d → Cause of death: heart attack

Kitty Leroy; Legend of the Old West

  Kitty Leroy 
Birth Name: Kitty Leroy
• Dancer, gambler, saloon owner, madam, and trick shooter
Born: 1850, ? ?  → Died: 1877, December 6
Age: 27y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot by jealous husband

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Lillian Smith; Legend of the Old West

  Lillian Smith 
Birth Name: Lillian Frances Smith
• Billed as "the champion California huntress" she was a young trick shooter and rider who joined Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show in 1886
Born: 1871, August 4  → Died: 1930, February 3
Age: 58y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 29d → Cause of death: unknown

Lucille Mulhall; Legend of the Old West

  Lucille Mulhall 
Birth Name: Lucille Mulhall
• One of the first women to compete with men in roping and riding events
Born: 1885, October 21  → Died: 1940, December 21
Age: 55y ⋅ 2m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: accident, automobile

Luke Short; Legend of the Old West

  Luke Short 
Birth Name: Luke L. Short
• Noted gunfighter, who had worked as a farmer, cowboy, whiskey peddler, army scout, dispatch rider, gambler and saloon keeper
Born: 1854, January 22  → Died: 1893, September 8
Age: 39y ⋅ 7m ⋅ 17d → Cause of death: heart failure

Mary Fields; Legend of the Old West

  Mary Fields 
Birth Name: Mary Fields
• Mail carrier, driving a mail route by stagecoach in Montana
Born: 1832, ? ?  → Died: 1914, ? ?
Age: 82y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: liver failure

Nate Champion; Legend of the Old West

  Nate Champion 
Birth Name: Nate D. Champion
• Small rancher, falsely accused rustler.
Born: 1857, September 29  → Died: 1892, April 9
Age: 34y ⋅ 6m ⋅ 11d → Cause of death: shot while fighting off vigilantes

Oliver Loving; Legend of the Old West

  Oliver Loving 
Birth Name: Oliver Loving
• First cattledriver; founded the Goodnight-Loving Trail; "The Dean of Texas Trail Drivers"
Born: 1812, December 4  → Died: 1867, September 25
Age: 54y ⋅ 9m ⋅ 21d → Cause of death: gangrene from a battle wound

Pat Garrett; Legend of the Old West

  Pat Garrett 
Birth Name: Patrick Floyd Garrett
• Sheriff in New Mexico, bartender, and customs agent; killed Billy the Kid
Born: 1850, June 5  → Died: 1908, February 28
Age: 57y ⋅ 8m ⋅ 23d → Cause of death: shot during an argument

Pawnee Bill; Legend of the Old West

  Pawnee Bill 
Birth Name: Gordon William Lillie
• Showman, created the Wild West show "Pawnee Bill's Historic Wild West"; later joined with "Buffalo Bill" Cody
Born: 1860, February 14  → Died: 1942, February 3
Age: 81y ⋅ 11m ⋅ 20d → Cause of death: old age

Pearl Hart; Legend of the Old West

  Pearl Hart 
Birth Name: Pearl Taylor
• Committed one of the last recorded stagecoach robberies in the United States and the only female to do so; the dates of her birth and death are uncertain
Born: 1876, November 13  → Died: 1955, December 28
Age: 79y ⋅ 1m ⋅ 15d → Cause of death: old age

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Perry Owens; Legend of the Old West

  Perry Owens 
Birth Name: Commodore Perry Owens
• Arizona lawman and gunfighter
Born: 1852, July 29  → Died: 1919, May 10
Age: 66y ⋅ 9m ⋅ 11d → Cause of death: Bright's disease

Phil Coe; Legend of the Old West

  Phil Coe 
Birth Name: Phillip Houston Coe
• Soldier, gambler, saloon owner, killed by Wild Bill Hickok
Born: 1839, July 13  → Died: 1871, October 9
Age: 32y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 26d → Cause of death: shot, died later

Pony Diehl; Legend of the Old West

  Pony Diehl 
Birth Name: Charles "Pony Diehl" Ray
• Outlaw in the New Mexico Territory and Arizona Territory
Born: 1848, ? ?  → Died: 1888, ? ?
Age: 40y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot in a gunfight

Richard King; Legend of the Old West

  Richard King 
Birth Name: Richard King
• Riverboat captain, entrepreneur and founder of the King Ranch
Born: 1824, July 10  → Died: 1885, April 14
Age: 60y ⋅ 9m ⋅ 4d → Cause of death: cancer, stomach

Ross Elizabeth Dunn; Legend of the Old West

  Ross Elizabeth Dunn 
Birth Name: Rose Elizabeth Dunn (Rose of Cimarron)
• Best known for her good looks and for her romantic involvement with outlaw George "Bittercreek" NewcombS
Born: 1878, September 05  → Died: 1955, June 11
Age: 76y ⋅ 07m ⋅ 06d → Cause of death: unknown

Ruth Roach; Legend of the Old West

  Ruth Roach 
Birth Name: Ruth Scantlin
• Professional bronco rider, and world champion rodeo performer
Born: 1896, ? ?  → Died: 1986, June 26
Age: 90y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: old age

Sam Bass; Legend of the Old West

  Sam Bass 
Birth Name: Sam Bass
• Train robber
Born: 1851, July 21  → Died: 1878, July 21
Age: 27y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot, died of wounds

Seth Bullock; Legend of the Old West

  Seth Bullock 
Birth Name: Seth Bullock
•  Deadwood's first sheriff, deputy U.S. Marshal, rancher
Born: 1849, July 23  → Died: 1919, September 23
Age: 70y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 0d → Cause of death: cancer, colon

Sherman McMaster; Legend of the Old West

  Sherman McMaster 
Birth Name: Sherman W. McMaster
• Outlaw, became Texas Ranger, rode with Wyatt Earp.
Born: 1853, ? ?  → Died: 1892, ? ?
Age: 39y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: shot in a gunfight

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Sundance Kid, the ; Legend of the Old West

  Sundance Kid, the  
Birth Name: Harry Alonzo Longabaugh
• Robber; member of the Wild Bunch gang
Born: 1867, ? ?  → Died: 1909, November 6
Age: 42y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: suicide while surrounded and trapped

Texas Jack; Legend of the Old West

  Texas Jack 
Birth Name: John Baker Omohundro
• Frontier scout, actor, and cowboy; first performer to do roping acts on stage
Born: 1846, July 26  → Died: 1880, June 28
Age: 33y ⋅ 11m ⋅ 2d → Cause of death: pneumonia

Texas Jack Vermillion; Legend of the Old West

  Texas Jack Vermillion 
Birth Name: John Wilson Vermillion
• Gunfighter, soldier, lawman, outlaw, Methodist preacher; participated in the Earp vendetta ride
Born: 1842, ? ?  → Died: 1911, ? ?
Age: 69y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: heart attack in his sleep

Texas John Slaughter ; Legend of the Old West

  Texas John Slaughter  
Birth Name: John Slaughter
• Civil War veteran, trail-driver, cattleman, Texas Ranger, sheriff, gambler, and state representative
Born: 1841, October 2  → Died: 1922, February 16
Age: 80y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 14d → Cause of death: stroke

Tiburcio_Vásquez Vásquez; Legend of the Old West

  Tiburcio_Vásquez Vásquez 
Birth Name: Tiburcio Vásquez
• America's most infamous Hispanic bandit and horse stealer.
Born: 1835, April 11  → Died: 1875, March 19
Age: 39y ⋅ 11m ⋅ 8d → Cause of death: Hanged

Tom Horn; Legend of the Old West

  Tom Horn 
Birth Name: Tom Horn (Aka: James Hicks)
• Lawman, scout, soldier, hired gunman, detective, outlaw and assassin
Born: 1860, November 21  → Died: 1903, November 20
Age: 42y ⋅ 11m ⋅ 30d → Cause of death: hanged

Vera McGinnis; Legend of the Old West

  Vera McGinnis 
Birth Name: Vera McGinnis
• Champion American rodeo rider
Born: 1892, November 12  → Died: 1990, October 23
Age: 97y ⋅ 11m ⋅ 11d → Cause of death: old age

Wild Bill Hickok ; Legend of the Old West

  Wild Bill Hickok  
Birth Name: James Butler Hickok
• Marksman, professional gambler, gunfighter, scout, lawman
Born: 1837, May 27  → Died: 1876, August 2
Age: 39y ⋅ 2m ⋅ 6d → Cause of death: shot in the back of the head

Will Rogers ; Legend of the Old West

  Will Rogers  
Birth Name: William Penn Adair Rogers
• Humorist, social commentator, vaudeville performer, actor, newspaper columnist
Born: 1879, November 7  → Died: 1935, August 5
Age: 55y ⋅ 8m ⋅ 29d → Cause of death: accident, plane crash over Alaska

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William Longley; Legend of the Old West

  William Longley 
Birth Name: William Preston Longley
• Outlaw, ruthless and ill-tempered gunfighter; killed at least 32 people
Born: 1851, October 6  → Died: 1878, October 11
Age: 27y ⋅ 4m ⋅ 5d → Cause of death: hanged

William Tattenbaum; Legend of the Old West

  William Tattenbaum 
Birth Name: William Tattenbaum (aka Russian Bill)
• A cattle rustler and trouble maker who claimed to be from Russian nobility
Born: 1853, ? ?  → Died: 1881, November 9
Age: 28y ⋅ ?m ⋅ ?d → Cause of death: hanged

Wyatt Earp; Legend of the Old West

  Wyatt Earp 
Birth Name: Wyatt Berry Stapp Earp
• Lawman, gambler; in gunfight at the O.K. Corral, Tombstone, Arizona
Born: 1848, March 19  → Died: 1929, January 13
Age: 80y ⋅ 9m ⋅ 25d → Cause of death: old age

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The contents of this page are available under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license and the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL).
("Cowboy" is not sex specific, just like doorman, busboy, snowman, paperboy, etc.)

Источник: https://www.lingerandlook.com/Names/Cowboys3.php

Discover Old West Outlaw History in Northfield, Minnesota

Town of Northfield, Minnesota.

On Sept. 7, 1876, six of the most notorious outlaws in America rode their horses over an iron bridge and entered Northfield, a quiet little country town in Minnesota, a north-central American state bordering Manitoba and Ontario, Canada.

At the same time, two more bandits rode into town from the south. All of them wore long, white linen coats to hide the fact they were carrying revolvers and cartridge belts. They were desperate men, killers, bank and train robbers, Southerners, and former bushwhackers from the Civil War. They came to Minnesota because, in 1876, no one would suspect this type of outlaw military raid on an out-of-the-way farming town so far north. 

The attack had been planned in great detail. Jesse James, Jim Younger and Bill Stiles hitched their horses in the town square, where they could cover the outlaws’ escape route back over the bridge. 

Cole Younger and Clell Miller got off their mounts on the main street and pretended to be adjusting saddles, while they surveyed pedestrians and kept a lookout. Frank James, Bob Younger and Charlie Pitts tied up their horses on Division Street and strolled casually into the First National Bank. It was 2 p.m. and the most famous bank robbery in American history was about to begin.

The Scriver building.

A Visit to Northfield, Minnesota Today

The clock that hung in the bank that day in 1876 is still there. It still reads 2 p.m. In a “Twilight Zone” sort of atmosphere, everything in the room is the same. 

When you stand on the original old floorboards and survey the bank counters and vault, you are seeing the same scene that Frank James and the other bandits saw as they came to the cashier window, drew their guns and commanded, “Throw up your hands. We are going to rob the bank. Don’t any of you holler. We’ve got 40 men outside.”  

Welcome to Northfield, Minn. It is a peaceful little place today, an hour south of Minneapolis, that is proud of its slogan: “Cows, Colleges & Contentment.”  

Jesse James production poster.

Although the town wants to be known for its beautiful and well-respected St. Olaf and Carleton colleges, Northfield can’t escape the notoriety of being the site of the last holdup of the James-Younger Gang. Today, it has an annual celebration in September, “The Defeat of Jesse James Day.”  

The Northfield Historical Society owns the Scriver Building where the robbery took place and they’ve done a splendid job of preserving the old bank with exhibits that detail the full seven bloody minutes that took place here on that sunny September afternoon in 1876. 

There are saddles and guns that belonged to the outlaws, along with a rifle used by one of the town’s many heroes. You can almost smell the gunpowder and hear the gun blasts of the battle that took place just outside the front door.

A photograph of a young Jesse James.

The James-Younger Gang

When the James-Younger Gang rode into town, the former Southern Civil War guerrillas were already well known as the most infamous desperadoes in America. Various members of the gang were credited with the nation’s first daylight peacetime bank robbery, one of the first train robberies, and some two dozen other daring holdups. 

Frank James and Cole Younger had ridden with the vicious William Quantrill and his guerrillas during the Civil War, with both of them participating in the Lawrence Massacre, on Aug. 21, 1863, where almost 200 unarmed men and boys in Lawrence, Kan., were murdered and the entire town was put to the torch. 

Jesse James became a Union-hating bushwhacker at age 16 fighting for Bloody Bill Anderson, along with his friend, 14-year-old Clell Miller. 

Inside the Northfield Historical Society Museum Store.

Confederate bushwhacker leaders Anderson and Quantrill were both psychopaths and the guerrilla warfare they led in Missouri and Kentucky was the most horrendous of the Civil War, more like organized gang killings than military fighting.

When the war ended, many of the former bushwhackers naturally drifted into crime. Frank and Jesse James were especially well-known, lionized by Southerners as almost “Robin Hood”-like figures. 

In truth, the bandits never shared their wealth with the poor and were involved in several cold-blooded killings of Pinkerton detectives assigned to capture them. But the James brothers could be kind to fellow Southerners they met during their crimes. In train robberies, they would often let Southern passengers keep their wallets and jewelry. 

The sympathy for the James boys only increased when in 1875 Pinkerton detectives threw a bomb into their boyhood home, killing their half-brother Archie and gravely injuring their mother by blowing one of her hands off. Neither of the James brothers was in the house at the time, gaining them lots of empathy.

Toy promotional poster.

The Northfield Raid 

By 1876, the outlaws were so famous in Missouri, it was too risky to pull jobs there, so they hit upon a plan to rob a bank in the rich farming country up north in Minnesota. Traveling in small groups to avoid suspicion, the outlaws told everyone they met that they were rich investors looking to buy farmland. That was somewhat true; to finance the bank job, the gang had robbed the Missouri Pacific Railroad of $15,000.

For a band of professional crooks, they made lots of mistakes. Hours before the robbery on Sept. 7, several of them got drunk. At 2 p.m., the town was uncharacteristically crowded with lots of people on the street, and worse, it was a small town. 

When eight strangers all wearing long linen coats came into town together, the residents got suspicious. Especially hardware store owner J.S. Allen. He didn’t like the looks of the three men who went into the bank, so he strolled over and peeked in the window. 

Outside window of the Northfield Historical Society.

Outlaw Clell Miller was assigned to guard the street and be on the lookout for something just like this. Miller walked over, stuck a gun in Allen’s face and told him to move on and not say anything. With that, the entire holdup plan fell apart.

Allen bravely tore himself loose and ran down the street. With Miller firing shots at him, Allen yelled: “Get your guns boys. They’re robbing the bank!”   

Other Northfield merchants took up the cry and the whole town started yelling. Miller jumped on his horse and along with Cole Younger starting firing pistols at citizens, telling them to get back inside. Jesse James and the other two bandits guarding the escape route became alarmed at the gunfire, and all three rode down the street, firing their guns, smashing windows, and telling everyone to go inside.

A Swedish immigrant, Nicolaus Gustavson, who may not have understood English, stood on the street watching the gunman. Incredibly, Northfield was scheduled to have a “Wild West” show that very afternoon, and he might have thought this was part of the show. At any rate, when he didn’t move, one of the outlaws shot him in the head, killing him.

Movie poster for The Great Northfield Minnesota Raid.

It was hunting season for prairie chickens in Northfield, so lots of residents had shotguns loaded with birdshot. Elias Stacy grabbed his shotgun, walked out in the street and fired a load into outlaw Clell Miller’s face. The birdshot didn’t kill him, but it did knock the bandit off his horse and fill his face with blood.

Henry Wheeler was another Northfield spectator on the street watching the gunfire. A medical student from the University of Michigan who was on vacation visiting his family, he was a crack shot. He ran to a hotel across the street, got a rifle, went to a third-floor window and began shooting at the James Gang.  

A.R. Manning, who owned the hardware store next door to the bank, grabbed his Winchester and a handful of cartridges and began his fuselage from behind a stairway. Soon, it seemed that everyone in town was firing some type of gun at the outlaws, who continued to ride up and down the street firing rounds at anything that moved.

Wanted poster for Jesse James.

Miller, the first outlaw to be wounded and covered with blood, got back on his horse just as Wheeler took a bead on him from the third-floor window and shot him through the chest, killing him instantly. 

When Cole Younger jumped off his horse to see how Miller was, the hardware clerk Manning shot him in the left hip. Manning then shot Bill Stiles through the heart. Outlaw Charlie Pitts had dismounted and was using his horse as a shield, so Manning, the hardware store sharpshooter, shot and killed the horse. 

Of course, the bandits noticed all these marksmanship and more than 30 shots were fired at Manning, splintering the stairs where he was hiding, but leaving him untouched.

With two men down and the whole town shooting, the outlaws on the street had to be wondering what was taking so long in the bank? Cole Younger remounted and rode his horse down the plankboard sidewalk to the bank window.

Northfield Riverwalk map.

In the Bank    

Nothing had gone right in the bank from the moment the three outlaws entered. With guns out, they ordered the three employees to lie on the floor; then the bandits rifled through the cash drawers. 

There were only a few dollars and a bag of nickels; the drawer with $2,000 in it was lower, and the outlaws never noticed it. Inside the unlocked vault was $57,000 in cash but the vault door was closed. The bandits thought it was locked and never realized all they had to do was turn the handle.

Instead, they ordered bank teller Joseph Lee Heywood to open the vault. He said it was on a time lock and he couldn’t open it. The robbers beat him on the head, but he refused to talk. Another bank employee bolted for the back door and was winged in the shoulder, but escaped.

Old illustration of the shoot out.

Outside, it must have sounded like a battle was being fought. Frustrated, the outlaws fired a gun next to Heywood’s ear, but he still refused to open the safe that was, of course, open all along. By now, Cole Younger was sitting on his horse outside on the sidewalk, yelling into the bank, “For God’s sake, come out, they are shooting us to pieces!”

The three outlaws in the bank gave up and walked out of the building and into a gun battle. One of them, probably Frank James, as he was leaving in total frustration, shot bank teller Heywood in the head, killing him. The desperate outlaws were so confused, they left behind the bag of nickels.

By now, the gang was taking severe carnage. All eight of them would be hit; two were killed, and they had lost a horse. Bob Younger on leaving the bank walked down the sidewalk and engaged in a one-on-one shootout with the marksman hardware store owner Manning. 

Inside the museum store.

They traded shots back and forth at close range when suddenly the outlaw took a shot to his right elbow.  The medical student, Wheeler, had hit him from the third-floor window. Younger did a “border shift,” tossing the gun to his left hand and kept blazing away.

The only thought now was an escape. Charlie Pitts had no horse, but Cole Younger swooped him up, and the six remaining outlaws galloped out of town on five horses, Jesse James taking the last bullet in his thigh as they raced down the street in a cloud of dust for the last time.  

Reward for the James crew capture.

The Hunt for the James-Younger Gang 

Among the many mistakes, the outlaw gang made was failing to cut the telegraph wires. They planned to do it after the robbery. Within hours, posses that would eventually reach a total of 1,000 men were on their tail. 

Still, in 1876, the bandits held a lot of cards. They stole horses, hid by day and rode by night, and whenever they encountered someone, they told them they were part of a posse chasing the bank robbers. 

For two weeks they eluded capture, trying to get back to Missouri. The James brothers figured they were the outlaws most wanted (and they selfishly knew they could move faster alone rather than traveling with the badly wounded Younger brothers), so they split off. 

Old bank lobby.

The James brothers not only made it back to Missouri, but they went back to robbing trains. Frank James was spooked by the Northfield disaster and later wrote, “I was tired of being an outlaw.” He decided to go straight. Years later, he surrendered and as part of a plea deal was found not guilty of all crimes and given a full pardon.

Jesse became increasingly erratic and dangerous, and his new gang of criminals was not on a par with the old. Finally, on April 3, 1882, one of his fellow outlaws, Bob Ford, decided to turn traitor and go for the reward on Jesse’s head. Waiting until Jesse was unarmed standing on a chair to hang a painting, Ford shot him in the back.

The Younger brothers and Charlie Pitts had a tougher time. After two weeks of running, the hungry, wet, tired and wounded outlaws were finally surrounded by a posse. 

Gifts at the museum store.

Charlie Pitts wanted to surrender, but Cole Younger said, “Charlie, this is where Cole Younger dies.”  The posse opened fire and another bloody gun battle raged. Pitts took a bullet to the chest that killed him instantly. 

Cole had eleven shots in his body before one bullet scraped his scalp and knocked him unconscious. Jim and Bob Younger were wounded again and surrendered. 

The three brothers pleaded guilty, were given life sentences, and served as prisoners together at Stillwater Penitentiary in Minnesota. Bob died in prison; Jim and Cole were pardoned, but Jim could not adapt to being free and killed himself.

Incredibly, Cole Younger and Frank James got together later in life and started a Wild West Show that toured the country. Both of them wrote fanciful books that had little truth but gained them lots of notoriety. 

In the end, it was Frank James who wrote the best epitaph of his life. “I have been hunted for twenty-one years. I have lived in the saddle. I have never known a day of perfect peace…We sometimes didn’t get enough to buy oats for our horses. Most banks had very little money in them.”

A color photograph of an older James.

IF YOU GO:  

Northfield is about an hour south of Minneapolis.

Go here for more information on the activities of the James-Younger Gang. 

Author Bio:Rich Grant, a freelance travel writer in Denver, is a member of the Society of American Travel Writers and the North American Travel Journalists Association. He is the co-author, with Irene Rawlings, of “100 Things to Do in Denver Before You Die,” published by Reedy Press in 2016.

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Filed Under: Historic Travel, Minnesota, Off-the-Beaten Path Travel, United StatesTagged With: Jesse James, Memorabilia, Northfield, Old West, Rich Grant

Источник: https://www.goworldtravel.com/old-west-outlaw-northfield-minnesota/

12 Incredible Real Life Cowboy Duos

The Wild West is one of the most romanticized periods in film. In the golden era of the '30s through the '60s when actors like John Wayne ruled supreme, the idea of the rugged frontiersman, the cowboy

The Wild West is one of the most romanticized periods in film. In the golden era of the '30s through the '60s when actors like John Wayne ruled supreme, the idea of the rugged frontiersman, the cowboy and outlaw was unparalleled in popularity.

Some incredible and iconic actors have been known to play notorious outlaws. The characters were usually bloodthirsty criminals, but people like Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Val Kilmer, and Kurt Russell lent these would-be villains a romanticised, folk-hero quality. Thanks to Hollywood, some of the most famous cowboys have become legends.

The truth of cowboy life, however, was much grimmer. The infamous outlaws that these actors portrayed were real-life criminals, murderers, and thieves. Yet, some of the greatest friendships - or 'bromances', if you will - that have ever been recorded developed between these cowboys. The profound connections between these adventurous characters help keep these cowboys, cowgirls, and outlaws alive in our hearts and minds. These are the twelve most famous cowboy duos that have ever existed.

12 King Fisher and Ben Thompson

King Fisher was a Texan gunslinger who was first arrested for horse theft at the age of 16. He became a cowboy and outlaw after taking part in posse activities around Texas ranches, and became proficient with his ivory handled pistols. He lived a very different life than Ben Thompson, who was an English-born gunman, gambler, and sometimes-lawman. Thompson once made an acquaintance of John Wesley Hardin, one of the most notorious gunmen in the Wild West, and tried (and failed) to remove “Wild Bill” Hickok as marshal of Abilene, Kansas, with Harden’s help.

Fisher and Thompson probably met in the early 1880s. In 1884, while in San Antonio, Texas, Fisher met up with his old friend Thompson. Thompson was unpopular in San Antonio because he had killed a popular theater owner there named Jack Harris, and a feud over the killing had been brewing. Thompson wanted to smooth things over with another theater owner and friend of Harris’, named Joe Foster.

Fisher accompanied Thompson to a theater production, but Foster refused to speak with them in their theater box. Fisher realized something was not right. As Fisher and Thompson stood up to leave, two gunmen in another theater box ambushed Fisher and Thompson, opening fire and killing them. The gunmen were not prosecuted, and the event came to be known as the Vaudeville Theater Ambush.

11 “Texas Jack” Vermillion and “Soapy” Smith

John “Texas Jack” Vermillion was a Confederate soldier in the Civil War, then a lawman, and then an outlaw. The origin of his nickname, “Texas Jack,” is unknown, but when asked why that was his nickname, he famously replied, “Because I’m from Virginia.” He took part in the 'Earp Vendetta Ride' that was glorified in the movie Tombstone, and afterwards joined the Soapy Smith Gang in Denver, Colorado.

Jefferson “Soapy” Smith was a famous con artist and crime boss, who gained his sobriquet “Soapy” after his most famous scam - a prize-package soap-selling racket. He was known for his swindles all across the US, including rigging city and state elections and cheating clientele in gambling halls he ran.

Texas Jack was with Soapy in 1889 at an Idaho train depot when a rival gang tried to assassinate Soapy. In 1898, Soapy tried to rob a man of $2,700 worth of gold (around $80,000 today) in a game of three-card monte, and the next day he was fatally wounded in a gunfight known as the Shootout on Juneau Wharf. Texas Jack either drowned in 1900, or died peacefully in 1911.

10 Bob and Gratton Dalton

Grat Dalton and Bob Dalton were younger brothers of famed Deputy US Marshal Frank Dalton. When Frank was killed during a shootout with outlaws, the Dalton brothers were devastated. Gratton became the new Deputy Marshal, but quickly sought an easier way to make a living, and thus formed the Dalton Gang.

The Dalton Gang robbed trains, but never struck it rich. In 1892, they decided to perform a bank robbery in Coffeyville, Kansas. The robbery was a colossal mistake, as townsfolk recognized the gang coming into town, and when they were ready to flee, they were surrounded. A shootout erupted, and both Gratton and Bob were killed, as well as four other Dalton Gang members, and four townspeople.

Brother Emmett Dalton was shot 23 times but somehow survived, and three other townspeople lived. The Dalton Gang was short lived and ultimately non-productive.

9 Bill Dalton and Bill Doolin

The fame that came from the Coffeyville shootout made the Dalton’s posthumously famous, and drove younger brother Bill Dalton to become more famous than his brothers. He co-founded the Wild Bunch gang with Bill Doolin, and for three years they gained a name for themselves doing bank robberies, stagecoach robberies, and train robberies.

The Wild Bunch was the most famous outlaw group in the Old West for a time. They were part of a shootout against 14 lawmen, but in late 1894, Bill Dalton was killed by US marshals. Rewards were offered for the rest of the Bunch’s capture or death, which turned friends into foes.

Doolin fled to New Mexico, but was relentlessly pursued by the Three Guardsmen, an emphatic group of lawmen. In 1896, Doolin was captured by one of the Guardsmen, Bill Tilghman, but escaped. He took refuge with his wife in Oklahoma Territory, but was killed by another guardsman, Marshal Heck Thomas, on August 24, 1896.

8 “Flat-Nose” Curry and “Kid Curry” Logan

George “Flat-nose” Curry and Harvey “Kid Curry” Logan were both part of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid’s group, the Wild Bunch (named after the original Wild Bunch formed by Bill Dalton and Bill Doolin). Both Curry and Logan took part in an escape after a Wild Bunch train robbery, and together killed a pursuing marshal. They were good friends in the Wild Bunch, and when George Curry was killed by a Sheriff in 1900, Kid Curry vowed revenge.

Kid Curry has been referred to as “the wildest of the Wild Bunch,” and reputedly killed at least nine lawmen in five different shootings, and two men in other instances. After George’s death, he rode to Utah to avenge his mentor’s death (he took George’s surname, Curry, because he looked up to him so much) and killed the Sheriff and Deputy Sheriff in a gunfight. He rode with the Black Jack Ketchum gang, and formed his own gang before joining the Wild Bunch.

Kid Curry was captured in a pool hall in Knoxville in 1902, but escaped afterwards (with a rumor spreading that a deputy had received $8,000 to let him go). In 1904, he was tracked down by a posse, outside of Parachute, Colorado. He had stolen horses to escape a train robbery, and the horse-owner and his neighbors pursued Curry, wounded him, and then Curry shot himself in the head. Rumors spread that Curry did not kill himself, was misidentified, and departed to South America with Butch Cassidy and Sundance.

7 Johnny Ringo and “Curly Bill” Brocius

Johnny Ringo and “Curly Bill” Brocius were portrayed in the movie Tombstone as the bad guys. It could be said that all outlaw cowboys were “bad guys,” but there’s a big gray area as to what constitutes 'bad.’ They are both mainly portrayed as being enemies of the Earp brothers, and participating in youngest brother Morgan Earp’s assassination.

As part of a group simply known as ‘The Cowboys,' Curly Bill and Johnny Ringo took part in many robberies and gunfights together, including a revenge-killing after one of their friends was killed, the infamous shootout at the O.K. Corral, and the subsequent 'Gunfight at Iron Springs.’ During that particular shootout, Curly Bill was struck down by a shotgun blast to the chest from Wyatt Earp.

Later that year, on July 14, 1882, Johnny Ringo was found dead in West Turkey Creek Valley, with a bullet hole in his right temple. Doc Holliday was originally assumed to be his killer, but modern studies believe Ringo committed suicide due to being depressed, drunk, and the recent deaths of his outlaw friends.

6 “Buffalo Bill” Cody and Annie Oakley

William “Buffalo Bill” Cody was one of the more colorful figures of the Old West. In 1883, he started a traveling show called Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, and would tour the country as the Cirque du Soleil of the time. It was during this time that he met Annie Oakley, an amazing sharpshooter who would become one of the first American women to reach “superstar” status.

Buffalo Bill also traveled in a show starring “Wild Bill” Hickok for 10 years, and his touring circus-like attraction gave him immense wealth. Oakley gained notoriety for beating a bravado marksman, Frank E. Butler, in a shooting match, at just 15 years old. Butler lost about $2,500 in today’s money, but he ended up marrying Oakley a year later.

Oakley and Butler joined Buffalo Bill’s Wild West in 1885. Oakley would go on to earn more than any other performer in the show, other than Buffalo Bill himself.

5 Billy the Kid and Tom O'Folliard

Billy the Kid is, of course, one of the most famous cowboys of the Old West - seen as both a notorious outlaw and a folk hero. William H. Bonney (which was actually William McCarty), as he went by, was relatively unknown during his life. Tom O'Folliard was Billy’s best friend, and they were both members of the outlaw group The Regulators, and took part in the infamous Lincoln County War.

The Lincoln County War arose from a conflict between two factions, over control of dry goods trade in the New Mexico Territory. The Regulators backed the newer, competing trade-story of the Tunstall-McSween faction, who were allied with a posse of outlaws and lawmen against the older organization of the Murphy-Dolan faction. The conflict was marred by back-and-forth revenge killings, climaxing with the Battle of Lincoln, which was a five-day gunfight.

O'Folliard was shot and killed by Pat Garrett’s posse (a marshal on the side of the Murphy-Dolan faction) in 1880, in a midnight ambush that Billy the Kid barely escaped. Soon after, the Kid’s group were surrounded by Garrett in an abandoned building, and Billy was captured. He was scheduled to be executed, but stunned everyone when he escaped prison by killing both of his guards. Sheriff Pat Garrett followed the Kid to Fort Sumner, where he eventually found and killed Bonney three months after his escape.

4 “Wild Bill" Hickok and “Calamity Jane”

James Butler Hickok was a soldier and spy for the Union Army, and then a lawman, gunslinger, and professional gambler. He was involved in several notable shootouts, including one with Davis Tutt in the first ever “quick draw fuel,” and he was killed while playing poker in Deadwood, South Dakota, by the unsuccessful gambler Jack McCall.

Martha “Calamity Jane” Canary was a frontierswoman and scout. She claimed to have been married to Wild Bill, but divorced him so he could marry Agnes Lake. She was famous for being compassionate to the sick and needy, and for her (supposed) military campaigns against Native Americans. Even if all of her claims are false, she at the very least traveled with Hickok to Deadwood, and from Deadwood their fame as partners became legend.

3 Frank and Jesse James

Frank James was the older brother of the infamous outlaw Jesse James, and the co-founder of the James-Younger Gang. Frank was a Confederate in the Civil War. His brother, Jesse, was already a celebrity during while he was alive, but became a legendary figure after his death. After the war, the duo gained notoriety by robbing banks, stagecoaches, and trains.

The James brothers were most active with their gang for 10 years, from 1866 until 1876, when their attempted robbery of a bank in Northfield, Minnesota, ended with the death of most of the gang. Only Jesse and Frank were left alive and uncaptured. After Jesse’s name was given a $5,000 bounty, he was betrayed and killed by his trusted friend, Bob Ford, and his death became a national sensation.

Ford was shocked to find himself arrested for first degree murder and sentenced to hanging, but he was pardoned and received a small part of the bounty just two hours after his sentencing. He would go on to star in a touring stage show with his brother, where they re-enacted the shooting. Frank James surrendered to the governor of Jefferson City, Missouri, in 1882, was acquitted of his crimes, and released. He lived with his mother for the next 30 years, and died at the age of 72.

2 "Doc" Holliday and Wyatt Earp

Wyatt Earp, one of the middle brothers of the Earp family, is probably the most famous Old Western lawmen of all time. He was the central figure of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and was a major figure in the development of Tombstone, Arizona. He was a lifelong gambler, always moving from town to town, and he was also one of the longest lasting cowboys, living until the age of 80.

John Henry “Doc” Holliday was Wyatt’s friend, and a gambler, gunfighter, and dentist. He partook in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral - as a lawman - in which three cowboys were killed. He also joined Wyatt in the Earp Vendetta Ride after Wyatt’s younger brother Morgan was murdered by Curly Bill Brocius and his group. He died of tuberculosis at the age of 36. Both Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday are two of the most highly-romanticized cowboys to come out of the Old West.

1 Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

In all fairness, Butch Cassidy’s best friend was fellow co-founder of the Wild Bunch, Elzy Lay. Nonetheless, his and Harry “Sundance Kid” Longabaugh’s friendship is immortalized by Paul Newman and Robert Redford’s portrayal of them. Together, with other members of the Wild Bunch gang, they performed the longest string of successful bank robberies in American history.

After taking part in numerous bank robberies and failing to get amnesty, Cassidy and Longabaugh fled to South America, along with Longabaugh’s girlfriend Etta Place. The duo held up a bank in Argentina, which proved to be their most lucrative yet - escaping with a sum of about $100,000 in today’s money - and then they vanished to Bolivia. That is where their famous final stand took place, in which they became surrounded by lawmen, and (probably) committed suicide.

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Notorious Outlaws of Bryce Canyon Country

Cattle rustling, bank heists, train robberies…temptations were irresistible for some of the more unsavory characters who roamed the Wild West at the turn of the 19th century. Blazing the Outlaw Trail from Montana to Mexico, outlaws such as Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch gang often hid out in Utah's intricate maze of canyons. This lawless bunch was often aided by locals who provided food, supplies, and horses—along with plenty of misinformation to local law enforcement.

Butch CassidyOutlaws roamed the west rustling livestock, robbing banks, and trains.
Butch Cassidy is Utah's most famous outlaw, but he didn't work alone. His notorious Wild Bunch gang members included Harry "The Sundance Kid" Longabaugh, Ben "The Tall Texan" Kilpatrick, William Ellsworth "Elzy" Lay, Will Carver, Matt Warner/Will "The Mormon Kid" Christianson, and Harvey "Kid Curry" Logan, to name a few. The women of the Wild Bunch included Etta Place, Laura Bullion, Annie Rogers, and outlaw sisters Anne and Josie Basset.
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Born Robert LeRoy Parker in 1866, Butch Cassidy had a strong Mormon upbringing, but over time gained a disrespect for the law that led him down the criminal path.  Butch Cassidy's first bank heist in 1889 netted a whopping twenty grand.  Hiding out in Robber's Roost, he evaded the law but it wasn't long before his first stint in jail.

Utah OutlawsWestern outlaws were some of the best horsemen of their time.The Wild Bunchgrew in numbers after Butch Cassidy's release from jail in 1896, with the addition of Elzy Lay, Kid Curry, and The Sundance Kid. Butch Cassidy and Elzy Lay had met as teens working a ranch in Wyoming. In 1899, they committed one of their most notorious crimes, robbing a Union Pacific train carrying the Pleasant Valley Coal Company's payroll. Butch made it to Robber's Roost, but Elzy was injured and eventually caught and sent to prison.

Tall and handsome, Elzy had charisma. He used his charms to his advantage, first with the ladies, and then later to become a respected business man. Butch, however, was the brains behind multiple bank and train robberies, planning the crime and then sending his Wild Bunch gang members in to do the dirty work. A "gentlemen's bandit" in his own mind, Butch Cassidy never killed anyone — or at least no one could ever prove that he did.

Robber's RoostBank and train robbers utilized Utah's canyons to hide from the law.Outlaw Kid Currywas a different story, wanted on warrants for 15 murders (and under suspicion for twice that number). William Pinkerton, head of the Pinkerton Detective Agency, called Kid Curry the most rancorous outlaw in America, saying "He is the only criminal I know of who does not have one single good point."

Harry "The Sundance Kid" Longabaugh hooked up with Kid Curry after a stint in jail. They robbed a bank together, then joined the Wild Bunch. Longabaugh met Etta Place in 1878 at the infamous Fannie Porter's Brothel, where Annie Rogers (alias Della Moore) also worked. Romantically linked to both Harvey Logan and Kid Curry, Annie eventually spent time in jail for passing bank notes stolen in the great Northern robbery by Kid Curry and Ben "The Tall Texan" Kilpatrick. She was acquitted in 1902 and accounts vary whether she spent the rest of her life working at Fannie Porter's brothel or living quietly as a law-abiding citizen.

Ben "The Tall Texan" Kilpatrick was the Wild Bunch's most prolific train robber. He served 15 years in prison for robbery, but immediately returned to a life of crime upon his release in 1911. Girlfriend Laura Bullion, a.k.a. Della Rose, often participated alongside Kilpatrick, also serving five years in prison for train robbery. Upon her release, she lived out her life as a seamstress. Kilpatrick, on the other hand, was killed during an attempted train robbery less than a year after his release from prison.

Born and raised in Utah, Willard "The Mormon Kid" Christianson, alias Matt Warner, committed several train and bank robberies alongside Butch Cassidy and Elzy Lay. A gunfight earned him five years in a Utah state prison but upon his early release for good behavior he turned his life around, becoming a justice of the peace and later a deputy sheriff. He lived in Price, Utah until his death of natural causes at age 74.

By 1902, the Wild Bunch had disbanded for good. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (along with Etta Place) left the country, presumably for South America, and it's unclear whether they died there or returned to the U.S. Famed outlaw hideout Robber's Roost was never penetrated during their heyday, and the original Wild Bunch corral still stands today.

Get out and explore the areas where the outlaws rode with companies such as these - Guides & Outfitters.

Источник: https://www.brycecanyoncountry.com/blog/post/notorious-outlaws-of-bryce-canyon-country/

There’s no more iconic scene in Western movies than the good old-fashioned pistol duel, where the lawman and the outlaw meet at high noon to see who’s faster on the draw. In actuality, this kind of thing very rarely occurred, and the true life Western stories—like Wild Bill Hickok being shot in the back while playing cards—tell a much more gruesome and less gallant tale. Still, there’s no denying that among the bandits and lawmen of the day there were a number of larger-than-life gunfighters whose exploits helped pave a bloody path for the characters that would later populate Western movies and dime novels. The following are ten of the most famous—and downright deadly—of these Old West gunslingers.

10. Ben Thompson

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Ben Thompson was a gambler, gunfighter, and sometimes lawman who rubbed shoulders with some of the most famous figures of the Old West. He started his criminal career at the age of 17, when he stabbed and killed a fellow gambler whom he had accused of cheating him at cards. Thompson was known for being lightning fast on the draw, and gained a reputation as a gunfighter after killing two men in a shootout on Christmas Eve of 1876. Wanting to escape this reputation, he took a job as the City Marshall of Austin, Texas, but he was forced to resign when he killed a local theater owner named Jack Harris during an argument. Thompson was himself killed in 1884, along with gunfighter King Fisher, when friends of Harris ambushed the two and gunned them down while they were watching a performance at an opera house.

9. Wyatt Earp

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Famed lawman Wyatt Earp is perhaps the most storied figure of the Old West, but he was also an accomplished gunslinger who was greatly feared by the bandits of the time. Earp had a varied career that saw him travel to boomtowns like Wichita, Dodge City and the lawless town of Tombstone to serve as sheriff, and he participated in some of the most legendary gunfights of the 1800s. The most famous of these is undoubtedly the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, which occurred in 1881 when Earp, his brothers Morgan and Virgil, and friend Doc Holliday confronted a group of cowboys who had recently been arrested for robbing a stagecoach. Three of the cowboys were killed in the fight, and everyone except Wyatt was wounded. The gunfight caused a huge scandal, and friends of the cowboys soon retaliated, wounding Wyatt’s brother Virgil and killing Morgan. Earp and Holliday then led a team of gunfighters on what has become known as their “Vendetta Ride,” and they eventually killed several men connected with the murders before fleeing the territory. All told, Earp participated in numerous gunfights in his life, killing anywhere from 8 to 30 outlaws (depending on the source), and his exploits remain some of the most famous stories of the Old West.

8. King Fisher

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One the lesser-known but more notoriously violent gunslingers of the Old West was John King Fisher, who was in and out of prison from the age of sixteen. In the early 1870s, Fisher became known as a bandit when he started running with a group of outlaws who raided ranches in Mexico. Fisher was known both for his flamboyant style, which saw him wear brightly colored clothes and carry twin ivory-handled pistols, as well as for his propensity for violence. He famously gunned down three members of his own gang when a dispute arose of money, and then killed seven Mexican pistoleros shortly after that. In his most famous gunfight, Fisher is said to have taken on four Mexican cowboys single-handedly. After hitting one with a branding iron, he supposedly outdrew another and shot him. In his typical brutal style, he then shot two of the man’s unarmed accomplices. In 1884, Fisher was ambushed and killed, along with Ben Thompson, by friends of a man whom Thompson had previously killed in a gun battle.

7. Dallas Stoudenmire

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Although not as well known as someone like Wild Bill Hickok or Wyatt Earp, Dallas Stoudenmire was a feared lawman in his day, and is known for participating in more gunfights than most of his contemporaries. After being wounded several times while fighting in the Civil War, Stoudenmire moved to the lawless city of El Paso, Texas to serve as sheriff. Only three days into his tenure, he became involved in one of the West’s most legendary battles, what is common known as the “Four Dead in Five Seconds Gunfight,” in which he shot three men. A few days after the fight, friends of the men Stoudenmire had shot hired the town drunk to assassinate him. But Dallas was able to get the drop on him and supposedly shot the man eight times, killing him. This only marked the beginning of what would be a bloody campaign for Stoudenmire as sheriff. Less than a year after these incidents, he would kill as many as six more men in gunfights while in the line of duty, eventually gaining a reputation as one of the most feared lawmen in Texas. Stoudenmire’s luck would not last forever, though, and in 1882 he was killed when a discussion between he and a group of his enemies escalated into a gunfight in which he was shot three times.

6. Billy The Kid

Henry McCarty, a.k.a. William H. Bonney or just “Billy the Kid,” started his life of crime with petty theft and horse thievery, but is said to have first killed a man at the age of eighteen. In 1877, he was deputized during the so-called “Lincoln County War” and rode with lawmen who were seeking to arrest a group of corrupt businessman responsible for the murder of an innocent rancher. Billy’s group, called “the Regulators,” became known for their wanton violence, and were themselves soon regarded as outlaws. The group was unfazed by their new classification as bandits, and proceeded to go on a killing spree, gunning down three people in the course of just three days, including a sheriff and his deputy. The group was eventually broken up by law enforcement, but the Kid managed to elude capture. He formed a gang, and increased his notoriety after shooting down a gambler in a New Mexico saloon. After a number of run-ins with the law, the Kid was again captured and sentenced to death, but he managed to escape after he got a hold of a weapon and gunned down the two men guarding him. After three months on the run, he was killed when Sheriff Pat Garrett and two deputies shot him to death in 1881. All told, Billy the Kid is said to have killed a total of 21 men, one for each of the years of his life, though this number is often regarded as inaccurate and exaggerated.

5. Wild Bill Hickok

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One of the most legendary figures of the Old West, Wild Bill Hickok was an actor, gambler, lawman, and gunfighter who was regarded as one of the most skilled gunslingers of his day. Hickok got his start as a constable and rider for the Pony Express, but he gained a reputation for being handy with a gun after he killed outlaw David McCanles with a single bullet from 75 yards away. Hickok has the distinction of being one of the few gunfighters to ever participate in a real “Western-style” quick-draw duel, when he killed a man named Davis Tutt, Jr. over a dispute concerning gambling debts. In 1869, Hickok was elected sheriff of Ellis County Kansas, and is said to have killed two men in his first month on the job. Although many of his exploits are legendary, probably the most famous aspect of Wild Bill’s life is his death, which occurred in Deadwood, South Dakota in 1876. Hickok was playing poker when he was shot in the back of the head by a gambler named Jack McCall, supposedly in retaliation for a prior insult. Hickok was supposedly holding a pair of Aces and Eights at the time, a combination now known as the “Dead Man’s Hand.”

4. Clay Allison

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Known for his mercurial personality and violent temper, Clay Allison was a gunfighter who is remembered as one of the most notorious and downright deranged outlaws of the Old West. Allison fought for the Confederacy in the Civil War, but was discharged after a blow to the head started causing erratic behavior in him. It is this ailment that many historians have said explains his shockingly brutal actions, which included once beheading a man he suspected of murder and carrying the head into his favorite bar. After this, which cemented his reputation as one of the most murderous figures of his day, Allison went on to participate in a number of gunfights against fellow gunslingers. The most famous of these was against outlaw Chunk Colbert, whom Allison shot in the head when the other drew his gun on him following a meal they had shared. When asked why he had eaten with a man who wanted to kill him, Allison replied, “I wouldn’t want to send a man to hell on an empty stomach.” For a man who led such a dangerous lifestyle, Allison met a rather ironic and unimpressive death in 1887, when he fell off a wagon and broke his neck. His gravestone is said to read: ”Clay Allison. Gentleman. Gun Fighter. He never killed a man that did not need killing.”

3. Jim “Killer” Miller

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One of the most downright murderous figures of the Old West, Jim “Killer” Miller was an assassin and gunfighter who is credited with killing at least 14 people, though legend has it that the number is somewhere closer to 50. One of the most famous stories about him involves a confrontation he had with a sheriff named Bud Frazer over Miller’s alleged involvement in the murder of a cattle rancher. Miller pulled his gun on Frazer, who proceeded to shoot him six times. Killer’s friends managed to escape with him, only to find that he had been wearing a metal plate under his shirt, which had blocked all of Frazer’s bullets. Two years later, Miller tracked the Sheriff down and killed him with a shotgun. Described as being cold to the core, Miller famously declared that he would kill anyone for money, and is rumored to have gunned down everyone from political figures to famed sheriff Pat Garrett. His days of bloodshed finally came to an end in 1909, when he was arrested for the murder of a U.S. Marshall.  After a mob of some forty people broke into the prison, Miller and three other outlaws were dragged to a nearby barn and lynched. In his typical maniacal fashion, prior to being hanged Miller is said to have shouted, “Let ‘er rip!” and voluntarily jumped off the box to his death.

2. Tom Horn

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Tom Horn spent a good portion of his life legitimately employed both as a lawman and a detective, but in actuality he was one of the most cold-blooded killers of the Old West. In the 1880s, Horn made a name for himself as a scout and tracker, and was responsible for the arrest of many feared criminals. This caught the attention of the famed Pinkerton Detective Agency, and Horn worked for them for several years as a tracker and bounty hunter. Though known as being eerily cool under pressure, Horn was considered to have a dangerous capacity for violence, and in 1894 he was forced to resign his post as a detective after he became linked to the murders of 17 people. Following his resignation, he developed a reputation as a killer for hire, and is said to have been responsible for the deaths of some 20 cattle rustlers over the course of several years. Horn was finally caught and hanged in 1901 after being linked to the murder of a 14-year-old boy. Ironically, some modern historians have claimed that on this particular occasion Horn was actually innocent. Still, there is no denying that he was responsible for a great many other killings. Some historians have reasoned that he may have had a hand in as many as 50 murders.

1. John Wesley Hardin

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In a relatively short life, famed outlaw and gunslinger John Wesley Hardin established himself as easily the most bloodthirsty figure of the Old West, and is credited with the deaths of no less than 42 people. The son of a Methodist preacher, Hardin displayed a capacity for violence early on in life when he stabbed a fellow student in the schoolyard at the age of 14. At 15, he gunned down an ex-slave, and then proceeded to kill three Union soldiers before going on the run. He was known for carrying two pistols in holsters strapped to his chest, which he claimed facilitated the quick draw, and he used them to gun down three more people in various gunfights soon after his flight. Hardin was eventually arrested at age 17 for the murder of a Texas City Marshal, but he was able to procure a gun while in jail, and when transferred he killed one of his guards and again went on the lam. Now a celebrated gunfighter, he made his way to Abilene and fell under the tutelage of Wild Bill Hickok. But Hardin was forced to flee the city soon after his arrival when he is said to shot and killed a fellow guest at his hotel because the man’s snoring was keeping him awake.  At 25, Hardin was finally arrested by a team of Texas Rangers, and eventually served a total of 16 years in prison before being released at the age of 41. Reformed form his years behind bars, Hardin began studying law and even passed the bar, but his old reputation eventually caught up with him. In 1895, he was killed after being shot in the back by a lawman in El Paso, Texas.

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Photos of the Old Wild West That Look Like They’re Straight Out of a Storybook

Goldie Griffith

Put holiday destinations for 2020 up, cowgirl! Ms. Griffith was a part of Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, but she wasn’t there to look pretty! Goldie Griffith was known for her mean abilities as a boxer and wrestler, she also rode broncos and performed various other acts.

Wild West

KayTurnbaugh / Youtube

Griffith became a star in her own right, even getting married at Madison Square Garden! She famously rode her horse up the steps of Ulysses S. Grant’s tomb in New York City and was known as “the gol darndest gal who ever sat leather.” On a bet, she rode her horse over 3,000 miles from San Francisco to New York.

We all want to be as tough as Goldie! Keep reading to see more fascinating figures from the Old West.

Texas Jack Vermillion

John Wilson Vermillion, also known as Texas Jack, is one of the legendary gunfighters of the Old West who was known for working with the Earps in their vendetta rides searching for outlawed cowboys. He was also known by the name “Shoot-Your-Eye-Out Vermillion” because it was rumored that he once shot a man in the eye.

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Wikimedia Commons

Texas Jack is called as such because that’s how they listed him on all of his wanted posters, which he was on for shooting a man during an argument at cards. Yikes! Someone once asked him why he was called Texas Jack and replied, “because I’m from Virginia.” Well, that explains a lot!

Jesse James

Jesse James is a notorious American outlaw, but his talents didn’t end there! He was also a guerrilla fighter, a gang leader, bank and train robber and, of course, a murderer. James was born in Missouri and, together with his brother, the two formed the James-Younger Gang. That’s one strong sibling bond!

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Wikimedia Commons

They were Confederate bushwhackers during the Civil War and were ultimately accused of committing multiple monstrosities against Union soldiers during the war, including their many infamous robberies.

Olive Oatman

Olive Oatman was only 14 years-old when her family was attacked and killed by a group of Native Americans. The Oatmans were traveling through present-day Arizona at the time. Olive and her sister were kidnapped and sold to the Mohave people. Her sister died of how to close a bank of america account from abroad while in captivity.

Wild West

Benjamin F. Powelson/Wikimedia Commons

Olive is best recognized by her blue face tattoo which she believed was a sign of slavery in the Mohave tribe where she was kept, but that is inconsistent with tribal traditions. According to the Mohave tradition, all members of the tribe receive face tattoos. Her story was widely publicized but few details are known about her time with the Mohave.

Santiago ‘Jimmy’ McKinn

Santiago ‘Jimmy’ McKinn was a boy by the age of 11 or 12, who lived with his family in the lower Mimbres Valley, New Mexico. One day, while out with his older brother Martin, a group of Chiricahua Apache led by Geronimo approached the two. The Apache then killed Martin and abducted young Santiago.

Old Wild West

Jimmy McKinn/Wikimedia Commons

As the story goes, Santiago was eventually rescued by General George Crook, but the boy did not want to go back to his family and preferred to stay with the Apache. The above photo depicts young Santiago McKinn along with his captors, with whom he lived for six months, taking up their language and lifestyle.

Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley is probably one of the most well known faces of the Wild West. Born Phoebe Ann Mosey, Oakley rose to fame at the early age of 15 due to her outstanding sharpshooting skills. She began trapping, shooting and hunting by the age eight, to support her poor family after the death of her father.

Old Wild West

Annie Oakley/Hulton Archive/Getty Images

After making a name for herself as a trained shooter, young Annie married fellow marksman and former rival Frank E. Butler. The two later joined Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show, turning Oakley into an international star.

Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show

Buffalo Bill has a “wild” reputation throughout the Old West, and has been one of the most influential showmen ever! Bill was a scout and a bison hunter, but when he wasn’t out in the wild, he was working his show! Don’t you want a ticket?

Old Wild West

Buyenlarge/Getty Images

The Wild West Shows were a series of traveling shows that romanticized life in the American Frontier. They performed variety acts, including reenacting the incident of Warbonnet Creek, a parade, and many other circus-like acts. There was something for everyone!

Rose Dunn

This next Wild West woman is something of a western legend. Rose Dunn, also known as Rose of the Cimarron, was romantically involved with outlaw George “Bittercreek” Newcomb around the age of 14 or 15. Newcomb’s gang adored Dunn for her good looks and cool demeanor. After a shoot-out with US Marshals, the gang went into hiding.

Rose Dunn Old Wild West

Wikimedia Commons

Newcomb and another gang member eventually returned to visit Rose and her brothers shot them on site. The Dunn’s collected a $5,000 bounty for Newcomb. He was wanted “Dead or Alive.” Legend says that Dunn set him up, but we may never know the true story.

Discretion is Advised

Brothels and outlaws usually go well together, and Fannie Porter’s brothel was no exception. Ex-prostitute porter was respected among criminals for her warm and sincere attitude, as well as her discretion. She was known for refusing to turn in her costumers, and was popular among members of the Wild Bunch gang for this reason.

Old Wild West

United States Library of Congress’s Prints/Wikimedia Commons

Among the San Antonio brothel’s frequent clients were Butch Cassidy and Kid Curry, the Sundance Kid and other members of the gang. What’s more, a number of Porter’s “girls” became involved with the gang members. Wild Bunch member, Laura Bullion (pictured above), is even said to have worked at the brothel for a time.

Members of Buffalo Bill’s troupe

These charming men gathered around a log cabin are several members of Buffalo Bill’s troupe. These are some of the people that would likely travel all over the world performing for people who wanted to get a glimpse of the Wild West! Lucky for us, we can catch a glimpse of it on here.

Old Wild West Buffalo Bill

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In this photograph, we have a John Nelson, John Burke, a Sioux Native American, and several other stern cowboys.

Charley Nebo and a Friend

Charley Nebo, pictured left, was born in 1842 to an English father and Canadian mother. He was a well known cowboy that lived in New Mexico, Texas and Nebraska. Nebo served in the Union Army during the civil war, and suffered a painful injury that left him handicapped. He ended up being honorably discharged, and eventually became a stockman.

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In 1878, Nebo started working for John Chisum’s cattle empire. He was also friends with renowned robber, Billie the Kid, and was known to be a skilled cowboy, that left a lasting impression on the old Wild West.

Having a Drink

Being a cowboy wasn’t always hard work on horseback at the ranch. In the photo below, a group of cowboys is seen enjoying a drink and a quick chat with the bartender at a saloon in Old Tasacosa, Northern Texas ca. 1907.

Old Wild West Photos

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The saloon was a place to rest, have a drink, play some poker and even negotiate cattle. Some saloons were open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and were popular not only among cowboys, but also gold diggers, soldiers, travelers and even lawyers.

Bob Leavitt’s Saloon

Bob’s Saloon was a popular establishment in Jordan, Montana, in the early 1900s. In this 1904 photo by L.A. Huffman, a group of cowboys is seen relaxing in front of the saloon. The owner, Robert Leavitt, was a cowboy himself, and was also one of the early settlers in Jordan.

Old Wild West Photos

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The old Western saloons offered their clientele various types of entertainment, including dancing girls, card games, dice games and even bowling. Some saloons even had piano players and theatrical skits for their costumers to enjoy.

The Cowboy Look

In the wild west, cowboys were so much more than mere animal herders. The term originated from the Spanish Vaquero, a livestock herder riding on horseback, and required skill and plenty of physical ability, developed from an early age.

Wild West Old Photos

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American cowboys were mostly white men, though quite a few African American freedmen, as well as Mexicans and American Indians, also worked as cowboys by the late 1860s. The cowboy look, that has since become iconic, famously included a bandanna, leather gloves, chaps, boots, a sturdy pair of jeans and most importantly, a wide brimmed cowboy hat.

Gould and Curry miner

Mining was a huge part of the Wild West – there were plenty of jobs in the field and lots of towns revolved solely around mining! This mine here is a silver mine in Virginia City, Nevada. The city had two major mines: Savage and the Gould and Curry.

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The miner here is 900 feet underground, and yet all he has for light is a burning magnesium wire. Can you believe that? Virginia City became a boomtown after the discovery of the silver deposits. At its peak, the city boasted of 25,000 residents. When the mine’s output declined, so did its residents. As of 2010, only around 850 people live in Virginia City. People in the West really were fearless!

Two Barmen in an Old West Saloon

We’ve all heard of saloons, right? Back in the old West, saloons were a specific kind of bar that served a wide assortment of folks, including cowboys, fur trappers, soldiers, miners, and many more. The very first saloon ever was established in Wyoming in 1822, but they quickly popped up all around the American Frontier!

Wild West Old Photos

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By 1880, these were one of the more popular establishments available to people in the West. Bartenders prided themselves on the appearance of their saloons, as well as their drink pouring abilities. Many of these saloons were used for gambling, prostitution and opium dens. Cheers!

Charging Thunder

Charging Thunder was one of the several Native Americans who participated in Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. This Lakota chief joined the crew when he was only 26 years old. Eventually, he married one of the American horse trainers in the crew… ah, stage romance!

Wild West Old Photos

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After Buffalo Bill’s show, Charging Thunder became a British citizen and ended up working in Manchester’s Belle Vue Circus as an elephant trainer. He later changed his name to George Edward Williams and found a factory job after the circus.

A Mojave Native American

This Mojave Native American’s name was Maiman, and he worked as a guide and interpreter in 19th century Colorado, especially during the 1870s. Maiman would often guide photographer Timothy O’Sullivan around and help him find the best locations for his photographs.

Wild West Old Photos

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O’Sullivan, unlike many other photographers at the time, didn’t call walmart auto center to photograph Native Americans in a studio, which lent his works a very realistic quality which we can see here! He also famously photographed many Civil War battlefields.

Billy the Kid, c. 1879

Here’s everyone’s favorite outlaw… Billy the Kid, who was actually born as Henry McCarty, is one of the most well-known outlaws of the Old West. Kid was one of the most notorious gunfighters of the time, and is known for having killed at least 8 men at a very young age.

Old Wild West Photos

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Billy the Kid was born in New York City and later resided mostly in New Mexico, he even fought in their Lincoln County War! Kid was eventually arrested and jailed, then died by gunshot of Sheriff Pat Garrett in an attempt to escape his jail cell. He was only 21! But his legacy didn’t end there. It was rumored that the outlaw didn’t die in the gunfight and over the next few decades numerous people committed crimes while claiming to be Billy the Kid.

General Custer Crossing the Dakota Territory

This photograph is of the Dakota Territory, which encompassed what is now North and South Dakota, and features General Custer’s men crossing the plains. General Custer – as you may remember from your history books – was an officer in the United States Army during the American Civil War and the Indian Wars.

Wild West Old Photos

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This photograph is by W.H. Illingworth, another famous photographer on this list, but unlike the rest of them, he’s English! Illingworth once accompanied an expedition to the Montana Territory in the 1860s and 1870s, through the Black Hills of the Dakotas.

The Soiled Doves

Plenty of notorious madams and prostitutes were considered fixtures of old Western towns, some were so popular and successful they became millionaires. These women came from all over the world, despite the harsh conditions they had to endure.

Wild West Old Photos

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These scarlet women had different, surprisingly poetic nicknames, depending on the region. In California, they were labeled “soiled doves” by the cowboys, and “ladies of the line” or “sporting women” by the California ’49er. Other nicknames were “fallen frails,” “doves of the roost,” “nymphs du prairie” and “fallen angles.”

Wheeler Survey Group

This incredibly happy looking group of men were the Wheeler Survey group. The Wheeler Survey was a giant expedition to survey the Western United States, led by Captain George Montague Wheeler. The expedition took place from 1869 to 1879 and led to the creation of topographic maps of the Southwest!

Wild West Old Photos

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Three areas of the survey were named after Captain Wheeler: Wheeler Peak in Nevada, Wheeler Peak in New Mexico, and Wheeler Geologic Area in Colorado! That’s not a bad deal!

Wyatt Earp, c. 1887

Wyatt Earp was a good friend of Doc Holliday and had some very similar interests. He was also a proficient gambler in the Wild West, but had a working job as a deputy sheriff in Arizona! It seems like everyone at the time had the same job…

Old Wild West Photos

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He gained his notorious reputation during a gunfight at the O.K. Corral in which he killed three cowboys. From then on he was known as a regarded shooter, especially in Tombstone, Arizona! He continuously clashed with cowboys until his death in 1929.

Louisa Earp, Morgan Earp’s Wife

We’ve heard plenty about the Earp men so far, but nothing about the woman! They say that behind every great man, there’s a great woman, and that’s certainly true of Morgan Earp. Morgan Earp was married to Louisa Earp, though nobody knows how they met or got married.

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The two lived in Montana for some time, then moved to California. When Morgan moved to Arizona, he left Louisa behind, expecting it to be a short trip, but the two would never meet again.

Navajo Indians Near Fort Defiance

This photograph by Timothy O’Sullivan, entitled “Aboriginal Life Among the Navajo Indians Near Old Fort Defiance, New Mexico” was printed in 1873! The print depicts the Navajoes at their home, an abandoned military post, back in the Old Wild West.

Life in the Old Wild West

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The Navajoes themselves are known for being very intelligent and fierce, and are one of the most wealthy aboriginal tribes of the United States. In this photo, you can see the ears of corn that they cultivate and the looms for making blankets.

Doc Holliday, all-around man

Doc Holliday is another incredibly well numbing cream for waxing walgreens and dangerous gunfighter of the Wild West. He was a good friend of Wyatt Earp and is well known for being a gambler, a gunfighter, and… a dentist! Say what?

Life in Old Wild West

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Holliday became a dentist when he was 20 years old, then when he was diagnosed with tuberculosis, he became a gambler in Arizona. Why not, right? He couldn’t stay away from the gun, though, and soon earned a reputation for being a deadly gunman.

Old Mission Church, New Mexico

Old Mission Church in New Mexico is one of the earliest examples of a Spanish Colonial era mission, as it was established way back in 1630! The mission itself is relatively small, but complex. It’s a long-standing piece of adobe history, and you can still visit it today!

Wild West Old Photos

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The Mission played a big role during the Pueblo Revolt and was inhabited by Franciscans for some time until Mexico gained independence from Spain. Now, it marks a tourist attraction for Zuni Pueblo, New Mexico!

Sioux Indian Teepees

The Sioux Nation of Native Americans is one of the largest tribes to have lived on the Great Plains. The Sioux Nation is actually 3 different tribes under the same nation: Eastern Dakota, Western Dakota, and the Lakota tribes. All of these were nomadic tribes that hunted bison, and as a part of their lives on the great plains, they built the teepees that you see here!

Life in Old Wild West

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It’s not known exactly where this photograph was taken, but it’s safe to guess that it’s probably the Dakota Territory. Wherever it was, it’s pretty amazing!

Sterling, Goldie Griffith’s son

On May 9, 1913, the tough and rough girl Goldie Griffith got married at Madison Square Garden to fellow Buffalo Bill performer Harry Griffith. The two didn’t always have the best marriage or the best life, but they did give birth to an adorable baby boy, Sterling.

Buffalo Bill Museum & Grave

Buffalo Bill Museum & Grave

After her time in the Wild West shows, Goldie Griffith took her son to Nederland, Colorado where she raised him alone in a happy tight-knit family. During their time in Colorado, the family opened a number of restaurants and trained dogs.

Timothy O’Sullivan photograph

Timothy O’Sullivan was born on Staten Island, New York, and would go on to become one of the most influential photographers of the Civil War era, though he also garnered a solid reputation for his photography of the American Western landscape. One of his best-known photographs is this one, of Native Americans.

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O’Sullivan joined a geological survey team in 1871 which allowed him to travel around the United States and take picturesque photographs everywhere that he went, especially in the pueblos of the Canyon de Chelly. There was nobody as talented as him!

This photograph is exactly what you’d expect from the Old West! Keep reading to see even more incredible photographs.

Morgan Earp, deputy

Morgan Earp was also friends with Doc Holliday and was Wyatt Earp’s brother! Just like his brother, Morgan Earp often spent his time in Tombstone, Arizona confronting outlaw cowboys. The Earps interfered so much that they all had targets on their heads!

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Those targets eventually got to Morgan Earp, who was killed by ambush. After his death, Wyatt Earp took matters into his own hands and avenged his brother’s death outside of the law. It’s like a real-life Western movie!

Personal hygiene in the Wild West

Don’t you just want to take a dip in these waters too? So refreshing! These waters are a part of the Pagosa Hot Springs in Colorado, which are still around today. It’s amazing to think that people are still doing the same things that those in the 19th century were doing.

Old Wild West Photos

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The Pagosa Hot Springs are renowned for their mineral waters, which supposedly could cure any ailments and rejuvenate any person – including this man!

Buffalo Soldier, 1890

Nobody is sure who this specific buffalo soldier is, but his face will forever be remembered in history! Buffalo soldiers were the name given to the 10th Cavalry of the United States Army between 1866 and 1951.

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The nickname, Buffalo soldier, was given to black soldiers by the Native Americans when the soldiers fought during the Indian Wars. The name has stuck ever since!

This photograph is an amazing piece of history – click on for even more!

The Deadwood Coach

John C.H. Grabill is another well-known photographer from the 19th century! He mostly worked out of the Dakota Territory, though he had a studio in Chicago as well. This photograph of his is of the infamous Deadwood Coach. The Deadwood Coach is perhaps the most historic and well-known stagecoach in existence!

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This is the stagecoach that was carried by Buffalo Bill in all of his Wild West shows throughout America and Europe. Can you imagine how many wonderful adventures this coach has seen?

Ox Teams at Sturgis

This photograph, which is currently located in the Library of Congress, is from the largest surviving collection of John C.H. Grabill’s works. This particular photograph is an image of frontier life in Sturgis, South Dakota. Can you imagine living in a town like this?

Wild West Photos

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All of the Dakota Territory was full of prospectors, hunters, and cowboys, many of which used these teams of oxen. Who needs cars when you’ve got a wagon?

SHARE this article if you loved seeing all of these historic photos of the wild west!

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Источник: https://www.directexpose.com/photos-old-wild-west-believe-exist/

Notorious Outlaws of Bryce Canyon Country

Cattle rustling, bank heists, train robberies…temptations were irresistible for some of the more unsavory characters who roamed the Wild West at the turn of the 19th century. Blazing the Outlaw Trail from Montana to Mexico, outlaws such as Butch Cassidy and his Wild Bunch gang often hid out in Utah's intricate maze of canyons. This lawless bunch was often aided by locals who provided food, supplies, and horses—along with plenty of misinformation to local law enforcement.

Butch CassidyOutlaws roamed the west rustling livestock, robbing banks, and trains.
Butch Cassidy is Utah's most famous outlaw, but he didn't work alone. His notorious Wild Bunch gang members included Harry "The Sundance Kid" Longabaugh, Ben "The Tall Texan" Kilpatrick, William Ellsworth "Elzy" Lay, Will Carver, Matt Warner/Will "The Mormon Kid" Christianson, and Harvey "Kid Curry" Logan, to name a few. Most notorious outlaws of the old west women of the Wild Bunch included Etta Place, Laura Bullion, Annie Rogers, and outlaw sisters Anne and Josie Basset.
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Born Robert LeRoy Parker in 1866, Butch Cassidy had a strong Mormon upbringing, but over time gained a disrespect for the law that led him down the criminal path.  Butch Cassidy's first bank heist in 1889 netted a whopping twenty grand.  Hiding out in Robber's Roost, he evaded the law but it wasn't long before his first stint in jail.

Utah OutlawsWestern outlaws were some of the best horsemen of their time.The Wild Bunchgrew in numbers after Butch Cassidy's release from jail in 1896, with the addition of Elzy Lay, Kid Curry, and The Sundance Kid. Butch Cassidy and Elzy Lay had met as teens working a ranch in Wyoming. In 1899, they committed one of their most notorious crimes, robbing a Union Pacific train carrying the Pleasant Valley Coal Company's payroll. Butch made it to Robber's Roost, but Elzy was injured and eventually caught and sent to prison.

Tall and handsome, Elzy had charisma. He used his charms to his advantage, first with the ladies, and then later to become a respected business man. Butch, however, was the brains behind multiple bank and train robberies, planning the crime and then sending his Wild Bunch gang members in to do the dirty work. A "gentlemen's bandit" in his own mind, Butch Cassidy never killed anyone — or at least no one could ever prove that he did.

Robber's RoostBank and train robbers utilized Utah's canyons to hide from the law.Outlaw Kid Currywas a different story, wanted on warrants for 15 murders (and under suspicion for twice that number). William Pinkerton, head of the Pinkerton Detective Agency, called Kid Curry the most rancorous outlaw in America, saying "He is the only criminal I know of who does not have one single good point."

Harry "The Sundance Kid" Longabaugh hooked up with Kid Curry after a stint in jail. They robbed a bank together, then joined the Wild Bunch. Longabaugh met Etta Place in 1878 at the infamous Fannie Porter's Brothel, where Annie Rogers (alias Della Moore) also worked. Romantically linked to both Harvey Logan and Kid Curry, Annie eventually spent time in jail for passing bank notes stolen in the great Northern robbery by Kid Curry and Ben "The Tall Texan" Kilpatrick. She was acquitted in 1902 and accounts vary whether she spent the rest of her life working at Fannie Porter's brothel or living quietly as a law-abiding citizen.

Ben "The Tall Texan" Kilpatrick was the Wild Bunch's most prolific train robber. He served 15 years in prison for robbery, but immediately returned to a life of crime upon his release in 1911. Girlfriend Laura Bullion, a.k.a. Della Rose, often participated alongside Kilpatrick, also serving five years in prison for train robbery. Upon her release, she lived out her life as a seamstress. Kilpatrick, on the other hand, was killed during an attempted train robbery less than a year after his release from prison.

Born and raised in Utah, Willard "The Mormon Kid" Christianson, alias Matt Warner, committed several train and bank robberies alongside Butch Cassidy and Elzy Lay. A gunfight earned him five years in a Utah state prison but upon his early release for good behavior he turned his life around, becoming a justice of the peace and later a deputy sheriff. He lived in Price, Utah until his death of natural causes at age 74.

By 1902, the Wild Bunch had disbanded for good. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (along with Most notorious outlaws of the old west Place) left the country, presumably for South America, and it's unclear whether they died there or returned to the U.S. Famed outlaw hideout Robber's Roost was never penetrated during their heyday, and the original Wild Bunch corral still stands today.

Get out and explore the areas where the outlaws rode with companies such as these - Guides & Outfitters.

Источник: https://www.brycecanyoncountry.com/blog/post/notorious-outlaws-of-bryce-canyon-country/

The Lawmen and Outlaws Who Built the Old West

The Old West was not all shootouts and gunslingers engaged in quick draw duels on Main Street. Indeed, shootouts were often deadlier for bystanders than the participants, and gunslingers preferred to shoot their victims in the back when possible – it was safer for the shooter. Still, the American West could get rough, and plenty of notorious outlaws gave often only slightly less notorious lawmen all the work they could handle to impose law and order. Following are thirty things about some of the more fascinating lawmen and outlaws of the Old West.

The Lawmen and Outlaws Who Built the Old West

30. The Lawman Whose Career Marked the Transition From the Old West to the Modern Era

When Francis “Frank” Augustus Hamer began his career in law enforcement in Texas in 1905, most notorious outlaws of the old west still chased cattle rustlers, bandits, and other outlaws across the West on horseback. Policing was minimal and often ad hoc, and sheriffs routinely rounded up posses when extra bodies were needed. By the time he retired in 1949, lawmen were part of an established bureaucracy of law enforcement, went from thither to yon by automobiles, used airplanes, and communicated via radios and wireless devices. His career thus witnessed the transformation of law enforcement from that of legendary Old West lawmen, to the era of modern policing.

The Lawmen and Outlaws Who Built the Old West

Hamer was born in Texas in 1884, and in his youth he was noted for keen intelligence, a photographic memory, and was a crackshot with a pistol. Raised in a devoutly religious family, he wanted to become a preacher when he grew up. At age sixteen, while working on a ranch belonging to a Dan McSween, the proprietor offered him $150 to shoot a business associate. He refused, and warned the marked man. In retaliation, McSween shot Hamer in the back and left side of the head, and left him for dead. He was saved by a black field hand, and never forgot it until his dying day: “A colored man was the best friend I ever had in my life. That colored man caused me to be living today&ldquo.

Источник: https://historycollection.com/the-lawmen-and-outlaws-who-built-the-old-west/

12 Incredible Real Life Cowboy Duos

The Wild West is one of the most romanticized periods in film. In the golden era of the '30s through the '60s when actors like John Wayne ruled supreme, the idea of the rugged frontiersman, the cowboy

The Wild West is one of the most romanticized periods in film. In the golden era of the '30s through the '60s when actors like John Wayne ruled supreme, the idea of the rugged frontiersman, the cowboy and outlaw was unparalleled in popularity.

Some incredible and iconic actors have been known to play notorious outlaws. The characters were usually bloodthirsty criminals, but people like Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Val Kilmer, and Kurt Russell lent these would-be villains a romanticised, folk-hero quality. Thanks to Hollywood, some of the most famous cowboys have become legends.

The truth of cowboy life, however, was much grimmer. The infamous outlaws that these actors portrayed were real-life criminals, murderers, and thieves. Yet, some of the greatest friendships - or 'bromances', if you will - that have ever been recorded developed between these cowboys. The profound connections between these adventurous characters help keep these cowboys, cowgirls, and outlaws alive in our hearts and minds. These are the twelve most famous cowboy duos that have ever existed.

12 King Fisher and Ben Thompson

King Fisher was a Texan gunslinger who was first arrested for horse theft at the age of 16. He became a cowboy and outlaw after taking part in posse activities around Texas ranches, and became proficient with his ivory handled pistols. He lived a very different life than Ben Thompson, who was an English-born gunman, gambler, and sometimes-lawman. Thompson once made an acquaintance of John Wesley Hardin, one of the most notorious gunmen in the Wild West, and tried (and failed) to remove “Wild Bill” Hickok as marshal of Abilene, Kansas, with Harden’s help.

Fisher and Thompson probably met in the early 1880s. In 1884, while in San Antonio, Texas, Fisher met up with his old friend Thompson. Thompson was unpopular in San Antonio because he had killed a popular theater owner there named Jack Harris, and a feud over the killing had been brewing. Thompson wanted to smooth things over with another theater owner and friend of Harris’, named Joe Foster.

Fisher accompanied Thompson to a theater production, but Foster refused to speak with them in their theater box. Fisher realized something was not right. As Fisher and Thompson stood up to leave, two gunmen in another theater box ambushed Fisher and Thompson, opening fire and killing them. The gunmen were not prosecuted, and the event came to be known as the Vaudeville Theater Ambush.

11 “Texas Jack” Vermillion and “Soapy” Smith

John “Texas Jack” Vermillion was a Confederate soldier in the Civil War, then a lawman, and then an outlaw. The origin of his nickname, “Texas Jack,” is unknown, but when asked why that was his nickname, he famously replied, “Because I’m from Virginia.” He took part in the 'Earp Vendetta Ride' that was glorified in the movie Tombstone, and afterwards joined the Soapy Smith Gang in Denver, Colorado.

Jefferson “Soapy” Smith was a famous con artist and crime boss, who gained his sobriquet “Soapy” after his most famous scam - a prize-package soap-selling racket. He was known for his swindles all across the US, including rigging city and state elections and cheating clientele in gambling halls he ran.

Texas Jack was with Soapy in 1889 at an Idaho train depot when a rival gang tried to assassinate Soapy. In 1898, Soapy tried to rob a man of $2,700 worth of gold (around $80,000 today) in a game of three-card monte, and the next day he was fatally wounded in a gunfight known as the Shootout on Juneau Wharf. Texas Jack either drowned in 1900, or died peacefully in 1911.

10 Bob and Gratton Dalton

Grat Dalton and Bob Dalton were younger brothers of famed Deputy US Marshal Frank Dalton. When Frank was killed during a shootout with outlaws, the Dalton brothers were devastated. Gratton became the new Deputy Marshal, but quickly sought an easier way to make a living, and thus formed the Dalton Gang.

The Dalton Gang robbed trains, but never struck it rich. In 1892, they decided to perform a bank robbery in Coffeyville, Kansas. The robbery was a colossal mistake, as townsfolk recognized the gang coming into town, and when they were ready to flee, they were surrounded. A shootout erupted, and both Gratton and Bob were killed, as well as four other Dalton Gang members, and four townspeople.

Brother Emmett Dalton was shot 23 times but somehow survived, and three other townspeople lived. The Dalton Gang was short lived and ultimately non-productive.

9 Bill Dalton and Bill Doolin

The fame that came from the Coffeyville shootout made the Dalton’s posthumously famous, and drove younger brother Bill Dalton to become more famous than his brothers. He co-founded the Wild Bunch gang with Bill Doolin, and for three years they gained a name for themselves doing bank robberies, stagecoach robberies, and train robberies.

The Wild Bunch was the most famous outlaw group in the Old West for a time. They were part of a shootout against 14 lawmen, but in late 1894, Bill Dalton was killed by US marshals. Rewards were offered for the rest of the Bunch’s capture or death, which turned friends into foes.

Doolin fled to New Mexico, but was relentlessly pursued by the Three Guardsmen, an emphatic group of lawmen. In 1896, Doolin was captured by one of the Guardsmen, Bill Tilghman, but escaped. He took refuge with his wife in Oklahoma Territory, but was killed by another guardsman, Marshal Heck Thomas, on August 24, 1896.

8 “Flat-Nose” Curry and “Kid Curry” Logan

George “Flat-nose” Curry and Harvey “Kid Curry” Logan were both part of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid’s group, the Wild Bunch (named after the original Wild Bunch formed by Bill Dalton and Bill Doolin). Both Curry and Logan took part in an escape after a Wild Bunch train robbery, and together killed a pursuing marshal. They were good friends in the Wild Bunch, and when George Curry was killed by a Sheriff in 1900, Kid Curry vowed revenge.

Kid Curry has been referred to as “the wildest of the Wild Bunch,” and reputedly killed at least nine lawmen in five different shootings, and two men in other instances. After George’s death, he rode to Utah to avenge his mentor’s death (he took George’s surname, Curry, because he looked up to him so much) and killed the Sheriff and Deputy Sheriff in a gunfight. He rode first bank of nigeria in new york the Black Jack Ketchum gang, and formed his own gang before joining the Wild Bunch.

Kid Curry was captured in a pool hall in Knoxville in 1902, but escaped afterwards (with a rumor spreading that a deputy had received $8,000 to let him go). In 1904, he was tracked down by a posse, outside of Parachute, Colorado. He had stolen horses to escape a train robbery, and the horse-owner and his neighbors pursued Curry, wounded him, and then Curry shot himself in the head. Rumors spread that Curry did not kill himself, was misidentified, and departed to South America with Butch Cassidy and Sundance.

7 Johnny Ringo and “Curly Bill” Brocius

Johnny Ringo and “Curly Bill” Brocius were portrayed in the movie Tombstone as the bad guys. It could be said that all outlaw cowboys were “bad guys,” but there’s a big gray area as to what constitutes 'bad.’ They are both mainly portrayed as being enemies of the Earp brothers, and participating in youngest brother Morgan Earp’s assassination.

As part of a group simply known as ‘The Cowboys,' Curly Bill and Johnny Ringo took part in many robberies and gunfights together, including a revenge-killing after one of their friends was killed, the infamous shootout at the O.K. Corral, and the subsequent 'Gunfight at Iron Springs.’ During that particular shootout, Curly Bill was struck down by a shotgun blast to the chest from Wyatt Earp.

Later that year, on July 14, 1882, Johnny Ringo was found dead in West Turkey Creek Valley, with a bullet hole in his right temple. Doc Holliday was originally assumed to be his killer, but modern studies believe Ringo committed suicide due to being depressed, drunk, and the recent deaths of his outlaw friends.

6 “Buffalo Bill” Cody and Annie Oakley

William “Buffalo Bill” Cody was one of the more colorful figures of the Old West. In 1883, he started a traveling show called Buffalo Bill’s Wild West, and would tour the country as the Cirque du Soleil of the time. It was during this time that he met Annie Oakley, an amazing sharpshooter who would become one of the first American women to reach “superstar” status.

Buffalo Bill also traveled in a show starring “Wild Bill” Hickok for 10 years, and his touring circus-like attraction gave him immense wealth. Oakley gained most notorious outlaws of the old west for beating a bravado marksman, Frank E. Butler, in a shooting match, at just 15 years old. Butler lost about $2,500 in today’s money, but he ended up marrying Oakley a year later.

Oakley and Butler joined Buffalo Bill’s Wild West in 1885. Oakley would go on to earn more than any other performer in the show, other than Buffalo Bill himself.

5 Billy the Kid and Tom O'Folliard

Billy the Kid is, of course, one of the most famous cowboys of the Old West - seen as both a notorious outlaw and a folk hero. William H. Bonney (which was actually William McCarty), as he went by, was relatively unknown during his life. Tom O'Folliard was Billy’s best friend, and they were both members of the outlaw group The Regulators, and took part in the infamous Lincoln County War.

The Lincoln County War arose from a conflict between two factions, over control of dry goods trade in the New Mexico Territory. The Regulators backed the newer, competing trade-story of the Tunstall-McSween faction, who were allied with a posse of outlaws and lawmen against the older organization of the Murphy-Dolan faction. The conflict was marred by back-and-forth revenge killings, climaxing with the Battle of Lincoln, which was a five-day gunfight.

O'Folliard was shot and killed by Pat Garrett’s posse (a marshal on the side of the Murphy-Dolan faction) in 1880, in a midnight ambush that Billy the Kid amazon credit card visa or mastercard escaped. Soon after, the Kid’s group were surrounded by Garrett in an abandoned building, and Billy was captured. He was scheduled to be executed, but stunned everyone when he escaped prison by killing both of his guards. Sheriff Pat Garrett followed the Kid to Fort Sumner, where he eventually found and killed Bonney three months after his escape.

4 “Wild Bill" Hickok and “Calamity Jane”

James Butler Hickok was a soldier and spy for the Union Army, and then a lawman, gunslinger, and professional gambler. He was involved most notorious outlaws of the old west several notable shootouts, including one with Davis Tutt in the first ever “quick draw fuel,” and he was killed while playing poker in Deadwood, South Dakota, by the unsuccessful gambler Jack McCall.

Martha “Calamity Jane” Canary was a frontierswoman and scout. She claimed to have been married to Wild Bill, but divorced him so he could marry Agnes Lake. She was famous for being compassionate to the sick and needy, and for her (supposed) military campaigns against Native Americans. Even if all of her claims are false, she at the very least traveled with Hickok to Deadwood, and from Deadwood their fame as partners became legend.

3 Frank and Jesse James

Frank James was the older brother of the infamous outlaw Jesse James, and the co-founder of the James-Younger Gang. Frank was a Confederate in the Civil War. His brother, Jesse, was already a celebrity during while he was alive, but became a legendary figure after his death. After the war, the duo gained notoriety by robbing banks, stagecoaches, and trains.

The James brothers were most active with their gang for 10 years, from 1866 until 1876, when their attempted robbery of a bank in Northfield, Minnesota, ended with the death of most of the gang. Only Jesse and Frank were left alive and uncaptured. After Jesse’s name was given a $5,000 bounty, he was betrayed and killed by his trusted friend, Bob Ford, and his death became a national sensation.

Ford was shocked to find himself arrested for first degree murder and sentenced to hanging, but he was pardoned and received a small part of the bounty just two hours after his sentencing. He would go on to star in a touring stage show with his brother, where they re-enacted the shooting. Frank James surrendered to the governor of Jefferson City, Missouri, in 1882, was acquitted of his crimes, and released. He lived with his mother for the next 30 years, and died at the age of 72.

2 "Doc" Holliday and Wyatt Earp

Wyatt Earp, one of the middle brothers of the Earp family, is probably the most famous Old Western lawmen of all time. He was the central figure of the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and was a major figure in the development of Tombstone, Arizona. He was a lifelong gambler, always moving from town to town, and he was also one of the longest lasting cowboys, living until the age of 80.

John Henry “Doc” Holliday was Wyatt’s friend, and a gambler, gunfighter, and dentist. He partook in the Gunfight at the O.K. Corral - as a lawman - in which three cowboys were killed. He also joined Wyatt in the Earp Vendetta Ride after Wyatt’s younger brother Morgan was murdered by Curly Bill Brocius and his group. He died of tuberculosis at the age of 36. Both Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday are two of the most highly-romanticized cowboys to come out of the Old West.

1 Butch Cassidy and The Sundance Kid

In all fairness, Butch Cassidy’s best friend was fellow co-founder of the Wild Bunch, Elzy Lay. Nonetheless, his and Harry “Sundance Kid” Longabaugh’s friendship is immortalized by Paul Newman and Robert Redford’s portrayal of them. Together, with other members of the Wild Bunch gang, they performed the longest string of successful bank robberies in American history.

After taking part in numerous bank robberies and failing to get amnesty, Cassidy and Longabaugh fled to South America, along with Longabaugh’s girlfriend Etta Place. The duo held up a bank in Argentina, which proved to be their most lucrative yet - escaping with a sum of about $100,000 in today’s money - and then they vanished to Bolivia. That is where their famous final stand took place, in which they became surrounded by lawmen, and (probably) committed suicide.

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Источник: https://www.therichest.com/most-popular/12-incredible-real-life-cowboy-duos/

A History of the Old Outlaws of California : Bad Guys Are a Good Draw at Exhibit

SACRAMENTO — 

Californians hate crime, but they love outlaws.

Old outlaws. Dead outlaws.

About 200,000 visitors have come since last March to ooh and aah and muse and chuckle over California badmen, notorious and obscure, bank of america ui debit card az deeds are on display in the State Museum in the Capitol building.

There’s Black Bart, the poetic stage coach robber. There’s the legendary Joaquin Murrieta, the Mexican Robin Hood. There’s Willian Miner, the Grey Fox, also called the Gentleman Bandit and the subject of a recent movie. And there’s long-forgotten Walter Hitchcock, wanted for murder and described on a poster as shifty-eyed with a prominent, pointed nose “very red, apparently from excessive drinking.”

Popular Exhibit

The exhibit, “The Outlaws of California, 1853-1925,” has been rivaled in popularity at the museum only by a former display portraying the calamitous San Francisco earthquake of 1906, according to exhibits technician Paula S. Jow. After the outlaws exhibit closes next Tuesday, the display material will be available for public viewing at the California State Archives, a block from the Capitol.

For the last seven months, ordinary, law-abiding folks from all walks of life have come to the State Museum to gaze at the modest exhibit, their fingers streaking the glass of the five display cases as they ponder prison ledgers, mug shots, letters and photographs, appeals for parole denied and granted.

“It’s fascinating,” said Vivian Gulley a retirement home worker from Hemet.

“What did they do?” she asked as she peered at a page from the San Quentin prison ledger dated 1883. “The crimes are just the basic crimes, murder, robbery. . There’s no drugs on here. . They’re not like the real terrible crimes we have today. There’s no hurting children.”

‘Black Bart the Po 8'

At the top of the ledger that Gulley was examining was the name C. E. Bolton, with the notation “Alias Black Bart the Po 8.”

That was the way Bolton signed the verses he sometimes left at the scenes of his 27 successful stagecoach holdups. A photograph of the gray-haired, distinguished-looking bandit is displayed next to the prison ledger which notes that Bolton served five years of a six-year sentence.

“He was a pretty good robber,” said Charles Aney, a construction worker from Sacramento who visited the museum.

Beneath the notorious Black Bart on the prison ledger are the names of other convicts, none of them ever well known and now all forgotten.

On the same day Black Bart entered San Quentin on Nov. 21, 1893, a Chinese cook with the melancholy name Ah Sam was imprisoned to begin a year’s sentence for grand larceny.

What Became of Him?

Ah Sam, what did he steal? What became of him?

And on the same page, on Nov. 29, it is noted that Ella Amador, a brown-eyed, 24-year-old seamstress from Los Angeles began a five-year sentence for a “felony.”

What did Ella Amador do, mused Gulley. What felony cost her five years at San Quentin?

At an adjacent exhibit case, John Salinas, an automobile detailer from Fresno, pondered a display dealing with Joaquin Murrieta, who, as legend has it, began robbing the rich and helping the poor in the 1850s after suffering discrimination and violent mistreatment by whites in the California gold fields.

“He was sort of a folk hero to the Mexican race,” said Salinas. “The struggle that a man went through back then. . might be like what a Mexican-American goes through today--prejudice, our legal rights.”

1853 Petition

The Murrieta display case contains an 1853 petition from Mariposa County residents to then-Gov. John Bigler, complaining that “our county is now being ravaged by a bunch of robbers under the command of the daring bandit Joaquin or some equally desperate outlaw.”

The leader of a band of California Rangers subsequently claimed to have killed Murrieta and collected a reward. A human head--alleged that of the bandit--was put on public display.

Bette Rudick, retired realtor from Los Angeles, looked at a display case showing that writer Jack London had helped a prisoner named Joe King gain parole in 1915 by offering him a job at his ranch in the Valley of the Moon.

“I think that’s great,” said Rudick, “if they’ve done their time and they can come back into society. (But) today, I don’t know. It’s completely different. Crime is a little different.

“We don’t live as they did then,” she added. “We live with bolted, locked doors, security systems, guards. I hate it.”

Источник: https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1986-10-20-me-6557-story.html

10 of the Most Notorious Women of the Wild West

sonora webster carver
wild west

Most of the time, when we think about the Wild Wild West, we think of cowboys and bandits and corrupt sheriffs. Hollywood depicts the west as a crime-filled most notorious outlaws of the old west made up of bearded men fighting for their land, searching for gold, or protecting women. But some of the most badass people in the wild west were, in fact, women who rose up and made a name for themselves as some of the best shooters or meanest criminals. Others spent their days saving lives and helping others. Below we take a look at some of the women of the wild west you wouldn’t want to mess with.

Annie Oakley

Annie Oakley. (Wikipedia)

When Annie was 15-years-old, she won a shooting match against traveling-show marksman Frank E. Butler. The two were later married and they joined Buffalo Bill’s Wild West show a few years later. Oakley became renowned for her sharpshooting skills and performed before royalty and heads of state. She encouraged the service of women in combat operation for the U.S. armed forces and penned a letter to President William McKinley offering “the government the services of a company of 50 ‘lady sharpshooters’ who would provide their own arms and ammunition should the U.S. go to war with Spain.”

Mary Fields 

Would-be mail thieves didn’t stand a chance against Stagecoach Mary, who sported men’s clothing, a bad attitude and two guns. Mary Fields was the first African American woman, and the second woman in the U.S., to carry mail, and she was known for hard-drinking and quick-shooting. She was born into slavery and freed after the Civil War, which is when she started working as a groundskeeper at the Ursuline Convent of the Sacred Heart in Toledo, Ohio. But she got in an argument and was kicked out. In 1895, she got a contract from the postal service to become a star route carrier. Her job was to protect mail on her route from thieves and bandits and to deliver mail.

Sonora Webster Carver

Sonora Webster Carver

Born in Waycross, Georgia, she was one of the first female horse divers. Her job was to mount a running horse as it reached the top of a forty-foot (sometimes sixty-foot) tower, and ride it as the horse plunged into an 11-foot pool of water below. She became the lead diving girl for William “Doc” Carver’s team. She traveled the country performing. She was blinded by a retinal detachment due to hitting the water off-balance with her eyes open while diving her horse in 1931. She continued to dive horses until 1942. The popular movie Wild Hearts Can’t Be Broken is based on her life, though she was quoted being disappointed with how she was depicted.

Belle Starr 

Known as the “Bandit Queen,” Belle Starr was born in 1848 as Myra Maybelle Shirley, but she soon grew into a rebellious spirit. She mingled with outlaws and became a horse thief. As her fame grew, she stayed a genteel lady: She drank whiskey and would gallop her horse at breakneck speeds, but always while riding sidesaddle. She threatened men who harassed her with a gun. She once told the Dallas Morning News that she was “a friend to any brave and gallant outlaw.” Starr was mysteriously murdered in 1889.

Cathay Williams 

Cathay Williams (Wikipedia)

She was the first African-American woman to enlist in the army, and did so by disguising herself as a man. Though she was hospitalized five times, no one ever discovered her secret. She called herself William Cathay and was deemed fit for duty. After the war, she moved to Colorado and got married, but then her husband stole her money and a team of horses. Williams had him arrested. There are rumors that she owned a boarding house during her time in the west as well.

Pearl Heart 

Pearl Heart was inspired by Annie Oakley, but instead of using her sharpshooting skills for show and entertainment, Heart used them for a life of crime. The Canadian-born outlaw is said to have been a cook in a boardinghouse, while others say she ran a tent brothel near a local mine. When she was low on money, Heart met up with a man named Joe Boot and the two of them robbed a stagecoach. Heart dressed as a man, and ultimately, they got lost when they ran away. This is one of the last recorded stagecoach robberies in the U.S. They were caught and during her sentencing, she said, “I shall not consent to be tried under a law in which my sex had no voice in making.” She served some of her sentence, but became pregnant in prison and was quickly pardoned by the governor. After that, her life becomes a mystery.

Eleanor Dumont

Eleanore Dumont (Pinterest)

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Also known as Madame Moustache, Dumont was a notorious gambler on the American Western Frontier, mainly during the California Gold Rush. No one knows quite where she is originally from, some say France, others say New Orleans. She turned up in San Francisco in 1849 and worked as a card dealer. After a few years, she opened up her own elegant gambling parlor. She refused to let in dirty, unclean men and served champagne over whiskey. She was so successful that she bought a ranch and started raising cattle. But then she met a man named Jack McKnight, who she thought she loved and could trust. She signed her property over to him so he could manage it. McKnight was a con man, and he took all her money and left her in serious debt. According to Ranker, she did not take this well. She hunted him down and killed him with two blasts from a shotgun. There are many stories of her foiling robbers and threatening steamboats at gunpoint. Unfortunately, she killed herself when her debts most notorious outlaws of the old west too large.

Laura Bullion

Laura Bullion (Wikipedia)

Bullion may have always been destined for a life of crime, as her father was a Native American bank robber. While she was working as a prostitute in Texas, she joined the Wild Bunch gang, where she ran with Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid. She became known as “Rose of the Wild Bunch” and helped the gang out with their robberies. She would help sell the stolen items, forge checks, and it is rumored she disguised herself as a man to help with heists.

Bridget Mason

She started life as a slave, but after winning her freedom in court in 1856, she moved to Los Angeles and became a nurse and midwife. Ten years later, she bought her own land for $250, making her one of the first black women to own land in Los Angeles. She was a savvy businesswoman and sold part of the land for $1500. She built a rental space on the remaining section. She eventually had over $300,000 to her name, but she donated to charities and made it her mission to help out the poor and needy. She established the First African Methodist Episcopal Church in 1872, which continued to help people even after she died.

Katherine Haroney

Katherine Haroney, or Big Nose Kate. (Wikipedia)

She was known as “Big Nose Kate” because she worked as a prostitute and didn’t want to be confused with another prostitute named “Kate.” She was known for her stubbornness and toughness. She spent the 1880s moving around the Midwest, and claimed that she worked as a prostitute because she liked not belonging to any one man or one house. She met Doc Holliday in Kansas and the two started a relationship. One time when he was arrested and locked up for killing a man in self-defense, Kate set fire to an old building. The fire threatened to burn down the entire town, and while the town was busy dealing with that, she held the guard who was watching Holliday at gunpoint while she freed her lover. They escaped and remained together until Holliday died.

Susan Anderson

Susan Anderson (Wikipedia)

Anderson was known as “Doc Susie” for her dedication to her medical practice. She was born in 1870 in Indiana and went to medical school before starting her own practice. She became famous when she successfully saved a miner’s arm after he was told by another doctor it would have to be cut off. Anderson practiced medicine for 47 years and didn’t retire until she was 84.

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Источник: https://www.insidehook.com/article/history/these-are-some-of-the-most-hardcore-women-of-the-wild-west

Signature Theatre

“The fabric of their lives needs to be folded into the tapestry of our nation’s history” – African American Women of the Old West

Inspired by a true story, Gun & Powder depicts two African American sisters who became notorious outlaws in the Wild West. Although they're not usually the main characters in modern cowboy stories (if they're depicted at all), there were large numbers of African American men and women security first credit union mortgage rates in all of the Western states. The frontier expansion offered both a new way of life and economic independence that was not afforded to either African Americans or women in the East.

African American women made enormous contributions to the advancement and culture of the West. They built towns, established charities, created schools, developed churches, and did dangerous jobs such as delivering the mail. They were real estate magnates, writers, celebrated chefs, investors and trailblazers.

Below are the stories of six women and the exciting and inspiring lives they led when they went West.

Biddy Mason black and white image

Biddy Mason

Bridget “Biddy” Mason

Real Estate Magnate and Philanthropist

(1818 – 1891)

Biddy Mason was born into slavery in 1818, but her exact birthplace is unknown; like so many enslaved people, she was forcibly taken from her family and sold several times. Her final owner, Robert Smith, converted to Mormonism and moved his household, including Biddy, to California with a larger group of church members. California was a free state and Biddy was legally free as soon as she entered the state, but her owner Smith kept her from learning of her right to freedom for five years. Once she learned this, she petitioned the court for freedom for herself and her children. Despite the obstacles Smith set in place, and the fact that she was not allowed to testify, she won her family’s freedom and adopted the surname Mason.

Mason settled in Los Angeles and worked as a nurse and a midwife. After saving money for a decade, she invested in real estate, becoming one of the first Black female landowners in Los Angeles. Her wise investments made her a fortune and a prominent citizen of the city, which she used to establish multiple charities, schools, daycares and the first African American church in Los Angeles. She died in 1891 as one of the richest women in the city.

Susie Sumner Revels Cayton black and white image

Susie Sumner Revels Cayton

Susie Sumner Revels Cayton

Writer and Editor

(1870 – 1943)

Born in 1870 in Mississippi, Susie Sumner Revels was the daughter of Reverend Hiram Revels, the first elected African American to the United States Senate. She was named in honor of family friend and prominent abolitionist Senator Charles Sumner of Massachusetts. In 1896, after graduating from college, Revels married newspaper owner Horace Cayton and moved west to join him in Seattle.

Horace Cayton had founded the Seattle Republican newspaper in 1894 and Susie regularly contributed content and served as Associate Editor. The paper appealed to both White and Black readers and eventually grew to be the second largest circulated paper in the city. The couple eventually became the only Black family to live in the affluent Capitol Hill area of Seattle. Susie Cayton was also immensely involved in civic life, she founded the Dorcus Charity Club and successfully organized boycotts for business that discriminated against African Americans. Unfortunately, as racism intensified in the city, revenue for the paper dropped and forced the Caytons to close the paper in 1913 and sell their home. Stores that buy magic cards near me continued her passionate activism into her 60s and 70s, when she joined the Communist party. Late in her life Cayton became friends with actor/activist Paul Robeson and writer Langston Hughes, who dedicated his poem “Dear Mr. President” to her.

Mary Fields sepia image

Mary Fields

Mary Fields, aka Stagecoach Mary

Trailblazer

(Circa 1832 – 1914)

Mary Fields, or Stagecoach Mary, was the first African American woman (and only the second woman overall) to be a star route mail carrier in the United States. Born into slavery in Tennessee around 1832, she received her freedom at the end of the Civil War. After working on a variety of jobs, Mary took employment with a convent in Toledo. She grew very close to one nun, Sister Amadeus, and was saddened when the nun left for a Jesuit mission in Montana. When Sister Amadeus contracted pneumonia, Mary Fields rushed to Montana to care for her and stayed for ten years with the mission. She started out doing general repairs, laundry, and other types of manual labor and worked her way up to become the forewoman. Standing at 6’ and around 200lbs, Mary was an imposing figure and would not tolerate disrespect from anyone. She was forced to leave the convent after tensions boiled over and led to a brawl with another worker on her team.

In 1895, she became the second female mail carrier in the country. She was then in her sixties. Mary earned the nickname Stagecoach Mary for her reliability and bravery through all conditions of what was a very dangerous job. After she retired from her star route contract, Mary settled in Cascade as its only African American resident. She was well known and popular in her city for her accurate shot, most notorious outlaws of the old west cigar, her whisky, her kindness, and her charity. Mary was the exception to rules and social norms in Cascade: when a law was passed barring women from saloons, the mayor granted Mary an exception and, as she didn’t know her birthdate, the town celebrated her birthday twice a year.

Elizabeth Thorn Scott Flood black and white image

Elizabeth Thorn Scott Flood

Elizabeth Thorn Scott Flood

Educator and Activist

(1828 – 1867)

Elizabeth Thorn was born free in 1828 in New York state and she was educated in Massachusetts. She married Joseph Scott in 1852 and they moved to northern California later that year. After Joseph died, Elizabeth and their son Oliver moved to Sacramento. At the time, Sacramento had a sizable African American community, but because all non-white children were barred from public school, they were unable to receive an education. After her son was denied enrollment, Elizabeth used her own home to open a school for minority children in 1854. Initially Elizabeth’s school was only open to African American children, but shortly after it opened she started accepting Asian American and Native American students as well. The Sacramento School Board assumed control over the school in 1855, although they refused to commit public tax revenue to it.

Elizabeth continued to most notorious outlaws of the old west and became the first African American public school instructor in California. She retired from teaching after she married Isaac Flood and moved to Oakland. However, seeing the dearth of educational opportunities in Oakland for non-whites, Elizabeth once more opened a school in her home. Meanwhile, she and her husband founded the Shiloh AME Church in the town, Oakland’s first Black church. The church led the way to the purchase of a schoolhouse where she taught until her unexpected death in 1867 at 39. Her successful activism eventually led to school integration in Oakland, and Elizabeth’s daughter, Lydia, was one of the first students at the newly integrated schools.

Mrs. Fisher cookbook cover

Abby Fisher’s Cookbook Cover

Abby Fisher

Cookbook Author

(1831 – ?)

Born enslaved in South Carolina to an African American mother and a White farmer, Abby grew up and eventually worked as a cook in the kitchen. She married Alexander Fisher around 1859 and together they had eleven children. The family moved to San Francisco, California in 1877 looking for economic opportunity. There, she opened her own immensely successful catering business, called Mrs. Abby Fisher & Co, and won awards for her cooking.

Abby’s Southern cooking was the toast of San Francisco society, and she became only the second African American female cookbook author in America in 1881 when she published What Mrs. Fisher Knows about Old Southern Cooking, Soups, Pickles, Preserves. She was illiterate, so she dictated her recipes and anecdotes. Containing 160 recipes, the book is a treasure trove of Southern cooking for historians and was re-printed in 1995. Fisher’s cookbook can still be purchased on Amazon Kindle today.

Mary Ellen Pleasant black and white photo

Mary Ellen Pleasant

Mary Ellen Pleasant

Millionaire and Abolitionist

(1814 – 1904)

Very little is known about Pleasant’s young life and parentage, but she was raised in Nantucket as worked a domestic servant for a White abolitionist family. She was light skinned and, on some occasions, passed herself as White. Through this family, Mary Ellen became involved in the abolitionist movement and worked with the Underground Railroad. She married another abolitionist, James Smith, and gained a substantial inheritance after he died four years later.

In 1849, she remarried and moved to San Francisco. Pleasant started a restaurant that catered to wealthy businessmen in the city, and she would often eavesdrop on these men to pick up investment tips and financial gossip. These bits of information came in handy – Pleasant was able to use them to make a fortune in investments. She used her money and influence to assist African Americans who made it to San Francisco through the Underground Railroad, and later she successfully fought against racial segregation in California through a series of lawsuits. She also gave militant abolitionist John Brown $30,000 to support his raid on Harpers Ferry in 1859.

She eventually began a decades-long business partnership with Thomas Bell and, for unknown reasons, much of her portfolio was in his name. After his death in 1892, Bell’s widow and son sued Pleasant for control of her vast fortune. They successfully painted her as a “scheming mammy” in the press, and she lost her fortune.

In 1901, she dictated her autobiography, The Making of ‘Mammy Pleasant’: A Black Entrepreneur in Nineteenth-Century San Francisco, and she passed away in 1904 as one of San Francisco’s most famous residents.

Источник: https://www.sigtheatre.org/
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