is microwave oatmeal good for you

Oatmeal is a great breakfast. It's full of whole grains which are good for digestion, heart health, and any number of other health benefits. Lift tab here to open. or Remove flap along perforation on back of box for a convenient pantry pack. Ingredients Apples & Cinnamon Ingredients: Whole Grain Oats. The list includes steel-cut oats, maple oatmeal, chocolate oatmeal and more. If you're like us, instant oatmeal is a morning staple.

Is microwave oatmeal good for you -

If instant oatmeal is a breakfast staple at your house, have you ever wondered how close the microwaveable packets of oatmeal come to the actual oats?

Nutrition Faceoff: Quaker Quick Oats vs. Instant Original

Quaker Quick OatsQuaker Instant Oatmeal – Original
Serving Size:1 oz (30 g)1 packet (28 g)
Calories:113 kcal100 kcal
Fat:2.3 g2 g
Saturated Fat:0.4 g0 g
Protein:3.8 g4 g
Total Carbohydrates:20.3 g19 g
Fiber:3 g3 g
Sodium:0 mg75 mg
Vitamin A:0% DV25 % DV
Vitamin C:0 %DV0% DV
Calcium:0%10% DV
Iron:8% DV40% DV
Thiamin:8% DVN/A
Phosphorus:12% DV10% DV
Magnesium:19% DV8% DV
Cooking time (microwave):1 minute1.5 minutes
Price per serving:$0.13$0.24

Dietitian’s Take: Quaker Quick Oats vs. Instant Original

At the same serving size, the calories, carbohydrate, fat, protein and fiber contents are basically the same between the two versions of oats. Money-wise, the quick oats are way cheaper: almost 50% less than the instant version! A closer look at the nutritional information and ingredient lists also reveals some noticeable differences:

  • Quick oats contain zero sodium. This is because quick oats are basically rolled oat flakes and nothing else. Instant oats have added salt.
  • The instant oats have higher levels of Vitamin A and the minerals iron and calcium. Why? A look at the ingredient label shows that the following additives are included: Vitamin A palmitate, calcium carbonate, and reduced iron. 
  • ​The quick oats contain more thiamin and magnesium than the instant.
  • While the amount of fiber is the same in the two oat versions, the instant oatmeal has guar gum as an additive. Guar gum acts as thickener and is high in soluble fiber, so there is no telling how much of the fiber from the instant oatmeal came from the actual oats vs. the guar gum. This a perfect example of why a Nutrition Facts label that looks “good” may not tell the whole story if you don’t look at the ingredient list.
  • The instant oatmeal also has caramel color added.

Our Pick: Quick Oats

Since you are spending money for oats, get the most bang for your buck by getting the quick oats, which contain just oats and nothing else. Why pay more for less oatmeal and extra additives in the instant oatmeal?

You can easily bump up the calcium, Vitamin A, and Vitamin D by adding milk to cooked oats yourself. A serving of quick oats can easily cook in 1 to 2 minutes in the microwave, so buying the instant packets of oatmeal isn’t really saving you any time. (Steel-cut oats, on the other hand, take about 30 minutes to cook, so the time saving is significant when you get the quick oats.)

For those watching the glycemic index of foods they eat, it should also be noted that the smaller the oat flakes, the higher the glycemic index of the oats will be. So, the instant oats will most likely have a higher GI than the quick oats or steel-cut oats.

Categories Groceries, HealthTags breakfast, fiber, food faceoff, grocery aisle, hot cereal, nutrition faceoff, oatmeal, oats, soluble fiber, whole grainsИсточник: https://www.healthcastle.com/nutrition-faceoff-quaker-quick-oats-vs-instant/

Oatmeal is a nutritious addition to any balanced diet. Still, many people wonder, “How much oatmeal should I eat a day to stay healthy?” Our experts answer that question and discuss the benefits of eating oatmeal every day.

We’ll also let you in on how you can be a part of The Soulfull Project’s unique community efforts to supply servings of our hot cereal to food banks in your area.

How Much Oatmeal Should I Eat A Day?

bowl of oatmeal with egg and spinach

We recommend eating one serving of oatmeal every day, but the specific answer to the question “How much oatmeal should I eat a day?” ultimately comes down to the type of oats you choose.

Steel cut oats, rolled oats, and instant oats are all pretty much the same nutritionally, but, as you’ll see below, there are benefits to eating oats that are closer to the original oat groat (the kernel right off the stalk).

How Much Oatmeal Should I Eat A Day: Steel Cut Oats

Steel cut oats (or Irish oatmeal) are oat groats right off the stalk that have been chopped into small pieces with a steel blade.

Because they’re basically raw grain, they’re denser and thicker than other types of oats and take longer to prepare (from 15 to 30 minutes) — unless you choose The Soulfull Project’s Quick Cook Irish Oatmeal Hot Cereal, which is ready in as little as three minutes.

Steel cut oats are heartier, chewier, and nuttier than other types of oatmeal, which makes them ideal as a healthy breakfast, lunch, dinner, or snack.

How much steel cut oatmeal should you eat a day? Here’s a simple, single-serving recipe you can make any time to help you eat the right amount of steel cut oatmeal:

  1. In a pan, mix ¾ cup of hot water, milk, or broth with ¼ cup of dry steel cut oats
  2. Bring liquid to a boil
  3. Reduce heat
  4. Simmer for 20 minutes or until oats reach desired texture
  5. Remove from heat and enjoy

If you’re short on time in the morning, mix up a batch of steel cut oats the night before so you can grab a healthy breakfast before starting your busy day.

How Much Oatmeal Should I Eat A Day: Rolled Oats

Rolled oats are similar to steel cut oats, except that rolled oats are steamed and flattened instead of chopped.

Rolled oats are partially cooked because of the steam, so they take much less time to prepare (two to five minutes) and have a milder flavor and softer texture than typical steel cut oats.

How much of this type of oatmeal should you eat a day? Try this easy recipe for a single serving:

  1. In a pan, mix 1 cup of water, milk, or broth with ½ cup of dry rolled oats
  2. Bring liquid to a boil
  3. Reduce heat
  4. Simmer for four minutes or until oats reach desired texture
  5. Remove from heat and enjoy

Can’t spare five minutes for a healthy breakfast? Rolled oats are the ideal base for easy-bake oatmeal bars — a simple way to embrace the day, refuel during a homeschooling break, or power up before a meeting.

How Much Oatmeal Should I Eat A Day: Instant Oats

Instant oats are similar to rolled oats in that they’ve been steamed and flattened. Instant oats, however, go through much more preparation than other oats before they reach consumers.

This extra effort results in a very mild flavor, soft texture, and extremely short cook times (one to two minutes).

How much instant oats oatmeal should you eat a day? This recipe explains:

  1. In a pan, mix 1 cup of water, milk, or broth with ½ cup of dry instant oats
  2. Bring liquid to a boil
  3. Reduce heat
  4. Simmer for two minutes or until oats reach desired texture
  5. Remove from heat and enjoy

Instant oats are also great as the base for your overnight oatmeal or oatmeal bars when you don’t have any steel cut or rolled oats on hand. The end result might not be as flavorful, but it will still be a quick, nutritious, and delicious treat when you’re short on time!

The Benefits Of Eating Oatmeal Every Day

oatmeal with blueberry toppings for how much oatmeal should I eat a day

Keeps Your Ticker On Time

Eating a heart-healthy balanced diet — including oatmeal — is a great way to keep your ticker on time and beating strong.

Fiber reduces both total circulating cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in your bloodstream. At the same time, that fiber prevents the remaining LDL from oxidizing (solidifying) when it comes in contact with the free radicals in your body (more on that below).

Oatmeal is packed with fiber! That’s why we recommend heart-healthy oatmeal for breakfast, lunch, or dinner as part of a balanced diet.

It’s also why we dedicate our time and energy to providing healthy food to those who often go without by donating our hot cereal to regional food banks.

Gluten-Free Goodness

Oats are naturally gluten-free, so go ahead and mix up a bowl of oatmeal for breakfast today.

If you suffer from celiac disease or even a mild sensitivity to gluten, look for the gluten-free label on the packaging before you buy for an extra bit of protection.

The gluten-free label ensures that your oatmeal contains as little gluten as possible (19 parts per million or less) to help you avoid the irritation, inflammation, and discomfort that gluten can cause.

gluten free steel cut oat bowl with peaches for how much oatmeal should I eat a day

The Soulfull Project, for example, puts the gluten-free label front and center on all packaging so you can rest easy and enjoy a hearty bowl of oatmeal or hot cereal without the struggles that gluten often brings.

No More Searching For Macros

For a healthy, balanced diet, you need to consume carbohydrates (the good kind!), protein, and healthy fat every day. These components of your food are so important that doctors and scientists call them essential macronutrients.

Most foods offer one or two macronutrients, but oatmeal contains all three!

You’d have to eat a slice of meat, a veggie, and some nuts to get the same combination of macronutrients as a single serving of oatmeal or hot cereal provides.

No need to search for your macros anymore — just eat a bowl of oatmeal every day as part of a balanced diet.

Vitamins And Minerals In One Place

Inside those essential macronutrients are micronutrients that your body needs to function at its best. What are micronutrients? They’re vitamins and minerals such as:

  • Selenium
  • Iodine
  • Niacin
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin K
  • Vitamin B
  • And many others…

Most foods contain a few vitamins and minerals — which is why we have to eat a varied, balanced diet to get them all — but some foods contain a larger variety than others.

Oatmeal is one of those foods and offers plenty of vitamins and minerals in one place! For example, The Soulfull Project’s Brown Sugar Pecan Multigrain Hot Cereal contains vitamin C, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, zinc, and manganese.

Add in your favorite extras — including fruits, vegetables, and nuts — to get even more micronutrients in a single serving of oatmeal or hot cereal.

Customize Your Oatmeal Experience

bowl of oatmeal with blueberries

1) Quantity

There are many ways to customize your oatmeal experience in order to answer the question, “How much oatmeal should I eat every day?” The simplest being to vary how much — the quantity — you make at one time.

Here’s a simple recipe for several servings of delicious steel-cut oatmeal cooked in an Instant Pot (so it’s fast and easy).

Steel-Cut Instant Pot Oatmeal

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 cup of almond (or other non-dairy) milk
  • 1 cup of steel-cut oats
  • 1 cinnamon stick (optional)
  • 1 generous pinch of kosher salt (optional)

Instructions

  1. Measure ingredients directly into your Instant Pot
  2. Press the manual setting and set the cooking time for three minutes on high
  3. After those three minutes, allow the oatmeal to sit in the Instant Pot (with the lid on) to “natural release” the pressurized steam for 20 minutes
  4. Press the release valve with the end of a wooden spoon to vent any residual steam
  5. Remove the lid (always angle the top of the lid toward your face to prevent steam from burning your skin)
  6. Scoop oatmeal into a serving bowl
  7. Add toppings of your choice with additional milk to taste
  8. Enjoy!

If you want to double this recipe, steel-cut oats need a three-to-one liquid-to-oats ratio.

If you only need enough for one person, here’s an easy set-it-and-forget-it recipe for a single serving of oatmeal any time.

Single-Serving Instant Pot Oatmeal

Instead of mixing all of the ingredients directly in the Instant Pot pot, you’re going to use a trivet.

A trivet is a stand that raises whatever it is you’re cooking out of whatever liquid you add to the bottom of the pot. Most Instant Pots include this tool when you buy them new.

The trivet makes the pressure cooker perfect for steaming potatoes or, in this case, cooking something in another bowl inside the Instant Pot pot.

Now, let’s talk about that other bowl. For this recipe, you’ll need a pressure- and heat-safe bowl in which to cook your Instant Pot oatmeal.

Many recipes recommend a Pyrex bowl or measuring cup, but the company has recently stated that their products are not safe to use in the Instant Pot.

Instead, mix and cook your oatmeal in a stainless steel bowl to avoid potential problems with glass containers.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup of your favorite oats
  • ½ cup of non-dairy milk
  • ¼ cup of water
  • 1 tablespoon of flaxseed (optional)
  • 1 cup of water (for under the trivet in the Instant Pot)

Instructions

  1. Insert the trivet into the Instant Pot
  2. Pour 1 cup of cold water directly inside the inner pot of your three or six-quart Instant Pot (1.5 cups of cold water for an eight-quart Instant Pot)
  3. In the stainless steel bowl, mix the oats, water, milk, and flaxseed
  4. Place the bowl on top of the trivet and put the lid on the Instant Pot
  5. Set the valve to "Sealed" and set manual time to three minutes on high pressure
  6. After the three minutes, allow the Instant Pot to naturally release for 10 minutes before using a wooden spoon to release any additional steam out of the pot
  7. Caution! Stainless steel bowl and oatmeal will be hot
  8. With oven mitts or a towel, remove the bowl carefully from the pressure cooker
  9. Allow to cool
  10. Serve with your favorite toppings

Quantity isn’t the only way to customize your dining experience and help you answer the question, “How much oatmeal should I eat?” Toppings play a big role in that as well.

2) Toppings

Toppings for oatmeal

Toppings are the essence of creating the perfect bowl of oatmeal goodness. The extra ingredients you add can transform your oatmeal into a sweet treat, a savory delicacy, or anything in-between.

All it takes is a little imagination and we’re sure you’ll find ways to customize your oatmeal to satisfy the flavors you’re craving.

To get you started, here are some of our favorite toppings:

  1. Strawberries
  2. Blueberries
  3. Raspberries
  4. Mango
  5. Apple
  6. Hemp seed
  7. Chia
  8. Flaxseed
  9. Walnuts
  10. Almonds
  11. Zucchini
  12. Carrot
  13. Peppers
  14. Dried cranberries
  15. Protein powder
  16. Nut butter
  17. Raisins
  18. Cinnamon
  19. Maple syrup
  20. Brown sugar

Any of those extra ingredients — in combination or by themselves — make a regular bowl of oatmeal taste divine.

If you’re feeling a little adventurous, try sprinkling your favorite dry cereal into a serving of hot oatmeal. It’s a great way to add a dash of excitement to your morning meal, and there are so many options available that you could try a new concoction every day.

It’s also a great way to get young ones to eat a bit healthier in the morning (a spoonful of sugar really does help the medicine go down).

If you want to keep things healthy, choose a simple flake cereal (e.g., Wheaties) or high-fiber variety with dried fruit (e.g., Mueslix).

Or relive your childhood with your favorite sweet and colorful cereals, such as:

  • Frosted Flakes
  • Froot Loops
  • Cap’n Crunch
  • Fruity Pebbles
  • Frankenberry
  • Applejacks
  • Trix
  • Honey Smacks
  • Cinnamon Toast Crunch

The sky’s the limit on the flavor and color combinations you can try, so don’t be afraid to get a little wild!

3) Texture

Some people like thick oatmeal, while others prefer thin oatmeal. Fortunately, it’s super easy to modify the liquid-to-oats ratio to achieve whatever consistency you desire.

We’ve given you several ratios in this article that you can experiment with, but you can also try these to see if they work better for you:

  • Quick-cook or rolled oats: 1 cup liquid to ½ cup oats
  • Steel-cut oats: 1 cup liquid to ¼ cup oats

Don’t be afraid to adjust even further for your own particular taste. The perfect bowl of oatmeal awaits!

4) Flavor

Oatmeal with maple syrup

Toppings play a big role in changing the flavor of your oatmeal, but it’s not the only way to add a little something different to your meal. Instead of relying solely on extra ingredients, try toasting your oats before you cook them.

Melt a dash of butter or coconut oil in a frying pan, add your oats, and toast for about five minutes or until the oats are golden brown. Then cook the toasted oats just as you would un-toasted oats.

Toasting your oats before cooking intensifies the flavors for a stronger, more savory meal.

5) Form

When you ask, “How much oatmeal should I eat?” you’re probably thinking about hot oatmeal, right? But oatmeal is also a great meal when it’s cold or mixed into other recipes.

Case in point: overnight oatmeal.

Overnight oatmeal is super easy to make — just mix the ingredients together and store your creation in the refrigerator overnight — and tastes great to boot.

Keen to try this tasty treat for yourself? Check out these articles from The Soulful Project blog for detailed instructions and flavor combinations that are out of this world:

Other Grains, Even More Benefits

Single serving of The Soulfull Project Brown Sugar Pecan Multigrain hot cereal

While you’re customizing your oatmeal with all of those extras, add some extra grains into the mix for even more benefits and make a hot cereal in the process.

Not sure which grains to add? The Soulfull Project can help. No matter which of our hot cereals you choose, you’ll get hearty grains and seeds, including:

  • Rye
  • Quinoa
  • Flax
  • Chia
  • Oats
  • Barley

These extras add a tasty and vitamin-packed kick to your morning routine that will help you power through to lunch and beyond.

And by varying the flavor of the hot cereal you use — such as The Soulfull Project’s Apple Cinnamon, Blueberry Almond, Brown Sugar Pecan, Toasted Coconut, or Cinnamon Spice — you can whip up a batch of oatmeal that even the pickiest eater among you will love.

Plus, for every serving you purchase, The Soulfull Project will donate a serving of our hot cereal to a food bank in your area.

pictogram of how The Soulfull Project serves the community

If you’re looking for even more healthy, food-allergy-friendly ways to make a meal, try Don’t Go Nuts’ many flavors of soy spreads (peanut-free peanut butter) and organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, nut-free, peanut-free chewy granola bars. They’re the best!

And if you want a bit more crunch in your breakfast bowl, try The Soulfull Project Crispy Granola (on top of your oatmeal or all by itself), which comes in three delicious flavors: Toasted Coconut, Maple Pecan, and Dark Chocolate Cherry.

To get more information on the serving-for-serving program and check out all of our delicious oatmeal and hot cereal flavors, visit TheSoulfullProject.com today.

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Источник: https://thesoulfullproject.com/blogs/soulfull-living/how-much-oatmeal-should-i-eat-a-day

7 Oatmeal Mistakes to Avoid

Oatmeal is a classic breakfast. And if you’ve gotten the impression that it’s a plain and boring meal that is only carbs, think again. Make it right, and you can have a well-balanced bowl of oats that contains the right amount of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, which will keep you full and satisfied throughout your morning. Oh, and, you’ll want to make it delicious, too. By acknowledging these common missteps and following registered dietitians' tips, you can prioritize health and taste. Here’s what you need to know.

1. You Aren’t Serving Up the Right-Sized Bowl

One cup of cooked oatmeal is a healthy serving size, says Jessica Crandall Snyder, RDN, CDCES, and CEO of Vital RD in Centennial, Colorado. That amount will contain 154 calories, 27 grams (g) of carbs, and 4 g of fiber, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

That doesn’t have to be the only part of your breakfast either. “Go ahead and have eggs on the side or throw berries on top,” she says, which will add more filling nutrients (protein, fiber) and volume. If one cup looks disappointingly puny in your bowl, it might be helpful to downgrade to a smaller vessel, like an appetizer bowl, she says.

RELATED: 8 Ways to Sneak More Fiber Into Your Diet

2. You’re Sticking to Water Only When Making Oats

If you love the way oatmeal tastes when it’s made with water and oats, continue to make it as you wish. But don’t be afraid to experiment with dairy and nondairy milk, says Seattle-based registered dietitian nutritionist Ginger Hultin, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and owner of Champagne Nutrition.

These liquids do add calories: 37 per cup for unsweetened almond milk, according to the USDA, and around 100 for soy or low-fat (1%) cow’s milk. Your choice depends on your goal. If you’re aiming to make your bowl creamier for fewer calories, opt for almond milk. If you’re looking to add in protein, try soy (6 g per cup) or low-fat cow’s (8 g per cup). Along with that, “any dairy or fortified nondairy milk will add in extra minerals, so you’ll get a boost of nutrients, too,” says Hultin.

3. You’re Not Adding Enough Protein on the Side

When putting together meals, Snyder makes sure she has a source of healthy complex carbs, protein, and produce. The same goes for oatmeal, but it may be even more important because it’s easy to think of your bowl as a complete meal. The oats supply healthy complex carbs and topping it with fruit will get you the produce (and more carbs), but you’ll want to incorporate protein to round things out. (One cup of cooked oatmeal made with water has 5 g of protein, per the USDA.) “I recommend 15 to 20 grams of protein at breakfast. Getting to this number creates more satiety, supports muscle mass and metabolism, and helps balance out your blood sugar,” she says.

Some ideas: Make your oats with soy, cow’s, or protein-fortified plant milks. Add in a scoop of protein powder. Stir in PB2, a personal favorite of Snyder’s; the powdered peanut butter nicely dissolves when stirred in and 2 tablespoons adds 6 g of protein. Nuts, nut butters, and seeds will also bump up protein. For instance, one ounce of almonds has 6 g of protein, according to the USDA.

RELATED: 15 Top Food Sources of Lean Protein

4. Unhealthy Toppings Have Made Your Bowl a Sugar Bomb

It’s easy to go overboard on sugar, as a result of including sneaky and obvious sources in your bowl. For instance, flavored, sweetened nondairy milk, some nut butters, and sweetened dried fruit contain added sugar, as the USDA notes. Then, there’s the addition of brown sugar, maple syrup, or honey, all of which are sugar. “Adding a lot of sugar to an already carbohydrate-rich breakfast can cause it to become imbalanced, as it’s high in carbs but low in fat and protein,” says Hultin. Make sure you’re using unsweetened nondairy milks and unsweetened nut butters to restrain added sugar. She also likes to mash in half of a banana for “high-fiber, natural sweetness.” (A half of a medium banana has 1.5 g of fiber, per the USDA. That’s about 5 percent of your daily value.) You could also sprinkle your oats with cinnamon and nutmeg during or after cooking to impart a natural sweetness, says Snyder. Topping with fresh fruit, such as berries, is another way to sweeten your bowl!

5. You’re Standing Over a Stove When You Don’t Want to Be

Stirring oats on the stovetop may be the most traditional way to make oatmeal, but it takes time and requires attention, lest they scald. (Yuck.) Steel-cut oats take 20 to 30 minutes to make, says Hultin, while rolled oats can be made in five minutes. But if that’s unappealing, you can make oatmeal in ways that work better with your lifestyle. “You can actually microwave either type of oat for a more hands-off approach so you can multitask,” she says. Stovetop or microwave will not change the nutritional properties of oatmeal. Another option: If you have a slow cooker or an Instant Pot, make a larger batch, portion it out for the week, and reheat, says Hultin. Just stir in a splash of liquid to get it creamy again — and grab a spoon.

RELATED: 8 Ways to Take Your Oatmeal to the Next Level

6. You’re Eating a Certain Type of Oats Because You Think They’re ‘Healthier’

Steel-cut, old-fashioned oats, and rolled oats: “It’s shocking, but they’re all essentially the same,” says Snyder. “The manufacturing and processing [to get the different shapes of oats] differs, but the nutritional values are the same,” she says. Each type of oatmeal offers unique textures, and some you’ll find more enjoyable than others. Go for the type you like the most, because eating healthy should make you happy. The one exception is the prepackaged packets of instant oats. Many of these are flavored and contain added sugar. If opting for instant, choose the plain variety and gussy it up yourself.

7. You’re Always Eating Hot Oatmeal

Oatmeal is known as a hot cereal, but a wonderful thing happens when you combine dry oats, yogurt or milk, fruit, and (maybe) chia seeds in a container in the fridge, says Snyder. After several hours (or, ahem, overnight), the oats absorb the liquid, plump up and soften into a familiar texture, and become “overnight oats.” These are eaten cold. The benefit is that there’s little prep, you don’t have to cook a thing, it switches up the style of oats to add variety, and they’re perfect as a snack. “I like to make overnight oats in to-go coffee cups, which I could just grab and head out the door,” Snyder says.

RELATED: The Best Oatmeal for People With Type 2 Diabetes

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/oatmeal-mistakes-to-avoid/
Well, it was good enough for Goldilocks and the Three Bears… but is it good for us human beings? Porridge is a lot of things – filling, easy to make, as well as something you can grab a bowl of at any time of the day, not just at breakfast time. You can make it with water or milk and you can sprinkle it with lots of different toppings to give it some more flavour. Topping ideas include bananas, blueberries, apples, or a drizzle of honey or syrup. (For more topping inspo read, ‘Pimp your porridge.’)

What is porridge?

It’s a dish that’s usually eaten for breakfast that’s made from many different grains, such as buckwheat, brown rice, spelt, quinoa or amaranth. It’s also possible to make porridge from oats. When it’s cooked in this way it’s called oatmeal.1 One cup of oats contains:2
  1. Protein - 26.4g
  2. Carbohydrates - 103g
  3. Fibre - 16.5g
  4. Fat - 10.8g
  5. Manganese - 383% of the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
  6. Copper - 49% of the RDA
  7. Zinc - 4% of the RDA
  8. Phosphorus - 82% of the RDA
  9. Thiamine - 79% of the RDA
Meanwhile, one cup of wheatgerm, another frequently-used ingredient that’s used to make porridge, contains:3
  1. 1. Calories - 414
  2. Protein - 26.6g of protein
  3. Carbohydrates - 59.6g
  4. Fibre - 15.2g
  5. Fat - 11.2g
  6. As well as B vitamins, selenium, manganese, phosphorus and magnesium

Who’d have thought that a humble cup/bowl of porridge could be packed with so much goodness?! Now, let’s move on to how you cook it…

The best way to cook/make porridge

If you’ve been making porridge for literally forever, then you’ve most probably perfected your porridge-making process so that the end result is just how you like it. But if you’ve never made it before and quite like the idea of giving it a try, here’s a basic porridge recipe to help get you started:4

What you’ll need:

  • 50g of porridge oats
  • 350ml of milk or water, or a combination of the two
  • Any toppings of your choice

What you need to do:

Cooking porridge on the hob

Pour 50g of porridge oats into a saucepan and then add all of the milk or the water. Bring the mixture to the boil and then let it simmer for 4 to 5 minutes. Stir it from time-to-time, making sure it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. Pour it into a bowl(s) and add your toppings.

Cooking it in the microwave

Mix the oats, milk/water together in a microwave-proof dish then microwave the mixture on high for 5 minutes. Halfway through, take it out and give it a stir. Leave it to stand for 2 minutes before adding your toppings and tucking into it.

So now you know what porridge is, how to make it, and it’s nutritional make-up, let’s focus on that all-important question that probably led you to this article in the first place – Is porridge healthy?

What are the benefits of eating porridge?

5 health benefits of eating oats and oatmeal – at a glance5
  1. Oats are uber nutritious – as the nutritional value lists show at the start of this article. Fibre, manganese, phosphorous, copper, iron, zinc, etc. it’s all in there. Oats happen to be one of the most nutritious-packed foods around.

  2. Oats are rich in carbs and fibre – as well as higher in protein and fat than most other grains.

  3. They contain a specific type of fibre – known as beta-glucan, which is a soluble fibre. This fibre alone can lower cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and increase the growth of good bacteria in the digestive tract, among many other things.

  4. Oats can help balance blood sugar levels – studies have found that oats can potentially help even out blood sugar levels because of the beta-glucan content, which helps delay when glucose is absorbed into the blood flow.

  5. Oatmeal porridge fills you up - the beta-glucan that’s present in oatmeal is also responsible for delaying the time it takes for the stomach to empty the food that’s in it. As a result, this can make us feel fuller for longer after we’ve eaten it.

How many calories in porridge?

Generally speaking, one cup of oats contains 607, while one cup of wheatgerm contains 414 calories.6 However, the type of porridge you use and the way you make it, will impact the overall calorie content. For example:7
  • A 3/4-cup of classic oatmeal porridge - contains 124 calories when made with water, or 215 calories if made with non-fat milk

  • Instant porridge contains more calories - a sachet flavoured with apple or cinnamon contains 157 calories when made with water or 248 calories if made with non-fat milk

Is porridge good for weight loss?

Eating food that’s filling can potentially help with weight loss because it helps you to eat fewer calories, and therefore lose weight.8 A study published in Nutrition Research in 2015 revealed that eating oatmeal can increase the chance of maintaining a healthy body weight. Meanwhile, research carried out on rats that looked at the link between alternative porridge recipes – made from quinoa and amaranth – found that the rats responded better to insulin. And, as we all know, insulin can help prevent the blood sugar dips that can make us feel hungry. However, it’s important to note here that this research has not been applied to humans.9Shop Food & Drink

Last updated: 27 November 2020

Источник: https://www.hollandandbarrett.com/the-health-hub/food-drink/nutrition/is-porridge-good-for-you/

Is porridge healthy?

Discover our full range of health benefit guides and check out some of our favouritehealthy porridge recipes, from our healthy porridge bowlto our baked banana porridge.

Nutritional benefits

An average sized bowl (150g), made with whole cow’s milk, provides:

168 Kcal / 708 KJ

7.3g Protein

7.0g Fat

19.9g Carbohydrate

1.4g Fibre

196mg Calcium

1.2mg Zinc

Don’t forget the nutritional profile of your porridge will vary depending on what you add as toppings or flavourings.

Top 5 health benefits

1. Helps to manage cholesterol levels

Oats contain a type of soluble fibre called beta-glucan, which studies suggest can help lower your cholesterol level if you have 3g or more of it each day. A 40g serving of oats supplies 2g beta-glucan.

2. May help balance blood sugar levels

The fibre, beta glucan, is also beneficial in helping us manage our blood sugar levels with studies suggesting it helps to lower levels of blood glucose after a meal and improves our sensitivity to the blood sugar managing hormone, insulin.

3. May support gut health

Oats are rich in prebiotic fibres, one example being beta glucan; these are the fibres which stimulate the growth and activity of our beneficial gut bacteria helping them to function, while inhibiting the growth of less desirable or pathogenic varieties. Prebiotic fibres are important for promoting a beneficial gut environment, maintaining proper gut function and for minimising inflammation.

4. Provides protective antioxidants

Whole oats are a good source of protective compounds called polyphenols, these have protective antioxidant properties.  One variety of which, avenanthramides, may help lower blood pressure by promoting the production of nitric oxide which relaxes blood vessels and improves blood flow.

5. May help with weight management

Porridge makes an excellent start to the day because oats are a source of complex carbohydrate, this means they provide slow-releasing energy to get you through the morning. In addition to this the soluble fibre in oats helps improve our sense of fullness, reducing our appetite and potentially helping us resist environmental cues to eat. The fibre beta glucan appears to also trigger the release of fullness hormones which supress our appetite.

Are oats safe for everyone?

Oats are safe for most people, although if you are not used to fibre in your diet you should introduce them gradually to avoid bloating and discomfort.

Oats don’t themselves contain gluten but may be contaminated during processing so, if you are coeliac or gluten intolerant, always check labels to ensure they are ‘gluten free’. Oats contain a protein called avenin, which although similar in structure to gluten appears to be well tolerated by most, although not all people.

If you have a condition which extends the length of time it takes to digest your food and you are not accustom to eating oats you should exercise caution because oats may not be an appropriate dietary inclusion for you.

If you have concerns speak to your GP or a registered dietician for guidance.

Best porridge recipes

Chocolate porridge

Oat chia porridge

Date and tahini porridge


This article was last reviewed on 15 July 2021 by Kerry Torrens.

Kerry Torrens BSc. (Hons) PgCert MBANT is a registered nutritionist with a post graduate diploma in personalised nutrition & nutritional therapy. She is a member of the British Association for Nutrition and Lifestyle Medicine (BANT) and a member of the Guild of Food Writers. Over the last 15 years she has been a contributing author to a number of nutritional and cookery publications including BBC Good Food.

Nicola Shubrook is a nutritional therapist and works with both private clients and the corporate sector. She is an accredited member of the British Association for Applied Nutrition and Nutritional Therapy (BANT) and the Complementary & Natural Healthcare Council (CNHC). Find out more at urbanwellness.co.uk.

All health content on bbcgoodfood.com is provided for general information only, and should not be treated as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other healthcare professional. If you have any concerns about your general health, you should contact your local healthcare provider. See our website terms and conditions for more information.

Источник: https://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/porridge-healthy

Is Oatmeal Healthy?

a bowl of oatmeal topped with blueberries and pecans

Oatmeal is a conflicting topic with some touting its benefits and others leaving it in the dust. So where does oatmeal stand and is it healthy?

a bowl of dried rolled oats with chia seeds

Is oatmeal healthy?

That depends on who you ask. And it also depends on each specific body. Even the research is conflicting, whether it’s based on carbohydrates or grains, it makes it confusing to understand where oatmeal falls into the world of health.

Like everything, the health category of oatmeal depends on:

  1. How your body uses it. 
  2. How you pair it or layer it with other foods. 
  3. The time of day you eat it. 

Let’s cut to the chase and break down the truth about how healthy oatmeal is.

What the research says.

The research is split. Food companies would like you to believe that oatmeal has ‘cholesterol-lowering benefits’ while others would tell you it spikes your blood sugar, putting you on the roller coasters of highs and lows.

But if we move beyond the noise and look at oatmeal in itself, here’s what we could find.

Cons to eating oatmeal.

Let’s start with the bad first because it’s always good to end on a high note.

If we pulled all of the negatives out of oatmeal, here would be the list:

  1. It is a grain, meaning it has all of the anti-nutrient properties that grains do. Includes phytic acid, which has been studied to strip your body from absorbing the vitamins and minerals in the oats.
  2. It is a high starch or high carbohydrate food. So, in the end, yes, oats can spike your blood sugar, putting you on a “sugar-high” your body doesn’t necessarily agree with. This could potentially cause excess weight gain.
  3. It is a bland food that leaves many people to spice it up with an extra heaping mound of sugar or two. So problem number two now escalates into a third, fourth, and fifth problem.

Pros to eating oatmeal.

The paleo community and our low-carb fans believe there are no pros. But to create a realistic and simplistic approach to life, I don’t think it’s fair to discount a food without looking at the full story. Not to mention, it is potentially better than the majority of breakfast foods on the market.

Here are the pros:

  1. It contains a healthy amount of fiber. Given that over 90% of people are no longer getting sufficient amounts of fiber in their diet, oats can help push people past the critical threshold. Oats contain both soluble and insoluble fiber, linking them to potentially reducing cholesterol and diabetes. 
  2. It contains a decent nutritional profile. Considering oats are not a form of produce {fruit or vegetables}, oats have a nutritional profile to look at. Definitely not one to toss out because of the carbohydrate load alone.
  3. They are versatile. There are countless ways to use oats or oat flour from breakfast to dinner. They make a great base for many healthy recipes that can simplify your diet.
  4. They are quick and easy. This is quite possibly the biggest is microwave oatmeal good for you I keep oats at home {especially true with children}. They are a quick and easy source of nutrition on the fly. From granola bars to granola or even a warm and comforting bowl of oatmeal in the morning, they are a pantry staple in our house.
a bowl of oatmeal topped with blueberries and pecans

Should you eat oats?

So, back to the original question… is oatmeal healthy? I think it is fair to say that the pros of oatmeal still outweigh the cons. Although it is important to note the cons given that oats are not an end all be all. The most important factor is listening to your body. How does it respond to a bowl of oats? 

If you feel inflamed, become excessively gassy, is microwave oatmeal good for you feel exhausted after you eat them, it’s probably best to skip them, at least for the time being. 

If you’re worried about your weight, I promise you a bowl www victoriassecret com india oats a few times a week is not the culprit. 

But the secret to making oats healthy is not eating them alone or with a heaping mound of sugar.

The addition of too much sugar is where people go wrong.

Maybe we should say oats can become what you make it?

What kind of oats should you eat?

If you dig into the nutrition difference between instant, rolled, old-fashioned or steel-cut, you’ll only find slight variations. In my opinion, it’s not worth worrying about. Eat the type you like. How you pair it is the essential element. 

The best way to eat oats.

Like all foods, the best way to prepare a bowl of oats or is microwave oatmeal good for you them is in addition to a healthy source of protein and fat—the staples of a well-rounded meal. 

Without protein and fat, oats are quickly digested and don’t leave you full for long. 

If you’re making oats try adding these ingredients to boost satiety and nourishment:

Healthy fat additions:

a jar of oatmeal

Try this quick hack.

The easiest way to make oatmeal healthy and convenient is to up-level regular oatmeal to store for future use. Here is the recipe I use:

  • 6 cups old-fashioned gluten-free oats
  • 1/2 cup flax meal
  • 1/2 cup Collagen Powder
  • 2 teaspoons ground boney m daddy cool mp3 song teaspoon salt

Mix it up and store it in an airtight container. 

When you’re ready to make a warm bowl of oatmeal, add your preferred liquid, whether water or milk, in a 1:2 ratio. Once it’s warmed, add in fruit, healthy fats, and a sweetener, or keep it savory with some wilted spinach, salsa, and a soft-boiled egg. 

The question is, do you prefer sweet or savory oatmeal!


Adding healthy fats to your oatmeal is a great way to make it more balanced.

Check out these 5 healthy fats to keep on hand in your pantry!


Источник: https://thelivingwell.com/is-oatmeal-healthy/

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Whole grain oats are a rich source of nutrients, including vitamins, proteins, minerals, fibers, antioxidants. If you follow a healthy eating habit, oatmeal is a beneficial food to add in your overall diet no matter how it is prepared. 

Common preparations of oatmeal include soaked overnight oats or cooked oatmeal prepared in the microwave or on the stovetop. The obvious difference is cooking versus raw soaking, but this guide will elaborate on the details a bit further.

What are the benefits of overnight oats vs cooked oats? The benefits of oatmeal can be experienced no matter which technique you habituate. However, it seems that overnight oats outweigh other preparation methods due to the fact that the grain has a chance to ferment, which aids in digestion, increase available nutrition and incorporates beneficial gut bacteria.

What are the benefits of eating overnight oats? Are raw oats better than cooked oats? Is it healthier to eat cooked or raw oatmeal?

Let us find convincing answers to these questions by exploring the benefits of both overnight oats and cooked oats. This guide will cover the benefits of preparing oats by cooking and with no cook techniques.

Overnight Oats vs. Cooked Oats

You will get contradictory opinions if you ask people to choose between raw overnight oats or cooked oatmeal preparations. Some people love eating uncooked oats, while others prefer cooked oats. 

We can evaluate the immediate differences and consider how the body absorbs, digests and utilizes the nutrients available from the whole grain. Let us explore in detail after analyzing the benefits of overnight vs cooked oats.

Is oatmeal healthier cooked or raw? Which one is better; cooked or raw oatmeal? Which oatmeal preparation is healthier for you to eat?

Do oats lose calories when cooked? There is a difference in calories and macro-nutrients between dry oatmeal and cooked oatmeal. 

Let us dig a bit deeper to understand the relevant points of contention. 

The major reason behind the difference in calories is the increased water content in the cooked oatmeal. You just need a 1/2 cup of dry oatmeal to make slightly more than 1 cup of cooked oats. 

1 cup of cooked oatmeal contains 5.9 grams of proteins and 166 calories. It also comprises 4 grams of fiber, 3.6 grams of fat, and 28.1 grams of carbohydrates.

Now, let us check what 1 cup of dry oatmeal contains. It has 10.7 grams of protein, 8.2 grams of fiber, 54.8 grams of carbohydrates, and 5.3 grams of fat, along with 307 calories. 

When you compare cooked oatmeal and raw oatmeal in terms of nutrients, you will find that raw oatmeal stands taller. So, the raw version is healthier than the cooked version as it purely contains nutrient dense food.

Cooked Oats

Is it necessary to cook oats? When you cook oats, you degrade the amount of available nutrition within the oats. Cooking also results in the release of certain anti-nutrients, such as phytic acid, that the human body cannot absorb directly from raw oats. 

Why do you cook oats? It makes the dry grain more palatable to eat, without properly hydrating the oats they are indigestible and can cause issues resulting from constipation.

Many people prefer cooked oats as it is hot comfort food. Oatmeal is often topped with milk, butter, nuts, berries, maple syrup or brown sugar. 

However, if you are prepared to eat raw oats that is microwave oatmeal good for you moistened with liquid, you can certainly consume soaked oats. It is a very healthy option that requires no cooking.

Actually, it is a personal choice, depending on the taste preference of the individual, the basic point is that it is not necessary to cook oats. You can eat them raw if you prefer, but they must be soaked. 

Does boiling oatmeal destroy nutrients?

When you boil oatmeal or any other food or vegetable, it loses around 25% of nutrients. If you microwave them, you can retain some more nutrients better than boiling because the cooking time is less. 

So, it can be said that boiling oatmeal destroys nutrients to a limited extent. As mentioned above, boiling, however helps your body absorb some nutrients better than absorbing from purely eating raw dry oats.

Cooking opens accessibility to some nutrients, while minimizing the quantity of others. The intensity of heat while cooking is a contributing factor, so if you are able to cook at lower heat for short length of time then you will be able to maximize the available nutrients.

Do oats lose calories when cooked?

Cooking naturally affects foods in different ways. In the case of oats, there are definitely less calories in cooked oats as opposed to dry oats, let me explain.

As clearly mentioned is microwave oatmeal good for you, 1 cup cooked oatmeal contains 166 calories. At the same time, 1 cup of dry or raw oats contains 307 calories. 

These figures can certainly suggest a lose of calories when cooked. However, the resulting lose is attributed to the absorption of water while being cooked.

Dry oats are nutrient dense, they are the whole grain unadulterated. In contrast, cooked oats are half water half grains, taking up the same amount of volume.

Overnight Oats

Overnight oats refer to raw oats that are soaked overnight. For soaking, you can use milk, dairy free milk, yogurt, juice or water. 

Absorbing the liquid during the night, the oats get softened. The same thing happens when you cook oats. 

However, the is microwave oatmeal good for you process occurs much slower compared to the cooking process. Because of the absence of heat, the hydration time becomes much lengthier.

Do overnight oats have phytic acid? Breaking down the amount of natural starches available in the oats, soaking reduces the phytic acid in overnight oats. 

This process equips your body to make use of the nutrients available in oats more effectively. That is to say, you can expect better nutrient absorption with overnight oats compared to eating raw dry oats.

Are overnight oats better hot or cold?

Overnight oats can be consumed either way, however they are commonly eaten while cold or room temperature. 

The soaked oats have been allowed to ferment once exposed to liquid. So the nutrients are available costco citi credit card login payment easier for your body to access, therefore you don’t need to cook overnight oats.

You don’t need to worry about the texture or consistency while eating cold overnight oats. Since the oats are soaked, they turn soft and are easier for you to digest. 

The taste also gets better with the soaking process. Some people always prefer eating hot foods. If you are one of them, you may not find the cold oats appealing. 

In such a situation, you can heat oats slightly to suit your taste preference. The benefits of overnight oats are not affected whether they are eaten cold or hot, although overcooking will degrade the nutrient availability.

What are the different types of oats available?

There are many different types of oats, however the most common are steel cut oats, rolled oats and quick oats. 

Oat groats refer to whole oats that contain the endosperm of the grain, bran, and cereal germ. Offering highly nutritious value, oat brans are pretty similar to the groats. The only difference is that the oat brans do not contain the cereal germ and endosperm.

One of the most common options available today is the rolled oats, which are the whole grain that has been steamed pressed with steel rollers. Available in thinner sizes, these old fashioned oats lower the cooking time and provide a smooth texture. 

The steel-cut oats are not processed with the help of rolling the whole oats. Instead, the whole oat is chopped in half to make this oat variation and slightly reduce the cooking time compared to whole groats. They demand more cooking time compared to rolled oats, and can always be associate with a chewier texture.

Instant oats and quick oats are one of the most popular types of oats available today. These products lightly thinner compared to rolled oats, so you can cook them very very fast; however instant oats have been fully pre-cooked, dried, and ground into a meal so that they ready to eat when topped with boiling hot water.

Generally speaking, all types of oats are healthy. However, if you rank them in terms of nutritious value, oat groats are the healthiest option available. The next one is oat bran followed by the steel-cut oats, rolled oats, and quick oats.

For cooking, all of these variants can be used, but that is not the same for soaking. The best type of oats for overnight oats in old fashioned rolled oats, the flakes are flattened thin enough that the texture is soft with a slight chewiness. 

overnight oats vs cooked oats

Cooked Oats vs. Raw Oats: Final Thoughts

If your prime focus is on health, then oatmeal is a nutritious food item to add in your diet. Some people advocate raw foods, while others support eating cooked foods.

Raw oats don’t mean that you need to eat dry oats. You can soak them in liquid to make them softer, palatable and more digestible.

This guide reflected on the necessity to cook oatmeal, or whether it could be consumed without heating in any way. It appears to be clear that you do not need to cook oatmeal if you soak the grain overnight.

In other words, you can choose the overnight oats to efficiently increase health benefits. This method allows you to combine various where is the west coast of the united states with the oats to make them taste better and be an even more nutritious meal. 

If you prefer cooked oats, you can experiment in many ways using different combinations. However, they don’t offer the same nutrition as raw oats do.

What is the healthiest way to eat oats? You cannot easily undermine the benefits of cooked oats, however if you are looking for the healthiest way to eat oats, you can choose the overnight oats. 

The grain ferments while being soaked overnight. This process adds to beneficial gut bacterial and makes more nutrients available for digestion. 

This method does not employ any heating process and retains all the nutrients efficiently. The benefits of overnight oats stand taller compared to other types of oatmeal preparations.

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Источник: https://simplyoatmeal.com/benefits-of-overnight-oats-vs-cooked-oats/
Well, it was good enough for Goldilocks and the Three Bears… but is it good for us human beings? Porridge is a lot of things – filling, easy to make, as well as something you can grab a bowl of at any time of the day, not just at breakfast time. You can make it with water or milk and you can sprinkle it with lots of different toppings to give it some more flavour. Topping ideas include bananas, blueberries, apples, or a drizzle of honey or syrup. (For more topping inspo read, ‘Pimp your porridge.’)

What is porridge?

It’s a dish that’s usually eaten for breakfast that’s made from many different grains, such as buckwheat, brown rice, spelt, quinoa or amaranth. It’s also possible to make porridge from oats. When it’s cooked in this way it’s called oatmeal.1 One cup of oats contains:2
  1. Protein - 26.4g
  2. Carbohydrates - 103g
  3. Fibre - 16.5g
  4. Fat - 10.8g
  5. Manganese - 383% of the Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA)
  6. Copper - 49% of the RDA
  7. Zinc - 4% of the RDA
  8. Phosphorus - 82% of the RDA
  9. Thiamine - 79% of the RDA
Meanwhile, one cup of wheatgerm, another frequently-used ingredient that’s used to make porridge, contains:3
  1. 1. Calories - 414
  2. Protein - 26.6g of protein
  3. Carbohydrates - 59.6g
  4. Fibre - 15.2g
  5. Fat - 11.2g
  6. As well as B vitamins, selenium, manganese, phosphorus and magnesium

Who’d have thought that a humble cup/bowl of porridge could be packed with so much goodness?! Now, let’s move on to how you cook it…

The best way to cook/make porridge

If you’ve been making porridge for literally forever, then you’ve most probably perfected your porridge-making process so that the end result is just how you like it. But if you’ve never made it before and quite like the idea of giving it a try, here’s a basic porridge recipe to help get you started:4

What you’ll need:

  • 50g of porridge oats
  • 350ml of milk or water, or a combination of the two
  • Any toppings of your choice

What you need to do:

Cooking porridge on the hob

Pour 50g of porridge oats into a saucepan and then add all of the milk or the water. Bring the mixture to the boil and then let it simmer for 4 to 5 minutes. Stir it from time-to-time, making sure it doesn’t stick to the bottom of the pan. Pour it into a bowl(s) and add your toppings.

Cooking it in the microwave

Mix the oats, milk/water together in a microwave-proof dish then microwave the mixture on high for 5 minutes. Halfway through, take is microwave oatmeal good for you out and give it a stir. Leave it to stand for 2 minutes before adding your toppings and tucking into it.

So now you know what porridge is, how to make it, and it’s nutritional make-up, let’s focus on that all-important question that probably led you to this article in the first place – Is porridge healthy?

What are the benefits of eating porridge?

5 health benefits of eating oats and oatmeal – at a glance5
  1. Oats are uber nutritious – as the nutritional value lists show at the start of this article. Fibre, manganese, phosphorous, copper, iron, zinc, etc. it’s all in there. Oats happen to be one of the most nutritious-packed foods around.

  2. Oats are rich in carbs and fibre – as well as higher in protein and fat than most other grains.

  3. They contain a specific type of fibre – known as beta-glucan, which is a soluble fibre. This fibre alone can lower cholesterol and blood sugar levels, and increase the growth of good bacteria in the digestive tract, among many other things.

  4. Oats can help balance blood sugar levels – studies have found that oats can potentially help even out blood sugar levels because of the beta-glucan content, which helps delay when glucose is absorbed into the blood flow.

  5. Oatmeal porridge fills you up - the beta-glucan that’s present in oatmeal is also responsible for delaying the time it takes for the stomach to empty the food that’s in it. As a result, this can make us feel fuller for longer after we’ve eaten it.

How many calories in porridge?

Generally speaking, one cup of oats contains 607, while one cup of wheatgerm contains 414 calories.6 However, the type of porridge you use and the way you make it, will impact the overall calorie content. For example:7
  • A 3/4-cup of classic oatmeal porridge - contains 124 calories atm withdrawal limit made with water, or 215 calories if made with non-fat milk

  • Instant porridge contains more calories - a sachet flavoured with apple or cinnamon contains 157 calories when made with water or 248 calories if made with non-fat milk

Is porridge good for weight loss?

Eating food that’s filling can potentially help with weight loss because free credit card with money and zip code helps you to eat fewer calories, and therefore lose weight.8 A study published in Nutrition Research in 2015 revealed that eating oatmeal can increase the chance of maintaining a healthy body weight. Meanwhile, research carried out on rats that looked at the link between alternative porridge recipes – made from quinoa and amaranth – found that the rats responded better to insulin. And, as we all know, insulin can help prevent the blood sugar dips that can make us feel hungry. However, it’s important to note here that this research has not been applied to humans.9Shop Food & Drink

Last updated: 27 November 2020

Источник: https://www.hollandandbarrett.com/the-health-hub/food-drink/nutrition/is-porridge-good-for-you/

Oatmeal is a nutritious addition to any balanced diet. Still, many people wonder, “How much oatmeal should I eat a day to stay healthy?” Our experts answer that question and discuss the benefits of eating oatmeal every day.

We’ll also let you in on how you can be a part of The Soulfull Project’s unique community efforts to supply servings of our hot cereal to food banks in your area.

How Much Oatmeal Should I Eat A Day?

bowl of oatmeal with egg and spinach

We recommend eating one serving of oatmeal every day, but the specific answer to the question “How much oatmeal should I eat a day?” ultimately comes down to the type of oats you choose.

Steel cut oats, rolled oats, and instant oats are all pretty much the same nutritionally, but, as you’ll see below, there are benefits to eating oats that are closer to the original oat groat (the kernel right off the stalk).

How Much Oatmeal Should I Eat A Day: Steel Cut Oats

Steel cut oats (or Irish oatmeal) are oat groats right off the stalk that have been chopped into small pieces with a steel blade.

Because they’re basically raw grain, they’re denser and thicker than other types of oats and take longer to prepare (from 15 to 30 minutes) — unless you choose The Soulfull Project’s Quick Cook Irish Oatmeal Hot Cereal, which is ready in as little as three minutes.

Steel cut oats are heartier, chewier, and nuttier than other types of oatmeal, which makes them ideal as a healthy breakfast, lunch, dinner, or snack.

How much steel cut oatmeal should you eat a day? Here’s a simple, single-serving recipe you can make any time to help you eat the right amount of steel cut oatmeal:

  1. In a pan, mix ¾ cup of hot water, milk, or broth with ¼ cup of dry steel cut oats
  2. Bring liquid to a boil
  3. Reduce heat
  4. Simmer for 20 minutes or until oats reach desired texture
  5. Remove from heat and enjoy

If you’re short on time in the morning, mix up a batch of steel cut oats the night before so you can grab a healthy breakfast before starting your busy day.

How Much Oatmeal Should I Eat A Day: Rolled Oats

Rolled oats are similar to steel cut oats, except that rolled oats are steamed and flattened instead of chopped.

Rolled oats are partially cooked because of the steam, so they take much less time to prepare (two to five minutes) and have a milder flavor and softer texture than typical steel cut oats.

How much of this type of oatmeal should you eat a day? Try this easy recipe for a single serving:

  1. In a pan, mix 1 cup of water, milk, or broth with ½ cup of dry rolled oats
  2. Bring liquid to a boil
  3. Reduce heat
  4. Simmer for four minutes or until oats reach desired texture
  5. Remove from heat and enjoy

Can’t spare five minutes for a healthy breakfast? Rolled oats are the ideal base for easy-bake oatmeal bars — a simple way to embrace the day, refuel during a homeschooling break, or power up before a meeting.

How Much Oatmeal Should I Eat A Day: Instant Oats

Instant oats are similar to rolled oats in that they’ve been steamed and flattened. Instant oats, however, go through much more preparation than other oats before they reach consumers.

This extra effort results in a very mild flavor, soft texture, and extremely short cook times (one to two minutes).

How much instant oats oatmeal should you eat a day? This recipe explains:

  1. In a pan, mix 1 cup of water, milk, or broth with ½ cup of dry instant oats
  2. Bring liquid to a boil
  3. Reduce heat
  4. Simmer for two minutes or until oats reach desired texture
  5. Remove from heat and enjoy

Instant oats are also great as the base for your overnight oatmeal or oatmeal bars when you don’t have any steel cut or rolled oats on hand. The end result might not be as flavorful, but it will still be a quick, nutritious, and delicious treat when you’re short on time!

The Benefits Of Eating Oatmeal Every Day

oatmeal with blueberry toppings for how much oatmeal should I eat a day

Keeps Your Ticker On Time

Eating a heart-healthy balanced diet — including oatmeal — is a great way to keep your ticker on time and beating strong.

Fiber reduces both total circulating cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in your bloodstream. At the same time, that fiber prevents the remaining LDL from oxidizing (solidifying) when it comes in contact with the free radicals in your body (more on that below).

Oatmeal is packed with fiber! That’s why we recommend heart-healthy oatmeal for breakfast, lunch, or dinner as part of a balanced diet.

It’s also why we dedicate our time and energy to providing healthy food to those who often go without by donating our hot cereal to regional food banks.

Gluten-Free Goodness

Oats are naturally gluten-free, so go ahead and mix up a bowl of oatmeal for breakfast today.

If you suffer from celiac disease or even a mild sensitivity to gluten, look for the gluten-free label on the packaging before you buy for an extra bit of protection.

The gluten-free label ensures that your oatmeal contains as little gluten as possible (19 parts per million or less) to help you avoid the irritation, inflammation, and discomfort that gluten can cause.

gluten free steel cut oat bowl with peaches for how much oatmeal should I eat a day

The Soulfull Project, for example, puts the gluten-free label front and center on all packaging so you can rest easy and enjoy a hearty bowl of oatmeal or hot cereal without the struggles that gluten often brings.

No More Searching For Macros

For a healthy, balanced diet, you need to consume carbohydrates (the good kind!), is microwave oatmeal good for you, and healthy fat every day. These components of your food are so important that doctors and scientists call them essential macronutrients.

Most foods offer one or two macronutrients, but oatmeal contains all three!

You’d have to eat a slice of meat, a veggie, and some nuts to get the same combination of macronutrients as a single serving of oatmeal or hot cereal provides.

No need to search for your macros anymore — just eat a bowl of oatmeal every day as part of a balanced diet.

Vitamins And Minerals In One Place

Inside those essential macronutrients are micronutrients that your body needs to function at its best. What are micronutrients? They’re vitamins and minerals such as:

  • Selenium
  • Iodine
  • Niacin
  • Vitamin D
  • Vitamin K
  • Vitamin B
  • And many others…

Most foods contain a few vitamins and minerals — which is why we have to eat a varied, balanced diet to get them all — but some foods contain a larger variety than others.

Oatmeal is one of those foods and offers plenty of vitamins and minerals in one place! For example, The Soulfull Project’s Brown Sugar Pecan Multigrain Hot Cereal contains vitamin C, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, zinc, and manganese.

Add in your favorite extras — including fruits, vegetables, and nuts — to get even more micronutrients in a single serving of oatmeal or hot cereal.

Customize Your Oatmeal Experience

bowl of oatmeal with blueberries

1) Quantity

There are many ways to customize your oatmeal experience in order to answer the question, “How much oatmeal should I eat every day?” The simplest being to vary how much — the quantity — you make at one time.

Here’s a simple recipe for several servings of delicious steel-cut oatmeal cooked in an Instant Pot (so it’s fast and easy).

Steel-Cut Instant Pot Oatmeal

Ingredients

  • 2 cups of water
  • 1 cup of almond (or other non-dairy) milk
  • 1 cup of steel-cut oats
  • 1 cinnamon stick (optional)
  • 1 generous pinch of kosher salt (optional)

Instructions

  1. Measure ingredients directly into your Instant Pot
  2. Press the manual setting and set the cooking time for three minutes on high
  3. After those three minutes, allow the oatmeal to sit in the Instant Pot (with the lid on) to “natural release” the pressurized steam for 20 minutes
  4. Press the release valve with the end of a wooden spoon to vent any residual steam
  5. Remove the lid (always angle the top of the lid toward your face to prevent steam from burning your skin)
  6. Scoop oatmeal into a serving bowl
  7. Add toppings of your choice with additional milk to taste
  8. Enjoy!

If you want to double this recipe, steel-cut oats need a three-to-one liquid-to-oats ratio.

If you only need enough for one person, here’s an easy set-it-and-forget-it recipe for a single serving of oatmeal any time.

Single-Serving Instant Pot Oatmeal

Instead of mixing all of the ingredients directly in the Instant Pot pot, you’re going to use a trivet.

A trivet is a stand that raises whatever it is you’re cooking out of whatever liquid you add to the bottom amazon credit card balance login the pot. Most Instant Pots include this tool when you buy them new.

The trivet makes the pressure cooker perfect for steaming potatoes or, in this case, cooking something in another bowl inside the Instant Pot pot.

Now, let’s talk about that other bowl. For this recipe, you’ll need a pressure- and heat-safe bowl in which to cook your Instant Pot oatmeal.

Many recipes recommend a Pyrex bowl or measuring cup, but the company has recently stated that their products are not safe to use in the Instant Pot.

Instead, mix and cook your oatmeal in a stainless steel bowl to avoid potential problems with glass containers.

Ingredients

  • ½ cup of your favorite oats
  • ½ cup of non-dairy milk
  • ¼ cup of water
  • 1 tablespoon of flaxseed (optional)
  • 1 cup of water (for under the trivet in the Instant Pot)

Instructions

  1. Insert the trivet into the Instant Pot
  2. Pour 1 cup of cold water directly inside the inner pot of your three or six-quart Instant Pot (1.5 cups of cold water for an eight-quart Instant Pot)
  3. In the stainless steel bowl, mix the oats, water, milk, and flaxseed
  4. Place the bowl on top of the trivet and put the lid on the Instant Pot
  5. Set the valve to "Sealed" and set manual time to three minutes on high pressure
  6. After the three minutes, allow the Instant Pot to naturally release for 10 minutes before using a wooden spoon to release any additional steam out of the pot
  7. Caution! Stainless steel bowl and oatmeal will be hot
  8. With oven mitts or a towel, remove the bowl carefully from the pressure cooker
  9. Allow to cool
  10. Serve with your favorite toppings

Quantity isn’t the only way to customize your dining experience and help you answer the question, “How much oatmeal should I eat?” Toppings play a big role in that as well.

2) Toppings

Toppings for oatmeal

Toppings are the essence of creating the perfect bowl of oatmeal goodness. The extra ingredients you add can transform your oatmeal into a sweet treat, a savory delicacy, or anything in-between.

All it takes is a little imagination and we’re sure you’ll find ways to customize your oatmeal to satisfy the flavors you’re craving.

To get you started, here are some of our favorite toppings:

  1. Strawberries
  2. Blueberries
  3. Raspberries
  4. Mango
  5. Apple
  6. Hemp seed
  7. Chia
  8. Flaxseed
  9. Walnuts
  10. Almonds
  11. Zucchini
  12. Carrot
  13. Peppers
  14. Dried cranberries
  15. Protein powder
  16. Nut butter
  17. Raisins
  18. Cinnamon
  19. Maple syrup
  20. Brown sugar

Any of those extra ingredients — in combination or by themselves — make a regular bowl of oatmeal taste divine.

If you’re feeling a little adventurous, try sprinkling your favorite dry cereal into a serving of hot oatmeal. It’s a great way to add a dash of excitement to your morning meal, and there are so many options available that you could try a new concoction every day.

It’s also a great way to get young ones to eat a bit healthier in the morning (a spoonful of sugar really does help the medicine go down).

If you want to keep things healthy, choose a simple flake cereal (e.g., Wheaties) or high-fiber variety with dried fruit (e.g., Mueslix).

Or relive your childhood with your favorite sweet and colorful cereals, such as:

  • Frosted Flakes
  • Froot Loops
  • Cap’n Crunch
  • Fruity Pebbles
  • Frankenberry
  • Applejacks
  • Trix
  • Honey Smacks
  • Cinnamon Toast Crunch

The sky’s the limit on the flavor and color combinations you can try, so don’t be afraid to get a little wild!

3) Texture

Some people like thick oatmeal, while others prefer thin oatmeal. Fortunately, it’s super easy to modify the liquid-to-oats ratio to achieve whatever consistency you desire.

We’ve given you several ratios in this article that you can experiment with, but you can also try these to see if they work better for you:

  • Quick-cook or rolled oats: 1 cup liquid to ½ cup oats
  • Steel-cut oats: 1 cup liquid to ¼ cup oats

Don’t be afraid to adjust even further for your own particular taste. The perfect bowl of oatmeal awaits!

4) Flavor

Oatmeal with maple syrup

Toppings play a big role in changing the flavor of your oatmeal, but it’s not the only way to add a little something different to your meal. Instead of relying solely on extra ingredients, try toasting your oats before you cook them.

Melt a dash of butter or coconut oil in a frying pan, add your oats, and toast for about five minutes or until the oats are golden brown. Then cook the toasted oats just as you would un-toasted oats.

Toasting your oats before cooking intensifies the flavors for a stronger, more savory meal.

5) Form

When you ask, “How much oatmeal should I eat?” you’re probably thinking about hot oatmeal, right? But oatmeal is also a great meal when it’s cold or mixed into other recipes.

Case in point: overnight oatmeal.

Overnight oatmeal is super easy to make — just mix the ingredients together and store your creation in the refrigerator overnight — and tastes great to boot.

Keen to try this tasty treat for yourself? Check out these articles from The Soulful Project blog for detailed instructions and flavor combinations that are out of this world:

Other Grains, Even More Benefits

Single serving of The Soulfull Project Brown Sugar Pecan Multigrain hot cereal

While you’re customizing your oatmeal with all of those extras, add some extra grains into the mix for even more benefits and make a hot cereal in the process.

Not sure which grains to add? The Soulfull Project can help. No matter which of our hot cereals you choose, you’ll get hearty grains and seeds, including:

  • Rye
  • Quinoa
  • Flax
  • Chia
  • Oats
  • Barley

These extras add a tasty and vitamin-packed kick to your morning routine that will help you power through to lunch and beyond.

And by varying the flavor of the hot cereal you use — such as The Soulfull Project’s Apple Cinnamon, Blueberry Almond, Brown Sugar Pecan, Toasted Coconut, or Cinnamon Spice — you can whip up a batch of oatmeal that even the pickiest eater among you will love.

Plus, for every serving you purchase, The Soulfull Project will donate a serving of our hot cereal to a food bank in your area.

pictogram of how The Soulfull Project serves the community

If you’re looking for even more healthy, food-allergy-friendly ways to make a meal, try Don’t Go Nuts’ many flavors of soy spreads (peanut-free peanut butter) and organic, non-GMO, gluten-free, nut-free, peanut-free chewy granola bars. They’re the best!

And if you want a bit more crunch in your breakfast bowl, try The Soulfull Project Crispy Granola (on top of your oatmeal or all by itself), which comes in three delicious flavors: Toasted Coconut, Maple Pecan, and Dark Chocolate Cherry.

To get more information on the serving-for-serving program and check out all of our delicious oatmeal and hot cereal flavors, visit TheSoulfullProject.com today.

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Источник: https://thesoulfullproject.com/blogs/soulfull-living/how-much-oatmeal-should-i-eat-a-day

7 Oatmeal Mistakes to Avoid

Oatmeal is a classic breakfast. And if you’ve gotten the impression that it’s a plain and boring meal that is only carbs, think again. Make it right, and you can have a well-balanced bowl of oats that contains the right amount of carbohydrates, protein, and fat, which will keep you full and satisfied throughout your morning. Oh, and, you’ll want to make it delicious, too. By acknowledging these common missteps and following registered dietitians' tips, you can prioritize health and taste. Here’s what you need to know.

1. You Aren’t Serving Up the Right-Sized Bowl

One cup of cooked oatmeal is a healthy serving size, says Jessica Crandall Snyder, RDN, CDCES, and CEO of Vital RD in Centennial, Colorado. That amount will contain 154 calories, 27 grams (g) of carbs, and 4 g of fiber, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

That doesn’t have to be the only part of your breakfast either. “Go ahead and have eggs on the side or throw berries on top,” she says, which will add more filling nutrients (protein, fiber) and volume. If one cup looks disappointingly puny in your bowl, it might be helpful to downgrade to a smaller vessel, like an appetizer bowl, she says.

RELATED: 8 Ways to Sneak More Fiber Into Your Diet

2. You’re Sticking to Water Only When Making Oats

If you love the way oatmeal tastes when it’s made with water and oats, continue to make it as you wish. But don’t be afraid to experiment with dairy and nondairy milk, says Seattle-based registered dietitian nutritionist Ginger Hultin, spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and carroll bank and trust routing number of Champagne Nutrition.

These liquids do add calories: 37 per cup for unsweetened almond milk, according to the USDA, and around 100 for soy or low-fat (1%) cow’s milk. Your choice depends on your goal. If you’re aiming to make your bowl creamier for fewer calories, opt for almond milk. If you’re looking to add in protein, try soy (6 g per cup) or low-fat cow’s (8 g per cup). Along with that, “any dairy or fortified nondairy milk will add in extra minerals, so you’ll get a boost of nutrients, too,” says Hultin.

3. You’re Not Adding Enough Protein on the Side

When putting together meals, Snyder makes sure she has a source of healthy complex carbs, protein, and produce. The same goes for oatmeal, but it may be even more important because it’s easy to think of your bowl as a complete meal. The oats supply healthy complex carbs and topping it with fruit will get you the produce (and more carbs), but you’ll want to incorporate protein to round things out. (One cup of cooked oatmeal made with water has 5 g of protein, per the USDA.) “I recommend 15 to 20 grams of protein at breakfast. Getting to this number creates more satiety, supports muscle mass and metabolism, and helps balance out your blood sugar,” she says.

Some ideas: Make your oats with soy, cow’s, or protein-fortified plant milks. Add in a scoop of protein powder. Stir in PB2, a personal favorite of Snyder’s; the powdered peanut butter nicely dissolves when stirred in and 2 tablespoons adds 6 g of protein. Nuts, nut butters, and seeds will also bump up protein. For instance, one ounce of almonds has 6 g of protein, according to the USDA.

RELATED: 15 Top Food Sources of Lean Protein

4. Unhealthy Toppings Have Made I m on my way lyrics Bowl a Sugar Bomb

It’s easy to go overboard on sugar, as a result of including sneaky and obvious sources in your bowl. For instance, flavored, sweetened nondairy milk, some nut butters, and sweetened dried fruit contain added sugar, as the USDA notes. Then, there’s the addition of brown sugar, maple syrup, or honey, all of which are sugar. “Adding a lot of sugar to an already carbohydrate-rich breakfast can cause it to become imbalanced, as it’s high in carbs but low in fat and protein,” says Hultin. Make sure is microwave oatmeal good for you using unsweetened nondairy milks and unsweetened nut butters to restrain added sugar. She also likes to mash in half of a banana for “high-fiber, natural sweetness.” (A half of a medium banana has 1.5 g of fiber, per the USDA. That’s about 5 percent of your daily value.) You could also sprinkle your oats with cinnamon and nutmeg during or after cooking to impart a natural sweetness, says Snyder. Topping with fresh fruit, such as berries, is another way to sweeten your bowl!

5. You’re Standing Over a Stove When You Don’t Want to Be

Stirring oats on the stovetop may be the most traditional way to make oatmeal, but it takes time and requires attention, lest they scald. (Yuck.) Steel-cut oats take 20 to 30 minutes to make, says Hultin, while rolled oats can be made in five minutes. But if that’s unappealing, you can make oatmeal in ways that work better with your lifestyle. “You can actually microwave either type of oat for a more hands-off approach so you can multitask,” she says. Stovetop or microwave will not change the nutritional properties of oatmeal. Another option: If you have a slow cooker or an Instant Pot, make a larger batch, portion it out for the week, and reheat, says Hultin. Just stir in a splash of liquid to get it creamy again — and grab a spoon.

RELATED: 8 Ways to Take Your Oatmeal to the Next Level

6. You’re Eating a Certain Type of Oats Because You Think They’re ‘Healthier’

Steel-cut, old-fashioned oats, and rolled oats: “It’s shocking, but they’re all essentially the same,” says Snyder. “The manufacturing and processing [to get the different shapes of oats] differs, but the nutritional values are the same,” she says. Each type of oatmeal offers unique textures, and some you’ll find more enjoyable than others. Go for the type you like the most, because eating healthy should make you happy. The one exception is the prepackaged packets of instant oats. Many of these are flavored and contain added sugar. If opting for instant, choose the plain variety and gussy it up yourself.

7. You’re Always Eating Hot Oatmeal

Oatmeal is known as a hot cereal, but a wonderful thing happens when you combine dry oats, yogurt or milk, fruit, and (maybe) chia seeds in a container in the fridge, says Snyder. After several hours (or, ahem, overnight), the oats absorb the liquid, plump up and soften into a familiar texture, and become “overnight oats.” These are eaten cold. The benefit is that there’s little prep, you don’t have to cook a thing, it switches up the style of oats to add variety, and they’re perfect as a snack. “I like to make overnight oats in to-go coffee cups, which I could just grab and head out the door,” Snyder says.

RELATED: The Best Oatmeal for People With Type 2 Diabetes

Источник: https://www.everydayhealth.com/diet-nutrition/oatmeal-mistakes-to-avoid/

Is microwaved oatmeal good for you?

Instant Whole Grain Goodness Contrary to popular belief, instant oats have the same nutritional benefits of regular oats.

How do you cook oatmeal in the microwave without boiling it over?

DIRECTIONS Pour desired amount of oatmeal into cereal bowl. (I suggested 1/2 cup, but any amount is fine. Add enough water to just cover the oatmeal. Microwave on high for about 2 minutes. Sprinkle a dash of cinnamon on top. Add sugar and milk/cream to the desired consistency and flavor.

How long do you leave oatmeal in the microwave?

1. Mix rolled oats, water, and milk in a bowl (use a large bowl to prevent spilling over when cooking). 2. Cook uncovered in the microwave on high power for 1 ½ minutes.

Is it better to microwave or boil oatmeal?

While there’s nothing better than oatmeal cooked over the stove, sometimes cooking it in the microwave is your best (or maybe only) option. Whatever the reason, a microwave can produce a satisfying bowl of oats. If you know a few tricks, it can produce an even tastier one than you might imagine.

What will happen if you start eating oats every day?

Benefits include lower blood sugar and cholesterol levels, protection against skin irritation and reduced constipation. In addition, they are very filling and have many properties that should make them a weight loss friendly food. At the end of the day, oats are among the healthiest foods you can eat.

Is it bad to eat oatmeal everyday?

“By eating oatmeal every day, you can lower your total cholesterol level, reduce the ‘ bad ‘ LDL cholesterol, and increase your ‘good’ HDL is microwave oatmeal good for you levels,” says Megan Byrd, RD. Byrd recommends even adding oatmeal into your treats, like her favored Oatmeal Protein Cookies recipe.

Why does my oatmeal keeps exploding in the microwave?

Oatmeal tends to overflow when the water boils and bubbles appear, while at the same time, the starches in the cereal swell and form a gel. This viscous gel makes it difficult for the bubbles to escape, causing the oatmeal to rise up and eventually spill over.

Why does my oatmeal boil over in the microwave?

Part of the creamy texture of the oatmeal comes from the starches thickening it up when you cook. But, when it’s in a microwave, you have little control over what is microwave oatmeal good for you inside, and you are usually using a bowl that’s just about the size of what you need it to be for the oatmeal. Hence the boil -overs.

How do you keep water from boiling over in the microwave?

You can either stop the microwave half way through the cooking process, give it a stir then continue federal holidays for 2020, or pour the ingredients and water into a larger bowl before microwaving.

How do you make oatmeal taste good?

Simple Ways To Make Oatmeal Taste Better Don’t forget to add salt to your oatmeal. Eat your oatmeal out of the right vessel. Whatever you do, don’t use water in your oatmeal. Don’t forget to soak your oatmeal. Add other grains to your oatmeal. Get creative with the spices in your oatmeal. Add healthy fats to your oatmeal with nut butters. Add an egg to your oatmeal.

How much water do you use per cup of oatmeal?

The ratio is 1:2. The usual serving size is 1/2 cup oats to 1 cup of water, milk or combination of both.

How do you make porridge in the microwave without it exploding?

Then I discovered a life-changing way to prevent a mushy mess in the microwave: All I had to do was switch the power setting. Whether you’re using whole rolled or instant oats, simply input your normal cooking time (plus a little extra) and lower your power settings to low or 50 per cent power before hitting go.

Do you cover oatmeal when cooking?

Once you add the oats to boiling water (or milk or whatever cooking liquid you ‘re using), cover the pot and don’t touch, stir, or even peek. Stirring can break up the compounds in the oats and will lead to a weaker, soggier oatmeal.

What is the gooey stuff in oatmeal?

Continually stirring the pot. It’s tempting to want to continually stir the oats as they simmer in the pot, but it can lead to too much starch, which results in a gummy, gluey texture.

Does cooking oatmeal in the microwave destroy nutrients?

Your microwave is not the devil. It’s been said that microwaving kills all, or most, existing nutrients in food. Although microwaving does involve radiation, heating meals and vegetables this way does not destroy all the nutrients. “The less we cook it in water, the more nutrients are going to be kept.

Источник: https://theinfinitekitchen.com/advices/often-asked-how-to-cook-oatmeal-in-microwave/
is microwave oatmeal good for you

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